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Police Superintendents J Rayner (L), PJ McLaughlin ®
Description: Call number: Home and Away - 29487 Digital ID: hood_29487 Format: film photonegative Find more detailed information about this photograph: www.acmssearch.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/itemDetailPaged.cgi?i... Search for more great images in the State Library's collections: acms.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/SimpleSearch.aspx From the collection of the State Library of New South Wales www.sl.nsw.gov.au
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Tags: statelibraryofnewsouthwales telephones
1957

Image from page 242 of
Description: Identifier: briarpatch1920swee Title: The Briar patch Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Sweet Briar College Subjects: Sweet Briar College Publisher: Sweet Briar, Va. : Sweet Briar College Contributing Library: Sweet Briar College Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: October 24—Seniors make initial ap-pearance in the majesty of capsand gowns. Great scramble between Fresh-men and Sophomores in whichNorris is mutilated. Both sidesare victorious, but Freshies dopenance.Gaiety rules the evening. On with the dance. October 27—Miss Pennypacker teaches hygiene class!! October 29—Grand moguls of the Freshman Class are elected. November 1—Y hut christened with ginger ale and doughnuts.Oh, boy! November 7—Juniors finally settle on Y hut as scene of theirparty for the Freshmen. November 8—Sophs lead Seniors down the Ghost Walk and givethem a big party at the windbreak. November 11—Armistice Day! Dr. Rogers lectures and all theladies fall for his smile. November 14—Sweet Briar sees a real movie, Mae Marsh in TheCinderella Man. November 22—Concert by Miss Kelley and Dr. Bradley. We areenchanted! November 26—Trot leaves for Thanksgiving and medical treatment. No\Ember 27—Interclass hockeygame. Many casualties. Muchfood—more casualties. T Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 bookauthorsweetbriarcollege booksubjectsweetbriarcollege bookpublishersweetbriarvasweetbriarcollege bookidbriarpatch1920swee bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsweetbriarcollege bookcollectionsweetbriarcollege
1920

Image from page 650 of
Description: Identifier: cangrocerjulydec1896toro Title: Canadian grocer July-December 1896 Year: 1889 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Supermarkets Grocery trade Food industry and trade Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. [1887]- Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: BAKING POWDER Under your own label. The best quality, with a strictguarantee as to purity and effectiveness. You are enabled to work up a trade distinctly your own, and beassured that the energy and push expended will directly benefityourself—and not your competitor. This is a specialty with us, and we believe we can make moneyfor you if we have the chance. APART from the Special Label we have the old and reliable Diamond, YellowSeal, in Tumblers, Jelly Jars and Sealers ; all put up under our own supervision. You can sell at popular prices and make a good profit. This is well worth considering and investigating. W. H. GILLARD & CO. wi—taw, HAMILTON We Sell GILLARDS NEW PICKLE and GILLARDS NEW SAUCE This journal has the iargest paid circulation and the largest adver-tising patronage of any grocery paper in America. We prove it. Text Appearing After Image: Vol. X. (Published Weekly) MONTREAL AND TORONTO, OCTOBER 2, 1896 (S2.00 per Year) No. 40 DROPS FROM THE EDITORS PEN. Gossip brings ill-repute, not business, tothe store. It is not credit that ruins trade ; it is inju-dicious credit. Future business depends upon how thepresent is transacted. A lying advertisement, like a lying tongue,ought to be cut out. Fish for business and leave the fishing forcompliments to someone else. Carelessness is at the root of 99 per cent,of the mistakes that are made. One thing the cash system is certain todo : It will prevent bad debts. Right may be driven into a corner some-times, but into the grave never. The store lounger is a blockhead thatblocks the way of many a customer. Continuity is essential to success in ad-\ ertising as well as in everything else. A merchant can usually find trade by theaid of judicious and bright advertising. Dishonesty is more likely to clothe onewith a convicts garb than with success. Artificial business-building methods mu Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1889 booksubjectsupermarkets booksubjectgrocerytrade booksubjectfoodindustryandtrade bookpublishertorontomacleanhunterpubco1887 bookidcangrocerjulydec1896toro bookleafnumber650 bookcontributorfisheruniversityoftoronto
1889

Image from page 64 of
Description: Identifier: histoiredesth00clar Title: Histoire des théâtres de société Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Claretie, Léo, 1862-1924 Subjects: Théâtre français Publisher: Paris : Libr. Molière Contributing Library: University of Ottawa Digitizing Sponsor: University of Ottawa View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: stard! » Elle eut un théâtre à Choisy, et quand elle y al-lait, il v avait deux représentations par jour, duclassique à quatre heures, et des folies à onze. Maiselle ne jouait pas encore elle-même. Elle ne tardaplus. Quand elle sinstalla à Trianon,elle sempressad-? remonter sur les planches, le bal et le jeu nelui suffisant plus. Elle débuta le 1 août 1780. Latroupe ne comptait comme acteur que le comtedArtois. Dans la salle, une quarantaine de per-sonnes, pas plus. Caillot et Dazincourt dirigeaientles études. Les rôles damoureux, quand la reineétait lingénue, étaient donnés au vieux dAdhémar,pour que le Roi ne trouvât pas a dire. Il y eut que-relle à cause des prétentions du duc de Fronsac-Richelieu au ride de souffleur, quil prétendaitravira M. Campan en sa qualité de premier gen-tilhomme de la Chambre. Le théâtre était dune décoration gracieuse, avecses colonnes ioniennes, ses Amours à lyres, sa salleblanc et or, ses peaux de lion branchagées de chêne, Text Appearing After Image: Marie-Antoinette, par M Vigée Lebrun. (Cliché Neurdein frèi et les nuages ouatés de son plafond, peint par La-grenee. Les places, en nombre fort limité, étaient très Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectthtrefranais bookyear1906 bookidhistoiredesth00clar bookauthorclaretielo18621924 bookpublisherparislibrmolire bookcontributoruniversityofottawa booksponsoruniversityofottawa bookcollectionuniversityofottawa
1906

Image from page 959 of
Description: Identifier: Highland_Echo_1915-1925 Title: Highland Echo 1915-1925 Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Maryville College student body Subjects: Maryville College Publisher: Maryville, TN : Maryville College Contributing Library: Maryville College Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: members of the team,his ever present assistance to a manneeding help, and his presence atnearly every tackle have made himone of the greaist defensive backs tobe found any where. He simply cantbe beat at backing up the line. He is a six footer, and possessesa hundred and seventy pounds ofleather weight. Tubby is a senior,and we hate to see him leave, wesure will miss him. Mavager Brown Shimmie is our manager, andhes an efficient one too. Aside fromhis executive duties he sometimesindulges in a little scrimmage andgame, and plays well. Shimmieis classed amont. the faster set—offoot ball men. and if he once getsloose, you had better look out.Chances are you cant catch him.He is a farmer by profession, butcan tote foot balls as well as pump-kins. Shimmie weighs a hundredfifty-one and stands five ten minusshoes. He is a Soph, and we expectto have him with us another pair ofseasons. Burney ActonBumey is our fast man. ComingTO us last year from Howard Col-lege in Birmingham, he made good Text Appearing After Image: A REVIEW OFTHE SEASON Reading Left to Right:—Front: Manager Brown; First Row: Hamilton McCall, Rice, Proffitt McMurray; Second Row: Clemens, King, Partee, Third Row: Riskey, Dinwiddle, Sch midt, Crawford, Acton. Top: Assis , Williams, Thrower, Sullinger, capt.Sneed, Musick, Wynecoop, Bowles,tant Coach Bond, Coach Honaker. his well eax-ned reputation as an Alhalf back. He weighs a hundred andsixty-one, and stands five feet elevenabove the ground. Burney carries his hundred sixtyone at a rate that cant be caughtup with, and if a man happens toget in front ot him, he often wakesup wondaring what hit him. This ishis second and last season, and heleaves one of the greatest recordsthat any foot ball man ever left. Jean McMurray Jean hardly stands under the barat five eleven, and tips the scales ata hundred forty-eight. From pointof service he shares with CaptainSullinger the distinction of havingserved his Alma Mater for threeyears, but unlike the captain he hasmore coming, and were glad Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 793
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1915 booksubjectmaryvillecollege bookidhighlandecho19151925 bookauthormaryvillecollegestudentbody bookpublishermaryvilletnmaryvillecollege bookcollectionamericana bookcontributormaryvillecollege bookcollectionmaryvillecollege
1915

Image from page 30 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924003182387 Title: Poultry for the farm and home Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Wigent, Zella Subjects: Poultry Publisher: Chicago. International harvester co., inc. Agricultural extension division Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Courl^sy A 36-eggs-per-year hen—I he kind that eats herliead off. Milk or Meat Scrap. Egg production depends more uponthe amount and kind of protein eaten than upon any other feed.Hens are naturally grain eaters and will do well on almost anygrain mixture if they have milk or meat scrap to go with it. Byholding most of the whole grain until the night feeding, we keepthe hens hungry and thus force them to exercise and to eat themore concentrated protein feed through the day. Milk is the best protein for chickens as well as for folks. Oneof the best ways to market part of your milk is through the eggbasket. Milk should not be sold from the farm until the chickens. 26 Text Appearing After Image: SKIM MILK BEST PROTEIN FEED ^ the pigs, the calves and the folks have had their portion. Many dairy farmers near the large cities where there is a goodmarket for milk make the mistake of not using enough milk athome. One-crop farming isalways disastrous whether thatcrop be cotton, potatoes, fruit,or milk. Milk can be fed either sweetor sour but do not feed it sweetone day and sour the next. Give aU the hens will drink, more egg^lt malfesyLnghick- If you do not have milk or «« grow,cannot buy it at a reasonable price, use beef scrap in its place. It is often good practice to use part beef scrap and part milk. Beef scrap is a product of the packing houses. Waste piecesand offals are ground, disinfected, and cooked. In this formthey keep indefinitely. Get a good quahty, one testing 60 or 6.5per cent protein. Where no milk is fed, one pound of beef scrap to every ninepounds of grain is about the right proportion. Save the table scraps and offals from butchering for the hens. If wild gam Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 booksubjectpoultry bookidcu31924003182387 bookauthorwigentzella bookpublisherchicagointernationalharvestercoincagriculturalextensiondivision bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber30 booksponsormsn
1921

Image from page 441 of
Description: Identifier: traitexprime00olli Title: Traité expérimental et clinique de la régénération des os et de la production artificielle du tissu osseux Year: 1867 (1860s) Authors: Ollier, Louis, 1830-1900 Subjects: Bone regeneration Bones Bone-grafting Bone Bones Bone Regeneration Bone Diseases Bone and Bones Publisher: Paris : Victor Masson et fils Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rmédiaire sépaissit alors. Los fléchit, du reste, souvent à ce niveau, et se brise, commenous lavons fréquemment observé pour le cubitus, après larésection de la diaphyse du radius chez le chien. Lorsquon a enlevé le cartilage de conjugaison du cubitus,ou troublé son évolution par la résection de la portion juxta-épiphysaire de la diaphyse, les fragments se réunissent entreeux, mais los cesse de saccroître plus ou moins complètement. Le radius, qui a conservé ses moyens daccroissement et dontles extrémités sont solidement unies à celles du cubitus, estobligé de se développer suivant une courbe plus ou moinsprononcée; il saplatit en lame de sabre dans le sens trans-versal, et présente laspect quindique la figure 28. Il forme unarc de cercle dont le cubitus serait la corde. Dans les cas où lépiphyse inférieure du radius a été tota-lement enlevée, lextrémité inférieure du cubitus sélargit,en saplatissant dans le sens transversal ; lépiphyse se dévie de Text Appearing After Image: H- A Fie 28. Arrêt de développement du cubitus par suite de lablation de sou cartilage de conjugaison inférieur ; le radius laissé intact, et fixé par ses extrémités au cubitus, na pu saccroître quen se contournant. A. Cubitus. — B. Radius. — a, b. Extrémités inférieures de cet os. — c, d. Extrémités supérieures. DES DIVERSES PARTIES DUN OS SUR SON ACCROISSEMENT. 403 manière à offrir au carpe une surface darticulation sur sapointe et son bord interne élargis. Les variétés de dispositionsont, du reste, très-nombreuses; mais ce qui est constant, cestla diminution de la masse et de la longueur de los voisin, nonintéressé par lopération, lorsque la résection a été faite sur unsujet très-jeune, et que les fonctions du membre ont été pro-fondément troublées. Si le membre continue à agir, los restantsbypertrophie au contraire en épaisseur. Dans les cas où, après lablation de la diaphyse du radius, ily a eu reproduction de los, le parallélisme est ass Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 759
Tags: booksubjectbones booksubjectboneandbones bookcentury1800 booksubjectbonediseases bookdecade1860 bookidtraitexprime00olli bookauthorollierlouis18301900 booksubjectbonegrafting booksubjectbone bookpublisherparisvictormassonetfils
1867

Image from page 347 of
Description: Identifier: generalbiographyv5pt1aiki Title: General biography; or, Lives, critical and historical, of the most eminent persons of all ages, countries, conditions, and professions, arranged according to alphabetical order Year: 1818 (1810s) Authors: Aikin, John, 1747-1822 Enfield, William, 1741-1797 Subjects: Biography Publisher: London : Smeeton Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: us led him to look be-yond the humble walk of art to which he hadbeen destined ; and as soon as he became hisown master, he entered at the academy for de-sign in St. Martins-lane, and studied drawingfrom the life. His proficiency, however, was notconsiderable: and he would never have surpassedmediocrity as a painter, had he not penetratedthrough external form to character and man-ners. Though he was at first obliged to en-grave arms and shop-bills for a livelihood, hesoon employed his invention in the decorationof books, and furnished sets of pl.\tes for severalpublications of the time. An edition of Hudi-bras afforded him the first subject suited to hisgenius ; yet he felt so much the shackles of othermens ideas, that he was less successful in thistask than might have been expected. Mean-time he had attained the use of the brush, as wellas of the pen and graver; and having a greatfacility in catching a likeness, he acquired consi-derable employment as a portrait painter. Grace / /-.T Text Appearing After Image: William FIogarth HOG ( 225 ) II O G was, however, no attribute of his pencil, and hewas more disposed to aggravate than to softenthe harsh touches of nature. His talents fororiginal comic design gradually unfolded them-selves, and various public occasions produceddisplays of his ludicrous powers. In 1730 heformed a clandestine marriage \^th the onlydaughter of sir James Thornhill, the painter;and soon after, he commenced his first greatseries of moral paintings, The Harlots Pro-gress. Some of these pieces, when they werefinished, were desii^nedly placed in the way ofhis father-in-law, in order to reconcile him to3 match which the obscurity of the object of hisdaughters choice had led him todisapprove. Hisobservation upon them was, The man whocan produce such works, can maintain a wifewithout a portion. He soon after, however,relented, and the young couple took up theirabode in his house. The Harlots Progress provedextremely popular. Above twelve hundrednames were entered as subscriber Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectbiography bookdecade1810 bookyear1818 bookidgeneralbiographyv5pt1aiki bookauthoraikinjohn17471822 bookauthorenfieldwilliam17411797 bookpublisherlondonsmeeton bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1825

Image from page 32 of
Description: Identifier: studiesinprimiti00roth Title: Studies in primitive looms Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Roth, H. Ling (Henry Ling), 1854-1925 Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland. Journal Subjects: Weaving Publisher: Halifax [Eng.] F. King & sons, ltd Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library Digitizing Sponsor: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: an attached cord (Fig. 34), and the temple (Fig. 37) consistsof a piece of hollow cane with a loose very thin piece of cane running through it,the protruding ends of which are stuck into the finished portion of the web, practi-cally similar to that of the above-mentioned Kachiquel loom. The dimensions are : NMVA (ANCIENT MEXICAN) £*M-WE.AV1N02A CODEX . Kl MC-S-^O^OUS-H VOL. I. PL .6l._ NOTE THe %\TOF WEAVING ATTHE. WARP 6N.P A. 1 Doubled is a terra used to denote two or more threads twisted into one, and known astwo-ply, three-ply, six-ply, etc. H. Ling Eoth.—Studies in Primitive Looms. 21 length, beam to beam inclusive, about 14 feet (or 425 m.); width of web,17£ inches (or 44-5 cm.); 64 warps to the inch (or 25-6 to the cm.); the warps aresisters, same as the Kachiquel warp; 25 picks to the inch (or 10 to the cm.); thewefts are single. Both warp and weft are continuous. The spool is of the primi-tive longitudinal type {Ad). The shed-stick is a palm midrib or stem. Text Appearing After Image: 4. A very interesting loom (Plate I) is that brought from Mazatec, Arizona,by J. Cooper Clark, and now in the British Museum ; for besides the plain up-and-down web, a large portion is devoted to twist or gauze1 weaving, while a consider-able piece of the plain web is afterwards covered by a woven-in design of dark blue 1 Gauze, formed by crossing adjacent warp threads and bound by weft at the point ofjunction. h 2 22 H. Ling Eoth.—Shtclies in Primitive Zooms. wool. Beginning at the breast beam, there are 10 plain picks, then 1 of gauze,then 4 more plain picks, whence the gauze weaving extends a length of about8^ inches (or 22 cm.), and on this is woven the pattern just mentioned; then wehave a further 6 5 cm. (or 2f inches) of gauze; then 14 cm. (or A^ inch) of plainweaving, followed by 76 cm. (or 3 inches) of gauze, and soon. The wTarp lay-outfor accomplishing the gauze is shown in Fig. 41. It should be noted that on thisloom, as on the Kachiquel loom, a piece of the tailing has b Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectweaving bookdecade1910 bookidstudiesinprimiti00roth bookauthorrothhlinghenryling18541925 bookauthorroyalanthropologicalinstituteofgreatbritainandirelandjournal bookpublisherhalifaxengfkingsonsltd bookyear1918 bookleafnumber32 bookcontributorsterlingandfrancineclarkartinstitutelibrary
1918

Image from page 97 of
Description: Identifier: christiancentury371unse Title: Christian Century Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Subjects: Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) -- Periodicals Publisher: Christian Century Co. Contributing Library: Disciples Divinity House of the University of Chicago Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: t wasproposed to ask $31,000,000 for missionsand $43,000,000 for education in theprosecution of the Interchurch move-ment. The matter was discussed butno action taken. —George L. Snively has had a recordin money raising the past year that isunique among the Disciples. He hasassisted in raising for the churches dur-ing the year a total of $602,541, and atthe same meetings where this has beenaccomplished there have been 274 acces-sions to the churches. —Linden Avenue church, Memphis,Tenn., Walter M. White, pastor, has afamily Altar League which is provingan important factor in the life of thechurch. —B. T. Bryant of Tyler, Tex., hasdecided to give up the medical profes-sion and give all of his time to thepreaching of the gospel. —Norwood church, Cincinnati, re-gards 1919 as a year that made forprogress. The total budget of thechurch during the year was $13,000. Theaccessions to the church during the yearwere 101. The missionary gifts aggre-gated $2,200 and the giving for the new Text Appearing After Image: PROMPTLY and SAFELY RELIEVED BY roches herbal embrocation ALSO IN BRQNCHITIS,LUMBAG0,RKEUMATI5M ALL DRUGGISTS OR W.EDWARDSsSON ^UGERA&CO. LONDON, ENGLAND. 90.g2 BEEKMAM st. NXC In Mexico By S. GUY INMAN A recognized authority onPan-American ques-tions, Mr. Inraan hereoffers to the thinking Amer-ican public, at this time ofspecial interest in Mexico,accurate information aboutmen and movements, and achance to get the Mexicanpoint of view. He outlines aconstructive enlightened pol-icy for the future relationsbetween the two neighbors. Price $1.50 plus 6 to 16 cents postage The Christian Century Press 700 EAST 40th Street CHICAGO year will be toward a goal of $25,000.C. R. Stauffer is in his ninth year withthis church and in this time 999 peoplehave been added to the church. —J. G. Waggoner, one of the veteranpreachers of Illinois, has followed thewinter migration and is now in Floridawith his wife. —E. A. Abbott spoke recently at aspecial service celebrating the twenty-fifth anni Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: typography text croup whoopingcough bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 booksubjectchristianchurchdisciplesofchristperiodicals bookpublisherchristiancenturyco bookidchristiancentury371unse
1920

Image from page 678 of
Description: Identifier: alienistneurolog3119unse Title: Alienist and neurologist. Year: 1910 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Neurology Psychology Psychiatry Psychology, Clinical Forensic Psychiatry Publisher: St. Louis, Mo. : Ev.E. Carreras, Steam Printer, Publisher and Binder Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: lence of Pepsme Fairchild | % by intention and in fact, physiologically different from the prep-arations made with dry pepsin. It is obtained from the secretingglands of the fresh gastric mucous membrane by a process which sxtracts the principles and properties of the gastric juice and pre-r sents them in association with all the soluble gastric cell; constituents. Fairchild Bros. & Foster Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectpsychology bookdecade1910 bookyear1910 bookidalienistneurolog3119unse booksubjectneurology booksubjectpsychiatry booksubjectpsychologyclinical booksubjectforensicpsychiatry bookpublisherstlouismoevecarrerassteamprinterpublisherandbinder
1910

Image from page 117 of
Description: Identifier: dentalmateriamed00prin Title: Dental materia medica and therapeutics; with special reference to the rational application of remedial measures to dental diseases .. Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Prinz, Hermann, 1868-1957 Subjects: Materia medica, Dental Dental therapeutics Publisher: St. Louis, Mosby Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: icate tissuegrowth. In the various forms of stomatitis, and as a prophy- 1 Heinz: Handbuch der Experimentellen Pathologie und Pharmakologie, 1904. 112 PHARMACO-THERAPEUTICS. lactic in mercurial administration in syphilis, it deserves to behighly recommended, and especially when combined with a metal-lic astringent and some of the more persistent antiseptics. H202solutions possess distinct styptic properties; they should not beused for such purposes in root canals, as their action on thehemoglobin of the blood may cause a discoloration of the toothstructure. Strong solutions of H202 (pyrozon, perhydrol) arepowerful caustics, and they are used as such for the destructionof gum tissue, in fistulous tracts, in pockets of pyorrheal teeth,and as styptics in severe hemorrhage, iYndresen1 advocates per-hydrol as the sovereign remedy in the treatment of hypersensi-tive dentin, especially in cervical cavities. It will not blackenthe cavity like silver nitrate, which is usually employed for such Text Appearing After Image: Figure 9.Pyrozon Probe Cup. purposes, but instead whitens the tooth structure. The causticsolution requires careful handling, and the soft tissues have to bewell protected by suitable napkins, a coating of vaselin, etc.Burns from caustic H202 solutions are relieved by immediatewashings with water and covering the burned surfaces with amild ointment. In using these powerful solutions it is goodpractice to pour the necessary quantity into a watch crystal orinto a pyrozon probe cup, and then apply it with a suitableapplicator, a platinum minim syringe, wooden probe, etc. Greatcare should be exercised to prevent the caustic solution fromcoming in contact with woolen fabrics, as it will char them, oreven set them on fire. 1 Andresen: Deutsche Monatsschrift fiir Zahnheilkunde, 1905, p. 25. ANTISEPTICS. 113 * Antiseptic Solutions. Hydrargyr. chlorid. gr. j (0.06 Gm.) Aquas hydrogen, dioxid. fl^ ij (60 Cc.) M. Sig.: Inject with a platinum pointed syringe into puspockets in pyorrhea. £ Resorc Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookpublisherstlouismosby bookiddentalmateriamed00prin bookauthorprinzhermann18681957 booksubjectmateriamedicadental booksubjectdentaltherapeutics bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana
1913

Image from page 268 of
Description: Identifier: historyofblackha02hart Title: History of Black Hawk County, Iowa, and its people Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Hartman, John C., 1861- ed Subjects: Black Hawk County (Iowa) -- History Black Hawk County (Iowa) -- Biography Publisher: Chicago : S. J. Clarke publishing company Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ted or used in BlackHawk county and the design was by Mr. Witry. They continued the manufac-ture of automobiles for some time but on account of the rapid increase in thedemand for gasoline engines had to abandon the former for lack of room. Mr. Witry is an extensive property holder of Waterloo and now occupiesthe old homestead with his mother and sister, his father having died in 1912.He is a member of St. Josephs Catholic church and of the Knights of Columbus,and he also has membership with the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the BenevolentProtective Order of Elks, the Chamber of Commerce, the Waterloo Club andWaterloo Business and Traveling Mens Association. His has indeed been abusy, useful and active life, resulting in continuous advancement. Followingout the bent of his nature he soon reached an expert position in connection withmechanics and his initiative spirit has led to inventions that have been of theutmost value and worth. A man of great natural ability, his success in business Text Appearing After Image: LOUIS W. WITt?Y HISTORY OF BLACK HAWK COUNTY 263 has been uniform and rapid. As has been truly remarked, after all that maybe done for a man in the way of giving him early opportunities for obtainingthe requirements which are sought in the schools and in books, he must essen-tially formulate, determine and give shape to his own character and this iswhat Mr. Witry has done. W. K. VOORHEES. W. K. Voorhees, one of the foremost business men and popular young citi-zens of Cedar Falls, has since 1910 served as secretary and general managerof the Standard Manufacturing Company of the city, which concern is engagedin the manufacture of steel gates and conducts one of the important industrialplants of Black Hawk county. His birth occurred in Mahaska county, Iowa,near the town of Pella, on the 25th of August, 1887, his parents being John K.and Algenette (Ryan) Voorhees, likewise natives of this state. John K. Voor-hees, Sr., the paternal grandfather, came to Iowa from Ohio in 1845 and at thatea Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1915 bookpublisherchicagosjclarkepublishingcompany bookidhistoryofblackha02hart bookauthorhartmanjohnc1861ed booksubjectblackhawkcountyiowahistory booksubjectblackhawkcountyiowabiography bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary
1915

Image from page 75 of
Description: Identifier: annualreportofno1908nort Title: Annual report of the North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Subjects: North Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Agriculture Publisher: [Raleigh, N.C.?] : Board of Agriculture Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: y in yield between these two fields is tobe attributed to these nematodes. The disease is apparently verywidely distributed through the State, often doing much damage. CARNATION. Root Knot (Heterodera radicicola (Greef), Mul.).—Roots af-fected with nematode galls were sent to the Station for determina-tion from Wake county. CAULIFLOWER. Black Rot (Pseu-d o m o na s campestris(Pam), Smith).—Spec-imens o f cauliflowerthickly covered withdensely black spots wereobserved upon the openmarket in Raleigh. Thedisease was exceedinglyconspicuous, owing tothe intense black spotsupon the white back-ground furnished by thehealthy portions of thecauliflower. Upon ex-amination it was foundthat the black spots weredue to bacteria, whichhad all the appearanceof being the usual formcausing the black rot ofthe cabbage. The vas-cular bundles, leading trom the SpOtS toward ^ 8.—Cauliflower Black Rot (Pseudomonas campestris).the Center of the head The blackened spots are caused by this bacterial rot. Text Appearing After Image: NOTES ON PLANT DISEASES. 71 were blackened in a manner characteristic of vascular bundles ofplants affected with black rot, and it seems clear that this disease isidentical with the cabbage black rot. From the appearance of the disease it seems certain that the infec-tion was from the surface and the disease was progressing inward.Upon inquiry, it was found that the diseased cauliflower was shippedfrom Washington, 1ST. C, and it was impossible to ascertain Avherethey were grown. The occurrence of this disease in this fashion isof much interest to North Carolinians, since it shows one manner inwhich it may gain access into and distribution through the State. CELERY. Leaf Spot (Sepkoria petroselina Desm. var. apii Br. & Cav.).—This disease made its appearance in a very destructive form in gar-dens in Wake county this year, causing the loss of the whole crop inmany instances. The leaves turn yellow, and then, upon closer ex-amination, are found to have black dots, pycnidia, upon th Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectagriculture bookauthornorthcarolinaagriculturalexperimentstation booksubjectnorthcarolinaagriculturalexperimentstation bookpublisherraleighncboardofagriculture bookidannualreportofno1908nort bookyear1908 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorstatelibraryofnorthcarolinagovernmentheritagelibrary
1908

Image from page 228 of
Description: Identifier: albumgographiq00dubouoft Title: Album géographique: La France Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Dubois, Marcel, 1856-1916 Guy, Camille, 1860- Subjects: France -- Description and travel Publisher: Paris, Colin Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rontière. ;ji7. Les voies de communication : La routeDU Lautaret au GAi-uniat. — La roule du Galibicrétait récemment la plus élevée des Alpes après celleilu Stelvio. Klle passait à 2.>;iO mètres en tunnel sousle col. Mais la voie nouvellement établie au col dularpaillon a relégué leGalibier au troisième plau. Pra-tiquée à petite allure par les aulomol>iles, malgré seslacets, la route du Galibier a été coustruile dans unbut stratégique pour relier Maurienne à Briunçon. L.\ FRANCE ALPESTRE 207 M--. Les voies de com-munication : Ll.NE I.KGkenoble a MarseillkPAR Gap. — Celte voielerr^p, qui forme de nom-hreux lacets entre les garesde Vif et Saint-Marlin-la-Gluse, contourne près doVif une montagne en décri-vant dimmenses oourbesdoù lon apen.-oit le massifdo la Moucherolle. les som-mets de Belledonnc et lesrochers de la Grande-Char-Ireusc. Cest ce magnifiqueet tVile chemin de mon-tagne qui sert de trait du-nion entre nos forts etcamps retranchés du Sud-Ksl. Text Appearing After Image: .itO. Les villes : Hmiuun : i k HC. — Kml>ritn osi pilioro^ijucmcnljuchée sur un escarpement qui domine de liii mètres la vallée do laDurance. La ville, qui eut la suprématie politique sur les cités des Alpesdès la lin du IVsiècle, fut une métropole importante dans le cours dumoven âge. comme tous les oppida ■-•. Les villes : l,i s-i.\ i^uoin 11 \i ii:. — I.ii>. siLui- au jutnl du . oioù passe le chemin de fer de Grenoble à Marseille, est aux confins duDevoluy. Cest un pays de climat excessif et de sol calcaire désagrégé.Nulle parties « chounîns >», gouffres semblables aux avens des Causses,les ravins, les éboulis ne sont plus considérables. o51. Les vil-les : Bri\N(.:on ; VCE PRISE I>1FORT DES TÈTES. — La vie estrude dans lesforts qui enlourenl Briançon :certains, tel lin-lernet. sont habiles, à 2:iOU mè-tres dallitudc.Une partie dusous-sol de Inville contient dospoudrières. Losvoitures ne peu-vent circu Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1906 bookpublisherpariscolin booksubjectfrancedescriptionandtravel bookidalbumgographiq00dubouoft bookauthorduboismarcel18561916 bookauthorguycamille1860 bookleafnumber228 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto
1906

Image from page 18 of
Description: Identifier: storyofmaryjones00rope Title: The story of Mary Jones and her Bible Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Ropes, Mary Emily Sheila Thibodeau Lambrinos Collection - York University Subjects: Publisher: London, England : British and Foreign Bible Society Contributing Library: ASC - York University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: York University Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: sonwas late autumn, and a cold wind was moan-ing and sighing among the trees> stripping 14 Mary Jones. them of their changed garments, lately sogreen and gay, whirling them round in eddiesand laying them in shivering heaps along thenarrow valley Wan and watery, the moon, encompassedby peaked masses of cloud that looked likeanother ghostly Cader Idris in the sky, hadrisen, and now cast a faint light across a lineof jutting crags, bringing into relief theirsharp ragged edges against the dark back-ground of rolling vapour. In pleasant contrast to the night withits threatening gloom, a warm light shonethrough the windows of one of the cottagesthat formed the village. The light wascaused by the blaze of a fire of dried drift-wood on the stone hearth, while in a rudewooden stand a rushlight burned, throwingits somewhat uncertain brightness upon aloom where sat a weaver at work. A bench,two or three stools, a rude cupboard, and akitchen-table—these, with the loom, were allthe furniture. Text Appearing After Image: A WELSH COTTAGE. 16 Mary Jones. Standing in the centre of the room was amiddle-aged woman, dressed in a cloak andthe tall conical Welsh hat worn by many ofthe peasants to this day. I am sorry ycu cannot go, Jacob, saidshe. Youll be missed at the meeting.But the same Lord Almighty who gives usthe meetings for the good of our souls, sentyou that wheezing of the chest, for thetrying of your body and spirit, and we mustneeds have patience till He sees fit to takeit away again. Yes, wife, and Im thankful that Ineednt sit idle, but can still ply my trade,replied Jacob Jones. Theres many a dealworse off. But what are you waiting for,Molly ? Youll be late for the exercises;it must be gone six oclock. Im waiting for that child, and shes gonefor the lantern, responded Mary Jones,whom her husband generally called Molly, todistinguish her from their daughter who wasajso Mary. At the Foot of the Mountain. 17 Jacob smiled. The lantern ! Yes, saidhe ; youll need it this dark night. Twasa good though Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1919 bookauthorsheilathibodeaulambrinoscollectionyorkuniversity bookidstoryofmaryjones00rope bookauthorropesmaryemily bookpublisherlondonenglandbritishandforeignbiblesociety bookleafnumber18 bookcontributorascyorkuniversitylibraries bookcollectionyorkuniversity
1919

Image from page 246 of
Description: Identifier: elementsofgeomet1835lege Title: Elements of geometry and trigonometry Year: 1835 (1830s) Authors: Legendre, A. M. (Adrien Marie), 1752-1833 Brewster, David, Sir, 1781-1868 Davies, Charles, 1798-1876 Subjects: Trigonometry Geometry Publisher: New York, Wiley & Long Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: re are given the angle A = 58° 07,the angle B = 22^ 37, and tlie side c=408 yards: required theremaining angle and the two otlier sides. To the angle A =58° 07 Add the angle B =22° 37 Their sum =80° 44 taken from 180° leaves the angle C - =99° 16. This angle being greater than 90° its sine is found by takingthat of its supplement 80° 44. To find the side a. As sine C 99° 16 ar.-comp. log. 0.005705 Is to sine Jl 58° 07 - - - - 9.928972 So is side c 408 2.610660 So side a 351.024 - - - . 2.545367 To find the side b. As sine C 99° 16 ar.-comp. log. 0.005705 ]% to sine B 22° 37 - - - . 9.584908 So is side c 408 2.610660 To side 6 158.976 .... 2.201333 2. In a triangle ABC, there are given the angle A = 38° 25B = 57° 42, and tlie side c = 400 : required the remainingparts. Ans. Angle C = 83° 53, side a=249.974, side 5=340.04. CASE II. Xriven two sides of a triangle, and an angle opposite one of them,to find the third side and the two remaining angles. 246 PLANE TRIGONOMETRY. Text Appearing After Image: 1. In the triangle ABC, thereare given side AC = 216, BC =117, and the angle A=22° 37,to find the remaining parts. Describe the triangies ACB,ACB, as in Prob. XL Book III. Then find the angle B by-Theorem III. As side BC or BC 117 ar.-comp. log. Is to side AC 216 So is sine A 22° 37 To sine B 45° 13 55 or ABC 134° 46 05 Add to each A 22° 37 00 22° 37 00 Take their sum 67° 50 55 157° 2305 From 180° 00 00 180° 00 00 Rem. ACB 112° 0905 ACB=22° 36 55 To find the side AB or AB. 7.9318142.3344549.5849689.851236 As sine A 22° 37 Is to sine ACB 112° 09 05So is side BC 117 To side AB 281.785 ar.-comp. log. 0.4150329.9667002.068186 2.449918 The ambiguity in this, and similar examples, arises in con-sequence of the first p^-oportion being true for both the trian-gles ACB, ACB. As long as the two triangles exist, the am-biguity will continue. But if the side CB, opposite the givenangle, be greater than AC, the arc BB will cut the line ABB,on the same side of the point A, but in one Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectgeometry bookcentury1800 booksubjecttrigonometry bookyear1835 bookauthorbrewsterdavidsir17811868 bookauthorlegendreamadrienmarie17521833 bookdecade1830 bookidelementsofgeomet1835lege bookauthordaviescharles17981876 bookpublishernewyorkwileylong
1835

Image from page 491 of
Description: Identifier: gleaningsinbeecu40medi Title: Gleanings in bee culture Year: 1874 (1870s) Authors: Subjects: Bees Bee culture Publisher: [Medina, Ohio, A. I. Root Co.] Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: n has thethree-frame hive filled so that she wantsmore room I place her in an eight-framehive having five frames of foundation.When the (|ueens in the other three hiveshave hatched, mated, are laying, and wantmore room, I place them also in eight-frame hives having five frames of founda-tion. By this I Ian I disturb only one colo-ny and add three; but if I have a colonythat has the swarming fever and will notstay, I take it to a new stand and placeone of the young queens with her bees onthe stand which has just been vacated. Thefield workers will go into the hive with her,and live happy ever after.Dayton, 0. AN EARLY TYPE OF STEAM-HEATED UNCAP-PING-KNIFE BY ARTHUR C. MILLER The accomiDanying photograph is of asteam-heated uncapping-knife which thewriter had made and experimented with inthe summer of 1896. A rubber tube ledfrom the steam-generator to the nipplenearest the handle, and the steam was al-lowed to blow freely from the other nipple.Later the second orifice was reduced with a Text Appearing After Image: Arthur C. Millers steam-heated uncapping-knifewhich he had made in 1896. grooved plug. So far as the writer knows,it was the first steam-heated uncapping-knife in existence. It was far from beingthe perfect device now on the market, butit served to demonstrate the principle, alsoto inflict sundry burns, and was soon laidciside for a good old-fashioned Binghamknife. It was experimented with on two orthree subsequent occasions, but was finallyput among the curios of the has beencollection which all good bee veterans pos-sess. Many persons saw this knife in opera-tion when I first made it, and I exhibitedit at Toronto several years ago, and I tliinkat Amsterdam, N. Y., the year before. Theman who made it for me is in business justacross the street from this office. I recall AUGUST 1, 1912 the date, because it was the same year Isold some real estate. I do not use any knife now—too slow. Providence, R. I. [Mr. A. C. Miller was probably the firstone to use steam for heating an iineapping Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectbees bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1874 booksubjectbeeculture bookpublishermedinaohioairootco bookidgleaningsinbeecu40medi bookcontributorumassamherstlibraries booksponsorumassamherstlibraries bookcollectionumassamherstlibraries
1874

Image from page 83 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial04dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 0O ârmolâ U G âoaâ TA -sâ H Easy Enigmas.âi. Bobolink. 2. Grasshopper.Square-Word.â opal pineannaleadPuzzle.âNotable, no table, not able.Cross-Word Enigma.âCharlie.Syncopations.â1. Aloe, ale. 2. Aunt, ant. 3.Coat, cat. 5. Colt, cot. 6. Lead, lad 7. Plea, pea.9. Rose, roe. 10. Tome, toe.Charade âKettle-drum. Geometrical Transpositions. âGrandiloquent,Circensial, Angelina, Quarantines, Connive, the Rubicon, Parsimc-rAnomorhomboid, Consideringly. Carp, cap,8. Reed, re Entcrtainir Answers to Puzzles in Septfmber Number were received, previous to September 18, from Willie Dibblee. Nettie A. Ives, JanA. Montgomery, Amy R. Carpenter. Virginia Davage, Lucy Allen Paton, Juliet, Jennie Fine, A. J. Lewis. Frieda E. Lippert, EmiElliott, Ida M.Bourne, Agnes M. Hodges, Lucy Davis. Johnny Kenny, Alex Nellie J. Thompson, C. M. Trmvbndgc, Nessie E. SteveB P Emerv Howard S Rodgers, Carroll L. Maxey, Bessie McLaren, Helen Green, Clara L. Calhoun, W. C. Delanoy, R. L. Groendyci Text Appearing After Image: Drawn by Thomas Muran. ;J by F. S. King. THE HEART OF WINTER. ST. NICHOLAS. /OL. IV. DECEMBER, 1876. No. 2. POEMS AND CAROLS OF WINTER. By Lucy Larcom. It was the winter wild,While the heaven-born Child,All meanly wrapped, in the rude manger lies. SWEETER carols than bird ever sang usher inle wintry weather. The poem of childhood washanted by angels on the hills of Palestine eighteenundred years ago, and its meaning has been deep-ning in the hearts of Christian men and women\rer since. Dear children, the secret of true poetry, as wellB of all other true things, lies hidden in the heartf the Babe of Bethlehemâthe secret of heavenly>ve, without which there is no beauty in the worksr words of men. Peace on earth, good-will totan ! is the hymn which must be sung in theeart before any poem worth keeping can be writ-:n. Is it not beautiful that when the flowers of theood and field have done blossoming, when theees are leafless, and no birds make melody amongte barren boughs, the whole Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial04dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 95 of
Description: Identifier: insectsinjurious02saun Title: Insects injurious to fruits Year: 1889 (1880s) Authors: Saunders, William, 1836-1914 Subjects: Insects, Injurious and beneficial Publisher: Philadelphia [etc.] J.B. Lippincott company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rs scattered over thebody. The side fringes which border the body close to theunder surface are composed of spreading tufts of light-graymingled with black hairs, of unequal length, proceeding fromwarts nearly one-tenth of an inch long. The under side is ofa pale-red or orange color, with black spots. This caterpillar,when at rest, closely resembles the color of the twig to whichit is attached, and hence is difficult to detect. It reachesmaturity during the month of July, and is found on thecherry and elm, as well as on the apple. The cocoon, which is usually attached to one of the branchesof the tree on which the larva has fed, is about an inch anda half long and half an inch wide, oval, convex above, andflattened on the under side 5 it is of a brownish-gray color,with a few blackish hairs interwoven with the silk. The moth (Fig. 88) is usually found in August and Sep-tember. It has a large, thick, woolly body, of a white color,variegated with bluish gray; its legs are thick and very Text Appearing After Image: 90 INSECTS INJURIOUS TO THE APPLE. hairy. On the fore wings are two broad, dark-gray bands, in-tervening between three narrow, wavy, white bands; the veins are white and i)roniinent. Thehind wings are gray, with a whitehind border, and across the middle^A Wi^S^^ there is a broad, faint, whitisiiband. On the top of the tlioraxis an oblong, blackish-brown spot,widening behind. The males arenot much more than half the size of the females; the former,when their wings are expanded, measure about an inch and ahalf across, the latter nearly two and a half inches. Likethat last described, this is a rare insect, and one never likelyto appear in sufficient numbers to be troublesome. No. 35.—The Oblique-banded Leaf-roller. Cacoecia rosaceana (Harris). This moth is a member of a very large family of smallmoths called Tortrices, or, popularly, leaf-rollers, becausetheir larva have the habit of rolling up the leaves, or por-tions of them, forming hollow cylinders, firmly fastened withsilken threa Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookauthorsaunderswilliam18361914 bookidinsectsinjurious02saun bookyear1889 bookpublisherphiladelphiaetcjblippincottcompany booksubjectinsectsinjuriousandbeneficial bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionbiodiversity
1889

Image from page 1188 of
Description: Identifier: 1921DesMoinesAndPolkCountyIowaCityDirectory Title: 1921 Des Moines and Polk County, Iowa, City Directory Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Subjects: des moines iowa polk county city directories Publisher: View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Loans, 805 S & L Bldg, Tel Walnut3140 SECURITY TRUST & SAVINGSBANK, W H Barnard Pres, J HFowler V-Pres, James Parker Cash-ier, 318 5th, Tel Walnut 132 Sedarwall Lelk elk Red Eiall ChainStore No 12 Sedden Jas tchr Washington IrvingJr High School res 2303 pean av Sedenis Stephen millmn H|awkeye PCement Co j Sedgwick F Clyde opr Royal Theaterrms 901 6th av Sedgwick Geo A acct la Tel Co res1607 Washington av Sedig Chas G mngr Green Mill Cafe-teria Sedlatzeck Margt bds 809 Bell av Sedlatzeck Mary A Mrs res 809 Bell Sedlock Jos S photog C F JTownsendrms 1001 Lyon I Sedore Harley A slsmn E F GibsonAgency res 1444 42d Sedrel Ivan chauf Reel Auto Servicerms Majestic Hotel See Bert tmstr res 1307 Stewart See Cecil emp Western Electric Cobds 1224 McKinley See Chas res 1429 Nelson av Rai*i*i/*lr Xr ^f\r% ^^^^^^ Roofers 208-210 E. Court Ave—Maple 1445 |taNQN$0||ILOERsSllPPLY4FbCLCf 727 Grud Ave. 10th ud Viae Sl«130.131 Mwkel BUILDINGMATEBULCOALPAINT SEE DES MOINES CITY DIRE(3T0RY (1921) Text Appearing After Image: SEF 1169 321, 517% See Em^line (wid Wm S) bds 535 Country Club boulSee Fred C driver res 923 LaurelSee Lena Mrs res 1224 McKlnley ,See Missouri J emp D M City Ry res 1312 DeWolfSee Oakley rms 1003 AllenSee R W eng Pittsburgh-D M Steel Co rms 4323 Ingersoll avSee T li^rank emp D M City Ry res 1244 McCormick Seeber Artemus L dept mngr D MNatl Bank res 1817 8th Seeber Gertrude A Mrs tc^r Oak ParkSchool bds 1817 8th Seeburger Albt H loansWalnut bds 2916 Cottage Grove av Seeburger Carl janitor City Marketr6s 1019 2d ; SeeWrger Daisy M typist la AutoMarkei bds 1019 2d Seeburger G Fred finisher Ford Mo-tor Co res 1525 Vermont « Seeburgir Paul F battery expert laStorag^ Battery Co bds 1019 2d Seeburger Raimund office 321, 517%Walnut res 2916 Cottage Grove av Seeburger Raymond J bds 2916 Cot-tage G^rove av SEEBURGER VERNON R(Miiier, Kelly, Shuttleworth & See-burgen) Asst County Attorney, res942 2fith, Tel Drake 1692-J Seeburger Walter L slsmn FrankSchlampp Co res 2830 Rutland av Seecatz O Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 booksubjectdesmoines booksubjectiowa booksubjectpolkcounty booksubjectcitydirectories bookid1921desmoinesandpolkcountyiowacitydirectory bookcollectiondesmoinesandpolkcountycitydirectories booksponsor
1921

Image from page 137 of
Description: Identifier: purduedebris00purd_3 Title: Purdue debris Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Purdue University Subjects: Purdue University College yearbooks Universities and colleges Publisher: Lafayette, Ind. : Senior Class of Purdue University Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Redlands, Cal. B. S. in Civil Engineering. Cross County Club. Captain (3).Civil Engineering Society.Thesis—Investigation of Power Development of the Wildcat Creek.Dad is a long, lanky scamp, about as ungainly as his nativeredwoods, possesses an abnormally developed brain when itcomes to figuring stresses and bridge sections, and was herefor work principally. He is thinking of locating in theHoosier State because it is closer than California. JOHN RANDOLPH HOAGLAND, Idaville, Ind. B. S. in Civil Engineering. Tau Beta Pi. Civil EngineeringSociety (2) (3) (4).Thesis-—Determination of the Action of Stiffening Angles in aPlate Girder. John Randolph spent two extra years in grade school, andas a result of hard work made Tau Beta at college. He isextremely proud of this distinction, and doesnt mind blowingoff his superior knowledge before his less fortunate classmates.If he develops good judgment enough to reduce the size of hiscranial appendage he may make a success at engineering. 119 Text Appearing After Image: HOFFMARK HOFMANN HOLTER HOOVER RICHARD FREDERICK HOFFMARK, Indianapolis, Ind. B. S. in Civil Engineering. Athletic Association (1) (2) (3)(4). Varsity Football Team. Won P (4). Minuet Club.Cleofan Club. Carlyle Literary Society. Vice President (3).Critic (3). Annuals (3) (4). Athletic Editor Exponent (3).Athletic Editor Debris. Thesis—Strength of Concrete Beams Reinforced with Steel ofHigh Elastic Limit. Dick, football player, Economist, Orator, Writer andEditor, Champion of the down-trodden, a convincing argu-mentationer, can see anything through that he undertakes,lie has a weakness for blonde hair and blue eyes. Greatman with the ladies, a great boy with the boys. He canrun a mile in six minutes and twenty-three seconds if pushed.Drinks beer and eats ice cream at a social tea with equal grace.In fact, he is a good fellow any place, has a warm heart and awarm temper, is nuts on athletics, souvenirs and tobaccosacks. GUSTAV WILLIAM HOFMANN, Cincinnati, O. B. S. in Mechanical Kngine Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectuniversitiesandcolleges booksubjectcollegeyearbooks bookyear1906 bookidpurduedebris00purd3 bookauthorpurdueuniversity booksubjectpurdueuniversity bookpublisherlafayetteindseniorclassofpurdueuniversity bookcollectionamericana
1906

Image from page 96 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924002746364 Title: The story of the Pullman car Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Husband, Joseph, 1885-1938 Subjects: Pullman cars Publisher: Chicago, A C. McClurg & co. Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: nstalled on the Vienna and Munich line in 1873,and their favorable reception and popularity unques-tionably went far to better the trying conditions ofEuropean travel. Designed in America and introduced on the con-tinent, the Mann boudoir cars enjoyed an almostunoccupied field in Europe, with the exception ofEngland, where the railway managers had adoptedthe Pullman cars as their standard. The Mann carwas developed to suit European railroads andEuropean wants. A Belgian company was organ-ized to introduce sleeping cars by contracts withrailroad companies, somewhat like those of the Pull-man Company in America. The Mann cars whichwere put in service in the United States betweenBoston and New York in 1883 were divided intoeight compartments, some accommodating two per-sons, some four. The seats were arranged trans-versely instead of longitudinally. Due to theirsmaller passenger capacity a higher rate was neces-sarily charged than for Pullman accommodations. [64] Digitized by Microsoft® Text Appearing After Image: Interior of a Pullman car used about 1880. Here a tendency toornamentation begins to show. Note the low-backed seats Digitized by Microsoft® Digitized by Microsoft® THE PULLMAN CAR IN EUROPE But exclusive possession of the Continental fieldwas not left to Colonel Mann undisputed, for duringthe year 1875 Mr. Pullman established a shop atTurin, Italy, and under the direction of a Mr. A.Rapp, who was sent on from the Detroit works, anumber of cars were constructed for use on throughtrains on the principal Italian lines. The followingtestimonial presented to Mr. Rapp at the conclusionof the work by the men who had been employedexpresses, although in none too polished English,their appreciation of the work that had been pro-vided them. TO PULLMAN ESQUIRE, THE GREAT INVENTOR OF THE SALOON COMFORTABLE CARRIAGES AND MASTER RAPP THE CIVIL ENGINEER, DIRECTOR OF THE MANUFACTURE OF THE SAME THE ITALIAN WORKMEN BEG TO UMILIATE. Welcome, Welcome Master PullmanThe great inventor of the Saloon Carr Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorhusbandjoseph18851938 bookyear1917 bookidcu31924002746364 booksubjectpullmancars bookpublisherchicagoacmcclurgco bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber96 booksponsormsn
1917

Image from page 248 of
Description: Identifier: strawbridgecloth02stra Title: Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly Year: 1882 (1880s) Authors: Strawbridge & Clothier Subjects: Department stores Mail-order business Clothing and dress Fashion Home economics Clothing and dress Consumer goods Dry goods Publisher: [Philadelphia : The Company] Contributing Library: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: No.f8.—Ladies Fichu, of black Spanish point lace ; price, fi.25. STRAWBRIDGE & CLOTHIERS QUARTERLY. 247 LEATHER BAGS. SCISSORS. Text Appearing After Image: No. I.—Hand Bag of black leather, with nickelframe; lined with satin; compartments on in-side and outside; price, I2.85. No. 2.—Shopping Bag, natural color alligatorleather, heavy nickel frame; lined with blackleather; compartments inside and out; I3.50. No. 3.—Shopping Bag, large size, natural coloralligator leather combined with plain leather;e.xtra heavy nickel frame; lined with blackleather; compartments inside and out; 13.50. No. 4.—Hand Bag, large size, finest black mo-rocco, heavy nickel frame and trimmings;lined with black leather; compartments onoutside and inside; price, I3.50. No. 5.—Hand Bag, large size, natural color alli-gator leather, heavy nickel trimmings; linedwith dark leather; compartments on insideand outside; price, I4.00. No. 6.—Ladies large size Hand Bag, finestblack, stiffened morocco; heavy nickel frame;lined with black leather; compartments onlyon the inside; spring closing; price, $4.25. No. 7.—Ladies Hand Bag, black pebbledleather, nickel fra Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1882

Image from page 309 of
Description: Identifier: referencehandboo02buck Title: A reference handbook of the medical sciences, embracing the entire range of scientific and practical medicine and allied science Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Buck, Albert H. (Albert Henry), 1842-1922 Stedman, Thomas Lathrop, 1853-1938 Subjects: Dictionaries, Medical Publisher: New York : W. Wood and Company Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: he BX.\ schedule this part is cla.ssified withthe diencepbalon. Subsequent research makes itevident that the original usage of His (perhaps withslight modification) rather than that of the BNAshould here be followed: cf. Johnston (1900). Various other modifications of the BNA schemehave been suggested, e.specially in view of the dataof comparative neurology, of which the followingseem to the present writer of sufficient importance torequire recognition. The rhombencephalon is a natu-ral division, but of its subdivisions, the isthmus 285 Brain, Anatomy of REFERENXE HANDBOOK OF THE MEDICAL SCIEXCES rhombencephali as a transverse segment of the braintube seems unnecessary. The isthmus should ratherbe regarded merely as a plane of separation betweenthe mesencephalon and the rhombencephalon. Themetencephalon and mj-elencephalon, as defined byHis, are not natural subdivisions. It accords betterwith both embryology and phylogeny to separate therhombencephalon into a primitive segmental part, Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 886.—Side View of a Model of the Brain of a HumanEmbryo at the End of the First Month, (.\fter His. from Baileyand Millers Embrjologj*.) the medulla oblongata, and a secondary supra-segmental part, the metencephalon, comprising thecerebellum and pons, these latter, together withthe brachium pontis, encircling the more primitivemedulla oblongata without involving any importantchanges within it. The medulla oblongata ma5 thenbe subdivided into (1) the myelencephalon, which infishes innervates the gill region and in aU vertebratesserves chiefly respirators and other visceralfunctions, and (2) the facial part of the ob-longata, comprising the cerebral region ofthe V. and VII. nerves for the sensory andmotor innervation of the face. The centersfor the VIII. nerve (and the lateral linenerves of fishes) lie in the facialis segmentand from them the cerebellum has beendifferentiated. The writer would, therefore,subdivide the rhombencephalon as follows: bral nerves; cf. Fig. SS4. The pos Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookauthorbuckalberthalberthenry18421922 booksubjectdictionariesmedical bookidreferencehandboo02buck bookauthorstedmanthomaslathrop18531938 bookpublishernewyorkwwoodandcompany bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber309
1913

Image from page 42 of
Description: Identifier: delatransfusiond00cass Title: De la transfusion du sang Year: 1874 (1870s) Authors: Casse, Joseph Subjects: Blood Blood Transfusion Publisher: Bruxelles : Henri Manceaux Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: empérature = 39,7. Pouls 64 un peuirrégulier et respiraiion plus calme. Tracé graphique des variations de la température pendant la 6™« expérience. 39.6-— Septième expérience. — 13 juillet. Le chien pèse 13,200 grammes. Injection de 160 grammes de sang défibriné,arté- rialisé et chauffé à 50 centigrades. h. 11,10 min. = 39°,4) Respiraiion accélérée. ) ^ ^ p. 148. h. 11,13 min. == 39,8 ÏR.convulsive et plaintive j h. 11,15 min. = 39,8 Respiraiion plus calme, pouls 152. h. 11,20 min. = 39*,9 Respiraiion calme, pouls 84 inter-mittent de 2 à 2. h. 11,25 min. = 40 Respiration normale, pouls 84, même phénomène. h. 12 = 4i,5 Respiration normale, pouls 90. h. 1,35 min. == 39^6 Res()iration normale, pouls 90.A part quelques matières fécales sanguinolentes en petite quantité, renihies dans laprès midi, le chien na présente aucun phénomène remarquable. 40 DE LA TRANSFUSION DU SANG. Tracé graphique des varialions de la température pendant la 1^^ expérience. Text Appearing After Image: Huitième expérience. — 12 juillet. Injection de 160 gr.chauffés à 55° centigrades. Sang défibriné et filtré. Nousnavons pas tenu compte dans cette expérience de leau éva-porée. Le thermomètre marquait 55**,4 centigrades, aumoment de linjection, et celle-ci fut faite rapidement,h. 10,58 min. =^ 39°,9. P. 104. Soubresauts de la respirât,h. 11,2 min. = 40«,2. P. 132. R. fortement accélérée,h. 11,7 min. = 40,2. P. Il2. La respiral, redevient calmeenviron 5 minutes après lopération. Linjection terminée le chien ne paraît pas se porter plusmal; il se couche au soleil, dans la cour où il se trouve,reste parfaitement calme, agite la queue et prête attentionquand on lappelle. A une heure, il vomit trois fois, et dans un des vomisse-ments on trouve un petit caillot sanguin. A une heure quarante minutes, il urine du sang. A six heures, lurine est la même quà une heure qua- DE LA TRANSFUSION DU SANG. 41 rante minutes. Le lendemain Tanimal ne présente aucuntrouble et s Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectblood bookyear1874 booksubjectbloodtransfusion bookiddelatransfusiond00cass bookauthorcassejoseph bookpublisherbruxelleshenrimanceaux bookcontributorfrancisacountwaylibraryofmedicine booksponsoropenknowledgecommonsandharvardmedicalschool
1874

Image from page 490 of
Description: Identifier: galleryoffamouse00copp Title: A gallery of famous English and American poets Year: 1874 (1870s) Authors: Coppée, Henry, 1821-1895 Subjects: English poetry American poetry Publisher: Philadelphia : J. M. Stoddart & co. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THE FISHERS COTTAaE. We sat by the fishers cottage,And loolied at the stormy tide; The evening mist came rising,And floatino; far and wide. 479 480 LELAKD. One by one in the lightliouseThe lamps shone out on high • And far on the dim horizonA ship went saiUng by. We spoke of storm and shipwreck,—Of sailors, and how they liAe; Of jomneys twixt sky and water.And the sorrows and joys they give. We spoke of distant countries, In regions strange and fair.And of the wondious beings And curious customs there; Of perfumed lamps on the Ganges, Which are launched in the twilight hour; And the dark and silent Brahmins,Who worship the lotos flower; Of the wretched .dwarfs of Lapland,—Broad-headed, wide-mouthed and small,— Who crouch round their oil-fires, cooking,And chatter and scream and bawl. And the maidens earnestly listened,Till at last we spoke no more; The ship like a shadow had vanished.And darkness fell deep ou the shore. CARLETON. Text Appearing After Image: GOIN HOME TO-DAY. My business on the jurys done—the quibbhn all isthrough— Ive watched the lawyers right and left, and give my ver-dict true; I stuck so long unto my chair, I thought I would grow in ; And if I do not know myself, theyll get me there agin ; 121 4S1 482 CAELETON. But now the courts adjourned for good, and I have got my pay;Im loose at last, and, thank the Lord, Im going home to-day. Ive somehow felt uneasy like since first day I come down ;It is an awkward game to play the gentleman in town;And this ere Sunday suit of mine oii Sunday rightly sets;But when I wear the stuff a week, it somehow galls and frets.Id rather wear ray homespun rig of pepper-salt and gray—Ill have it on in half a jiff when I get home to-day. I have no doubt my wife looked out, as well as any one—As well as any woman could—to see tliat things was done:For though Melinda, when Im there, wont set her foot outdoors.Shes very careful, when Im gone, to tend to all the chores.But nothing prospe Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectenglishpoetry bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectamericanpoetry bookyear1874 bookauthorcoppehenry18211895 bookidgalleryoffamouse00copp bookpublisherphiladelphiajmstoddartco bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber490
1874

Image from page 241 of
Description: Identifier: larousseuniverse02laro Title: Larousse universel en 2 volumes; nouveau dictionnaire encyclopédique publié sous la direction de Claude Augé Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Larousse, Pierre, 1817-1875 Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries, French French Publisher: Paris Larousse Contributing Library: Internet Archive Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s dela poésie latine, embrasse fouies les légen-des de la mythologie et des temps fabuleux. i. histoire de liule n et Baucis. la chasse I don, le récit du Déluge, lhistoire de,MédT , ete.. en sont les passages les plusconnus. Le ton y est des plus variés ; maisla poésie a plus de grâce que de force.plus desprit que de pensée. métamorphoser fd-xijv.a.(dugr. meta, qui marque changement, et morphâ,forme). Transformer : Latone métamor-phosa des paysans en grenouilles. Fig. Chan-ger lextérieur ou le caractère : ta fortunel,i complètement métamorphosé. métailiCOtine n. f. Base isomère dula nicotine. métaphase [fa-ze] n. f. (du préf. meta, et de phase). Phase ou stade très court dela caryocinèse. métaphonie n. f du préf. meta eldu gr. phonè, voix. JAnquist. Modification,par assimilation partielle, de la qualitédune voyelle sous linfluence de la voyelledune syllabe voisine, quand il y a uneconsonne entre les d<-,ux ; cest par mè-taphonie quen allemand Gott donne Text Appearing After Image: Métamorphoses Crustat ses 1- Zoe de crabe . •!. Nauplius de ho-mard , 3. Hégalope de portunus. --- Annèlidea . i. Jeune néréide ; 5 Lai ndophn Lrocha, U tus* i;. B,9 BtaU mecessifs des scypblstomes.— Mollusques : l*1, 11, t.. BUtÛ surcessifs du pneumodenuon. —Echinth l-1 I .u v. il ..i. j i. 1 î. Larve plu» âgi-p ; 15. Larve doursin.X. BATRACIENS] INSECTES, HfiDUSSS. aôtuich métaphore n. f. (du gr. metapliora. transport).Figure de rhétorique, par laquelle on transporte unmot de lobjet quil désigne habituellement à unautre objet auquel il ne convient quen vertu dunecomparaison sous-entendue. (Cest par métaphorequon dit la Lumière de l esprit, a Qeurdes ant etc mètaphorétique adj. [du gr. metapl bile Se dit dune définition qui est vicieuse parce quelle peut sappliquer a autre chose quà l objetdéfini, comme la suivante : le lion est un animal métaphorique adj. Qui tient de la meta phore : expression métaphorique. Qui abonde en méta-phores : fi st;/le des One Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 booksubjectfrench booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionariesfrench bookauthorlaroussepierre18171875 bookpublisherparislarousse bookidlarousseuniverse02laro bookcontributorinternetarchive bookcollectioninternetarchivebooks
1922

Image from page 196 of
Description: Identifier: socialengland05trai Title: Social England : a record of the progress of the people in religion, laws, learning, arts, industry, commerce, science, literature and manners, from the earliest times to the present day Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Traill, H. D. (Henry Duff), 1842-1900 Mann, James Saumarez, 1851- Subjects: Publisher: New York : Putnam Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: DUXSTOX PILLAR, XEAR LIXCOLX. brewing kettle. Women spun wool into coarse cloth; mentanned their own leather. Wealth only existed in its simplestforms, and natural divisions of employment w^ere not made,because only the rudest implements of production were nowused. The rough tools required for the cultivation of the soil,and the rude household utensils needed for the comfort of dailylife, were made at home. In the long winter evenings farmers, AGRICULTURE, 1680-174?. 133 Text Appearing After Image: Photo : P. Woohoufjh, Esq.HARTESTERS LEATHER BOTTLE, 1757{Ipswich Museum.) their sons, and their servants carved the wooden spoons, theplatters, and the beechen bowls; fitted and riveted the bottomsinto the horn mugs, or closed, in coarse fashion, the holes in the leathern jugs. They plaited thewicker baskets; fitted handlesto the scythes, rakes, and othertools; cut the staves, and fixedthe thongs for the flails ; madethe willow or ashen teeth forrakes and harrows, and hardenedthem in the fire; fashioned oxyokes and forks, racks and rack-staves ; twisted willows intoscythe cradles, or into thetraces and other harness gear.Travelling carpenters, smiths,and tinkers visited farmhousesand remoter villao-es at rareintervals to perform those ]3arts of the work which neededtheir professional skill. But every village of any size foundemployment for such trades as those of the smith and thecarpenter. Mean-while the womenplaited the strawfor the neck-collars,stitched and stuftedsheepskin bags f Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookidsocialengland05trai bookpublishernewyorkputnam bookauthormannjamessaumarez1851 bookauthortraillhdhenryduff18421900 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsorinternetarchive
1901

Image from page 87 of
Description: Identifier: practicalhydropa64smed Title: Practical hydropathy, including plans of baths and remarks on diet, clothing and habits of life.. Year: 1864 (1860s) Authors: Smedley, John Subjects: Hydrotherapy Baths Hot water Publisher: London : J. Caudwell Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ot, for this purpose, and for support tothe back. In cases where much medicine has been taken, the stimu-lating effects of the baths and bandages throw it off in the crisis, uponthe non-vital organs, the legs, arms, and surface of the body; and soentirely replace the vitiated tissue by new and healthy formation. Wherever there is disease inthe system, there the crisiswill show itself,the parts most affected.* CHEST COMPRESS.-We use different kinds andsizes. — The shorter chestspongio-piline compress,with collar, is invaluable inall chest complaints, andbronchial affections, or ofthe lungs. The collar is, made of two thicknesses of 13 in from E to F. 10 in. from C to D, 14 in. ,. , ., .. , io in. nomxi i .i,* iAT1(Tpr collar 14 calico, covered with oiled from A to 15—full size 6 m. longer, collar i* » . in. Ion-. 3 in. wide. silk, and quilted. * See Crisis Treatment, page 435. We now use swans-down calico and mackin-tosh jaconet for body bandages, instead of oiled silk and calico. Text Appearing After Image: relieving b.vtiis a:nt> peactice or hydropathy. 75 The spongio should be bound with tape, and have twocrossings of tape at the back, to keep it from stretching, andshould be worn night and day until the complaint is removed.It will not weaken the chest; but, on the contrary, greatlysoothe and bring external warmth and circulation ; and so relievethe internal congestion. The collar is wrung out of cold ortepid water, and the spongio sprinkled or sponged with the same,but not to drip, or the compress will feel cold ; and re-wettedmorning, noon, and night. The 179 compress will be useful atthe same time, as the apex of the lungs comes up to the pointbetwixt the shoulder and neck. The above chest compress weordinarily use with a body bandage and spinal compress. Some-times, however, the body bandage cannot be used for want of vitalheat, and then we find the full-size spongio chest compress, which,is merely six inches longer, to be the best. Either of these chestcompresses, or the calic Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectbaths booksubjecthydrotherapy bookcentury1800 bookdecade1860 bookyear1864 booksubjecthotwater bookidpracticalhydropa64smed bookauthorsmedleyjohn bookpublisherlondonjcaudwell bookcontributorharoldbleelibrary
1864

Image from page 91 of
Description: Identifier: historyofallnati05wrig Title: A history of all nations from the earliest times; being a universal historical library Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Wright, John Henry, 1852-1908 Subjects: World history Publisher: [Philadelphia, New York : Lea Brothers & company Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: w their loyalty to the emperor, hurled accusations oftreason at one another. The emperor had no desire to interfere, for henow learned from the earlier wife of Sejanus the share which he hadhad in the death of Drusus. In the l)loody and joyless days that followed this catastrophe therewere but few Romans that could safely avoid servility and intrigue.It was only natural that the world should long for the end of the reignof the dweller in Capri, who, without joy, without hope, without any-thing that could rouse him from his gloom, wished never again to seethe hated city. The hopes of Rome turned to young Caius, the son ofGermanicus, whom the emperor summoned to Capri after the death ofSejanus. He was the last survivor of his family; for his older brotherhad died in prison, and his mother, Agrippina, had starved herself todeath. Men about the court who knew him could, however, entertainbut gloomy forel)üdings for the future of the realm under his govern- 86 THE JULIAN-CLAUDIAN DYNASTY. Text Appearing After Image: Fkj. 21. — The family of the Caesars. Sardonyx cameo. Inliis holding the globe;Julius Caesar in heaven attended by Drusus; Augustus on a Pegasus attendedheavenward by Cupid. In the centre Tiberius and Livia enthroned; in front of themAntonia, Germanieus in armor, his wife Agrippina, and the y(mng Caligula; behindthe throne the younger Drusus and Julia Livilla. Below, captives from Germanyand elsewhere. With one exception, the largest engraved gem known, —13 inches by11 inches. Sent to Paris from Constantinoi)le by P.aldwin II., the last Latin emperorof Constantinople (1228-1261). (Paris, National Library.) ment.^ His education had been wickedly neglected; he was not with-out intelligence and wit, but incapable of application. The only studyhe cared for was oratory. He was passionately fond of the theatre, 1 The nickname Caligula was given him by the P.hine soldiers in his childhood,from the little soldiers boots he wore with the costume of the legionaries. CALIGULA SUCCEEDS TI BE Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1905

Image from page 39 of
Description: Identifier: leadpoisoningins00hami Title: Lead poisoning in the smelting and refining of lead Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Hamilton, Alice, 1869-1970 Meeker, Royal, b. 1873 Subjects: Lead Lead industry and trade Hazardous occupations Lead Poisoning Publisher: Washington, Govt. print. off. Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: urgy of copper, butwdth lead, only the Godfrey and the Holthoff furnaces have foundmuch use; until very recently the Wedge furnace,. a modification ofthe furnaces used in copper smelting, has been introduced. Thesetypes of furnaces require scarcely any attention; in fact, during thenatural runnmg of the furnace it has only to be oiled, the fire keptup, the hopper above filled, and the roast taken away whenever acar is filled. The furnaces make scarcely any outside dust or fumes.Cleaning and repauing will be mentioned in connection with thesame work on all types of furnaces. In most of the plants visited the mechanical roasting departmentwas clean and free from perceptible fumes except when some acci-dent to the working of a furnace caused it to smoke for a time.The charging is usually mechanical, and the discharge of roasted mate-rial often takes place under a spray of water which eliminates allrisk of dust. When the work is carelessly done and dust and fumes Bulletin No. 141—Labor. Text Appearing After Image: PLATE 4.—HUNTINGTON-HEBERLEIN POT, The pot is the lower half, the upper half consisting of the great hood and flue which isfitted over the pot during roasting. The windows in the side are opened for rakingfrom time to time. When roasting is complete the hood is lifted off, the pot caught bya crane, tipped over, and the smoking charge dumped and crushed. LEAD POISONING IN SMELTING AND EEFINING LEAD. 29 are permitted there is danger, because botJi fumes and dust fioiapreroasters contain oxide of lead. HUNTINGTON-HEBERLEIN POTS. Tliis metliod of roasting and sintering ores was developed inEurope and introduced into this country in 1905. Tlie generaldesign of these furnaces is shown in the accompanying illustration(plate 4). The charge to be roasted is placed in a huge cast-iron potwliicli has a false bottom. If the first layers of the charge are red-hot,tlie roasting begins the moment the blast is turned on beneath tliegrate; otherwise a coal or coke fire must be started in the bottomb Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookpublisherwashingtongovtprintoff bookyear1914 bookidleadpoisoningins00hami bookauthorhamiltonalice18691970 bookauthormeekerroyalb1873 booksubjectlead booksubjectleadindustryandtrade booksubjectleadpoisoning
1914

Image from page 525 of
Description: Identifier: alienistneurolog3019unse Title: Alienist and neurologist. Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Neurology Psychology Psychiatry Psychology, Clinical Forensic Psychiatry Publisher: St. Louis, Mo. : Ev.E. Carreras, Steam Printer, Publisher and Binder Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Physicians who administer our Antidiphtheric Serum and Antidiphtheric Globulins may do so with full assurance of their purity, potency and uniformity. Our antitoxinsare prepared with scrupulous care. They are rigidly tested. They are supplied in themost satisfactory syringe-containers ever offered to the medical profession. Our Antidiphtheric Serum and Antidiphtheric Globulins are marketed in thesame style of package and at the same price per given number of antitoxic units. TheGlobulins, a highly concentrated product, occupies a relatively smaller container thanthe older serum. 500, 1000. 2000. 3000, 4000 and 5000 units. Parke, Davis & Company Laboratories: Detroit, Mich., U.S.A.: Walkerville, Ont.; Hounslow, Eng.Branches: New York, Chicago, St. Louis, Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, Kansas City, Minneapolis, U.S.A.;London, Eng.; Montreal, Que.; Sydney, N.S.W.; St. Petersburg, Russia; Bombay, India;Tokio, Japan; Buenos Aires, Argentina. PEACOCKS BROMIDES In Epilepsy and all cases Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectpsychology bookidalienistneurolog3019unse booksubjectneurology booksubjectpsychiatry booksubjectpsychologyclinical booksubjectforensicpsychiatry bookpublisherstlouismoevecarrerassteamprinterpublisherandbinder bookyear1909
1909

Image from page 492 of
Description: Identifier: gri_notiziedepro01bald Title: Notizie de' professori del disegno da Cimabue in qua : per le quali si dimostra come, e per chi le bell' arti di pittura, scultura, e architettura lasciata la rozzezza delle maniere greca, e gottica, si siano in questi secoli ridotte all' antica loro perfezione Year: 1681 (1680s) Authors: Baldinucci, Filippo, 1625-1696 Baldinucci, Francesco Saverio, 1662-1738 Rotari, Pietro, 1707-1762 Franchi, Santi, 17th/18th cent Matini, Piero, fl. 1684-1700 Manni, Giuseppe Stamperia di S.A.R. (Florence, Italy) Accademia della Crusca Subjects: Artists Art, Italian Publisher: In Firenze : Per Santi Franchi [et al.] Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: /r MARCO ANTONIO FRANGIA BIGI DETTO IL FRANGI AB IGIO PITTORE FIORENTINO Difeepolo di Jfrfariotto Albertinelli, nato 1483. 4fa 15*4* Opo avere il Franciabigio ricevuti i principi dellarte dall AI-bertinelli, ed efferfi colle proprie fatiche acquietato buon cre-dico, furongli date a fare alcune opere in pubblico, una deUle quili fu un San Bernardo e una Santa Caterina da Siena, afrefeo, nella Chiefa di San Pancrazio de* Monaci Vallombro-fani. Fece poi a olio una Vergine, con Gesù, per la Chiefadi San Pier Maggiore : e fl tabernacolo di Sant Job dietro a Servi, dove afrefeo figurò la Votazione della Madonna, e alla medefima Compagniadipinte la tavola dell Aitar maggiore. Colorì ancora li due angeletti chenella Chiefa di Santo Spirito full Altare di San Niccola, fi veggono da lati Text Appearing After Image: 236 Decennale IL del Secolo IV. dal 1510. al 1520. Iati dellimmagine del Santo, che in que* tempi fu fatta di legno con mo-dello di Jacopo Sanfovino. E anche dipinfe i due tondi, dov è la Nun-ziata» e le ftoriette della vita del Santo: nella predella della tavola dellequali opere fu molto lodato, perchè in effe, ficcome poi fece in alcunealtre, fi sforzò al poflìbile di feguitar la manieradAndrea del Sarto, concui tenne fua danza molto tempo. A concorrenza del medefìmo, nelcortile dinanzi alla Chiefa de Servi, dipinfe la ftoria dello Spofalizio diMaria Vergine , con San Giufeppe.* ed occorfe, che avendo i Frati diquel Convento, colioccafione di certa folennita, voluto fcoprirla fenzafaputa del Franciabigio, al quale ancora redavano a finire il bafamento ealtro, che a lui fófle paruto neceflario: eflò fé ne chiamò sì fattamentedifgudato, che fopraffatto da collera, lubito avutane la nuova, fé ne an-dò al luogo della pittura, efalendo fui ponte, che ancora non era intera-me Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectartists bookdecade1680 booksubjectartitalian bookcentury1600 bookauthorrotaripietro17071762 bookauthorfranchisanti17th18thcent bookauthormatinipierofl16841700 bookauthormannigiuseppe bookauthorstamperiadisarflorenceitaly bookpublisherinfirenzepersantifranchietal
1825

Image from page 418 of
Description: Identifier: gri_notiziedepro01bald Title: Notizie de' professori del disegno da Cimabue in qua : per le quali si dimostra come, e per chi le bell' arti di pittura, scultura, e architettura lasciata la rozzezza delle maniere greca, e gottica, si siano in questi secoli ridotte all' antica loro perfezione Year: 1681 (1680s) Authors: Baldinucci, Filippo, 1625-1696 Baldinucci, Francesco Saverio, 1662-1738 Rotari, Pietro, 1707-1762 Franchi, Santi, 17th/18th cent Matini, Piero, fl. 1684-1700 Manni, Giuseppe Stamperia di S.A.R. (Florence, Italy) Accademia della Crusca Subjects: Artists Art, Italian Publisher: In Firenze : Per Santi Franchi [et al.] Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: D E E NOTIZIE DE PROFESSORI DEL DISEGNO DA CIMABUE IN QUA DECENNALE I DEL SECOLO IV. DAL MD. AL MDX. ALBERTO DURERÒ PITTORE, SCULTORE, ARCHITETTO,E INTAGLIATORE DI NORIMBERGHA CITTA DI ALEMÀGNA Dtfcepoh di Buonmartino, tmto mi 1470.^1528. Sfai poca notizia potrei io dare del celebre artefice Al-berto Durerò, fé a ciò non mi avelie in parte ajutato latraduzione di quello, che nel proprio idioma ne ferirle ilbuon Pittore Carlo Vanmander Fiammingo; aggiugnen-dola a quello, che con molta fatica e industria fparfoper gli ferirti di ottimi Autori, ho io (in qui potuto ritrarne, per far sì, che la nofìra Italia, che per un cor-fo di fopra 170. anni nelle belle opere fue ha ammira-valore di lui e la chiarezza del fuo intelletto, iortifea ancora di fa-alcuna cofa della luà perfona, e dell altre qualità dell animo fuo. L Quali Text Appearing After Image: to 1!pere \6i Decennale L del Secolo IV. dal i$oo. alialo. Quali follerò negli antichi tempi gli antenati di Alberto, e onde traefleV origine la fua cafa , non è ben noto; ma però fu fcritto» che quellipoteflèro avere avuto loro cominciamento nellUngheria, e che di quivifé ne paflàflero ad abitare in Germania. Ma poco rilieva tutto ciò; con-cioffiacofachè, per molto qualificati che poteflèro eflere flati i fuoijrenitori,non è per quello, che alcuna maggior gloria avellerò potuto elfi procac-ciare a lui di quella, che egli colla moka virtù fua feppe acquiftare.Ev dunque da faperfi, come il natale d Alberto feguì nella città di No-rimbergh in Alemagna, lanno della noftra falute 1470. in tempo appuntoquando in Italia fi era già cominciata a fcoprire e praticare lottima ma-niera del dipignere. Il Padre fuo efercitò con lode univerfale il meftieredellorefice, nel quale feppe dare a vedere a fuoi cittadini il molto,eh evaleva in ogni più artificiofo lavoro . E (lata opinio Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectartists bookdecade1680 booksubjectartitalian bookcentury1600 bookauthorrotaripietro17071762 bookauthorfranchisanti17th18thcent bookauthormatinipierofl16841700 bookauthormannigiuseppe bookauthorstamperiadisarflorenceitaly bookpublisherinfirenzepersantifranchietal
1825

Image from page 679 of
Description: Identifier: surgeryitstheory00wals Title: Surgery; its theory and practice Year: 1896 (1890s) Authors: Walsham, William Johnson, 1847-1903 Spencer, Walter George, 1858-1940 Subjects: Surgery Publisher: Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: % aregenerally of moderate size, globular in shape, usually of a dark-brown or mahogany color, rough and tuberculated, very hard andheavy, and crystalline on section. They are only partially de-stroyed in the blow-pipe flame, the residue being alkaline andeffervescing with an acid. They are insoluble in acetic acid, butsoluble in hydrochloric acid. The nucleus is generally composed 678 DISEASES OF REGIONS. Text Appearing After Image: Oxalate of lime calculus. Fig. 328. of oxalate of lime, but may consist of uric acid or urate of am-monia. The nucleus is usually formed in the kidney. These cal-culi are most frequent in middle a^e. 3. The phosphatic calculi are of three kinds : (a) the phos-phate of lime or earthy phosphate ; (^) the ammonio-magnesianor triple phosphate, and (r) the phos-phate of lime with the ammonio-magne-sian phosphate, the mixed or fusiblephosphate. Of these the last is the onlycommon form. It is usually of large sizeand of white color, smooth, soft, friable,earthy and laminated on section, and ofirregular shape, taking that of the nucleuson which it is formed ; it fuses whenheated in the blow-pipe flame ; is insolu-ble in warm alkalies, but is soluble in ace-tic acid. The nucleus is composed ofuric acid, oxalate of lime, or of some for-eign body other than a calculus, as apiece of catheter, hair-pin, blood or fibrin.It occurs most frequently in the laterp>er!ods of life, and is then generall Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectsurgery bookdecade1890 bookyear1896 bookidsurgeryitstheory00wals bookauthorwalshamwilliamjohnson18471903 bookauthorspencerwaltergeorge18581940 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcolumbiauniversitylibraries booksponsoropenknowledgecommons
1896

Image from page 98 of
Description: Identifier: jamesrivertouris00ches Title: The James river tourist, a brief account of historical localities on James river, and sketches of Richmond, Norfolk, and Portsmouth Year: 1889 (1880s) Authors: Chesterman, William Dallas, 1845-1904, ed Subjects: Publisher: Richmond, E. Waddey, printer Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ce played— Welcome, he said, my dear ones light,And the dim shore echoed for many a night The name of the death-cold maid! Till he hollowed a boat of the birchen bark, Which carried him off from shore;For he followed the meteor spark—The wind was high, and the clouds were dark, And the boat returned no more. But oft from the Indian Hunters camp This lover and maid so trueAre seen at the hour of midnight dampTo cross the lake by a fire-fly lamp, And paddle iheir white canoe. Finis or Preface.—These lines will speed theparting or welcome the coming reader. The book begins with Richmond and describes thepoints of greatest interest as the steamer moves on down THE JAMES RIVER TOURIST. 91 the river. The reader who starts from Norfolk to Rich-,mond, therefore needs to make the last first, andbegin at the end of the book. Th|^e will be no difficultyin fixing upon the localities mentioned if such personbut remember to look to the left when the book pointshim to the rights or vice versa. Text Appearing After Image: H Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1889 bookidjamesrivertouris00ches bookauthorchestermanwilliamdallas18451904ed bookpublisherrichmondewaddeyprinter bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionlibraryofcongress
1889

Image from page 165 of
Description: Identifier: structuredevelop00camp3 Title: The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Campbell, Douglas Houghton, 1859-1953 Subjects: Publisher: New York, Macmillan Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: orbicularis at least, entirely erroneous, and itis extremely likely that when normal specimens of the otherspecies are examined from microtome sections, in the young 152 MOSSES AND FERNS CHAP. stages at least, a similar columella will be found. The singleembryo that Leitgeb (1. c. PI. IV., Fig. yy) figures of N. orbi-cularis (valvata) is at once seen to be abnormal, and as his con-clusions were drawn from a study of similar dead embryos inthe other species, they cannot be accepted without more satis-factory evidence. While in the main corresponding to the em-bryo of Anthoceros there are some interesting differences whichare closely associated with the structure of the older sporogo-nium. The foot is smaller than in Anthoceros and derived onlyfrom the lowest tier of cells. The columella is decidely smaller,and the archesporium, as well as the young sporogonium wall,relatively much thicker. As in Anthoceros, the archesporiumdoes not extend to the foot, but is separated by the zone of B Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorcampbelldouglashoughton18591953 bookyear1918 bookidstructuredevelop00camp3 bookpublishernewyorkmacmillan bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionnybotanicalgarden bookcontributortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden booksponsortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden
1918

Image from page 699 of
Description: Identifier: illustratedcompa00rich Title: The illustrated companion to the Latin dictionary and Greek lexicon; forming a glossary of all the words representing visible objects connected with the arts, manufactures, and every-day life of the Greeks and Romans, with representations of nearly two thousand objects from the antique Year: 1849 (1840s) Authors: Rich, Anthony, 1803 or 1804-1891 Subjects: Classical dictionaries Publisher: London, Longmans Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ner, that when thrown upon theground, one of them would always stand upright, as in the annexedexample, from an original. It wasemployed in ancient warfare for thepurpose of impeding a charge ofcavalry, being thrown on the groundto wound the horses feet. Veg.Mil. iii. 24. TRIBUNAL (SiKaar-hpiov). Thetribunal; a raised platform at oneextremity of a law court, upon whichthe curule seats of the judges andother persons of distinction whowished to attend the proceedings wereplaced. (Cic. Verr. ii. 2. 38. Id.Orat. i. 37. Suet. Tib. 33.) It was Text Appearing After Image: I sometimes of a square form, and con-! structed within the external wall ofthe court, as shown by the internalabuttment on the right side of theannexed engraving, which represents| the ground-plan of the Basilica atPompeii ; at others, it consisted of asemicircular absis or alcove (hemicy-clium, Vitruv. v. 1. 8.), projectingI beyond the external wall of the edi-I fice, as in the Basilica at Verona, of| which a restoration is exhibited at: P-81- 2. In a camp, the tribunal was anelevated platform upon which the ! general sat to administer justice| (Tac. Hist, iv. 25. Ib. iii. 10.); simi-; lar to the suggestum on p. 631. 3. In a Roman theatre, the tribunal. was an elevated seat in the pit (or-chestra, Suet. Claud. 21.), generallyappropriated to the use of the praetor(Id. Aug. 44.). I TRIBUNUS. A tribune; a titleI originally signifying an officer be-| longing to a tribe, either elected asI its president, or to perform certainduties in its behalf; whence thename was subsequently transferr Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 booksubjectclassicaldictionaries bookpublisherlondonlongmans bookyear1849 bookidillustratedcompa00rich bookauthorrichanthony1803or18041891 bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber699 bookcollectionamericana
1849

Image from page 42 of
Description: Identifier: gri_33125011099708 Title: Atlas historique, ou, Nouvelle introduction a l'histoire, à la chronologie & à la géographie ancienne & moderne : représentée dans de nouvelles cartes, où l'on remarque l'établissement des etats & empires du monde, leur durée, leur chûte, & leurs differens gouvernemens : la chronologie des consuls romains, des Papes, de empereurs, des rois & des princes, &c. qui ont été depuis le commencement du monde, jusqu'à présent : et la génealogie des maisons souveraines de l'Europe. Year: 1720 (1720s) Authors: Chatelain, Henri Abraham Gueudeville, Nicolas, approximately 1654-approximately 1721 Subjects: Atlases, Dutch Historical geography Publisher: A Amsterdam : Chez Zacharie Chatelain Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 11 . Tom ^\. J/! A.Tag : i^ K^rOlJL DES AsSYB-XETfS PREMIERS ET wSECODSTDS,MOIIfS COÏTSIDXIiABLES, JUSQTTXS À LEmPIRX HoMATIT. Ajres la mort de Balthssai- L4ssirie£assa,Jhudomnatiart. des ^edes audes Petjèsfar la libéralitéde Cj-rus - Moïale des BaiIonisas étantéteinfe--h^S^ •Ofrès un interreonede huîiaiu remit ces^cuflesfius lancien-jot^ das.issi■iens-,4ùisLjùutleMaiaii Text Appearing After Image: fi F t |v. I CHRONOLOGIE HISTORIQUE DES ROIS DASSYRIE. N E M R O D fut h premier cjiiiciin- fedla dciâiirhiiiylo- „. ,(.„, ,if, i,jt,g, tui lyl^yrle di-: /«, A„ R./.,.„ I,l,.„ 1, juiijaà la cjut lesChuldrens iommi I ds régner a fi EVOCHUSrigrxi 6. am. CHOMASBOLUSPORUSNECH UBESAB lusONIBALLUSCHINZIRUS MARDOCEN-TES dura 40. ans. S I S I M O R D A- CHUS NADIUS PARANNUS NAbONNADUS is ce Princecommencèrentlc. Jj.ansdÛbreivationsAllrniiomjqurs, que Calliltliène envnua piGrec à Aiiftoie, Hc que lo s dans Babylonej .nquA Jre le Grand la prit. Dail il seiuit que lesChaldcenssappliqutii[.iics le lems de Ncrarod â obk-i/teks Allres. T L (èmble quil ait été le Btl des R.bvloniens, ou le Bil Jupînr,les Chaldéens honorèrent corn-un Dieu, régna 7. anç,régna 3;.ans.rè^na 43- ans.régna 48. ans.régna 40, ans. Es Chaldéens ayant Ôé vainnisdans nne Guerre quils eurenllire les Phéniciens , les Ara&esrent, qui fe rendirent maitreide Babylone. Ils y règnèrL-nt du-ran Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectatlasesdutch bookdecade1720 bookyear1720 booksubjecthistoricalgeography bookidgri33125011099708 bookauthorchatelainhenriabraham bookauthorgueudevillenicolasapproximately1654approximately1721 bookpublisheraamsterdamchezzachariechatelain bookcentury1700 bookcontributorgettyresearchinstitute
1825

Image from page 180 of
Description: Identifier: familyflightarou00hale Title: A family flight around home Year: 1884 (1880s) Authors: Hale, Edward Everett, 1822-1909 Hale, Susan, 1833-1910, joint author Subjects: New England -- Description and travel United States -- History Publisher: Boston, D. Lothrop and company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: all hers since her motherhad deserted it,— and indulged herself in the rare luxury of one ofwhat in her childhood had been called Bessies tantrums, anaccess of crying, accompanied by the darkest view of her situation in life. It lasted perhaps ten minutes, during which her nature workedoff the excitement of the last week Then she became reasonable,and thought of a great many things which made her position not 176 A FAMILY FLIGHT AROUND HOME. only desirable, but delightful. Washing her face to remove thetears, she set herself to the active hard work of changing all thefurniture in the room from one place to another, and putting finallyaway the remains of her mothers packing. By the time the early dinner hour had arrived, she was not onlycheerful, but in ridiculously good spirits, and Tom being absent, shecarried off the blank caused by the two vacant places in a mannerwhich surprised Mr. Bruce, and every one but Hubert, who had seenher just like this before, in similar circumstances. Text Appearing After Image: DANDELIONS AND BUTTERCUPS. TWO HEROES. 177 CHAPTER XX. TWO HEROES. IT is evident that the stirring events of the early half of theeighteenth century were raising a crop of heroes ready 10stand forth fully equipped in the service of freedom when the timecame to resist the oppression of the mother-country. The boyswho were born at that period grew up familiar with the smell ofpowder and smoke, and accustomed to the use of arms. To resist,to defend, were a part of their natural lives, and to do and daregreat things. Thus the names of young men who took brave partsin the contests on the Lakes, reappear again as patriots in thecause of liberty. The French War was a grand field for the military training ofmen, officers and soldiers for the scenes to be enacted a few yearslater. The young men of the country who displayed military geniusin that war were all the time rising from the ranks of the commonsoldier to positions of command and responsibility. Israel Putnamwas among the young men who Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1884 bookdecade1880 booksubjectunitedstateshistory bookauthorhaleedwardeverett18221909 bookidfamilyflightarou00hale bookauthorhalesusan18331910jointauthor booksubjectnewenglanddescriptionandtravel bookpublisherbostondlothropandcompany bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress
1884

Image from page 80 of
Description: Identifier: gliantichisepolc00bart_0 Title: Gli antichi sepolcri, ovvero, Mausolei romani ed etruschi trovati in Roma ed in altri luoghi celebri : nelli quali si contengono molte erudite memorie Year: 1767 (1760s) Authors: Bartoli, Pietro Santi, 1635-1700 Bonfigli, Marco Antonio Pietro, da Cortona, 1596-1669 Calcografia camerale (Rome, Italy) Subjects: Sepulchral monuments Tombs Sculpture, Roman Sculpture, Etruscan Inscriptions, Latin Publisher: In Roma : [Calcografia della Rev. Camera Apostolica] Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Si quadrata comparto cUpieira.Tù7urtinaJIiìscriatoné desso fa conoscere che appartiene à Caio Vooliaalklìlk aeuaplebeacuiilS-eFRj^ cheSob all Iinperadori> etalit Vestili si convenuta, hautndqc/li permesso dentro la City illuqjioper riporui ledihiCtnerie d suoi pastori contro la leifataeUe^ilITauole.conu lo rferif ce Cicer; Ouidio ne^asti/a nuntione diduejratelk J?ubhcyX.dià delia Plebe che ordinarono Ejiuochijlorali Pianta di antico Sepolcro nella Via Appi a, incontro Domine quo uadisCreduto communemente dellafa/mplia de Scipio/li: La pianta fatta dipunti dimostra Uprimo ordine a pian terreno, laltra circolare u disopra,. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectsculptureroman booksubjectsepulchralmonuments bookauthorbartolipietrosanti16351700 bookauthorpietrodacortona15961669 booksubjectinscriptionslatin booksubjecttombs bookidgliantichisepolc00bart0 bookauthorbonfiglimarcoantonio bookauthorcalcografiacameraleromeitaly booksubjectsculptureetruscan
1825

Image from page 350 of
Description: Identifier: pictorialhistory01kitt Title: The pictorial history of Palestine and the Holy land including a complete history of the Jews Year: 1844 (1840s) Authors: Kitto, John, 1804-1854 Subjects: Jews -- History Palestine -- History Publisher: London C. Knight Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hat the Hebrews, in430 years, might have increased from seventypersons to 977,280 males above twenty yearsold. He supposes that of those seventy per-sons who went down to Egypt, only forty re-mained alive after a space of twenty years,each one of whom had two sons. In like man-ner, at the close of every succeeding period oftwenty years, he supposes one-fourth part ofthose who were alive at the commencement ofthat period to have died. Hence arises the fol-lowing geometrical progression. After twenty years, of the seventy there are forty living, each having two sons:— Consequently rr: 80 80 f = 140 120 f = 180 180 I — 270 and so on. Thus the first term of the progression is 80 = a The denominator | = i The number of terms ^,^ ■=■ n Therefore the expression of the whole sum will be a h — a 6-1 Or- 80 X I ^ - 80 80 X 6109 — 80 = 977,280 The date to which the history has now reached isOf the world .Before Christ 38031608 BOOK III. JOSHUA AND THE JUDGES. CHAPTER I. THE CONQUEST. Text Appearing After Image: [Ancient Syrian Chief addressing the People.*] ^ After the death of Moses the Israelites remained encamped in the phiins of Moab, with theriver Jordan before them, prepared for, and expecting, the order for their advance into theland promised to their fathers. i This pause on the borders of that land affords us a very suitable opportunity of consideringthe grave questions—What claim had the Hebrews to the land they were about to invade with * The costume is Egypto-SjTian—that is Ej;ypti.in, with such modificationi as the Syrians apjxiar to have given it in adoptingit from tlie Egyptians It has been very carefully studied. 336 HISTORY OF PALESTINE. [Book III- the intention to retain it for their own use ?—what right had they to declare a war of utterextermination against nations who had never given them any cause of offence? The answer which is now much relied upon is that of Michaelis, and, more lately, ofJahn. This answer alleges, that the Canaanites had appropriated to their o Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 bookyear1844 bookpublisherlondoncknight booksubjectjewshistory bookidpictorialhistory01kitt bookauthorkittojohn18041854 booksubjectpalestinehistory bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorprincetontheologicalseminarylibrary
1844

Image from page 147 of
Description: Identifier: architectenginee11333sanf Title: Architect and engineer Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Architecture Architecture Architecture Building Publisher: San Francisco : Architect and Engineer, Inc Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Consulting EngineersDESIGNERS OF HEATINGAIR CONDITIONINGVENTILATING AND WIRINGSYSTEMS, MECHANICALAND ELECTRICAL EQUIP-MENT OF BUILDINGS 41 SUTTER STREET ROOM 710San Francisco California DINWIDDIE CONSTRUCTIONCOMPANY Builders of the nev; gymna-sium. University of Cali-fornia; Grace Cathedral,Russ Building and HartfordInsurance Building, SanFrancisco; Life ScienceBuilding, University of Cali-fornia, Berkeley. CROCKER BUILDINGSAN FRANOSCO The Architect and Engineer, May, 1933 73 McNEAR BRICK FOR Beauty andPermanence McNear Brick Company Main Office and FacloriesMcNEAR POINTSan Rafael, Calif. San Francisco Office and Yard417 BERRY STREET A L A D D I N HEAT I I\ G Kntlineerinfi a n d 1 a\(iiir service for ivarm air htiit- iiiff and nir coi (iilionint/ Representatives in ever\ citv in Northern Cah- fornia. ALADDIN HEATING CORP. 5107 Broadway. Oakland OLympic 5424 APEX Blo-Air Fan Heaters Portable and Wall Types 1320 watts to 4000 wattsThermostat Control if Desired —-— ] Some- .* * thing Text Appearing After Image: Heaters uselate the air instead of depending uponthe slow process of gravity circulation.Instant heat and a greater amount inthe lower living zone of the room, withthe same consumption. Fan can beused without the heat for cooling.Switches easily accessible at top. Canbe installed under windows. There is a complete line of Apex Airnnd Water Heaters. APEX Manufacturing Company Oakland. California £>Hj nbutors SANDOVAL SALES CO. 557 Market St.. San Francisco APEX SALES CO. 1833 Industrial St.. Ix>s Angelei The insulating material com-prises in general a layer of fibrousmixture constituting a filling be-tween layers of sheet materialwhich form what might be termedliners for the filling. The fillingconstitutes the main heat insulat-ing element, while the liners serveto hold the filling in place, andpreferably to keep moisture fromthe filling. The insulating mate-rial is ordinarily put up in the formof relatively long strips of theproper width to extend betweenadjacent studs of a wal Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectarchitecture booksubjectbuilding bookyear1905 bookidarchitectenginee11333sanf bookpublishersanfranciscoarchitectandengineerinc bookcollectionsanfranciscopubliclibrary bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsanfranciscopubliclibrary
1905

Image from page 376 of
Description: Identifier: revuedeviticultu2919vial Title: Revue de viticulture : organe de l'agriculture des régions viticoles Year: 1893 (1890s) Authors: Viala, P Ravaz, L Subjects: Viticulture Viticulture Publisher: Paris : Bureaux de la "Revue de Viticulture" Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: r marchande. Onvoit que le foie repré-sente une grosse partiede la valeur dune oieengraissée. Le foie estvendu soit avec l oie quila renferme, soit sépa-rément. Les foies séparésproviennent des oies dont le reste est conservé à la ferme pour la graisse et le salé, leur vente diminuedautant le prix réel des parties conservées. Le foie de loie, moins long et moins épais que celui du canard, a lavantagede fondre moins à la cuisson. Pour quils se présentent plus blancs surle marché,les ménagères fontdégorger les foies pendant quelques heures dans de leaufroide et légèrement salée (fig. 18). Cette opération a dailleurs lavantage daug-menter le volume etle poids du foie. Il se fait, en Gascogne et en Languedoc, une consommation importante de foiesau naturel, soit frais, soit conservés dans la graisse. 1) Plus de 100.000 kilos de foie gras sont transformés on pâtés chaque année à Toulouseet le chiffre de lexportation de ces pâtés à létranger est considérable. Text Appearing After Image: Clcht Fac. Fig. 21. — Oie de Toulouse troussée pour la vente (dessous). 188 D P. CAZENEUVE. — DANGERS DES INSECTICIDES A BASE ARSENICALE De la Sainte-Catherine (25 novembre à fin janvier), le commerce des oies grasseset des foies est dune activité des plus grandes dans tout le Sud-Ouest (i) ; lescultivateurs apportent sur tous les marchés les oies élevées en nombre excédantleurs besoins. Sur des tables recouvertes de blanches serviettes (tig. 19), les oiesforment des alignements appétissants ou de savantes pyramides. Les vendeuses de foies séparés les conservent au contraire dans des paniersbien clos, enveloppés parfois dans des linges, afin de les préserver du contactde Tair et de la lumière qui les bruniraient et les déprécieraient. Nest-ce pasdailleurs ainsi quen ce même pays les violettes, cette autre belle spécialité deToulouse, sont apportées sur le marché aux fleurs, afin quelles gardent toute laforce de leur parfum? Nulle part au monde, on ne trousse au Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectviticulture bookauthorvialap bookauthorravazl bookpublisherparisbureauxdelarevuedeviticulture bookyear1893 bookidrevuedeviticultu2919vial bookcontributoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign booksponsoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign
1893

Image from page 290 of
Description: Identifier: tekarere5000chur Title: Te Karere Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. New Zealand Mission Subjects: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. New Zealand Mission Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Publisher: Auckland, N.Z. : New Zealand Mission Contributing Library: Brigham Young University Hawaii, Joseph F. Smith Library Digitizing Sponsor: Consortium of Church Libraries and Archives View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ns said they werevery grateful ... for the call. Three Air FlightsBring 122 to M.I.A. Meet From Los Angeles 122 M.I.A.leaders came to Salt Lake City inthree chartered air flights to attendthe General Conference. The group came largely from Ingle-wood, California, and included thestake Y.M.M.I.A. superintendent,Y.W.M.I.A. president and stake ac-tivity counsellor. Singers took part in the music festi-val in the Tabernacle and dancers par-ticipated in a dance festival that washeld the following day at the Univers-ity of Utah Stadium. A member of the Ingle wood StakeSunday School superintendency organ-ized the flight travelling by WesternAir Lines planes. Brigham Young Honoured Brigham Young has been given thehonour at placement in the CapitalBuilding in Washington D.C. with astatue carved from Italian marble. The (Continued on Page 294)TE KA RE RE •t Bit by bit we gather conclusive evidence of the .... Origin of The Maori People By John Q. Adams, former President of the Samoan Mission. Text Appearing After Image: AVERY interesting bit of narra-tive was given by Brother JamesSouthon, who, himself, remembers itdistinctly from reading it in a currentmagazine, the Australian Review ofReviews. At the time, for some strangereason, it impressed him deeply, andsince joining our Church, some yearsago, its real significance becomes moreapparent as an additional light uponBook of Mormon truths. Here is thenarrative as Brother Southon relatesit: A certain Captain Barclay, ofH.M.S. Orpheus, cruising in New Zea-land waters, was at one time the guestof Sir George Grey, Governor of New/ciland. In conversation, the topic dis- cussed turned to the origin of theMaori people. The governor informedthe captain that on the Island of Motu-tapu (forbidden or sacred island),there were at that time two stonegods which were looked upon by theMaoris as so sacred as to be viewedby no one except attending priests,upon pain of death. The Governor him-self had been permitted this privilege,however, through some favour ex-tend Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidtekarere5000chur bookauthorchurchofjesuschristoflatterdaysaintsnewzealandmission booksubjectchurchofjesuschristoflatterdaysaintsnewzealandmission bookpublisheraucklandnznewzealandmission bookyear1907 booksubjectchurchofjesuschristoflatterdaysaints bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorbrighamyounguniversityhawaiijosephfsmithlibrary
1907

Image from page 424 of
Description: Identifier: annalesdes61018791880miln Title: Annales des sciences naturelles Year: 1834 (1830s) Authors: Milne-Edwards, H. (Henri), 1800-1885 Audouin, Jean Victor, 1797-1841 Milne-Edwards, Alphonse, 1835-1900 Perrier, Edmond, 1844-1921 Bouvier, E.-L., 1856-1944 Grassé, Pierre Paul, 1895- Subjects: Zoology Biology Publisher: Paris, New York : Masson [etc.] Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: louve au lith. Imp ,_B ecmiet, Paris . ng 18 à 32. Pièces du Squelette du Megapodius Duperre y Aïm. des S c.liât, oe S erie Zool. T. 10. PL. 26 4 Text Appearing After Image: I Terrapene cannât a , LiraiéII Emjs ornata, Bell.III Testudo sulcata, Mill. Ami. des S c.nat. ôe Serie Zool.T. 10. PL.27.v Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectzoology bookcentury1800 booksubjectbiology bookauthormilneedwardshhenri18001885 bookauthoraudouinjeanvictor17971841 bookauthormilneedwardsalphonse18351900 bookauthorperrieredmond18441921 bookauthorbouvierel18561944 bookpublisherparisnewyorkmassonetc bookidannalesdes61018791880miln
1834

Image from page 753 of
Description: Identifier: lequincaijuidec1907mont Title: Le quincaillier (Juillet-Decembre 1907) Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Commerce Publisher: Montréal : Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Saindoux, compose en seaux 20 lbs. 2.20 Fromage.Canadien colore . . [Prix du march§]Canadien blanc . . [Prix du marche] Beurre Corona .Cremerie, choix, pains de 1 lb.Cremerie, choix, boite 56 lbs. .Beurre de ferme, choix, pain de 1 lb • . (Prix du march Viandes Cuites.Jambon bouilli d6soss§, avec peau Jambon bouilli desosse, sans peau 0.24 Jambon roti 0.28 0.240.233 Jambon New England . . . 0.10Tete en fromage .... 0.10 Boudin blanc 0.09 Boudin noir . 0.09 Pore SalS.Barils, Short Cut Mess Can. . . 22.50Barils, Heavy Pork (Shoulder) . 18.00 Barils, Long Cut Mess 20.50 Barils, Long Cut heavy Mess, non desosse 21.00 JOHN P. MOTT & CO. J. A. Taylor, Agent, Montreal Chocolats et Cacaos Mott. La Elite i® Prepared Cocoa .Breakfast CocoaNo 1 Chocolate .Breakfast Choc. . Diamond Chocolate Navy Chocolate Cocoa Nibbs Cocoa Shells Confectionery Chocolate . Plain Chocolate Liquors . Vanilla Stick .... Text Appearing After Image: 0.23 . 20 a, . 21 a la gr. 1. w. d. McLaren MontrealPoudre a pate Cooks Friend. No 1, en boites de 4 et 2 doz. ... 2, No 2, en boites de 6 et 3 doz. . . . 0 No 3, en boites de 4 doz. . . . 0 No 10, en boites de 4 et 2 doz. ... 2 No 12, en boites de 6 et 3 doz. . . . 0 408045 10 70 A. ROBITAILLE & CIE, MontrealCognac Sorin La cse Carte bleu . 8.50 Carte rouge 9.50 Carte dor 11.00 24 flasks, avec verre 9.50 48 x/2 flasks, avec verre 11.00 Au gallon ..... 4.00 a 4.25 Cognacs J. Mourier & Cie La cse Quants . 7.00 24 y2 bouteilleis ...... 8.00 48 % bouteilles ...... 9.0C 24 flasks . ; 8.0( 48 y2 flasks , . 9.00 24 flasks, avec verre .... 8.5048 Y>2 flasks, avec verre ..... 9.50 Cognac Mont St-Louis La cse Quarts 6.00 24 flasks 7.25 48 y2 flasks 8.50 Champagne Bellon & Cie qts. pts. Carte Blanche 12.0:0* 13.00 Rhum St-Paul qrts. 11.50 Rhum St-Paul pts. 12.50 Scotch Whisky Craig Dhu Blend La cseQuarts ord 6.50 Quarts imperial 9.50 24 flasks ••• . . . ■ . . . 7.5048 y2 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1907

Image from page 374 of
Description: Identifier: 39002086411023.med.yale.edu Title: The diseases of infancy and childhood : designed for the use of students and practitioners of medicine Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Koplik, Henry,1858-1927 Subjects: Children Pediatrics Publisher: Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s. 0) C) 03 IL ffi r O U) T r* ci n -t-) 0 W *-> m ra U m 0 y o n 05 0) CO c ^ r, 0) r m -7^ *-! £ 5 — 5 m ■- 3 C O a 0 . o Ifl 0 c S 5 05 0 c 5S Q a 6 n E. O MENINGITIS 341 and children of this age to contraction of the lower extremities, avariety of normal myotonia (Fig. 62). On the other hand, in casesof so-called cerebral symptoms complicating pneumonia and typhoidfever, the Kernig phenomenon may also be apparent, so that, althoughit is present in all cases of meningitis, it is not pathognomonic of thedisease. It may be absent in cases of the malignant type in whichthere are collapse symptoms. Hyperesthesia.—In the majority of cases of cerebrospinal menin-gitis, after the symptoms are fully established, the patients are irri-table, refuse to be comforted, start at the slightest sound, lie mostlyon the side, the arms and lower extremities flexed, the body takinga crouching position. Any attempt to disturb the patients is met Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 02.- -Kernig symptom in a case of cerebrospinal nieninyitis of the epidemic type.Female, aged nine years. with resistance. The amount of hyperesthesia varies not only in thedifferent epidemics, but in difierent types of the disease, but it ispresent in most cases, thus being in marked contrast to what is seenin the tuberculous form of meningitis, in which the children lie in astuporous condition, do not notice their surroundings, cannot beroused, and are not as irritable as in the epidemic cerebrospinal form.MacEicens Sign.—MacEwen has shown that in children, in vari-ous forms of meningitis, percussion of the skull over the anterior hornof the ventricles will give a tympanitic note if the head is so heldthat the frontal or parietal l)one may be percussed over the anteriorhorn of the ventricle. The patient is placed in the sitting posture,with the head inclined to one side, and percussion of the inferiorfrontal or parietal bone is carried out. 342 THE SPECIFIC INFECTIOUS DISEASE Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectchildren bookdecade1910 bookpublisherphiladelphialeafebiger bookyear1918 booksubjectpediatrics bookid39002086411023medyaleedu bookauthorkoplikhenry18581927 bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionmedicalheritagelibrary
1918

Image from page 1158 of
Description: Identifier: americanfloristw35amer Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade Year: 1885 (1880s) Authors: American Florists Company Subjects: Floriculture Florists Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: cll boiler was a recent ad-dition, installed to heat the whole of theplant. Allentown, Pa.—Extensive parkplanting is to be done this season, 170varieties correctly labeled for education-al purposes having been ordered fromThomas Meehan & Sons of Philadelphia.Altogether 204 deciduous trees, 179 ever-greens and close on 1000 shrubs are tobe planted. Plans for grading, layingcurbing and 3000 square yards of walks, with drinking fountains and bandstandare included in the proposed improve-ments. Boise. Idaho.—Carl Imes. the forestranger in charge of the Boise Riverdistrict of the Sawtooth reserve, washere recently. He states that the gov-ernment will establish a nursery in thespring for the purpose of experimentingwith the artificial propagation of na-tive trees to replenish the forests. Largeseedbeds will be sown this season andfive or six native forest trees are to begrown from seed gathered in the fallof 1906. Spokane, Wash.—This district islooking up from a gardening point of Text Appearing After Image: The Late E. W. Wood.See obituary. view. Just recently three separate pur-chases of land have been made, and allwith a view to use them for growingtruck and other produce. C. M. Trip-let!, of Moscow, Idaho, purchased twoand one-half acres for $750; William E.Brown of Westlake, Idaho, has pur-chased five acres for $1,500, and MorganWilhite of the same place has securedten acres for $3,000. South Bend, Ind.—On account of thephenomenal growth and development ofthe business of the Ideal Concrete Ma-chinery Co., it has been found necessaryto vacate the present factory building,and lease the plant formerly occupied bythe Bissel Plow Co., which will give thefirm three times its present floor space,and other facilities which will material-ly assist in promptly taking care of theever increasing demand for concretemachines. Williamsport, Pa.—A very seriousfire occurred at the Evendcn Bros. low-er greenhouses, earlv in the morning ofDecember 24. The outbreak was dis-covered, by the watchman, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1885

Image from page 381 of
Description: Identifier: pictorialhistoci00sear Title: Pictorial history of China and India; comprising a description of those countries and their inhabitants Year: 1851 (1850s) Authors: Sears, Robert, 1810-1892 Subjects: Publisher: New York, R. Sears Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: the date of its existence, the condition of its inhabitants,or the cause of its being buried in the dust. The numerous coins of theearly and middle ages, found recently in various parts of Hindostan, prove the existence and duration of several states,and record the names of many of their sove-reigns not otherwise known ; but they throw nolight on the general state of the country, nor dothey afford any information with regard to thepeople for whose use they were coined. The most celebrated exploit of Sultan Mah-mud in India, was the conquest, before alludedto, of the temple of Somnath, near the south-ern extremity of the peninsula of Guzerat, therichest and most frequented place of worship inthe country. There were twothousand priests belonging tothe shrine of Somnath, with anumerous train of musiciansand female dancers, whose tal-ents were called forth at allthe religious festivals, whichwere conducted with the ut-most joyousness; and all theseFemale Dancer. wefc maintained out of the Text Appearing After Image: MUSSULMAN CONQUESTS. 379 revenues of two thousand villages that had heen granted, by different princes,to support the grandeur of this splendid place of worship. The interior ofthe temple exhibited a specimen of Hindu magnificence, that was, no doubt,highly agreeable to the invaders. The great lamp was suspended by achain of solid gold, and the pillars that supported the lofty roof were richlycarved, and ornamented with precious stones — a greater proof of wealththan taste, but not less admirable on that account, in the eyes of Mahmudand his followers, who entered the spacious edifice after three days of almostincessant fighting, for it was strongly fortified and guarded, besides which,several neighboring princes had come with their assembled forces to aid inits defence. At length the enemy prevailed, and the gorgeous temple wasquickly despoiled by the rude hands of the IMussulman soldiers. It is related that the chief Bramins prostrated themselves before the con-queror, entreating Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1851

Image from page 666 of
Description: Identifier: catalogueofsharp00shar Title: Catalogue of Sharp & Smith : importers, manufacturers, wholesale and retail dealers in surgical instruments, deformity apparatus, artificial limbs, artificial eyes, elastic stockings, trusses, crutches, supporters, galvanic and faradic batteries, etc., surgeons' appliances of every description Year: 1889 (1880s) Authors: Sharp & Smith (Chicago, Ill.) Subjects: Surgical instruments and apparatus Surgical instruments and apparatus Surgical Instruments Publisher: Chicago : [s.n.] Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1889

Image from page 110 of
Description: Identifier: penmansartjou14unse Title: Penman's Art Journal and Penman's Gazette Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: D. T. Ames Contributing Library: The University of Scranton Weinberg Memorial Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 3c. tn munpa. iiMrffM JOSEPH GILLOTTS STEEL PENS. GOLD MEDAL, PARIS exposition, 1889. THE MOST PERFECT OF PENS. A. E. DEWHURST. ARTIST PENMAN, Execute! all Kinds o( Ornamental Pen-Work To Order. Our GDgTos»inK, Pen-Drawinj?, Loilering and FlourlBbiDg have received tbe highest commenda- lALTY :al Pen-wortt, ReAolu*I, Teistimonials, Ac, executed In a flnit-claaamanner. Lar^e pieces of Flourlshlue, Letteringand Pen-Drawings done in the beat iMXwtble manner.Correspondence solicited and satisfaction Kuorao-tee<t. Address 12-12 A. E. DEWHURST, UtIca, N. Y. PEN DRAWING, the most plwiwmt, piiutlcal ninl nrofltahU- partof pen art. WEBB S PROGRESSIVE LESSONS INPEN DRAWING uffditl the flrat arid only opportu-nity ever offered for iisplrlnK young penmen tolearn |)on drawinfi at a rensonublo cost.Objects, animiits. tollu^^e, ids, inndsc ~~ stlpplfull li mal instruction and orltlciam of your work f:uarantee improvesustnietions. »end a „ , Address A. C. WEBB, Pen Artlat. e and begin the work. Text Appearing After Image: Is mnklUK a Bpeclolty of giving leflsooH Id all brancliPHof Penraanshlp by mail. LarKeexDcrlcDre bas placed buit bwn wonderfully b«ncflted. My letasouH ore orlgl- may^ta^Wken^atiheopl^on^cjf^the^^^^ SPECIAL. Liis mii B poraonal letter—my vtry THE NORTBERN O. N. OR.A.ISrDIjH! Mr. Emerick has received much praise for theta^te tind skill dlapluyed in his card-work. 6am-r>ie« will be sent for 10 ueute. J. C. EMEBICK.!>Bwego. N, T. l-Vi no Some books are so well written and prove so valuable to theirowners that thieves steal their contents, and by misarrangemcntof them, make books which they try to palm off as superior tothe originals. Grahams fland-Book of Standard Phonography has been pirated from, to a greater extent, probably, than anybook ever published in the United States. Because it is the best te.\t-book on the subject ever published, asis jjroved by the fact that it rendered obsolete all phonographicbooks preceding it, all of which are now out of print, and by thefact t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 bookpublisherdtames bookidpenmansartjou14unse bookcollectionamericana bookcontributortheuniversityofscrantonweinbergmemoriallibrary bookcollectionuniversityscranton booksponsorlyrasismembersandsloanfoundation bookleafnumber110
1890

Image from page 593 of
Description: Identifier: rodguncan15cana Title: Rod and gun Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Canadian Forestry Association Subjects: Fishing Hunting Outdoor life Publisher: Beaconsfield, Que. [etc.] Rod and Gun Pub. Co. [etc.] Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hi<%hind feet for a spell, and finally we could see where he hadregained strength enough to use his feet. Aswe trailed him we found that he was gettingstronger as he travelled along. We followedhim for four hours and never even got aglimpse of him. Iinally we gave him up indisgust and wended our way back to camp,picking up the other buck on our way out.We found that we must have creased thebuck, thereby paralyzing him for a fewminutes. We had arranged with a packer to bring usup a couple of horses the next day to take ourgame out. As we had four deer besides ourduffle, we concluded to get up early the nextmorning and lake two of them down to thefoot of the mountain b\ hand. \\e did so andmet the packer with the two horses on his wayup. We returned with him to our camp andfinally reached the Grand Prairie hotel in timefor a good, hearty dinner. Needless to say wewere well pleased with our outing and we hopeto trv our luck there again this season. A Curious Find in Lake Utopia: N. B. Text Appearing After Image: Indiun Relic Discovered by Capt. Jesse Milliken in Lake Utopia, N. B. THE accompanying reproduction showsan Indian relic which was discovered inLake Itopia, X. B. by Capt. JesseMilliken of St. George, X. B. Mr. C. Johnsonof the same town, to whom we are indebtedfor the snap-shot from which the reriroduc-tion was made, writes that Cajit. Milliken isan old resident of St. George and a sportsmanof the old school. He spends [)art of everysummer camping on the shore of the lake andcan cast a Ily or sail a boat with the best ofthem. He knows all the good fishing holesand is always willing, Mr. Johnson asserts, totake his friends for a sail and as a consequencenumbers many friends among the sportsmenand tourists who visit this Pretticsi Lake inAmerica as it has been justly called. \\hilerowing about in Lake Itopia, ali<iut llircemiles from .St. George, Capt. Milliken struckan object in the water near Ihe shore. On in-vcsligation he found it to he a piece of granu- lile stone carved out in Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjecthunting bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectfishing bookyear1898 booksubjectoutdoorlife bookauthorcanadianforestryassociation bookpublisherbeaconsfieldqueetcrodandgunpubcoetc bookidrodguncan15cana booksponsoruniversityoftoronto
1898

Image from page 272 of
Description: Identifier: oneyearcourseine00heyd Title: One year course in English and American literature; an introduction to the chief authors in English and American literature, with reading lists and references for further study Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Heydrick, Benjamin Alexander, 1871- [from old catalog] Subjects: English literature American literature Publisher: New York city, Hinds, Noble & Eldredge Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ed materialfor several volumes of poems, Songs of the Sierras, Songs ofthe Sunlands, Songs of the Desert, and others, in which thefree life, the tropical scenery, and the great open spaces ofthe Southwest are celebrated in swinging, musical, if some-what careless verse. But among the many Western writersof verse two stand out above therest: Eugene Field and JamesWhitcomb Riley. Eugene Field (1850-1895) wasborn in St. Louis, Sept. 3, 1850.He was educated in the East, butwent West again to become ajournalist. He worked on vari-ous papers in St. Louis, KansasCity, and Denver, and in 1883went to Chicago to join the staffof the Daily News, a position heheld until his death. He hada column in the paper calledSharps and Flats, where hewrote what he pleased. Sometimes it was a wittyparagraph at the expense of Chicagos society leaders ;sometimes it was a rollicking bit of verse; sometimesa tender story. The best of this work he gathered upinto half a dozen volumes of prose and verse. His first Text Appearing After Image: 258 THE RISE OF WESTERN LITERATURE book of poems, A Little Book of Western Verse, was wel-comed with delight for its freshness and its humor. Insubsequent volumes, A Second Book of Verse, Love Songs ofChildhood, and others, Field won wider and wider recognition.His child poems, contained in the Love Songs and WithTrumpet a7id Drum, are perhaps his finest work. Thesimplicity and charm of such poems as Little Boy Blue,Wynken, Blynken and Nod, and The Rockaby Lady ofHushaby Street fairly entitle him to be crowned the poetlaureate of childhood. In A Little Book of Profitable Tales he has collected some of his bestsketches and short stories, whichshow his humor and pathos inequal degree. James Whitcomb Riley (1852- ) was born at Greenfield, Ind., and has spent nearly all hislife in his native state. In hisyouth he was by turns travelingsign painter, actor, and journalist.While a reporter on the India-napolis Journal he wrote for thatpaper some poems in Hoosierdialect, which were publishedo Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectenglishliterature booksubjectamericanliterature bookyear1909 bookpublishernewyorkcityhindsnobleeldredge bookidoneyearcourseine00heyd bookauthorheydrickbenjaminalexander1871fromoldcatalog bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana
1909

Image from page 187 of
Description: Identifier: mechcontract1909toro Title: Mechanical Contracting & Plumbing January-December 1909 Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Air conditioning Refrigeration and refrigerating machinery Heating Plumbing Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: or the radiationwas skimped in the hot water heatingsystem. A radiator was placed in eachroom and a thermometer on the dining-room radiator. The house was exposedon all sides and the required amountof radiation was installed, as a test wasmade that showed an even temperatureall over the house. Regulating chainswere connected to the draft dampersor the boiler and saved many a run tothe basement. Many Labor-saving Devices. Something unusual, and what we canhardly expect to be put in general usewas the electric light plant. A gasolene Canada as the one I have described, yetit goes to prove what can and will hedone in the future. The farmer hasthe inclination for home as well as farmimprovements, and now is the time forthe master plumber to direct his atten-tion to what he has to sell. The im-plement manufacturers have found theOntario farmers quick to respond toany offer to better their farm, and theheating and plumbing trade will findthem equally responsive to a better-ment in the home. Text Appearing After Image: THE VASPER PIPE CUTTER. In this cutter, which has a capacityof from i in. to 2 in. pipe, the bevelcutting wheels are supplanted by cut-ting tools that make the action of theimplement the same as that of a latheor power-driven cutter. The action is,therefore, very rapid, and there is nobuir either on the inside or the outsideof the pipe after it has been cut. Theaction also allows the cutting of thinwashers from pipes. The main frame of the tool consistsof two arms hinged at the handle endand terminating at the other end in V-shaped bearings. The frame opens onits hinge and is put on the pipe andclamped there by means of an adjust-able tie-bar and thumb nut. Pivoted tothe side of the main frame are twocnife-carrying arms, an integral part ofwhich are o\ erhanging lugs to which arefastened heavy coil springs. Thesesprings actuate the feed of the knife- Disc Cutting Machine in Tsc on a Taper Disc. installed in the fall of 1907, was themeans of selling four others within adistance of ten Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectplumbing booksubjectheating bookyear1909 bookidmechcontract1909toro booksubjectrefrigerationandrefrigeratingmachinery booksubjectairconditioning bookpublishertorontomacleanhunterpubco bookcontributorfisheruniversityoftoronto
1909

Image from page 70 of
Description: Identifier: lifeofjacobhisso00amer Title: The Life of Jacob and his son Joseph Year: 1836 (1830s) Authors: American Sunday-School Union Subjects: Jacob (Biblical patriarch) Joseph (Son of Jacob) Publisher: Philadelphia : The Union Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: niel, that is, God^s Face. It is also calledPenuel. And thus you have the reasonwhy the patriarch was called IsraelThis new title became the principal nameof his posterity, and of the church. The Jews, in recollection of Jacobswrestling and lameness, avoid eating cer-tain parts of the thigh of animals. Surely, Jacobs fear of Esau must begone. He has prevailed with God, and AND HIS SON JOSEPH. 65 God has met him face to face, and blessedhim. When a mans ways please theLord, he maketh even his enemies to beat peace with him.* He lifted up hiseyes and looked, and behold, Esau came,and with him four hundred men. Jacobhastened to arrange his family so thatRachel and little Joseph might be furthestfrom danger, and the handmaids and theirchildren in front. Then going before, hebowed himself to the ground, after theeastern manner, (as in the cut,) seventimes, until he came near his brother. Text Appearing After Image: And Esau ran to meet him, and em-braced him, and fell on his neck andkissed him; and they wept. These weretears of joy and reconciliation. Esaufirst broke silence. Looking on the wo-* Prov. xvi. 7.6* 66 LIFE OF JACOB, men and children, he asked, Who arethese? Jacob said, The children whomGod hath graciously given thy servant.And then the whole family, in order,came and bowed themselves before Esau.He then asked what was intended by thelarge drove he had met, and Jacob ex-plained that it was a present. * I haveenough, my brother, said Esau, keepwhat thou hast for thyself. Jacob, how-ever, urged him, until he consented toreceive it. He even offered to lead theway, and accompany Jacob to the pro-mised land; but Jacob prudently declinedthe offer, as the tenderness of the flocksand of the children made it necessary forthem to go very slowly. So Esau re-turned that day on his way home, andJacob, full of joy, went forward towardsthe south-west. His last encampmenteast of the Jordan was near Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1836 bookauthoramericansundayschoolunion bookidlifeofjacobhisso00amer booksubjectjacobbiblicalpatriarch bookpublisherphiladelphiatheunion bookdecade1830 booksubjectjosephsonofjacob bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana
1836

Image from page 541 of
Description: Identifier: arsenaldelachiru02gauj Title: Arsenal de la chirurgie contemporaine : description, mode d'emploi, et appréciation des appareils et instruments en usage pour le diagnostic et le traitement des maladies chirurgicales, l'orthopédie, la prothése, les opérations simples, générales, spéciales et obstétricales Year: 1867 (1860s) Authors: Gaujot, Gustave, 1828-1913 Spillmann, E Subjects: Surgical instruments and apparatus Surgical Instruments Publisher: Paris : Baillière Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: pour but de permettre dappliquer lappareil sur des lampede divers calibres. Avec les appareils imaginés par Czermak on peut non-seulement exa-miner le larynx des malades, mais le sien propre, en ajoutant de nouveauxmiroirs. Ce fait est important, car ce nest quen faisant des études sursoi-même que lon peut arriver à une certaine habileté. La figure 1147 fait parfaitement comprendre lauto-laryngoscope de Czer-mak. Les rayons, partant de la lampe, tombent sur le réflecteur ; celui-ciles envoie sur le miroir laryngoscopique qui les réfléchit à son tour sur lesparties à éclairer. Dès que limage est formée sur le miroir laryngosco-pique, lobservateur la voit se réfléchir sur un miroir carré, placé un peuau devant de lui. Une personne étrangère pourrait en même temps observerlimage laryngoscopique en mettant son œil contre louverture centrale duréflecteur. Il suffit de suivre la marche des rayons lumineux, tracés sur lafigure, pour se rendre compte de tous ces faits. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 1447. MljUlii .,. i.i.i.i.liiMiiV.iiiiiliiiiiniiiNiiiiJ.iiuii. Auto-]aryng-osccpe de Czermak. Une faudrait pas croire quun réflecteur fût indispensable pour la laryn-goscopie, comme il lest pour lophthalmoscopie ; les chirurgiens françaisont créé une nouvelle méthode en supprimant cet accessoire. iMoura-Bou-rouillou, le premier, a construit un laryngoscope à lumière directe. EXPLORATION DU LARYNX. 531 r-Nl Lappareil de Mou ra-Bou roui Hou (1) se compose dun collier de cuivre.(une tige articulée, cest-à-dire à deux branches mobiles lune surlautre. Le collier es! en forme de pince courbe; il est maintenu solide-ment autour de la galerie de la lampe au moyen de deux ressorts. La con-vexité du collier est munie, dun côté dun porte-écran, dans lequel onm< t un morceau de papier ou de carton ; celui-ci est destiné à préserverles yeux du médecin cl à concentreren même temps la lumière sur la len-lille. Dr lautre côté celte convexitéporte une pièce dans laque Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectsurgicalinstrumentsandapparatus booksubjectsurgicalinstruments bookcentury1800 bookdecade1860 bookidarsenaldelachiru02gauj bookauthorgaujotgustave18281913 bookauthorspillmanne bookyear1867 bookpublisherparisbaillire bookcontributorfrancisacountwaylibraryofmedicine
1867

Image from page 132 of
Description: Identifier: vaughansseedsto1918vaug_0 Title: Vaughan's seed store Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Vaughan's Seed Company Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Gardening United States Equipment and supplies Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Seeds Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Horticulture Equipment and supplies Catalogs Publisher: Chicago. Ill. : Vaughan's Seed Store Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: postpaid, each 15c; doz., $1.50. Extradoz., $2.50 (exp.) KUDZU VINE (Pueraria Thunbergiana) or Jack-and-the-Bean-Stalk-Vine The most remarkable climber extant. In rich soil will grow 70 feet in one season.Starts into growth slowly, but after three or four weeks grows almost beyond belief.Leaves in shape like Lima Bean; dark green; texture, soft and wooly. Fine forporches, arbors, old trees, etc. Small roots, each 15c; 3 for 40c, postpaid. Largerroots, each 25c; 3 for 65c (exp.) MATRIMONY VINE (Lycium) Well known, hardy, fast-growing vine; handsome when covered with scarletfruit in autumn. Commonly used as a trailer, and for a ground cover under treesand on terraces or any kind of steep slopes to hold the soil in place. Strong, 2-yr., each 25c; doz. $2.50; 3-yr., each 35c; doz. $3.50; 4-yr., each50c; doz. $5.00 (exp.) PERIPLOCA (Silk Vine^ Graeca. A rapid-growing beautiful climber; will twine around a tree or othersupport to the height of 30 or 40 feet. Foliage glossy and purple-brown Text Appearing After Image: Half Hardy or Annual Vines CARDINAL CLIMBER. A graceful annual climber. The flowers are 1}4 inchesin diameter of a fiery cardinal red flowering from mid-summer until frost.The foliage is deeply laciniated and heavier and coarser than those of the CypressVine, to which it is related. Planted in good, rich soil when all danger of frostis over it makes a rapid growth, attaining a height of 30 feet.Price, strong plants, each 20c; doz. $2.00. COBAEA Scandens. (Cathedral Bells). Purplish lilac flowers, bell-shaped,prolific bloomers. Rapid grower. 3-in. pots, each 20c; doz. $2.00; 100, $15.00.4-in. pots, each 30c; doz. $3.00. IVY, English. Beautiful evergreen vine. For hanging baskets, window-boxes andvases. Each 15c; doz. $1.25; 100, $8.00. 4 in. pots, each 25c; doz. $2.50;100, $18.00. IVY, German (Parlor Ivy). 2 in. -ots, each 15c; doz. $1.25; 100, $8.00. 4 in. pots, each 25c; doz. $2.50, 100, $18.00. MOONFLOWER. (Ipomoea Learii). Blue. A beautiful satiny blue. Each 15c; doz. $1.50; 100,10 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection booksubjectflowersseedscatalogs booksubjectvegetablesseedscatalogs bookyear1918 bookauthorvaughansseedcompany booksubjecthorticultureequipmentandsuppliescatalogs bookpublisherchicagoillvaughansseedstore booksubjectgardeningunitedstatesequipmentandsuppliescatalogs
1918

Image from page 266 of
Description: Identifier: surgicaltreatmen02warb Title: Surgical treatment; a practical treatise on the therapy of surgical diseases for the use of practitioners and students of surgery Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Warbasse, James Peter, 1866-1957 Subjects: Surgery Publisher: Philadelphia, London, W. B. Saunders company Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 953.—Harelip Operationwith Transverse Incisions.First Stage. Fig. 954.—Flaps DrawnDown into Position. SecondStage. cleft comes to form a part of the border of the reconstructed lip. Each case,is peculiar and requires judgment in calculating the size and shape of theflap and the area of denudation. The wound should be sutured with horse-hair or celluloid-treated thread. A deep suture close to the coronary arterywill control it. A row of sutures should be used on both the facial and dentalsides of the lip. Every other suture should be passed deeply, the skin suturesjust to the mucous membrane, and the mucous membrane sutures just to the 270 SURGICAL TREATMENT skin. Every other suture should be for superficial approximation. Thedeep sutures hold the muscle and prevent bleeding (Figs. 948 and 949). Care should be taken that no epithelium is left upon the surface to becovered. The tissue removed should come just to the skin. The preser-vation of the lines representing skin-mucous- Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectsurgery bookyear1920 bookpublisherphiladelphialondonwbsaunderscompany bookidsurgicaltreatmen02warb bookauthorwarbassejamespeter18661957 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcolumbiauniversitylibraries booksponsoropenknowledgecommons
1920

Image from page 142 of
Description: Identifier: washburncosamate1869wash Title: Washburn & Co.'s amateur cultivator's guide to the flower and kitchen garden : containing a descriptive list of two thousand varieties of flower and vegetable seeds : also a list of French hybrid gladiolus, Year: 1869 (1860s) Authors: Washburn & Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Flowers Seeds Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Publisher: Boston, Mass. : The Company Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: in some three weeks after the common sorts. Martynia (Martynia ProboscidiaV A hardy annual plant, with a strong branching stem two feet and a half high. The leaves arelarge, heart-shaped, entire, or undulated, downy, viscous, and emit a peculiar musk-like odor whenbruised or roughly handled. The young pod* are the parts of the plants used. These are pro-duced in great abundance, and should be gathered when about hah grown, or while tender andsucculent; after the hardening of the flesh, they are worthless. They are used for pickles, andby many are considered superior to the Cucumber, or any other vegetable employed for that pur-pose. Culture. — The Martynia is of easy culture. As the plants are large and spreading:, theyshould be two and a half feet apart in each direction. The seeds may be sown in April or May. inthe open ground, where they are to remain ; or the seeds may be sown earlier in * hotbed, andtransplanted. per ox. Martynia. Per pkt, 10 ... 40 TO THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. 115 Text Appearing After Image: WHITE JAPAN MELON. CITRON-MELON (see p. 114). Melon, IMCusls: Varieties (Cucumis Melo).German, Melone. — French, Melon. — Spanish, Melon. The Melon, in some character, is to be found in all tropical countries ; but the finest varieties aresupposed to have come from Persia and Afghanistan. The delicious flavor and perfume make itvery popular in all countries where the climate will admit of its cultivation. Culture. — Plant in hills six feet apart each way, eight or ten seeds in each, and thin out tothree or four plants when in a state of forwardness. To grow good melons, the hills should beprepared by digging out the soil from one and a half to two feet deep, and two or three feet broad,according to the richness of the land. _ Add a very liberal quantity of the best decomposed stablemanure, and mix well with the soil, filling up a little above the general level. By this mode, goodmelons may be raised on almost any soil. Seeds should not be put into the hills until the weatherbeco Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1860 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection booksubjectflowersseedscatalogs booksubjectvegetablesseedscatalogs bookyear1869 bookidwashburncosamate1869wash bookauthorwashburnco bookpublisherbostonmassthecompany bookcollectionbiodiversity
1869

Image from page 99 of
Description: Identifier: panamacanalinpic01abbo Title: Panama and the canal in picture and prose .. Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Abbot, Willis John, 1863-1934. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: New York [etc.] Pub. in English and Spanish by Syndicate publishing company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: and fifty years ago,almost, that the little hollow ran with a crimsonfluid, and the bodies of dead Spaniards lay in therivulet where now the little native boys are coolingtheir feet. The path is steep, rugged and narrow.Branches arch overhead and as the trail has servedas a runway for the downpour of innumerable tropicalrains the soil is largely washed away from betweenthe stones, and the climbing is hard. Not much fun carrying a steel helmet, a heavy-leather jacket and a twenty-pound blunderbuss upthis road on a hot day, with bullets and arrowswhistling past, remarks a heavy man in the van,and the picture he conjures up of the Spanish assail-ants on that hot afternoon in 1780 seems very vivid.Although the fort, the remains of which are nowstanding, is not the one which Morgan destroyed,the site, the natural defenses and the plan of theworks are identical. There was more wood in theoriginal fort than in that of which the remains arenow discernible—to which fact its capture was due. Text Appearing After Image: THE AUTHOR AT SAN LORENZO A RIP VAN WINKLE OF A FORTRESS 8i Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookauthorabbotwillisjohn18631934fromoldcatalog bookidpanamacanalinpic01abbo bookpublishernewyorketcpubinenglishandspanishbysyndicatepublishingcompany bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber99
1913

Image from page 130 of
Description: Identifier: capecodoldcolony1921brig Title: Cape Cod and the Old colony Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Brigham, Albert Perry, 1855-1932 Subjects: Pilgrims (New Plymouth Colony) Cape Cod (Mass.) Publisher: New York and London, G.P. Putnam's Sons Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: aharan oases, on the shores of France, Britainor the Low Countries, on the banks of theColimibia River, and, for at least two hundredyears, in the outer parts of Cape Cod. On the French coast and elsewhere, stakeand brush fences are carried along the crest ofa dune, that the sands may lodge in andbeyond them. When the fence is engulfed an-other is erected above it, until after sufficientupward building, the winds fail to carry thesand over and a barrier dune has come intobeing which protects the inland fields frominvasion. This method has never been used on theCape, where the more widespread method pre-vails of supplementing natures protectiveefforts, by preserving natural vegetation andby artificial plantings of grasses and trees.Readers of Thoreau recall his playful imag-inings about tying up the Cape to its moor-ings, and they remember his references to thewarning-out of the townsmen in the spring toplant beach grass in exposed situations. Fewer than the readers of Thoreaus classic Text Appearing After Image: 4 M The Changing Shoreline 93 sketches are those who know that one of theobjects of the agricultural explorers sent outall over the world from Washington has beento find sand-binding grasses, which wouldavail to hold dunes in place for the salvationof harbors and cultivated lands. The dangersof sand shifting have long been recognized onCape Cod and the great fear was that the sandsmight invade the harbor of Provincetown andthus destroy one of the most importanthavens on the New England coast. The force of the winter storms is little real-ized by the summer inhabitants. A singlestorm may dash the sands so effectively onwindows close to the shore that their trans-parency is destroyed. At the Highland LifeSaving Station, the life guards say that theyhave covered a pane of glass with a stencil,and have seen letters well etched in a stormblowing for three hours. Sand grains as largeas grains of wheat have been freely swept upfrom the beaches and deposited on the dunes,wind velocities of fi Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectpilgrimsnewplymouthcolony bookyear1921 bookpublishernewyorkandlondongpputnamssons bookauthorbrighamalbertperry18551932 bookidcapecodoldcolony1921brig booksubjectcapecodmass bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc
1921

Image from page 278 of
Description: Identifier: strawbridgecloth02stra Title: Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly Year: 1882 (1880s) Authors: Strawbridge & Clothier Subjects: Department stores Mail-order business Clothing and dress Fashion Home economics Clothing and dress Consumer goods Dry goods Publisher: [Philadelphia : The Company] Contributing Library: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: (without collar. Patent Electric Shirt, with reversible collar, can be worn with collar or not, as desired; $2.50. Text Appearing After Image: Mens Blue Flannel Shirts, |i.75, 2.25 and 3.50.Boys Blue Flannel Shirts, at |i.5oand 2.00.Mens Colored Flannel Tourist Shirts (with andwithout collars), at I2.75. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectclothinganddress bookcentury1800 booksubjectfashion bookdecade1880 bookyear1882 booksubjectdepartmentstores booksubjecthomeeconomics bookpublisherphiladelphiathecompany bookidstrawbridgecloth02stra bookauthorstrawbridgeclothier
1882

Image from page 233 of
Description: Identifier: completeathletic00muss Title: The complete athletic trainer Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Mussabini, S. A Ranson, Charles Subjects: Athletics Physical education and training Publisher: London, Methuen & co. ltd Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ing circleare the physical qualifications of the putter.If he starts out with them and is properlycoached to put his weight and power behind theshot, do the shift from the front leg to theback leg and follow-through to the veryend of the cast, there is no valid reason why 50feet should not be covered in the fulness of time.To get the best out of the big shot-putter heshould receive a strong but gradual preparation,including fast walking, sprinting, ball-punchingand swinging the hammer. At first, while hehas to thoroughly accustom himself to theroutine of the put, he should practise with181 i82 COMPLETE ATHLETIC TRAINER nothing heavier than a twelve-pound shot. In-creasing half-a-pound at a time (which can bedone by hollowing out a sixteen-pound ball andreplacing half-pound sections, say every otherthree days), considerable benefit will be derivedfrom taking the weight, in a graduating way, upto eighteen pounds. This is done with the objectof developing strength at the required points. Text Appearing After Image: The correct finish of a putt. Once the power is acquired, the cultivation ofspeed must be the chief consideration. Plentyof smart spins on the track will tune up thelegs to do their very important share of thework; for it must never be forgotten that amans strength really depends upon his under-pinning. The putter should take the shot easily in thepalm of his casting hand, and hold it snugly PUTTING THE SHOT 183 below shoulder height, so as to get the longestleverage possible. The other arm should bestuck straight out and upward, pointing theway, as it were, for the direction the shot hasto take. The pose of the body is distinctlysideways, with the back leg (the one of course,below the casting hand) and all other partsloosely set. See that the knees are bent, thefeet close together and the front leg takenslightly off the ground in between each of thetwo short, quickly taken hops on the back legwhich are meant to carry the putter to thecentre of the seven-foot circle. Reaching there,fi Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectphysicaleducationandtraining bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookidcompleteathletic00muss bookauthormussabinisa bookauthorransoncharles booksubjectathletics bookpublisherlondonmethuencoltd bookcollectionamericana
1913

Image from page 649 of
Description: Identifier: lesoblatsdemarie01ortouoft Title: Les Oblats de Marie Immaculée durant le premier siècle de leur existence Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Ortolan, Theophile, 1861- Subjects: Oblates of Mary Immaculate Publisher: Paris : Librairie Saint-Paul Contributing Library: Scott - York University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Ontario Council of University Libraries and Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: t de lestime des évêques,elle possédait de florissantes communautés dans les cités les plus impor-tantes de lAngletene, de IKcosse et de lIrlande. Au mois daoût 1861,elle allait ouvrir, à Dublin même, un collège qui, après un au dexis-tence, compta plus de cent élèves. Elle ne tarderait pas à se fixer aucœur de Londres, tout près de la fameuse Tour historique, où elleélèverait une belle église à la mémoire des martyrs ang-lais, mis à mortpar le roi persécuteur, Henri VIII. Dautres établissements se préparaient aussi, réservés à un pros-père avenir. Le Tout-Puissant bénissait visiblement, dans le Rovaume-Uni,lhumble Congrégation qui manifestement lui était chère. Ces bénédictions, nous le verrons dans le second volume, nefurent pas moins abondantes, en Amérique, en Afrique et en Asie, oùil plut à la Providence, du vivant même du vénéré Fondateur, deconduire et de multiplier, fort au delà des prévisions humaines, lesOblats de Marie Immaculée. Text Appearing After Image: Table des Illustrations A MARIE IMMACULEE Dédicace v In matrem semper habehuiit 201 PORTRAITS Le Vénéré Fondateur. enfant adolescent jeune liomme missionnaire . vicaire général i335 4143 251 364G09 eveque à làye de soixante-cinq ans.. . Léon XII 196 Mgr Guibert 3^6 Les PP. Tempier 23i> Albini .. 329 Vincens 4^5 INIouchette 486 (-iiarles Baret 5oi Casimir Aubert 516 John Noble 537 Crawley 579 Charles Bellon 094 Cooke 599 Le lr. (lamper 4^7 VUES Venise. Grand Canal, vu de la maison liabitée par lesMazenod. 29Aix. Extrémité du grand Cours et ancien Carmel 71 Eglise de la Mission. Façade extérieure 86 Eglise de la Mission. Intérieur, io3 N.-D. du Laus. Église et couvent.. i3i Intérieui de léglise i33 Vue du sud-est 281 La Ciotat. Le Bec de lAigle 177 Marseille. Le Calvaire. Intérieur de léglise ai9 Cliapelle de ICEuvre des Italiens. 220 N.-D. de lOsier. Vue densemble... 3ooMaison des Pères. Cloître et cour intérieure 30) Lu four de Bon-Rencontre 40i AJaccio. Crra Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1914

Image from page 224 of
Description: Identifier: onstructureaffin1881nich Title: On the structure and affinities of the genus Monticulipora and its sub-genera, with critical descriptions of illustrative species Year: 1881 (1880s) Authors: Nicholson, Henry Alleyne, 1844-1899 Subjects: Corals, Fossil Monticulipora Publisher: Edinburgh, London, W. Blackwood and Sons Contributing Library: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library Digitizing Sponsor: Harvard University, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Ernst Mayr Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: arkably dimorphic, the largeand small corallites being uniformly distributed throughout theentire colony, and being singularly different in internal struc-ture. The structure of the large corallites is most easily recog-nised in longitudinal sections (fig. 43, b), in which each is seento possess a central tube, occupying the axis of the visceralchamber, and entirely surrounded by a circumferential zone ofpeculiarly modified tabulse. The central tube may be openthroughout, but it is usually intersected, at remote intervals,by delicate horizontal tabulae. Surrounding the central tubeon all sides, and forming its walls, is a zone of tabulae, whichspring from the wall of the corallite, and are then bent down-wards so as to become parallel to the long axis of the corallite,finally joining the next tabula; below. There is thus formed a S UB- GENUS PR A SOPOR A. 205 series of large circumferential vesicles, the convexities of whichare directed upwards and towards the centre of the corallite. Text Appearing After Image: Fg- 43- —Minute structure of Prasopora Graytc, Nich. and Eth. jun., from the LowerSilurian of Girvan, Ayrshire. A, Part of a tangential section, enlarged eighteen times,showing the two sets of corallites, and the singular perforated tabula; of the large tubes ;B, Part of a vertical section, similarly enlarged, showing the entirely different nature ofthe tabulation in the two sets of corallites respectively. When the section does not pass accurately through the medianplane of the corallites (as it very commonly does not), then itcomes to intersect the exterior tabulate zone, and the cut edo-esof the vesicular tabular appear as transverse lines and simulateordinary tabular; so that in most sections parts of the tubesexhibit one set of appearances, and parts show . the other.When examined in tangential sections (fig. 43, a), the largecorallites are seen to be hexagonal, prismatic, or sub-polygonal,and in the centre of each is a rounded or oval opening repre-senting the transverse secti Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1881 bookauthornicholsonhenryalleyne18441899 booksubjectcoralsfossil bookidonstructureaffin1881nich booksubjectmonticulipora bookpublisheredinburghlondonwblackwoodandsons bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcontributorharvarduniversitymuseumofcomparativezoologyernstmayrlibrary
1881

Image from page 921 of
Description: Identifier: americantextbook00bang Title: An American text-book of genito-urinary diseases, syphilis and diseases of the skin Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Bangs, Lemuel Bolton, 1842-1914 Hardaway, W. A. (William Augustus), 1850-1923 Subjects: Urogenital System Urination Disorders Syphilis Skin Diseases Publisher: Philadelphia, W. B. Saunders Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: skin appears of a moiC or less deep-red color, dry and smooth, except for minute drops of blood oozing from finepoints. No serous or purulent discharge is ever found under the scales inuncomplicated psoriasis. After removal the scales rapidly form again. Overjoints, and other parts exposed to frequent motion or other injuries, fissuresmay occur between the scales. The psoriatic patch in all instances begins as a flat, pinhead-sized papule 882 IN FLA MM A TIONS. bearing a minute white scale in the center, and grows by peripheral exten-sion. In its further development, however, it leads to different configurationsaccording to the size and shape. Certain types, occurring more frequently,have been designated by special names without implying a change in the cha-racter of the disease itself. In rare instances, where the lesions remain forsome time in the primitive stage of pinhead-sized spots, we speak of psoriasispunctata, and of psoriasis guttata when they increase to the size of a split Text Appearing After Image: Fig 238.—Disseminated psoriasis of the trunk in the shape of smaller round patches (psoriasis num-mulata.) Coalescence into larger areas, thickly covered with scales over and around the elbows(psoriasis diffusa) (see Fig. 239). (From the collection of Dr. J. A. Fordyce.) pea. In j^oriasis nummulata the patches resemble coins of different size.They may further increase, retaining the regular circular or oval outlines,without any material change in the central portions, to almost any size, untilthey nearly cover a whole limb or the entire trunk. But more often two ormore will coalesce into a large tract of diseased skin with irregular indentedborders, sometimes resembling the outlines of a geographical map. _ Thiscondition is called psoriasis diffusa, and jisoriasis universalis in its highestdevelopment, when the larger part or almost the entire surface of the body PSORIASIS. 883 is affected. But even in the most extreme cases it is always possible to findareas of healthy skin, howeve Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectsyphilis bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectskindiseases booksubjecturogenitalsystem bookyear1898 bookpublisherphiladelphiawbsaunders bookidamericantextbook00bang bookauthorbangslemuelbolton18421914 bookauthorhardawaywawilliamaugustus18501923
1898

Image from page 595 of
Description: Identifier: practicaltreatis00rich Title: A practical treatise on mechanical dentistry Year: 1903 (1900s) Authors: Richardson, Joseph Warren, George William, ed Subjects: Dentistry Dentistry Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ons or other foreign matter to be heldthere, and thereby become offensive. There is really but one kind of bridge-work, and but one wayto make bridge-work to insure success. There are many ways ofmaking teeth without plates, but this is not bridge-work. For the first illustration, as seen in Fig. 554, we have a case 590 MECHANICAL DENTISTRY. where all the teeth have been extracted except the two cuspids andtwo second molar roots. First proceed to prepare the roots by crowning. I use goldcrowns on the molar teeth, and what is known as the Low crownon the cuspids. The preparation of the two cuspids consists inmaking the crown ready for adjustment, the process of which isabout the same as for the Richmond crown. I always measurethe tooth to be crowned with gold with a strip of block tin, No.35 thick Stub gage or thereabouts. Place the tin around the tooth,,and with pliers carefully measure the full size of the same. Should you be measuring a tooth, or part of a tooth, on which; Fig. 554. Text Appearing After Image: there are projections, take the engine, and with a stone grind offthe same, making a smooth surface, so there will be nothing tointerfere with the fitting of the bands properly. After cutting thetin measures by the marks made by the pliers, you have themeasures ready to make the gold bands by. Cut the bands andbevel the edges and solder together, and you are ready to fit.After fitting all the bands and finishing the crowns in the usualway, place each in position in the mouth, having previously reg-ulated the articulation of each crown as desired, in the process ofmaking. We now take a deep articulation in wax, and impressionin plaster-of-Paris; remove before it gets too hard, and place allthe crowns in their positions in the impression; varnish, oil, and. BRIDGE DENTURES. 591 pour in the usual way; separate the cast from the impression andplace in the articulator. Then pour with plaster. After theplaster has hardened, remove the wax, and we have the articulationproper, and are ready t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1903 booksubjectdentistry bookpublisherphiladelphiapblakiston bookidpracticaltreatis00rich bookauthorrichardsonjoseph bookauthorwarrengeorgewilliamed bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcolumbiauniversitylibraries
1903

Image from page 327 of
Description: Identifier: reportofstatemin17cali Title: Report of the State Mineralogist Year: 1892 (1890s) Authors: California State Mining Bureau Subjects: Mines and mineral resources Gold mines and mining Mineralogy Publisher: Sacramento : California State Mining Bureau Contributing Library: University of California, Davis Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of California, Davis Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Co/ore?c/o SAa/fer- Screen+ 8 rfesh - - 8 A/esA, / 3 JJ/esterlSo/f/e Cooes- S/>y S/,,fot. s/>,fot. S/»/*- 7g//j 72t/s. 2. tfiester< Ta//S r ^f^/ste*/ Co^ccSrtjfer Text Appearing After Image: 3 C/s?trt?rso / Orerstroni W,tf/ei, 736/e /v/7 /£■/?*>*/ Can res? rs-* fe. l/\/are rV^ose. Plate V. Flow Sheet, Standard Tungsten Mill. January, 1917. Holdings consist of 14 claims. Formation is granite.Contact metamorphic deposit, the ore consisting of scheelite associatedmainly with garnet, epidote, and quartz. The main ore body, LittleSister claim, is near east margin of a large mass of metamorphosedsedimentary rocks embedded in quartz-diorite. These rocks consist of INYO COUNTY. 305 limestone, quartzite, siliceous conglomerate, and metamorphic shales.Ore is said to average from 0.4 to 0.6% W03. Deposit strikes N. 40°W. and is 80 to 90 feet wide and about 280 feet in length. Mine worked through adit tunnel 300 feet in length, which cut orebody 200 vertically below outcrop. This adit is connected with gloryhole by raise 35 feet above level. Glory hole is about 200 feet long*, 80feet wide and 165 feet deep. The ore body on NW. end is cut off bygranite, and on SE. end by fault Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1892

Image from page 48 of
Description: Identifier: historicaldescri00silv Title: A historical, descriptive and commercial directory of Owyhee County, Idaho, January 1898 Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: Owyhee County (Idaho) Owyhee County (Idaho) -- Directories Publisher: Silver City, Idaho : Owyhee Avalanche Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: riders. In 1890 the present owners purchased the property and prosecuted workvigorously by starting a cross-cut tunnel to tap the ledge 540 feet below thelowest previous workings, and the following summer commenced to erect a ten-stamp mill. At first the outlook was very discouraging, the ledge after a driveof 950 feet being cut at a barren spot, but the company prosecuted the workwith renewed energy, and in due time their perseverance was rewarded by theuncovering of a large chute of ore, which fully justified all the expense they hadundertaken. This was followed by the discovery of several more good chutesof ore, and warranted a further outlay on the part of the company, and theyconcluded to cut the ledge at a greater depth, and with this end in view, pur-chased the Idaho tunnel of Herndon and Mattenson, and through this tunnelcut the ledge May, 1895, 306 feet below the old tunnel level, opening into aboutfour feet of good ore. A shaft has since been sunk from the Idaho tunnel level Text Appearing After Image: Idaho and Pittsburs Minlns and Milling Company. -,THE MEW YCRKPUBLIC LIBRARY ASTOR, LENOXTILDEN FOUNDATION OUVirKE COUNTY, fPAfrO. 35 to a depth of loo feet, and crosscuts run east and west from this point, the eastcutting the Black Jack ledge fifty-three feet from the shaft, and the west drivingfor the Kinp.irc St;itc ledge, which it is expected will be cut twenty to thirty feetfurther in at a distance of ninety feet from the shaft. This Empire State ledgehas been cut 370 feet above this point and there shows about three feet of goodmilling ore. The shaft is in two compartments, each 4x4 in the clear, one com-liartnunt used as a cagcway. in which a Frascr & Chalmers cage is in operation,the other being used for a pumpway, counterbalance slide and manway. Thehoisting engine is a Fairbanks, Morse & Co., thirty-horse power, power beingfurnished by an Ingersoll-Sergeant air compressor, located at the mill, 2,600 feetdistant. A pump, of a capacity of sixty gallons a minute, is als Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1898 bookidhistoricaldescri00silv booksubjectowyheecountyidaho booksubjectowyheecountyidahodirectories bookpublishersilvercityidahoowyheeavalanche bookleafnumber48 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary
1898

Image from page 246 of
Description: Identifier: pulmonaryconsump00mays Title: Pulmonary consumption, pneumonia, and allied diseases of the lungs : their etiology, pathology and treatment, with a chapter on physical diagnosis Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Mays, Thomas J. (Thomas Jefferson), 1846- Subjects: Tuberculosis Pneumonia Lungs Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Pneumonia Lung Diseases Publisher: New York : E.B. Treat & Co. Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: had been intro-duced experimentally with a hypodermic syringe. Why doesthe infection fail to spread and cause pulmonary tuberculosisas in the case of animals ? Is it because the soil is non-recep-tive? This might be true in healthy persons, but can hardlybe said of cases of Potts disease, and of tuberculosis of theperitoneum. Is it because there is a difference in the vitalresistance to the bacilli between man and animals? Or is itprincipally because the efficiency of the tubercle bacillus as acause of pulmonary consumption in the human subject isoverestimated? All the data that can be gathered on thissubject seem to favor the correctness of the latter conclusion. CHAPTER Xn. pathology of pulmonary consumption.The Structure of the Respiratory Organs, The lungs are enclosed within the thoracic cavity, and aredivided into five lobes—of which there are three in the rightand two in the left lung. The arrangement and topographyof these organs are fully described in the following figures: Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 9.—Diagram showing the relation of the lobes of the lungs tothe front wall of the chest.—Fowler. It may be said that each lobe has a cone-like shape, withits apex directed either forward or backward. Thus theupper lobe of the left and the upper and middle lobes of theright lung have their apices behind and above, and theirbases in front; while the lower lobes of both lungs have theirapices in front and below, and their broad bases behind. 248 DISEASES OF THE LUNGS. This is partly illustrated in the diagrams of figures 9 and10, which show a side view of both lungs. The septum,which separates the upper and lower lobes of the left lung,begins near the top behind and extends diagonally down-wards and forwards and ends in front near the base of thechest. The septa which divide the right lung into three lobesalso begin at the top behind and extend downward and for-ward. It appears, therefore, that the upper lobe of the leftlung occupies the whole of the front of the chest except a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1901

Image from page 95 of
Description: Identifier: gri_33125001464581 Title: The engraved work of J. M. W. Turner, R.A. Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Rawlinson, W. G. (William George), 1840- Turner, J. M. W. (Joseph Mallord William), 1775-1851 Subjects: Turner, J. M. W. (Joseph Mallord William), 1775-1851 Publisher: London : Macmillan Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: LIST OF ENGRAVINGS AFTERJ. M. W. TURNER, R.A. PUBLISHED OR PROJECTED DURING HISLIFE-TIME, TOGETHEE WITH OTHERS PUBLISHED AFTER HIS DEATHBUT EXECUTED MAINLY BY ENGRAVERSWHO HAD WORKED UNDER HIM PART 1. LINE ENGRAVINGS. Sect. A. Line Engravings on Copper. Sect. B. Line Engravings on Steel. Sect. C. Line Engravings op Late Date and mostlyop Large Size; some on Copper and someON Steel. Sect. D. Line Engravings on Steel executed apterTurners Death, mainly by Engraverswho had worked under him. PART II. MEZZOTINTS.PART III. AQUATINTS. PART IV. LITHOGRAPHS AND CHROMO-LITHOGRAPHS. Text Appearing After Image: PART L—LINE ENGRAVINGS Section A.—Line Engravings on Copper I. The Copper-Plate Magazine and Thei Itinerant, 1794-1798 1 Rochester 11794 Chepstow i 1794 Nottingham 1795 Bridgenorth 1795 Matlock 1795 Birmingham 1795 Chester 1796 Peterborough 1796 Ely 1797 Westminster Bridge 1797 Flint, from Parkgate ... 1797 Hampton Com-t, Herefordshire 1797 Carlisle 1797 Wakefield 1798 Sheffield 11798 Elgin Cathedi-al 1797 II. The Pocket Magazine, Ladies Pocket |Magazine, and Pocket Print Magazine, |1795-1796 I The Tower of London j 1795 Chelsea Hospital ; 1795 Oxford 11795 Cambridge 11795 Windsor : 1795 FUnt 11795 Bath ! 1795 Worcester 1795 WaUmgford 1795 Timbridge i 1795 Swansea 11795 Guildford \ 1795 Neath 11795 Staines 1795 Bristol ! 1796 Northampton ... i 1796 Ixxxvii 6ix4| 6ix4|61x416|x4ii6fx4i61x416|x4t6|x4| 6f x4f6ix4f6fx4i6*x4i6|x4}61x4161x4^ 4Jx2|4-1x224ix2^-4|x2f41x224|x2243L X 214|x2|4ix2|4|x2i41x2-14|x2t4ix2§4|x2§4| X 2241x22 Walker and StorerStorerJ. WalkerJ. WalkerJ. WidnellStorer Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookauthorturnerjmwjosephmallordwilliam17751851 booksubjectturnerjmwjosephmallordwilliam17751851 bookpublisherlondonmacmillan bookyear1908 bookidgri33125001464581 bookauthorrawlinsonwgwilliamgeorge1840 bookcontributorgettyresearchinstitute booksponsorgettyresearchinstitute
1908

Image from page 491 of
Description: Identifier: cangrocerjulysept1919toro Title: Canadian grocer July-September 1919 Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Supermarkets Grocery trade Food industry and trade Publisher: Toronto : Maclean-Hunter Pub. Co. [1887]- Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: .Mapleine. Crown Broom Works, Ltd.. Vancouver.Broo ms, Wooden ware. National Licorice Co., Montreal.Licorice. The Dominion Sugar Co., Ltd.. Wallaee-hnrg. Chatham, Kitchener.Sugar. Essex CamiinLi & Preserving Companv,Ltd.. Essex, Ont.Canned Goods. Nicholson & Brock, Toronto.Bird Seed and Bird Gravel. Procter & Gamble Distributing Co. ofCanada, Ltd., Hamilton, Ont.Crisco, Oils, Flakewhite and Soap Chips. William Rogers & Co., Denia, Spain.Valencia Raisins. Federico Garret iV Co., Malaga. Spain.Olive Oil. W. A. Taylor Conf. & Mfg. Co., Ltd.,Winnipeg.Horse Radish and Relishes. Thornton & Co., Malaga. Spain.Malaga Raisins. Foster & Eloltermanfi, Ltd.. Brantford.Honey. Gorman, Eckert & Co., Ltd.. London, Ont.Olives, Spices and Extracts. D. Urquihart. Hensall, Out.White Beans. •L H. Wethey, Ltd., St. Catharines.Mincemeat, Jams and Jellies. Mason & Hickey 287 STANLEY STREET WINNIPEG, CANADA 16 CANADIAN GROCER—Manufacturers Agents Section August 15, 1919 Text Appearing After Image: Our Head Officeat Winnipeg Put Your Line Among TheBig Sellers of The West The House of Scott-Bathgate offers youevery necessary requirement to placeyour product to advantage in the West-ern Canada markets.Practical experience, aggressive sales-men, ample accommodation—theseare some of our success-making facili-ties. Christies Biscuits and Robertsons Confection-ery are sold by us direct to the retail trade. Wehave popularized these in the West. We cando the same for your line. Write for information Scott-Bathgate Co., Limited GROCERY BROKERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS149 Notre Dame Ave., E, Winnipeg, Canada August 15, 1919 CANADIAN GROCER—Manufacturers Agents Section 17 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1919 bookidcangrocerjulysept1919toro booksubjectsupermarkets booksubjectgrocerytrade booksubjectfoodindustryandtrade bookpublishertorontomacleanhunterpubco1887 bookleafnumber491 bookcontributorfisheruniversityoftoronto
1919

Image from page 34 of
Description: Identifier: leonardodavincia02mn Title: Leonardo da Vinci, artist, thinker and man of science; Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Müntz, Eugène, 1845-1902 Subjects: Leonardo, da Vinci, 1452-1519 Publisher: London : W. Heinemann New York, C. Scribner's sons Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THE FALL OF PHAETON-AN ANCIENT CAMEO COPIED BY LEONARDO IN thE BATTLE OF ANGHIARI (Museum, Florence.) Text Appearing After Image: SKETCH FOR A BATTLE, At^TEK A IHOTOGUAlH SUTILIED BY M. ROUVEYRE. (Windsor Library.) CHAPTER II THE POET, THE THINKER, THH PHILOSOPHER—LEONARDOS CONVICTIONS, MORAL AND RELIGIOUS Léonard, ce frère Italien de Faust. (MiCHELET.) THE painter of Jllona Lisa and theLast Supper enchanted and dazzledhis contemporaries from the firsthour, and four centuries have not dimin-ished the prestige of his artistic creations.As a thinker and investigator he has beenless fortunate. It has required the effortsof several generations of learned men, fromVenturi, Libri, and Govi, down to Uzielli,Richter, Charles Ravaisson-Mollien, Bel-trami, and Piumati, to complete the workof rehabilitation. 1 propose, in ni)- turn, to inc^uire whatplace was occupied by letters in theactivities of this universal genius. So far the problem has noteven been attacked ; and if I have to be content at last with a VOL II. ^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookpublishernewyorkcscribnerssons bookyear1898 bookpublisherlondonwheinemann bookauthormntzeugne18451902 booksubjectleonardodavinci14521519 bookidleonardodavincia02mn bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber34
1898

Image from page 190 of
Description: Identifier: pilotlorefromsai00unit Title: Pilot lore; from sail to steam Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: United New York and New Jersey Sandy Hook Pilots Benevolent Associations National Service Bureau Allen, Edward L Subjects: Shipping -- New York (State) New York Pilots and pilotage -- New York (State) New York New York (N.Y.) -- Harbor Publisher: [New York] Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: cents a hundredpounds. One of the features of the plant is the provision that has beenmade for the accommodation and welfare of employees. There isan attractive two-story building designated as the LongshoremensClub. This is equipped with a restaurant and lounging rooms forstevedores and dock laborers. This makes it possible for the mento obtain without inconvenience properly cooked wholesome food ata reasonable price. It also provides a place for them to go duringspare time when the weather is inclement. An emergency hospitalis maintained by the Company for its employees and those of itstenants. Two other institutions also care for the employees, branches ofthe Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. The Y. M. C. A. providessocial, athletic and recreational features. The building has bowl-ing alleys, billiard tables, a large gymnasium with full equipment,reading rooms and lounging rooms — 161 — ^ ^ ~ 1 g .5 X -a H «?• hrj s * -*^ 3. « > ST >- M a I! ^ a- 2 ^ & O Co O —» Text Appearing After Image: THE STATEN ISLANDSHIPBUILDING COMPANY BACK in 1895 a small group of men who had spent the greaterpart of their lives following the sea, decided that the Port ofNew York needed a steel shipyard. Their experience hadtaught them that a steel shipyard located in the port, could not helpbut be successful because of the great demand of harbor craft tosupplement the call for larger tonnage, which call became, as every-one knows, a paramount demand during the hectic }Tears from 1915-1920. That their venture was successful, the present plants of theStaten Island Shipbuilding Company stand ready to testify. Theman who pioneered this enterprise was W. J. Davidson, who is stilla most active president of this company. Associated with him atthe start were a few of the leading men of the old Starin yard ofwhom Messrs. Clute, Carney and Hinton were the leaders. Of theseassociates the latter two—Carney and Hinton—have recently died,while James Clute is at present one of the owners of the Company. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 bookpublishernewyork bookidpilotlorefromsai00unit bookauthorunitednewyorkandnewjerseysandyhookpilotsbenevolentassociations bookauthornationalservicebureau bookauthorallenedwardl booksubjectshippingnewyorkstatenewyork booksubjectpilotsandpilotagenewyorkstatenewyork
1922

Image from page 64 of
Description: Identifier: worldsmeatfuture00pear Title: The world's meat future. An account of the live stock position and meat prospects of all leading stock countries of the world, with full lists of freezing works Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Pearse, Albert William, 1857- Subjects: Meat industry and trade Cattle trade Sheep Publisher: Sydney, N. S. W. J. Andrew Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: e years asthe alfalfa zone. Alfalfa cultivation, however, has expandedto such an extent on every side of this zone, that to-day thedesignation records more accurately the district of its originthan the limits of its actual cultivation. The north of theprovince of Buenos Aires, owing to its situation on the banksof the Parana and the river Plate, and due to its having beensettled longer than any other, is one of the most fertile regionsimaginable. After having been for long devoted to sheepraising, it is to-day the principal centre of maize growing. Thenorth-eastern portion of this province consists, generallyspeaking, of low-lying lands, subject to frequent inundations.The Provincial Government, however, has undertaken drainageworks, the completion of which should have beneficial effect uponthe value of these lands. The western district of the provinceof Buenos Aires, the south of Cordoba, and the province of SantaFe, the eastern portion of San Luis and the Pampa Central, ARGENTINA 61 Text Appearing After Image: 62 THE WORLDS MEAT FUTURE present very slight difterenees as regards climate aud soil. TheArgentine ]\Iesopotainian provinces of Entre Rios and Cor-rientes, likewise constitute an admirable cattle-raising region^due to favourable climate, abundant i)asture, and ample Avatersupply. Lastly, Patagonia, cold and windy, is gradually attaining a position as one of the healthiest sheep-rearingdistricts of tlie world. Argentina is divided into 14 provinces and 10 territories. It islargely composed of innnensely rich plains with great depth ofriver deposit soil, and is almost bare of trees, except round thenumerous estancias, where the owner invariably plants largely.In the Chaco will be found dense forest country. Cattle andsheep are to be found all over the Pampa, from the extremenorth to the extreme south, where are the territories of RioNegra, Chubut and Santa Cruz. However, the bulk of the goodcattle are to be found in the east, or Atlantic, side, and sheepon the west and south. Patagonia Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectsheep booksubjectcattletrade bookyear1918 booksubjectmeatindustryandtrade bookidworldsmeatfuture00pear bookauthorpearsealbertwilliam1857 bookpublishersydneynswjandrew bookcontributorncsulibraries
1918

Image from page 97 of
Description: Identifier: clevelandersaswe00news Title: Clevelanders "as we see 'em;" a gallery of pen sketches in black and white Year: 1904 (1900s) Authors: Newspaper Cartoonists' Association of Cleveland Subjects: Publisher: Cleveland, Ohio, Privately printed for the Association, by the A.H. Clark Co. Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: George T. Bishop President, Northern Texas Traction Company 91 Text Appearing After Image: F. W. Gehring The Forest City Savings and Trust Company 92 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1904 bookidclevelandersaswe00news bookauthornewspapercartoonistsassociationofcleveland bookpublisherclevelandohioprivatelyprintedfortheassociationbytheahclarkco bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookleafnumber97 bookcollectionamericana
1904

Image from page 44 of
Description: Identifier: autobiographyofc00cain Title: Autobiography of Captain W.S. Cain; biographical sketches of relatives, reminiscences of 1861-1865, also some opinions and reflections concerning public duty Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Cain, W. S. (William Stephen), b. 1836 Subjects: Cain family Publisher: Topeka, Monotyped and printed by Crane & Company Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ening; no sign of haste or hurry about it. Allthe children and any of us grandchildren—who fre-quently visited her—and the men-servants and maid-servants, all knelt together while grandmother prayedin the Manx language; and yet there was not a vestigeof what we call sanctimoniousness about her. A busy 20 THE CAIN FAMILY. woman all the time, yet she seemed to have lots oftime to entertain us little ones when we came to visither. Sixty years ago there were no poorhouses in theIsle of Man. The poor went from door to door begging.A poor palsied paralytic named Walter Dun would beplaced in a little donkey-cart by his friends, and thenproceed on his rounds for charity. .On one occasionhe came to Ballamoda. The weather was inclement,and the servants all busy. Grandmother gatheredthe poor paralytic in her arms, carried him into thehouse, gave him some nourishing food, some more tocarry home, and put him back in his little cart rejoic-ing. He was a devout Catholic, she a devout Metho-dist. Text Appearing After Image: JOHN WILLIiUVI CAIN, Founder of our family in Atchison, Kansas. He was a man who exemplified in his life that teaching of Holy Writ, to do justly and to love mercy, and to walk humbly be ore God. CHAPTER 3. John William Cain was born in Castletown, Isle ofMan, April 1, 1808, and was the only son of WilliamCain and his wife Elenor Clague Cain. John WilliamCain, like most youths of his station in life, served anapprenticeship to the house-carpenter business. Afterlearning his trade he worked at it for a short time inLiverpool, to obtain a better understanding of thetrade. Returning to the Isle of Man he established acarpenter business in Castletown, employing a fewmen. In the year 1832 he was married to Ann Myl-chreest, daughter of John Mylchreest and his wifeElizabeth Stephen Mylchreest of Ballamoda, nearCastletown. My Aunt Sophie writes me: I havequite a recollection of their marriage day. It was alarge wedding. I remember seeing them coming fromchurch in the gigs that were mostly use Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1908 bookidautobiographyofc00cain bookauthorcainwswilliamstephenb1836 booksubjectcainfamily bookpublishertopekamonotypedandprintedbycranecompany bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber44 booksponsorinternetarchive
1908

Image from page 111 of
Description: Identifier: manualofpatholog00jone Title: Manual of pathological anatomy Year: 1875 (1870s) Authors: Jones, C. Handfield, (Charles Handfield), 1819-1890 Sieveking, Edward H. (Edward Henry), 1816-1904 Payne, Joseph Frank, 1840-1910, ed Subjects: Anatomy, Pathological Anatomy Pathology Publisher: London : Churchill Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: with difierencesof bodily constitution. SirJames Pagetf found in the fiuidderived from blisters in differentpersons very varying amountsof corpuscular elements, thenumber being generally in in-verse proportion to their healthand strength. These variationshe attributes to differences inthe condition of the blood.Eecent discoveries have ledsome rather to attribute themto variations in the facility withwhich blood corpuscles can leave the vessels, and these in allprobability to differences in the structure of the vascular walls.This view, however, cannot explain the difference between thebasis-substance of different specimens, which is made up of fibresin some and granular matter in others. Another variety of exu-dation, the licemorrhagic^ is distinguished by the abundance of redcorpuscles, though these, as we have seen, generally pass out ofthe vessels in small number. It has been thought that bloodpigment sometimes transudes without the corpuscles, but this hasnot been clearly proved. Text Appearing After Image: Fibrinous exudation on pleura in processof absorption : areolae form in it, and reduceit to filamentous bands. STJPPUUATION. We have next to consider that form of exudation in which thecells preponderate enormously, and in which the noncellular part * * Lelirbuch der Path. Anat., third edition, vol. i., p. ISfi.+ * Lectures on Surgical Pathology, second edition, p. 252. SUPPURATION, 97 is fluid, viz., pus, wliich, in the words of Eokitansky (loc cit.), hasbeen till now separated in an unnaturally sharp manner fromother exudations. There are many varieties of pus ; but that which is commonlycalled healthy (laudable) is that which we shall take for a typicaldescription. It appears to the naked eye as a creamy, thick,opaque, and homogeneous fluid; communicates an unctuous feel-ing when rubbed between the fingers; is of a yellow or whity-yellow tint; sweetish or insipid; and, while warm, gives oft apeculiar, mawkish smell. Its specific gravity i« 1-030-1-033. Ifallowed to stand some time Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectanatomy bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectpathology booksubjectanatomypathological bookyear1875 bookpublisherlondonchurchill bookidmanualofpatholog00jone bookauthorjoneschandfieldcharleshandfield18191890 bookauthorsievekingedwardhedwardhenry18161904
1875

Image from page 165 of
Description: Identifier: lettersfromwesti00lloy Title: Letters from the West Indies, during a visit in the autumn of MDCCCXXXVI, and the spring of MDCCCXXXVII; Year: 1839 (1830s) Authors: Lloyd, William, M.D Subjects: Publisher: London, Darton and Harvey [etc., etc.] Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: orthy, and not mischievously inclined, or theywould cany away the cane joints for their pigs,or displace them, to cause confusion \ my opinionis, that if our English farmers left their pota-toes bare in a similar manner, a very small chance 136 LETTERS FROM for a crop would remain to them. At other times,wishing to indulge my horticultural taste, I visit agarden on a plantation which is open to invalids,and admire the variety of tropical fruit trees; tobe embowered amidst these Caribbean waters ona little spot, one of the smallest of the Antilles, asevenings shades are advancing, preparatory to thefall of nights sable mantle, induces a pensivemood, and an aspiration to Deity, that the moralgrandeur of man, through his grace, might be on apar with the beauties of nature ; and that as theCaribs have ceased to prey on their fellow men,Europeans might also remove the grievous bur-dens which accompany their yoke of bondage: Ambulant es in horto, audiebant vocem Dei. I remain, &c. ^ ■ Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookpublisheretcetc bookidlettersfromwesti00lloy bookauthorlloydwilliammd bookpublisherlondondartonandharvey bookyear1839 bookdecade1830 bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress
1839

Image from page 181 of
Description: Identifier: treatmentoffract1901scud Title: The treatment of fractures Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Scudder, Charles L. (Charles Locke), b. 1860 Cotton, Frederic Jay, 1869-1938, joint author Subjects: Fractures Publisher: Philadelphia : W. B. Saunders Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: xed Position : The condylesof the humerus are grasped by the thumb and finger of one hand,a finger of the other hand is placed in the bend of the elbow, trac-tion is made upon the forearm, and it is slowly flexed to an acuteangle. While the forearm is being flexed, traction and lateralpressure are brought to bear upon the loose fragments of thehumerus to correct existing malpositions. These manipulationswill materially assist in the reduction (see Fig. 220). The degree of flexion will be determined by the obstruction12 i ;8 FRACTURES OF THE HUMERUS offered by the local swelling. If the swelling is great, or is likelyto increase very much, then the degree of flexion must be lessthan when there is no swelling. In the bend of the elbow, to pre-vent chafing, is placed a piece of gauze upon which has beendusted a dry powder. This acutely flexed position is maintainedby an adhesive-plaster strap, three inches wide, passing about thearm and forearm (see Fig. 221). This strap should be placed Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 221.—Left elbow in position of forced flexion. Gauze in bend of elbow. Thin axil-lary pad. Pad under band and wrist. Gauze protection under forearm, held by safety-pinfrom slipping. Adhesive plaster maintaining flexion. Skin protected on upper arm bygauze.compress from cutting of adhesive plaster. upon the upper arm as high as the axillary fold, and upon theforearm just above the styloid of the ulna. A piece of linen orcompress cloth (cotton cloth) is placed under the forearm andhand where they would come in contact with the skin of the(lust. This should be pinned so as not to slip from position.The arm thus flexed is supported by a swathe sling (see Fig. 213)made of cotton cloth, fifteen inches wide, folded three times, and TREATMENT OF FRACTURES OF THE ELBOW i/9 long enough to extend twice around the body. This is appliedas illustrated (see Figs. 222, 223). The elbow is held to theside by pinning a strip of compress to the swathe at the elbowand posteriorly (see Fig. 223). Pr Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 booksubjectfractures bookpublisherphiladelphiawbsaunders bookidtreatmentoffract1901scud bookauthorscuddercharleslcharleslockeb1860 bookauthorcottonfredericjay18691938jointauthor bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcolumbiauniversitylibraries
1901

Image from page 120 of
Description: Identifier: buildingengineer1616cont Title: Building & engineering news Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Contractors' and Dealers' Association of California Subjects: Architecture Building Construction industry Engineering Publisher: San Francisco : L. A. Larson Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ., on Lots 7 and S, F, G, 6thand 7th Sts., Sacramento. Repair 2boilers in two-story brick cannery. Owner California Cannery Co., 601 G St., Sacramento..Architect .. .None. Contractor. .Harry Simpson, 2510 21stSt., Sacramento. COST, $400 KRA.ME GARAGE NO. 2121 TWE.NTY-FIRST ST., on N i^Lot S, V, V, 21st and 22nd Sts., Sac-;ramento. One-story frame private^garage. ; Owner James Gillis, Premises. Architect . . .None. Contractor. .Siller Bros., 1614 13th St.,Sacramento. COST, $100 -ALTEltATIONS EIGHTEENTH AND -D, on Lots 1, 2,3 and 4, L), E, 17th and ISth Sts., Sac-ramento. Partition in one-storyframe corrugated iron freight shed. Owner Northern Elec. Co., 8th and J Sts.. Sacramento. Aicihtcct . . ..\onc. Days work. COSTH. $:;r,fi .\LTEUATlliNS NO. 309 V ST., on \V % Lot 7, U, V, :!]iland 4th Sis., Sacramento. Move miestory Irame dwelling and place (Dinew coiicrcte foundations and repaiifrom 503 17th St. Owner Manuel Jacinto, 330 V St., Arrhit.ct Sa . None. enl( COST, p.)-2 f UBLIO UBBAH? Text Appearing After Image: San Fraucisco, Cal.. .laniiarv SW. lOlC Pi-lephones Douprlas 2371Douglas 2372 SCHUMACHER WALL BOARD THE WALL BOARD THAT DOES NOT WARP, SHRINK OR BUCKLE Main oHice and .actory, 58th, San PedrO Sts. and SlaUSOn Ave. LOS Anfleles, Cal. For Sale at all Lumber Yards Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectarchitecture booksubjectbuilding bookdecade1910 booksubjectengineering booksubjectconstructionindustry bookauthorcontractorsanddealersassociationofcalifornia bookpublishersanfranciscolalarson bookyear1914 bookidbuildingengineer1616cont
1914

Image from page 23 of
Description: Identifier: hygienedentalge00turn Title: Hygiene, dental and general Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Turner, C. E. (Clair Elsmere), 1890-1974 Rice, William Subjects: Hygiene Teeth Publisher: St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: the roots of the teeth as they develop afterthe eruption of their crowns and is removed by the processof absorption after the loss of any tooth. It follows, there-fore, that after the premature loss of a tooth and the removalof its supporting process, no stimulus remains for bone devel- 20 HYGIENE: DENTAL AND GENERAL opment; the continuity of the entire arch is broken and theteeth tend to drift in the direction of least resistance. Thisresults inevitably in the loss of the normal relationship be-tween the approximating surfaces of the teeth of each jawas well as the occlusal relationships of the teeth in opposingjaws. Serious deformity may follow. Smith has shown {Journal of the Allied Dental Societies,Vol. I, April, 1906) that in certain cases of malocclusion thetimely and well judged extraction of teeth may result bene-ficially by relieving the crowded condition. The tendency ofthe drift may then bring the surfaces of the remaining teethinto positions closely simulating the normal. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 1.—Model illustrating normal occlusion. Orthodontia.—We agree with Johnson that the attainmentof the ideal normal occlusion of the teeth by orthodonticinterference is not always possible and in many cases anattempt to bring this about will result in an inharmony inthe relationship of the teeth to the general contour of thebony and muscular structures of the face which nature willnot tolerate. Not only will it be impossible to retain the teethin their new position, which is an abnormal one, but theremay ultimately result a deformity more objectionable thanthe original condition. Extensive orthodontic treatment DENTAL HYGIEXE 21 should be undertaken only after a careful study of all pre-vailing conditions by one whose vision is not limited to theteeth alone. It is futile to attempt to permanently establishideal normal occlusion when all the forces of nature are beingexerted to maintain the position of the teeth in their relation-ship to the organism as a whole. Development.—Lhygienedentalge00turn Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjecthygiene bookyear1920 bookpublisherstlouiscvmosby bookidhygienedentalge00turn bookauthorturnerceclairelsmere18901974 bookauthorricewilliam booksubjectteeth bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress
1920

Image from page 181 of
Description: Identifier: realeopdied10eule Title: Real-Encyclopädie der gesammten Heilkunde; medicinisch-chirurgisches Handwörterbuch für praktische Ärzte Year: 1885 (1880s) Authors: Eulenburg, Albert, 1840-1917 Subjects: Medicine Surgery Publisher: Wien, Urban & Schwarzenberg Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 26. Text Appearing After Image: Als ein wesentliches Zeichen müssen die am meisten in die Augenspringenden Veränderungen des Gliedes angesehen werden, da normale Bildungdes Gliedes bei hochgradigen Formen gewiss zu den Seltenheiten gehört (Blanden-,Voillemier). In der Mehrzahl der Fälle ist es verkümmert, hat die Aehnlichkeitmit der Clitoris, worin auch neben der Spaltung des Hodensackes die Zwitterbildungoder Geschlechtsverwechslung ihren Grund hatte, oder es fehlen einzelne Theile, wiedie Vorhaut, die Eichel, die Corpora cavernosa. In der Mitte zwischen beiden stehenjene Fälle, wo das Glied von oben gesehen, normal aussieht, emporgehoben dieMissbildung erkennen lässt (Düplay). Neben der mangelhaften Entwicklung ist dasGlied meist gleichzeitig nach abwärts gekrümmt, und zwar um so mehr, je weiternach hinten die abnorme Oeffnung liegt, und wird das Glied sehr häufig durchzwei Hautfalten, den Uebergang der Haut des Gliedes an der Seite der Rinne indie des Hodensackes, in dieser Stellung festgehalten, so da Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectmedicine bookcentury1800 booksubjectsurgery bookdecade1880 bookyear1885 bookauthoreulenburgalbert18401917 bookpublisherwienurbanschwarzenberg bookidrealeopdied10eule bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionmedicalheritagelibrary
1885

Image from page 148 of
Description: Identifier: analysisancientmyth02brya Title: A new system, or, An analysis of ancient mythology : wherein an attempt is made to divest tradition of fable, and to reduce the truth to its original purity ... Year: 1774 (1770s) Authors: Bryant, Jacob, 1715-1804 Basire, James, 1730-1802 Blake, William, 1757-1827 Subjects: Mythology History, Ancient Iran -- Antiquities Publisher: London : Printed for T. Payne ... : P. Elmsly ... : B. White ... : and J. Walter ... Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d by Zon, theSun. They either reprefented their Gods, as girded roundwith a ferpent, which was an emblem of the fame mean-ings or elfe with this bandage, denominated »° Zona. Theyfeem to have been fecondary Deities, who were called Zoniand Azoni. The term fignifies Heliads; and they were «5 HLietil Prop. 4. P. 92. Lord in his account of che Perfees fays, that Zertoofl: (Co he expreffes th*name) was conveyed by an Angel, and faw the Deity in a vifion, who appearedlike a bright light, or flame. Account of the Perfees. C. 3. ^9 See Stanleys Chaldaic Philof. P. 7. and p. 11. They were by Damaf-cius ftiled Zwco/, and A^&u o*: both terms of the fame purport, though dif-tinguifhed by perfons, who did not know their purport. * See Plates ai nexed. » Martianus Capella. L. i. c. 17. Ex cundlis igitur Coeli regionibus advo-catis Diis, cseteri, quos Azonos vocant, ipfo commonente Cyllenio, convocantur.PlcUus ftiles them A^wis, and Zwcais;. See Scholia upon the Chaldaic Oracles. 3 - looked Text Appearing After Image: Zoi-d.ittr, oerr k^aunuj i>t?/,rf/.f ^.p-rptiacu s The Analysis of Ancient Mythology. 125 looked upon as cEtliereal eflences, a kind of emanationfrom the Sun. They were exhibited under different re-prefentations ; and oftentimes Hke Cneph of Hgypt. Thehlletj with which the Azoni were girded, is defcribed as of afiery nature: and they were fuppofed to have been waftedthrough the air. Arnoblus fpeaks of it in this Hght. * Age,nunc, veniat, qu^efo, per igneam zonam Magus ab interioreorbe Zoroaftres. I imagine, that by Azonaces, Ai^ojya/iy)?,before mentioned, the reputed teacher of Zoroafter, wasmeant the chief Deity, the fame as Oromanes, and Oro-mafdes. He feems to have been the fupreme of thofe ethe-real fpirits defcribed above; and to have been named Azon-Nakis, which fignifies the great Lord, Azon. Naki, Nakis,Nachis, Nachus, Negus, all in ditierent parts of the worldbetoken a king. The temple at Iftachar, near whichthefe reprefentations were found, is at this day called thepalace Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjecthistoryancient booksubjectmythology bookyear1774 bookcentury1700 bookidanalysisancientmyth02brya bookauthorbryantjacob17151804 bookauthorbasirejames17301802 booksubjectiranantiquities bookpublisherlondonprintedfortpaynepelmslybwhiteandjwalter bookdecade1770
1825

Image from page 198 of
Description: Identifier: countriesofworld04brow Title: The countries of the world : being a popular description of the various continents, islands, rivers, seas, and peoples of the globe Year: 1876 (1870s) Authors: Brown, Robert, 1842-1895 Subjects: Publisher: London New York : Cassell, Petter, Galpin & co. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 5 it was £1,121,995; and in the last financial statement of the Colonial Treasurer thepublic income is estimated at £4,919,893, while there was in the Treasury a surplus of * New South Wales : its Progress and Resources, by authority of the Commissioners of the PhiladelphiaExhibition (Sydney, 1876). NEW SOUTH WALES: TRADE .\XD INDTJSTRT. 17.3 £-Z,4:7-i,d-2S.* There is also a public debt of £ll,72i,-il9. The population has greatlyincreased of late years. In ISil this was stated at l^OjGGQ; in 1851, 197,108, aftergiving up 68,3-35 to Victoria; in 18G1, 358,278, after giving up 25,000 to Queensland;in 1874, 584,278; while the latest data which we possess estimates the population of thecolony at 662,212 persons—or males, 367,.323, and females, 294-,889. The death rate ofthe colony is 153-t per 1,000, the percentage of male deaths being 1910 per cent,higher than the percentage of female deaths to total deaths. Wool constitutes the great wealth of New South Wales. Over mile after mile Text Appearing After Image: VIKW OF LAKE GEOHOE, NEW SOL TH WALES of the colony, particularly in the Riverina—the Mesopotamia of New South Wales—■millions t of sheep pasture on the fattening salt-bush {Salsola), to an extent whichhas been estimated in coin at £10,000,000, this sum, of course, including the totalvalue of the holdings, though it ought to be noted that in the majority of eases theland does not belong to the squatter, but to the Crown, whose tenant he is. The total area,leased at less than one halfpenny per acre for pastoral purposes, is nearly 150,000,000 acres.The runs vary in size from 5,000 acres to 1,000,000 acres, and it is not unique to find a * The Financial Statement of the Hon. James Watson, Colonial Treasurer (Sydney, February 12th, 1879).. t Official returns show that in JIarch, 1877, there were in the colony 366,703 horses, 3,131,013 homed cattle,and 24,.503,388 sheep. 174 THE COUNTRIES OF THE WOKI.P. • siiiiatUT owning 150,000 sheep. There are also vast numbers of fine cattle, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookpublisherlondon bookyear1876 bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookidcountriesofworld04brow bookauthorbrownrobert18421895 bookpublishernewyorkcassellpettergalpinco bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber198 bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1876

Image from page 452 of
Description: Identifier: djacobchristians11sch Title: D. Jacob Christian Schäffers Abhandlungen von Insecten : erster[-dritter und lezter Band] .. Year: 1764 (1760s) Authors: Schäffer, Jacob Christian, 1718-1790 Beez, J. G., ill Beez, Sophie, ill Franck, J. F., ill Nussbiegel, Georg Paul, 1713-1776, ill Preissler, Johann Justin, 1698-1771, ill St. Loibel, I., ill Eisenmann, engraver Fridrich, Jacob Andreas, 1684-1751, engraver Fridrich, J. M., engraver Fridrich, J. G., engraver Schaur, F., engraver Seligmann, I. M., engraver Trauttner, G. Phillip, engraver Jekel, Henri, 1816-1891, former owner. DSI Schaus, William, 1859- , former owner. DSI Subjects: Insects Parasites Publisher: Regensburg : Verlegts Johann Leopold Montag Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: T F FrjmJc pznjc Riifisb ^c\e(\*e()nerte /> ir linjrijr^ scuI^S T^^itisJ- SZb.I. 0 f^. dnq.m. Text Appearing After Image: lleuenbecnf ^C^Aftfc I. G-. Sex püuc Tiaixsh. .Q. TtlIt-uJi xailps Ü.tUJbon.. y .-M(q.I. tTZh.JT. ff^ia.m. ^^^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectinsects bookauthorschauswilliam1859formerownerdsi bookauthorjekelhenri18161891formerownerdsi booksubjectparasites bookauthorschfferjacobchristian17181790 bookiddjacobchristians11sch bookauthorbeezjgill bookauthorbeezsophieill bookauthorfranckjfill bookauthornussbiegelgeorgpaul17131776ill
1825

Image from page 136 of
Description: Identifier: unitedstatesbiogwi00amer Title: The United States biographical dictionary and portrait gallery of eminent and self-made men; Wisconsin volume Year: 1877 (1870s) Authors: American Biographical Publishing Company Subjects: Wisconsin -- Biography Publisher: Chicago : American Biographical Publishing Company Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 5 he commenced the furniture business, and hascontinued it to the present time. He is a religiousman in his sentiments and uniformly attends theEpiscopal church. In politics he is, and has always been, a Democrat,unwavering in his devotion to the Union. He wasthe first treasurer of the then village of Madison,and filled the office three different years. He waspresident of the council and acting mayor of the cityin i860. He was alderman four years, commencingin 1858, and again in 1873, 1874 and 1875, in whichlatter year he was again elected president of thecouncil. He married Sarah L. Goodnow, a noblewife and Christian woman, in September, 1848, andlived with her six years. In 1858 he married Fran-ces A. Adams, by whom he has two children, livingwith their parents. His grandparents on both sideswere revolutionary soldiers; his father was in thewar of 1812. Mr. Clark is what is commonly termeda self-made man. Nature makes all men ; circum-stances develop them. Mr. Clark was fortunate in Text Appearing After Image: t^-rzi^v-z^ ^/klcir^ THE UNITED STATES BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONART. 83 having parents to teach him the vahie of knowledgeand the vahie of morals; hence, when he had theopportunity, he was teaching others, thereby indi-rectly teaching himself. The principles of actionwhich have governed him through life were basedupon the morals his parents taught him. He is aremarkable man, having many of the virtues whichdistinguish good men, and none of their vices. He has by honest toil accumulated a comfortable inde-pendence ; he has discharged the duties of manyoffices of honor, and some of them of pecuniaryresponsibility, and yet neither in his public dutiesnor in his private dealings has a shade of suspicionever rested upon the escutcheon of his honor. Suchmen are the salt of the earth, and should be held upas models for all those who come after them. GEORGE O. WEST. WHITEWATER THE subject of this sketch was born at Charles-ton, New Hampshire, on the 29th of January,1836, and is the son of Enoch H. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1877 bookidunitedstatesbiogwi00amer bookauthoramericanbiographicalpublishingcompany booksubjectwisconsinbiography bookpublisherchicagoamericanbiographicalpublishingcompany bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorallencountypubliclibrarygenealogycenter booksponsormsn
1877

Image from page 24 of
Description: Identifier: consolidatedrura232knor Title: Consolidated rural schools and organization of a county system Year: 1910 (1910s) Authors: Knorr, George Washington United States. Office of Experiment Stations United States. Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Statistics Subjects: Rural schools Schools, Centralization Publisher: Washington : U.S. G.P.O. Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: of township, $548,577 ; total enrollment, 181 ; inelementary courses, 151 ; high school, 30. The three townships (Kinsman, Johnston, and Greene) maintain-ing consolidated schools, hereinafter called consolidated school town-ships, are in Trumbull County (see fig. 5). The facts collected inthis investigation have furnished material for two bulletins; the pres-ent one outlines the general scheme, and a second w411 deal chieflywith the cost, organization, and effectiveness of public conveyance byschool wagons and other means. No. 232 21 This portion of northeastern Ohio is gently undulating and, whereunderdrained, fertile and productive. The price of farm land rangesbetween $35 and $75 an acre. Dairying is the leading form of agri-cultural industry, chiefly the production of cheese and commercialmilk. Attention is also paid to potato, onion, and egg production.The dairy stock is well graded up and there are a number of pure-bred dairy herds. Holstein-Friesian blood greatly predominating. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 8.—Consolidated school building at Greene Center, Greene Township. TrumbullCounty, Ohio. Cost of building, complete, ^9,859. A substantial, steam-heated, brick building with stone foundation and slate roof. It con-tains eight rooms, viz : Four class rooms, a principaFs office, a kindergarten or play roomfor small children, and two large rooms, one used for high-school instruction and as achemical and physical laboratory, the other designed for use as a public reading room. Abasement extends under the entire building. The grounds occupy 4 acres. This large building, situated 5 miles from one railway and 6 from another, is the mostconspicuous landmark within an area of 25 square miles. It is gradually becoming thecenter of the intellectual activities of the community as is indicated by an annual lecturecouise. the well-attended graduation exercises, and various other entertainments heldthere. Valuation of township is $369,994 : total enrollment, 151 ; 129 in elementarycourse ; an Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1910 bookauthorunitedstatesofficeofexperimentstations booksubjectruralschools bookpublisherwashingtonusgpo bookidconsolidatedrura232knor bookauthorknorrgeorgewashington bookauthorunitedstatesdepartmentofagriculturebureauofstatistics booksubjectschoolscentralization
1910

Image from page 80 of
Description: Identifier: bulletin198119831920bost Title: Bulletin 1981-1983, 1997-2004 Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Boston University. Department of Religious Education Boston University. School of Religious Education and Social Service Boston University. School of Religious and Social Work Boston University. School of Social Work Subjects: Boston University. Department of Religious Education Schools of social work Publisher: Boston : Boston University Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: courses 3, 4 and 5 or 24, 25, or be taken as a co-ordinatestudy. Students taking this course must be able to use their Sun-days for observation and practice work. One hour, first and secondsemesters. Professor Pixler. 28. Principles of Adolescent Religious Education. A studyof the underlying principles of religious education in their relationto adolescent life. A consideration of the approach to adolescence;physical growth, social adaptation, mental unfolding, religious ex-pansion and their association interests; the scope of boy and girldevelopment. (Not offered, 1920-1921). Tzvo hours, first semester. Mr. Mayer. 29. Organization and Administration of Young PeoplesWork in the Church School. This course will consider the or-ganization, curriculum and program of the modern local churchschool for the religious education of adolescents. It will deal withthe impressional and expressional activities of youth, physically,socially, mentally and religiously, and will point out methods for the Text Appearing After Image: RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, SOCIAL SERVICE 65 training in service of the adolescent. It will evaluate existingagencies for moral and religious education. Two hours, first se-mester. Mr. Mayer. 30. Organization and Administration of Young PeoplesWork in the Community. This course will deal with the com-munity problems of adolescent life. It will consider adolescentenvironment, including its constructive and destructive factors, andits social, industrial and political phases. The Older Boys, OlderGirls, Young Mens and Young Womens Conferences; the YoungPeoples Inter-Sunday School Councils; the Community TrainingSchool; City, County, State and International Sunday School Asso-ciations and other opportunities for the training of youth and theleaders of youth for community life will be studied in detail. Twohours, second semester. Professor Alexander and Mr. Mayer. 31. Adolescent Environment. A study of the personal, home,school^, employment, community and church factors in the surround-ings of y Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookidbulletin198119831920bost bookauthorbostonuniversitydepartmentofreligiouseducation bookauthorbostonuniversityschoolofreligiouseducationandsocialservice bookauthorbostonuniversityschoolofreligiousandsocialwork bookauthorbostonuniversityschoolofsocialwork booksubjectbostonuniversitydepartmentofreligiouseducation booksubjectschoolsofsocialwork bookpublisherbostonbostonuniversity
1918

Image from page 232 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924014463495 Title: Applied anatomy and kinesiology, the mechanism of muscular movement Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Bowen, Wilbur Pardon, 1864- Subjects: Muscles Exercise Physical education and training Publisher: Philadelphia and New York, Lea & Febiger Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: e rib above. Although the action has been in dispute it is nowgenerally agreed that the external intercostals act to lift the ribsin inspiration. INTERNAL INTERCOSTALS. Eleven muscular sheets just beneath the external intercostals. Structure.—Fibers extending downward and backward, like theinternal oblique. The muscle extends from the sternum backwardas far as the angles of the ribs, being absent next to the spinal INTERNAL INTERCOSTALS 229 as column. The layer of muscular fibers is about half as thickthe external. The origin, insertion and action of the internal intercostals isstill an unsettled question. Few topics of anatomy have been so long and bitterly disputedas the action of the intercostal muscles. Disagreement is not sur-prising, for the question is important and difficult. These musclesare too deeply covered by other muscles to permit of study onthe normal living subject and the mechanical problems are compli-cated and confusing. The first one to make a practical study of Text Appearing After Image: INTERNAL INTERCOSTAL STHROUGH ARTIFICIAL GAPEXTERNAL Fig. 136.—The intercostal muscles. (Gerrish.) the matter was Galen, physician to the Roman emperor in thesecond century. He discovered by experiments made on livinganimals that the intercostals and the diaphragm are breathingmuscles, and he taught that the upper intercostals, external andinternal, lift the ribs and that the lower ones depress them. Hisview was accepted by all scholars for more than twelve centuries.In the sixteenth century Vesalius, a Belgian, trained in the univer-sities of Louvain and Paris, and chosen professor of anatomy atthe three leading universities of Italy in succession, taught thatthe intercostals are both depressors of the ribs and muscles ofexpiration. Aranzi, who followed him shortly in the university ofBologna, taught that the intercostals have nothing to do with 230 BREATHING breathing, except as passive portions of the chest wall, and yonHelmont, a famous scholar of Amsterdam, held the same opinio Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectphysicaleducationandtraining booksubjectexercise bookdecade1910 booksubjectmuscles bookyear1919 bookidcu31924014463495 bookauthorbowenwilburpardon1864 bookpublisherphiladelphiaandnewyorkleafebiger bookcollectionamericana
1919

Image from page 164 of
Description: Identifier: somecelebratedir00gera Title: Some celebrated Irish beauties of the last century Year: 1895 (1890s) Authors: Gerard, Frances A Subjects: Women Publisher: London, Ward and Downey limited Contributing Library: Boston College Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Boston College Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: id not care to have thedrag of so doubtful a wife. His friends, too, persuaded himthat such a marriage would be injurious to him. The whole matter worried him, and it was doubtless truewhat he one day told her, that he had lain tossing all thenight thinking of this wretched marriage, that it was a foolishthing for both, who might do better in separate lines, andthat in short he had worn the shirt of Dejanira. Then throw it off at once, sir, said she in her shrill, in-harmonious voice. From this moment I decline to speak toyou, unless in the course of our professional business. Andso ended their love idyll, begun in sunshine, finishing instorm. Their quarrel soon became known, and the public interesteditself in the separation between their favourites. Most peoplesided with Mrs. Woffington, and caricatures bearing veryhard upon the actor appeared in the shop windows. Therewas no doubt he deserved it. He had asked her to be hiswife with the full knowledge of the life she was leading, and Text Appearing After Image: MRS. WOFFINGTOX. lTofncepaffel23. Peg Wojjington. 129 he only awoke to the fact when his fancy had passed away. Inthe ardour of his passion he had written Once more Ill tune my vocal shell,To hills and dales my passion tellA flame which Time can never quellWhich burns for thee, my Peggy. And now, when it suited him to throw her aside, he reviledher coarsely. These are the bitter lines in which he tookleave of her :— I know your Sophistry, I know your ArtWhich all your dupes and fools cajole,Yourself you give without your heart,All may share that but not your soul. This ungentlemanly attack upon the woman he had onceloved to infatuation did not improve Garricks position;there was a strong feeling against him when the actressgave her version of the aflfair. Altogether the actor sufferedin popular feeling more than she did—nor did her spiritssink under his desertion. However, it is not always thewounds that bleed outwardly that are the most dangerous, andit may be safely affirmed tha Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectwomen bookyear1895 bookdecade1890 bookpublisherlondonwardanddowneylimited bookidsomecelebratedir00gera bookauthorgerardfrancesa bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc bookleafnumber164
1895

Image from page 143 of
Description: Identifier: anatomistsvademe1851wils Title: The anatomist's vade mecum : a system of human anatomy Year: 1851 (1850s) Authors: Wilson, Erasmus, Sir, 1809-1884 Subjects: Human anatomy Anatomy Publisher: 14, 656 p. : ill. Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: le by the projection of the odontoid process.6. Lateral and capsular ligament of the occipito-atloid articulation. 7. Cap-sular ligament between the articulating processes of the atlas and axis. 134 LIGAMENTS OP THE VERTEBRAL C0LU5[N. 4. Articulation of the Atlas with the Axis.—The ligaments of thisarticulation ^x^five in number,— Anterior atlo-axoid, Two capsular. Posterior atlo-axoid, Transverse. The anterior ligament consists of ligamentous fibres, which passfrom the anterior tubercle and arch of the atlas to the base of theodontoid process and body of the axis, where they are continuous withthe commencemeut of the anterior common ligament. The posterior ligament is a thin and membranous layer, passingbetween the posterior arch of the atlas and the laminse of the axis. The capsular ligaments surround the articular processes of the atlasand axis ; they are loose, to permit of the freedom of movement whichsubsists between these vertebrse. The ligamentous fibres are most Fis. 58.* Text Appearing After Image: numerous on the outer and anterior part of the articulation, and thesynovial membrane usually communicates with the synovial cavitysituated between the transverse ligament and the odontoid process. The transverse ligament is a strong ligamentous band, wliich archesacross the area of the ring of the atlas from a rough tubercle upon theinner sm-face of one articular process to a similar tubercle on the other.It serves to retain the odontoid process of the axis, in connection withthe anterior arch of the atlas. As it crosses the odontoid process, * A posterior view of the ligaments connecting the atlas, the axis, and theoccipital bone. The posterior part of the occipital bone has been sawn away,and the arches of the atlas and axis removed. 1. The superior part of the occi-pito-axoid ligament, which has been cut away in order to show the ligamentsbeneath. 2. The transverse ligament of the atlas. 3, 4. The ascending anddescending slips of the transverse ligament, which have obtained for it Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjecthumananatomy booksubjectanatomy bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookyear1851 bookidanatomistsvademe1851wils bookpublisher14656pill bookauthorwilsonerasmussir18091884 bookcontributorfrancisacountwaylibraryofmedicine booksponsoropenknowledgecommonsandharvardmedicalschool
1851

Image from page 157 of
Description: Identifier: proceedingsofthe4189asso Title: Proceedings of the... Annual Meeting of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. Year: 1894 (1890s) Authors: Association of Military Surgeons of the United States. Meeting Subjects: Surgery, Military Medicine, Military Surgery, Military Medicine, Military Military Medicine Publisher: St. Louis : The Association Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: h wood, which they trim down untilthey measure about 30 feet long, by 2^ inches at the butt, and 1£inches at the top. In making the travois several of these lodge-polesare lashed together at their large ends with rawhides, and then are 74 FOURTH ANNUAL MEETING OK THE fastened at their lashed ends to a pack-saddle, in such manner thatan equal number of poles trail backward on either side of the pony,the small ends resting upon the ground. The frame of the couch is made of ash, is somewhat ellipticalin shape, and the bed is a network of rawhide lashed to the frame,strand by strand. Its dimensions are about 3 feet by 4 feet. Thecouch is laid lengthwise across the poles, and lashed thereto so thatits upper side is about 1 foot from the ponys tail A blanket,lashed to the lower side of the couch, completes the travois. It willbe observed that the long elastic poles make admirable springs forthe couch, and that any jar communicated to them is well distributedbefore it reaches the passenger. Text Appearing After Image: A less satisfactory apparatus is made by taking two poles about16 feet long and 4 inches in diameter, at the butt. These poles arelaid nearly parallel to each other, being separated, 21 feet in frontand 3| feet in rear, and are connected by a cross-bar about 6 feetfrom the front ends, and a second G feet back of the first, each notchedat its ends and securely fitted into, and lashed at, the corresponding-notches in the poles. The space between the cross-bars is filled inwith canvas or other material, which makes the couch. The frontends of the poles are securely fastened to the saddle of the animal, ASSOCIATION OF MILITARY SURGEONS. 75 and the rear ends drag upon the ground. To lessen any shockcommunicated to the apparatus, in passing obstructions, one poleis made a few inches shorter than the other. A breast strap and traces should, if possible, be improvised andfitted to the animal. Based upon the principles above outlined, a number of veryingenious traveaux have been constructed by Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1894 booksubjectmilitarymedicine booksubjectmedicinemilitary booksubjectsurgerymilitary bookidproceedingsofthe4189asso bookauthorassociationofmilitarysurgeonsoftheunitedstatesmeeting bookpublisherstlouistheassociation bookcollectionamericana
1894

Image from page 99 of
Description: Identifier: churchat19pres Title: Church at Home and Abroad, The (Jan. - June 1896) Year: 1896 (1890s) Authors: Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Subjects: Missions -- Periodicals Publisher: Philadelphia : Presbyterian Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work Contributing Library: Presbyterian Historical Society Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Boards Treasury, 146-149 PUBLICATION AND SABBATH-SCHOOL WORK.—Practical Report from Kentucky-Bible Institute Work—Sabbath-School Work in Illinois, 149-151 CHURCH ERECTION.-Scope of the Board and its Needs 151-153 FREEDMEN.—Finger on Pulse—Helping the Board, 153-154 COLLEGES AND ACADEMIES.—Hundredfold Investments—The Seal—New Market Academy—New Market Folk, By Prof. John G. Newman, 155-159 MINISTERIAL RELIEF 159-161 CHILDRENS CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR.—Some Questions—A Droll Mistake, . . . 102YOUNG PEOPLES CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOR.— Missionary—Presbyterian Handbook-Christian Brotherhood—Notes—Suggestions for Study—Christian Training Course—Mis-sionary Personals, 163-167 GLEANINGS AT HOME AND ABROAD, 168-170 Worth Reading—Book Notices 170-171 Summary of Protestant Missions, From A. B. C. F. M. Almanac, 172 Questions, Trend of Thought in Periodical Literature, Study of Current Events, . . 183-186 Things Chinese, Home Missionary Programs, Missionary Calendar, 186-188 Text Appearing After Image: PUPILS IN THE GIRLS SCHOOL, YAMAGUCHI, JAPAN. II THE CHURCH AT HOME AND ABROAD. February, isq6, CURRENT EVENTS AND THE KINGDOM. COME OVER AND HELP US. Li Hung Changs recent message to thepeople of the United States, which he askedBishop Hendrix to deliver, was this :Send teachers to establish schools andphysicians to build hospitals; we will treatthem well and protect them. A KOREAN STATESMAN. Bishop Hendrix, who recently spent sometime in Korea, formed a high opinion of Mr.Yun, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs. Aman of moral stamina, while occupying ahigh position as a statesman, he speaks inChristian chapels on the Lords day, anddoes not hesitate to raise his voice against theevils that hinder the progress of his country. CHINESE CITIZENS. Wong Kin Ark was born in Sacramento,Cal., in 1873. His whole life, with the ex-ception of a single year in China, has beenspent in this country. Returning after ayears absence, landing was refused, as theCollector of the Port held he was not a cit Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1896 bookpublisherphiladelphiapresbyterianboardofpublicationandsabbathschoolwork bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusa booksubjectmissionsperiodicals bookidchurchat19pres bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber99 booksponsorlyrasismembersandsloanfoundation
1896

Image from page 613 of
Description: Identifier: thisweekinboston10bost Title: This week in Boston Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Boston (Mass.) -- Description and travel Publisher: [Boston] The Innovation publishing company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Museum, Cambridge. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Free. Peabody Museum, Cambridge. Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Free. Boston Society of Decorative Art, 184 Boylston St. Embroideriesand Handicraft Work. Old South Meeting House Museum, >Washington and Milk Sts.Open 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. Admission 25 cents. For complete list of Art Exhibitions see Sunday and Monday. SOCIETIES Luncheon of the Twentieth Century Club, 3 Joy Street, afternoon.Park Street Club meets at the Park Street Church, evening. ! LECTURES Dwight L. Elmendorf on Florence and Venice, illustrated, Sym-phony Hall, afternoon. CONCERTS Boston Symphony Orchestra at Symphony Hall, avening. EXHIBITIONS Motion pictures of the Coronation, Tremont Temple, afternoonand evening. OPERA BOSTON OPERA HOUSE—■Carmen, matinee. IFOREIGN SAILINGS 5. 5. Devonian for Liverpool. SPORTS Ice skating at the Boston Arena. WHERE TO SHOP See page 20. 1 WHERE TO DINE See pages 14, 16. THII WItK IN BOSTOn BEFORE AND AFTER THE PLAY OR ANY OTHER TIME VISIT THE Text Appearing After Image: Locke & CostelloTHEATRE TICKETS HOTEL BREWSTER TELEPH0NE^0XF0RD^1272 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherbostontheinnovationpublishingcompany bookyear1905 booksubjectbostonmassdescriptionandtravel bookidthisweekinboston10bost bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber613
1905

Image from page 75 of
Description: Identifier: businessm00bacon Title: Leading business men of Marlboro, Hudson, So. Framingham, Natick, and vicinity; embracing also Saxonville and Cochituate Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: [Bacon, George Fox] [from old catalog] Subjects: Marlboro (Mass.) Hudson (Mass.) South Framingham, Mass. [from old catalog] Natick (Mass.) Saxonville (Mass.) Cochituate, Mass. [from old catalog] Publisher: Boston, Mercantile publishing company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ariety. Mr. (_.. \V . Moultoncreasing demand throughout the Slate. It is put is a native of Natick. He served in the army forup in one pound packages, and in order to pro- three years during the Rebellion, and is welltect the public from fraudulent imitations, the and favorably known in this place. Ihe line otlikeeachar ikeness and signature of the proprietor are on holiday goods shown embraces about everything- 3ach package. Mr. Emerson manufactures the that can be thought of, we can only say hat irticle himself and is prepared to furnish it in they must be seen to be appreciated, for their quantities to suit at very short notice. It is variety is almost endless, and they mclude thewarranted positively harmless to the most deli-, very latest nove ties to be found in the maiket Gate skin or fabric, and should be used in every All in want of birthday gifts or fancy goods will family, both for laundry and toilet purposes. do well to pay a visit here. 70 / LEADING BUSINESS MEN OF NATICK. Text Appearing After Image: F. J. Williams, Photographer, North Avenue,Natick, Mass.—It seems ahiiost incredible thatany person who had arrived at years of discretion should judge of the merits of an article en-tirely by its cost, but, nevertheless, it is unde-niable that thousands of apparently intelligentpeople can be found who if sliown two objects,similar in appearance but differing greatly inprice, will deceive themselves into thinking thatthe higher priced one is immeasnrabh^ superiorto the other. Some photographers take advan-tage of this peculiar human trait and quoteexorbitant prices on work which is in no sensebetter than that which a discriminating buyer■can obtain at a much smaller figure. Such, how-ever, is not the policy pursued by Mr. F. J.Williams, or Williams, the Photographer, ashe is more generally known; and we have nohesitation in saying that those who wish to getabsolutely first-class photographic work at abso-lutely bottom prices, cannot possibly do betterthan to call at the spacious a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 bookpublisherbostonmercantilepublishingcompany bookidbusinessm00bacon bookauthorbacongeorgefoxfromoldcatalog booksubjectmarlboromass booksubjecthudsonmass booksubjectsouthframinghammassfromoldcatalog booksubjectnatickmass
1890

Image from page 240 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924021974054 Title: In the days of Poor Richard Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Bacheller, Irving, 1859-1950 Adams, John Wolcott, ill Subjects: Publisher: Indianapolis : The Bobbs-Merrill Company Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: f men which had come to besiegeBoston was able to shoot and dig. That is about allthey knew of the art of war. Training had begun inearnest. The sergeants were working with squads;Generals Lee and Ward and Green and Putnam andSullivan with companies and regiments from daylightto dark. Jack was particularly interested in Putnam—a short,rugged, fat, white-haired farmer from Connecticut ofbluff manners and nasal twang and of great animationfor one of his years—he was then fifty-seven. He wasoften seen flying about the camp on a horse. Theyoung man had read of the heroic exploits of this vet-eran of the Indian wars. Their mission finished, that evening Jack and Solo-mon called at General Washingtons headquarters. General, Doctor Franklin told us to turn over thebosses and wagons to you, said Solomon. He didnttell us what to do with ourselves cause twasnt nec-sary an he knew it. We want to enlist. For what term? Till the British are licked. You are the kind of men I need, said Washing- Text Appearing After Image: Cui WolcaTf Odft*w> ADVENTURES IN THE SERVICE 219 ton. I shall put you on scout duty. Mr. Irons willgo into my regiment of sharp shooters with the rankof captain. You have told me of his training inPhiladelphia. 3 So the two friends were enlisted and began servicein the army of Washington. A letter from Jack to his mother dated July 25,1775, is full of the camp color: General Charles Lee is in command of my regi-mient, he writes. He is a rough, slovenly old dogof a man who seems to bark at us on the trainingground. He has two or three hunting dogs that livewith him in his tent and also a rare gift of profanitywhich is with him everywhere—save at headquarters. To-day I saw these notices posted in camp: Punctual attendance on divine service is requiredof all not on actual duty. No burning of the pope allowed. Fifteen stripes for denying duty. Ten for getting drunk. Thirty-nine for stealing and desertion. Rogues are put in terror, lazy men are energized.The quarters are kept clean, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 bookpublisherindianapolisthebobbsmerrillcompany bookidcu31924021974054 bookauthorbachellerirving18591950 bookauthoradamsjohnwolcottill bookcollectionamericana booksponsormsn bookleafnumber240
1922

Image from page 119 of
Description: Identifier: littlejourneysto001hubb Title: Little journeys to the homes of eminent orators Year: 1903 (1900s) Authors: Hubbard, Elbert, 1856-1915 Roycroft Shop. Publications Subjects: Orators Publisher: East Aurora, N.Y. : Roycrofters Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: political logic, one whoscorned all persuasion and in whose lexicon therewas no such word as expediency.Lorenzo turned away, whipped and disappointed—the 86 SAVONAROLA prophecies of impending doom had even touched hisown stout heart. He was stricken with fever, and theextent of his fear is shown, that in his extremity hesent for the Prior of St. Marks to come to his bedside.QEven there, Savonarola was not softened. Beforegranting absolution to the sick man, he demandedthree things. First, you must repent and feel a truefaith in God, who in his mercy alone can pardon.C(Liorenzo assented. Second, you must give up your ill-gotten wealth tothe people, Lorenzo groaned, and finally reludtantly agreed.Third, you must restore to Florence her liberty.QLorenzo groaned and moaned, and turned his faceto the wall. Savonarola grimly waited half an hour, but no signcoming from the stricken man, he silently went hisway. CJ The next day Lorenzo the Magnificent, agedforty-two, died—died unabsolved. Text Appearing After Image: SAVONAROLA 87 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1903 bookidlittlejourneysto001hubb bookauthorroycroftshoppublications booksubjectorators bookauthorhubbardelbert18561915 bookpublishereastauroranyroycrofters bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc
1903