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Image from page 562 of
Description: Identifier: journalofapplied04baus Title: Journal of applied microscopy and laboratory methods Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Bausch & Lomb Optical Company Subjects: Microscopy Publisher: Rochester, N.Y. : Publication Dept., Bausch & Lomb Optical Co. Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: HE recognized standard high-grade Cam-eras of the world, and the worlds greatestCameras, especially adapted for scientificphotography, making both the PREMO andPOCO CAMERAS the best and most practicalinstruments ever constructed. WRITE FOR COMPLETE ART CATALOGUE DESCRIBING THIS ENTIRE LINE, ROCHESTER OPTICALAND CAMERA CO. -«--«*- Scientific Department. ROCHESTER, N. Y., U.S.A. The Post Express Printing Compaay,Rochester. N. r. LABOR A TOR Y A PPARA TUS. VETTER quality in officedesks, files,cabinets,sectional fil-ing casesWILLPLEASEYOU. 5>^e Modern Laboratory s conducted on business principles, and its material,literature, and expenditures are classified and ac-cessibly arranged. THE CARD INDEXis the modern way of classifyingand making accessible. Text Appearing After Image: We furnish cabinets and indexes adapted for every purpose, from the simplest to the most complex We adapt them to YOUR SPECIAL CASE. VETTER DESK WORKS, Rochester, N.Y. Catalogue H. EttablUhfd 1879. Laboratory §team Sterilizersl f- -p> FOR UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES. I Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 booksubjectmicroscopy bookidjournalofapplied04baus bookauthorbauschlombopticalcompany bookpublisherrochesternypublicationdeptbauschlombopticalco bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionnybotanicalgarden bookcontributortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden
1901

Image from page 336 of
Description: Identifier: livinglondonitsw03sims Title: Living London; its work and its play, its humour and and its pathos, its sights and its scenes; Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Sims, George Robert, 1847-1922 Subjects: Publisher: London, Paris : New York & Melbourne, Cassell and company, limited Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: - have onequality in common. Both are seeking toorder and shape their lives outside the palewhich fences in and limits the sphere ofaction of ordinary citizens. The occult and the mystic have e\er hada fascination for mankind, and here, in138 Text Appearing After Image: B.ASKl.NG I.N rHK SUN. the London of the twentieth century, arethousands of men and women of all classesand all degrees of intellect who daily resortto prophets and prophetesses, to seers andwizards, with as firm a faith in their poweras the savages have in the priests of theJu-ju groves. The commonest forms of modern magicare fortune - telling by cards, palmistr)-,thought reading, clairvoyance and crystalgazing. Spiritualism is commonly carriedon b)- hundreds of professtcnal mediums asa means of livelihood, and messages fro_iithe dead are rapped out nightly for theedification of the true believers. Methodsof cure outside the programme of modernmedicine are practised for a fee by ChristianScientists, and there are several weekl)-organs which advertise the names and ad-dresses of the practisers of magic, blackand white. The scheme of this work compels it toabstain from criticism, and merely to presentthings as they are, therefore it must beunderstood that no opinion is herein offeredas Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 bookpublisherlondonparisnewyorkmelbournecassellandcompanylimited bookidlivinglondonitsw03sims bookauthorsimsgeorgerobert18471922 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsorinternetarchive bookcollectioncdl
1902

Image from page 228 of
Description: Identifier: historygovernmen00vaug Title: History and government of New Mexico Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Vaughan, John H. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: State College, N.M., The author Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: al (1851)he established a free English school in Santa Fe. The nextyear (1852) he brought in five Sisters of Loretto and beganto establish convents and academies. The first of themwas the Loretto Academy and Convent at Santa Fe,founded January 1, 1853. In 1859 he brought the firstChristian Brothers and founded St. Michaels College EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SINCE 1850 215 at Santa Fe. The founding of the Jesuit college at LasVegas, 1877, was also the work of his hands. By 1865, he was able to report that he had thirty-sevenearnest priests and a half dozen other workers, had builtforty-five new churches, repaired eighteen or twenty others,and had laid the foundations for a system of Catholicschools. He became archbishop in 1875, and continued hislabors almost to the time of his death in 1888. Lamy isthe great name in Catholic education in nineteenth centuryNew Mexico. 252. ProtestantMission Schools, 1850-1870.— Prior to theAmerican Occupation r..Catholic missionaries had the N ew Mexico Text Appearing After Image: field all to themselves.After the close of theMexican War Protestantmissionaries from theUnited States began toenter the field, thoughfor many years theymade little headway. TheBaptists led the way, es-tablishing the first Prot-estant mission school in Santa Fe in 1849 and building thefirst Protestant church in 1853. The Methodists follow-ed and established a school in Santa Fe in 1850, but closedit in 1852 and did very little until the seventies. The Pres-byterians came in 1851, but accomplished nothing untilthe Civil War. when they bought the property of the Bap- First Protestant Church in New Mexico, Santa Fe, Built by the Baptists, 1853 2l6 THE HISTORY OE NEW MEXICO tists in Santa Fe in 1866 and sarted a mission school therethe next year. Episcopalians followed in 1863; and Con-gregationalists, in 1878. They all established missionschools as a leading part of their work. Just as the railroad was coming the Congregationalistsestablished an academy at Santa Fe in 1878 and others atL Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 bookidhistorygovernmen00vaug bookauthorvaughanjohnhfromoldcatalog bookpublisherstatecollegenmtheauthor bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber228
1921

Image from page 17 of
Description: Identifier: britishzoology02penn Title: British zoology Year: 1776 (1770s) Authors: Pennant, Thomas, 1726-1798 Subjects: Zoology -- Great Britain Publisher: Warrington, Printed by W. Eyres, for B. White, London Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: PLATES. Plates.LXXXVIII. Herring Gull 7 Wagel S P*&53S LXXXIX. KlTTIWAKE 7 Common Gull I ^ XC. Great and Lesser Terns 545XCI. Stormy Petrel? Fulmar 3 54° XCII. M. and F. Goosander - $$5XCIII. M. and F. Red-breasted? Goosander - -J 55 XCIV. Bean Goose 1 White-fronted Wild f 5J5 Goose - - J XCV. Eider Duck and Drake - 581 XCVI. M. and F. Velvet Duck - 5%$ XCVII. Wild Ducks - -591 CCVIII. Long-tailed Duck ? White-throated Duck3 ^ XCIX. Ferruginous Duck -1 Long-tailed Duck, a i 601Variety - . J C. Scaup Duck 1 Bimaculated DuckjCI. Garganey 7 ^ Female GarcaneyS*Il. Shag - « 610 CIL Gannet - - 612 APPENDIX, PLATES APPENDIX. Plates. N° I. ROUCH-LEGGED FALCON Page 623 II. Roller - - 614 III. Nutcracker - 62/ IV. M. and F. Oriole - - 6z> V. Rose-coloured Ouzel - 67 VI. Crane - 69 VII. Egret - . h VIII. Little Bittern - 6;3 IX. Spoonbill - 64 Competitions for Two Piping Bullfinches oS DIVISION II. WATER-FOWLS, Vol. II. F f The COMMON HRRON .\r./-,■;. Text Appearing After Image: Div.IL water fowls. Sect. I. WITH CLOVEN FEET.II. WITH FINNED FEET.III. WITH WEBBED FEET. BILL long, ftrong and pointed. NOSTRILS linear. TONGUE pointed. TOES connected as far as the firft joint by a ftrong membrane. XXVIIf.HERON, M ALE, Heroncendre. Belon. av. 182. Garza cinerizia grofla. Zinan. Alia ardea. Gejner av. 219. 113. Ardea cinerea major. Aldr. Le Heron hupe. Brijfon av. a<u. iii. 157. Scopoli, No. v. 296. tab. 35. 1T 7• Reyger. Frijch II. 199. Common Heron, or Heron- Blauer Rager. Kram. 346. fliaw. Wil. orn. 277. Ardea major. Lin. fyfi. 236. Ardea cinerea major feu pel- Hager. Faun.Suec.jp. $9. la. Raii/yn.av. 98. The Heron. Br, Zool. 116. tab. 173. Com-mon. Female. Ardea Pella five cinerea. Gef- Hegre. Cimbris Skid-Heirener&o. 211. Skredheire. Brunnich, 156. Ardea cinerea tertia. Aldr. Le Heron. Brijfon a<v. v. 292.a-u. III. 159. Wil orn. tab. 34, 279. & Raiifyn. av. 98. ReygerFrifch, If. 198. Ardea cinerea. Lin.Jyft.236. Brit. Zool. 116. ZW/j- et Norvegis Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectzoologygreatbritain bookpublisherwarringtonprintedbyweyresforbwhitelondon bookidbritishzoology02penn bookcentury1700 bookdecade1770 bookauthorpennantthomas17261798 bookyear1776 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookleafnumber17 bookcollectionamericana
1825

Image from page 10 of
Description: Identifier: baltimorecityblu00balt Title: Baltimore city blue book .. Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: [Baltimore Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hman ;i6o,oo 7 Latrobe— Captain $1,500.00 Engineer 1,200.00 Mate 720.00 Deckhand 600.00 Watchman, one-half of $720 360.00 Full crew for ice and excursion sea-son—Firemen, Deckhands, CoalPassers, each, per day, $1.75 and.. 1.50 . Annapolis— Captain $ 600.00 Eng:ineer 900.00 Assistant Ensj;ineer 750.00 Mate 720.00 Deckhand r. 600.00 Watchman 720.00 Full crew for ice season REMOVAL OF FLOATING MATTF.R. Superintendent, per day $ 2.25 6 Boatmen, each, per day 1.75 1 PUBLIC WHARVES AND DOCKS. \SALARIES. PER YEAR. Principal Assistant Enfrineer $2,400.00 Assistant Engineer and General Super-intendent 1,800.00 Assistant Engineer 1,500.00 2 Engineers, each 1,200.00 •* Draftsman and Computer 1,200.00 Draftsman and Computer 1,080.00 Clerk and Typewriter 1,080.00 i Inspector of Cement 1,080.00 4 Inspectors, each i.080.00 Night Watchm;in 600.00 4 Rodmen, each 900.00 6 Tapemen, each 780.00 Tide Recorder 720.00 6 Dredging and Dumping Inspectors, each .,..-.: yjy 00 Boatman, pei day 2.0U ^ \ - Text Appearing After Image: DON T WORRY WITH YOUR FEET Have them Treated and then you can smile BUNIONS,INGROWINGNAILS. ALL DISEASES OF THE FEET TREATED Nurse in Attendance for Ladies. Dr. J. H. Liverpool, Jr. . SURGEOAT .GHRIROPODIST On ICE hours: 214 American Bldg- 9 A. M. tob p. M. Suiidavs 10 A. M. toi P.M. Kes 1449 N. CARKY STKKET C. & P. Phone, Gilmor 988. Md. Phone, Courtland 546. CHUPCHES, LODGES CLUBS. SOCIETIES. Can Secure Dates for Picnics, Outings, Etc.EITHER SUMMER OR WINTER. YOCKELS PARK KNOWN AS ACTONS PARK FREDERICK YOCKEL, PROP. Dancing Pavilions Ten Pin Alley and all out Buildings are Thoroughly Repaired and Newly Painted. NEW WALKS,End of Loag Bridge. Brooklyn, A. A» Qq, 9 SMITHS Home-IVlade Egg Noodles SMITHS Home-Made Egg Noodles SMITHES Home-Made Egg Noodl^es SMITHS Home=Made Egg Noodles SMITH,S Home=Made Egg Noodles And EMPIRE Macaroni. And EMPIRE Macaroni. ^ And EMPIRE MacBroni. And EMPIRE Macaroni. And EMPIRE Macaroni. Both in 5 and lOc packages Both in 5 and 10c packages Both in 5 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherbaltimore bookyear1908 bookidbaltimorecityblu00balt bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber10 bookcollectionlibraryofcongress
1908

Image from page 61 of
Description: Identifier: ropetwineinforma00chat Title: Rope and twine information Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Chatfield & Woods Company, Cincinnati Sykes, Alexander Living, 1865- Subjects: Rope Twine Hemp Publisher: Cincinnati, O Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fine Twine Cut to Special Length; 57 Text Appearing After Image: 58 COARSE TWINES—Finished Light and Dark India Hemp—See current price list.Stock packages. Size 5678910 Standard Size Balls Standard Size Bales lb. 11 1 i}4 2 3 150-250-500 lbs. 150-250-500 150-250-500 150-250-500 150-250-500 150-250-500 150-250-500 Other forms of packing can be furnished as follows: No. 42 and No. 5, 4 lb. balls, Ic advance. No. 4 ) in I4 lb. balls, ^ lb. paper packages, 1 ■ oc advance. Made on order only. No. 4i2« No. 5, No. 6, _> lb. balls, jC advance; 5 or 10 lb.balls, no advance. Reels, single end, 50 and 100 lbs., 2^ advance. Coils, 100 lbs. or larger. Hide Rope Shape imany ends), noadvance. Our Crown India Hemp is favorably known throughoutthe trade. Uniform in size, well polished, soft and flexible. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookpublishercincinnatio bookidropetwineinforma00chat bookauthorchatfieldwoodscompanycincinnati bookauthorsykesalexanderliving1865 booksubjectrope booksubjecttwine booksubjecthemp bookyear1917
1917

Image from page 489 of
Description: Identifier: chamberscyclop01cham Title: Chamber's Cyclopædia of English literature; a history, critical and biographical, of authors in the English tongue from the earliest times till the present day, with specimens of their writings Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Chambers, Robert, 1802-1871 Patrick, David, 1849-1914 Subjects: English literature English literature Publisher: London : W. & R. Chambers Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: does, upon my life.You and I both shall meet my father there.And he shall bid you welcome. Dor. .\ blessed day ! We all long to be there, but lose the way. There are editions of M.issingcr (none complete) l)y Gifford(1805; new cd. 1813), Hartley Coleridge (with Fords works, 1840),Cumiias^ain (1867), and S)*moiis (1837-89). 468 Beaumont and Fletcher Bcaiiaiioiit and Fletclicr. two of the greatest Elizabethan dramatists, left intheir joint work the most memorable outcome of aliterary partnership, of a mysterious double per-sonality. Heretofore dramatic collaboration hadbeen generally brief and incidental, confined to afew scenes or a single play. But Beaumont andFletcher lived together for ten years, and wrote aseries of dramas, passionate, romantic, and comic,with such perfect co-operation that their names,their genius, and their fame have been inseparably(onjoined or indissolubly blended. Shakespeareinspired these kindred souls. They appearedwhen his dramatic supremacy was undisputed, Text Appearing After Image: FRANXIS BEAUMONT. From an Engraving by P. Audinet in the British Museum. and, especially in the comedies, they could notbut be touched by such a master-spirit. ButBeaumont rendered enthusiastic homage to BenJonson, and several of his plays show abundanttraces of Jonsons influence. Francis Beaumontwas the younger by five years, and died nineyears before his colleague. The son of a judge,a member of an ancient family settled at Grace-dieu, in Leicestershire, he was born in 1584,and educated at Oxford. He became a studentof the Inner Temple, probably to gratify hisfather, but does not seem to have prosecutedthe study of the law. In 1602 he published apoetical expansion of a tale from Ovid, and be-came an intimate of Ben Jonson and the circle ofwits who met at the Mermaid Tavern. He wasburied on 9th March 1616, at the entrance to StBenedicts Chapel, Westminster Abbey.— JohnFletcher was the son of that Dean of Peter-borough who obtruded unwelcome ministrations on Mary Queen of Scots at t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectenglishliterature bookyear1906 bookauthorchambersrobert18021871 bookauthorpatrickdavid18491914 bookidchamberscyclop01cham bookpublisherlondonwrchambers bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber489
1906

Image from page 91 of
Description: Identifier: englishbodleyfam00scud Title: The English Bodley family Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Scudder, Horace Elisha, 1838-1902. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: Boston, New York, Houghton, Mifflin and company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: en taking a great deal more interest initself People have learned to read, for one thing, and the morethey fill their minds with what is in books, the more they want tosee how the things look of which the books tell, — the battle fieldswhere battles have been fought, the castles in which knights havelived, and the houses where poets were born. They want to makeall these things real to themselves. But I dont go so far back, objected Mr. John Bodley. I onlygo back say to our great-grandfathers. They did not go sight seeingas we do. I dont believe ten of them made up a party and visitedGuys Cliff. a ^^Q yq none of us great-grandfathers, said John Bodley. Nor were they at the time, laughed his father. But come,what makes the difference ? I 11 tell you, Mr. Bodley, said Mrs. Van Wyck. Depend uponit, its because the world has grown more democratic. A COUNTRY WALK. 89 «You re more than half right, Phippy, said Cousin Ned,*^ There s no doubt that the last three generations have seen a won- Text Appearing After Image: Kenilworth Castle. derful increase of interest in men because they are men and not be-cause they belong to our particular class. The fact is, the world is 90 THE ENGLISH BODLEY FAMILY. getting acquainted with itself, and it does not require a specialintroduction as much as it once did. Do you know what interestsme most in England, Mr. Bodley ? No. It is such a sight as I saw once, when I saw your Dean Stanleywalking through Westminster Abbey with a company of working-men on a Saturday afternoon, and showing them the monumentsof great Englishmen. Yes, that was fine, said Mr. Bodley. It speaks well for theDean, and it speaks well for the workmen. They came back to the road and followed it to Kenilworth. Itwas a delightful walk, noble trees shaded the road, and a footpath,broad and well kept, ran by its side. They passed through the vil-lage of Leek Wootton, which seemed to be famous for nothing. Now this, said Professor Adams, comes nearer to my idea ofwhat an Ens-Hsh hamlet should be. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1900 bookpublisherbostonnewyorkhoughtonmifflinandcompany bookidenglishbodleyfam00scud bookauthorscudderhoraceelisha18381902fromoldcatalog bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber91
1900

Image from page 269 of
Description: Identifier: flowerbeeplant00love Title: The flower and the bee; plant life and pollination Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Lovell, John Harvey, 1860-1939 Subjects: Fertilization of plants Publisher: New York, C. Scribner's sons Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ibit a great variety of rose, pink, flame-colored and red shades. It is rather remarkable that among571 species of Compositoe there are only 9 red flowers. On theother hand, 13 species, or one-half the mallow family, havepink or red blossoms; and there are 22 species in the pinkfamily. In the buckwheat family the petals are wanting, butthe sepals are often red and sometimes the seed-vessels, stems,and leaves. In the poppy family the flowers are crimson,scarlet, or red, and the sap is also yellow and red. The mostbrilliant red flower in our flora is the cardinal-flower {Lobeliacardinalis. Fig. 112), which is pollinated by humming-birds.There are also three flowers which are scarlet outside, butyellow within, and rarely all over; they are the wild columbine,trumpet-honeysuckle, and Maryland pinkroot, to all three ofwhich humming-birds are common visitors. Blue FlowersThere are 325 blue flowers and 194 blue-purple flowers inthe flora of northeastern America. Blue is the highest color 248 Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 112. Cardinal-Flower. Lobelia cardinalisThe most brilliant red flower in our flora. A humming-bird flower THE FLOWER AND THE BEE in the floral world, and undoubtedly blue flowers, as a whole,were the latest evolved. They adorn the culminations in flower-building. Simple, small, regular flowers, as has already beenshown, are usually white or yellow, as the water-plantains,buttercups, and fivefingers, while many red flowers are alsoprimitive in structure. But corollas which are two-lipped, orbilaterally sj^mmetrical, and highly modified are most frequentlyblue or blue-purple and are often variegated with other hues.For instance, in the buttercup family, while the buttercups areyellow, the bilateral larkspurs and monks-hoods have bluesepals and petals. Again, in the rose family the regular rotatefivefingers are yellow and the roses are white or red, and blueflowers are entirely absent; but in the sister family of thepea family (Papilionacece), where the corolla is butterfly-shaped, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookpublishernewyorkcscribnerssons booksubjectfertilizationofplants bookyear1918 bookidflowerbeeplant00love bookauthorlovelljohnharvey18601939 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionnybotanicalgarden bookcontributortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden
1918

Image from page 676 of
Description: Identifier: minnesotanorthso155unse Title: Minnesota, North and South Dakota and Montana gazetteer and business directory Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Minnesota North Dakota South Dakota Montana Publisher: Minneapolis, [etc.], R. L. Polk and Co Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Alain. Calder John, dentist 39 Owsley blk. Caldwell Mrs Mildred, millinery 17 EGranite. Caledonia Hall 124 S Montana.California Brewery Co, John Milch, pres ! and mngr; F J Kenck, sec and treas; 42 j K Alain. California The. John Milch, pres and 1mngr; F J Kenck, sec and treas; saloonand concert hall, Main s e cor Broad-wa y. Calkins Benjamin E, stationer 37 X Main.CALL AX J P & CO (Joseph P Callan), Beal Estate. Loans, Insurance andMines 40 E Broadway.Calmono Orchard Co, Frank H Powers, pres; Guv M Powers, mr.gr, 50 Owsley ,blk. Cameron Xettie. baker 115 W Broadway. :Campana Bros & Co (Constante and Mrs , Pellegrina Campana, Barney E Dolga- bell), grocers 509 W Park.Campana Eugene G, phys 50 Owsley blk.Campana Airs Pellegrina, wines 511 W j Park. CAMPBELL ALBERT J, Atty A C >1 Co, 610 Hennessy bldg.Campbell Donald, phys 307 W Broadway.Campbell John D, saloon 1302 Talbot av. |Campbell Ralph B, barber 124 S Main. • :3a Published Every Day The Weekly on in the YearThursday Text Appearing After Image: LARGEST SI jfi «^p ^ mmmumom BEST ADVERTISING MEDIUMBEST PAPER FOR THE NEWS THE BUTTE MINER CO., Butte, Montana o i] E N H R L ! E C r ns SAINTPAUL UNFGRS. Gas Engines and Coal Gas Engines Chenp Power but Not a Cheap Engine. y> MINNEAPOLIS STEEL AND MACHINERY CO. B b! 0 i W L LI L 1 j i N A! G R AL D ft L E P0 Y 0 S L TABU :SJ Kiri.-r Wild Irn rtieioia hiuI th»i Ka*t»-rn<-•* Hi il l IIn « • 1s, I * 11 If Itll ll 10!! Use Anti- Garljon Sco Adv. inMinneapolisDepartment. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1906 booksubjectminnesota booksubjectnorthdakota booksubjectsouthdakota booksubjectmontana bookpublisherminneapolisetcrlpolkandco bookidminnesotanorthso155unse bookcollectionamericana
1906

Image from page 33 of
Description: Identifier: technicalpaper248unit Title: Technical paper Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: United States. Bureau of Mines Subjects: Mines and mineral resources Mines and mineral resources Publisher: Washington Govt. Print. Off. Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: *> - Figure 1.—Details of the R. F. K. mask. u GAS MASKS FOR GASES MET IN FIGHTING FIRES. later, the canisters remove the smoke from ordinary wood fires. Therubber disk valve at the bottom allows air to flow through the canisterin one direction only. The heavy spring pressing on the stiff wirescreen at the top holds the granular absorbent firmly in position.Corrugations on the tinned iron container add stiffness to the can,and tend to prevent the passage of gas along the walls. Text Appearing After Image: Figure 2.—Apparatus used for making smouldering fires: as, Sprinkler; b, coarse wire basket; c, can;d, hole in can; e, bricks; /, asbestos; g, fan. The canister itself is comparatively inexpensive, so that whenthe absorbent is exhausted it can be replaced by a new one at smallcost. CARE AND INSPECTION OF GAS MASKS. Masks are constructed largely of rubberized fabric. Rubberdeteriorates under the action of light and air, and the higher thetemperature the more rapid is the deterioration. Fabric deterioratesif allowed to remain moist. Hence, masks should be kept in cool Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectminesandmineralresources bookpublisherwashingtongovtprintoff bookyear1911 bookauthorunitedstatesbureauofmines bookidtechnicalpaper248unit booksponsoruniversityoftoronto bookcontributorgersteinuniversityoftoronto bookleafnumber33
1911

Image from page 359 of
Description: Identifier: gazettedesbeauxa49pari Title: Gazette des beaux-arts Year: 1859 (1850s) Authors: Subjects: Art Collectors and collecting Publisher: [Paris, s.n.] Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ns ni léblouissement subit ni lapoignante sensation qui nous ont arrêté court devant les Deux Foscari,nous nous sentons, en revanche, Ae^àxiiXAssassinat du duc de Guise, pé-nétrés, peu à peu, par une terreur contenue dautant plus durable, quellesaccroît à chaque instant de la découverte de traits exacts et vifs, soitdans la mise en scène, soit chez les acteurs. Delaroche est à Delacroix,dans lordre pittoresque, ce que Vitet est à Victor Hugo dans lordrelittéraire. Lun écrit en vers, lautre écrit en prose; lun entrevoit lépo-pée, lautre analyse lhistoire. Dans lesprit et dans lart il y a place pourtout et temps pour tout. LAssassinai du duc de Guise reste encore laplus complète expression de lécole anecdotique et le modèle, non encoredépassé, de la composition dramatique aussi iidèle que possible auxréalités de lhistoire. Les Français, qui nont ])as toujours lœil bien exigeant, ont toujours v.i 1 ^ -^ ,V -J - 7> • -^ -^ ^ :^^-: i Text Appearing After Image: D 4 H a û lï. 2 332 GAZETTE DES BEAUX-ARTS. lesprit éveillé. Nous ne craignons pas la peinture un peu aigre, voiremême un peu plate et dure, pourvu quelle dise quelque chose et ledise finement. De tout temps, nous avons été ainsi. Aussi avons-noustoujours eu, dans la peinture de genre, des artistes à succès, que lesvieux Hollandais eussent un peu morigénés, mais qui perpétuent, cheznous, avec un talent spécial qui est de la littérature autant que de lapeinture, la tradition de lironie décente, de lobservation piquante, dela mise en scène spirituelle. Boilly appartient, sans ambages, à cettefamille. Il met toute son attention à la reproduction rapide et vive desattitudes, des gestes, des physionomies. Ses petits tableaux sont souventdes documents précieux. Tel est son Café Corraza en i820. Nous yretrouvons, attablés sous la lueur jaune des lampes, autour dun damier,tous les personnages typiques de lépoque : le beau libéral en pantalonblanc, habit à la fiançaise Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectart bookcentury1800 bookpublisherparissn bookyear1859 bookdecade1850 booksubjectcollectorsandcollecting bookidgazettedesbeauxa49pari bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc bookcontributorwellesleycollegelibrary
1859

Image from page 545 of
Description: Identifier: turnersnorthcaro1901rale Title: Turner's North Carolina almanac : for the year of our Lord ... Year: 1847 (1840s) Authors: Subjects: North Caroliniana Almanacs, American Publisher: Raleigh [N.C.] : Henry D. Turner Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina, Government & Heritage Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: the control of theBoard of Agriculture. H. H. Brimley isCurator, salary $1,800; Mss A. Lewis, Usher, $480. State Board of Agriculture—J. J. Laugh-inghouse, Greenville; C. W. Mitchell, Au-lander; William Dunn, New Bern; AshleyHome, aayton; R. W. Scott, Melville; A,T. McCallum, Red Springs; J. P. McRae,Laurinburg; R. L. Doughton, LaurelSprings; W. A. Graham, Machpelah; A.Cannon, Horse Shoe. North Carolina Geological and EconomicSurvey. Joseph Hyde Pratt, State Geologist; F.B. Laney, Assistant Geologist; J. E. Pogue,Jr., Assistant Geologist; W. L. Spoon, RoadEngineer; W. W. Ashe, Forester; K W.Myers, Hydraulic En^neer, in charge ofwater-power investigation; R, T. Allen,Mineralogist; H. M. Berry, Secretary. Officeat Chapel Hill, N. C. Board of Internal Improvements. Members of the Board are appointed bythe Governor. The present Board, ap-pointed by Governor Glenn, are B. C. Beck- EVERY SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT SHOULD HAVE A STATE FLAG. SEE PAGE 48, 36 TUENEE-ENmSS :NrORTH CAROLIIsrA ALKANAC, Text Appearing After Image: with, of Raleigh, and R. A. Morrow, Mon-roe, N. C. A. H. Arringtmi, Secretary ex-officio. State Board of Education. The Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Sec-retary of State, Auditor, Treasurer, Super-intendent of Public Instruction and Attor-ney-General. / State Oyster Commission. The Commissioner is appointed by theGovernor. W. M. Webb, Morehead City,Commissioner, salary $900 per annum, and$300 per annimi for expenses.Governors CounciL Secretary of State, Auditor, Treasurer,and Superintendent of Public Listruction.And Attorney-General ex-offieio legal ad-viser Executive Department. Board of Public Buildings and Grounds.Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurerand Attorney-General. N. C. Representatives in Congress.Senate—Lee S. Overman, Rowan County;term expires March 4, 1909. F. M. Sim-mons, Wake County; term expires March4, 1913. Salary $7,500 each. BLOOD AND SKIN DISEASES B.B.B. ALWAYSCURED. Botanic Blood Balm never fails tocure all inauner of Blood and Skindiseases. It is the great Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 bookyear1847 booksubjectalmanacsamerican booksubjectnorthcaroliniana bookidturnersnorthcaro1901rale bookpublisherraleighnchenrydturner bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber545 bookcontributorstatelibraryofnorthcarolinagovernmentheritagelibrary
1847

Image from page 545 of
Description: Identifier: anatomydescripti1887gray Title: Anatomy, descriptive and surgical Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Gray, Henry, 1825-1861 Pick, T. Pickering (Thomas Pickering), 1841-1919, ed Keen, William W. (William Williams), b. 1837 Subjects: Human anatomy Anatomy Publisher: Philadelphia : Lea brothers & co. Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: the cortical, systemapproach the ascending branches of the central or ganglionic system from the baseof the brain, but the two systems do not anastomose. Between the two sets of ves-sels there is, as it were, a poorly-nourished neutral zone, in which lacunar softeningstherefore often occur in old age, when the nutrition of the brain is impaired. The other, shorter branches, go entirely to the thin gray layer on the cortex ofthe cerebrum, and are known as the cortical branches (Fig. 383, 2). They formmeshes which supply the middle zone of the gray cortex very richly with blood(Fig. 383), but the inner and outer layers much less abundantly. 540 THE ARTERIES. The fact that all these cerebral arteries and branches are so independent of eachother as terminal arteries explains many cases of localized lesions1 which areespecially apt to arise from obstruction to the blood-current by emboli followed bynecrosis of that part of the cerebrum supplied by the obstructed vessel. This may [Fig. 381. Text Appearing After Image: View of the Brain from below (after Ecker and Duret). Distribution of Vessels. The region bounded by the line ( ) represents the territory over which the Internal and Inferior Frontai Branches of the Anterior Cerebral Artery are distributed.The regions bounded by the line ( ) represent the territories over which the branches of the Pos-terior Cerebral Artery are distributed. I. Is the region of the Anterior Temporal Artery.II. Posterior Temporal Artery. III. Occipital Artery. Fissures and Convolutions: F1, gyrus rectus; .F2, middle frontal convolution; F3, inferior frontal convolution;/4, sulcus olfactorius; /5, sulcus orbitalis; T2, second or middle temporo-sphenoidal convolution ; Ts, thirdor inferior temporo-sphenoidal convolution; T*, gyrus occipito-temporalis lateralis (lobulus fusiformis);T5, gyrus occipito-temporalis medialis (lobulus lingualis): t*, sulcus occipito-temporalis inferior; t3, sulcustemporo-sphenoidalis inferior; t2, sulcus temporo-sphenoidalis medialis; po, parie Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjecthumananatomy booksubjectanatomy bookcentury1800 bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 bookauthorgrayhenry18251861 bookidanatomydescripti1887gray bookauthorpicktpickeringthomaspickering18411919ed bookauthorkeenwilliamwwilliamwilliamsb1837 bookpublisherphiladelphialeabrothersco
1887

Image from page 70 of
Description: Identifier: newelucidationof00sowe Title: A new elucidation of colours, original, prismatic, and material : showing their concordance in three primitives, yellow, red, and blue, and the means of producing, measuring, and mixing them : with some observations on the accuracy of Sir Isaac Newton Year: 1809 (1800s) Authors: Sowerby, James, 1757-1822 Subjects: Newton, Isaac, Sir, 1642-1727 Color Painting -- Technique Publisher: London : Printed by Richard Taylor and Co. Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Oft I idol Puhl^tiil hj .T.i S.meH,,, /.„„.h;, (^//irc/n^c(^yca/t:/?. 6^ Text Appearing After Image: Octjjgo,. AJ;! ^r^-^C±l Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectcolor bookcentury1800 bookdecade1800 bookidnewelucidationof00sowe booksubjectnewtonisaacsir16421727 booksubjectpaintingtechnique bookpublisherlondonprintedbyrichardtaylorandco bookyear1809 bookauthorsowerbyjames17571822 booksponsorsloanfoundation
1825

Image from page 23 of
Description: Identifier: antiquitiesofcon00gill Title: The antiquities of Constantinople : with a description of its situation, the conveniencies of its port, its publick buildings, the statuary, sculpture, architecture, and other curiosities of that city : with cuts explaining the chief of them : in four books Year: 1729 (1720s) Authors: Gilles, Pierre, 1490-1555 Ball, John, 17th cent Panciroli, Guido, 1523-1599 Tinney, John, d. 1761 Subjects: Publisher: London : Printed for the benefit of the translator Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: enal^ and alfo of the Place called theCynegium, p. 238 V. Of the Blacherna?, the Triclinium of the Bla- chernae, of the Palace^ the Aqueduft, and ?nanyother Places of Antiquity^ p. 244 VI. Of the Bridge near the Church of St. Mamas, ofthe Hippodrom, of the Brazen Lyon, and theTomb of the Emperor Mauritius, p. 248 VII. Of the Seventh ^Hill^ the Twelfth Ward, a7id ofthe Pillar o/Arcadius, p. 250 VIII. Of CONTENTS. VIII. Of the Statues, and the ancient Tripos of A-polio plac\i in the Xerolophon, p. 255 IX. Of the Columns now remaining on the SeventhHill, p. 261 X. Of the Thirteenth Wafd of the City, called the Sycene Ward, of the Toiun of Galaca, fometimescalled Pera, p. 264 XI. A Defcription of Galata, of the Temples of Am-phiaraus, of Diana, and Venus, of its Theatre^and the Forum of Honorius, p. 270 An Appendix^ taken out of a MS. /;; the BodleianLibrary of the Univerfity of Oxon, relating tothe antient Statues of Conftaniinople, demolifhdhy the Latins, when they took the City, p. 285 Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookauthorgillespierre14901555 bookdecade1720 bookcentury1700 bookyear1729 bookidantiquitiesofcon00gill bookauthorballjohn17thcent bookauthorpanciroliguido15231599 bookauthortinneyjohnd1761 bookpublisherlondonprintedforthebenefitofthetranslator bookcontributorgettyresearchinstitute
1825

Image from page 17 of
Description: Identifier: b20457753 Title: Visit of Society of Chemical Industry [electronic resource] : Burroughs Wellcome & Co.'s quarter century commemoration Dartford, Kent, July 15, 1905 Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Burroughs Wellcome and Company Society of Chemical Industry Subjects: Drug Industry Publisher: [London : Burroughs Wellcome] Contributing Library: Wellcome Library Digitizing Sponsor: Wellcome Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: , T. F.Hirst, A. N. 1 Halsey, F. 2 Reynolds, W. C. 4 Trollope, T. W.12 Pottle, F. J. 2nd 3rd Kent, CBarnes, G. H.Ellis. E. A.Pottle, F. J.Brooks, H.Rippin, J. H.May, F. C.Thompson, W. 15 May, F. C. 16 Thompson, W. F. 11.0 a.m. 4th FINAL-2 Bei THROWING CRICKET BALL 1 Shiers, W. J. 2 Bembridge, C. H.Halsey, F.Reynolds, W. C.Death, T.Burrett, H.Reeks, E. RWilkinson, H. W. 9 Goater, J. E.10 Coldwell, L. E. ibridge, C. H. 3 Halsey, F. 2nd Pottle, F. J.Dartnel W.l- till, G. iderwood, T.jood, II.Clifton, S.Robertson, A. F.Brooks, B. F.Tappenden, W. n.i5^a.m. 8 Wilkinson, H. W. NOTE—Preliminary Rounds and Heats contested previous to July 15th. and Numbers of competitors in finals are given in dark type. 17 A 2 LONG JUMP 1 Edeson, W. J. 8 Hooper, H. 2 Shiers, \V. J. 9 Gray, W. 3 Halsey, F. 10 Pottle, F. J. 4 Reynolds, W. C. 11 Major, G. H. 5 Trollope, T. W. 12 Tappenden, W. 6 Exeter, J. 13 Jackson, R. E. 7 Johnson, F. W. FINAL— 1 Edeson, W. J. 3 Halsey, F. 5 Trollope, T. W. I2nd 11.30 a.m, Text Appearing After Image: AQUATIC SPORTS Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidb20457753 bookauthorburroughswellcomeandcompany bookauthorsocietyofchemicalindustry bookpublisherlondonburroughswellcome booksubjectdrugindustry bookyear1905 bookcollectioneuropeanlibraries bookleafnumber17
1905

Image from page 448 of
Description: Identifier: wanderingsinsout00wate Title: Wanderings in South America, the north-west of the United States and the Antilles in the years 1812, 1816, 1820 & 1824 : with original instructions for the perfect preservation of birds, etc. for cabinets of natural history Year: 1885 (1880s) Authors: Waterton, Charles, 1782-1865 Wood, J. G. (John George), 1827-1889 Subjects: Zoology -- Guyana Zoology -- South America Guyana -- Description and travel South America -- Description and travel Brazil -- Description and travel Publisher: London : Macmillan Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d is said to resemble beef. Jacamars.—The species here described is the Great Jacamar—{.Tacamerops grandis). The mode of feeding employed by this bird, and describedby C. Kingsley in ^^ Last, exactly corroborates Watertonsaccount. He had been startled by seeing a bat fly pastat mid-day, the shade of the tropical forest being so deep anddark. And there is another ! No ; as it turns, a blaze ofmetallic azm*e off the upper side of the wings proves this oneto be no bat, but a morpho, a moth as big as a bat. Andwhat was that second large flash of golden green, whichdashed at the moths, and back to yonder branch not ten feetoff? A Jacamar—kingfisher, as they miscall her here, sittingfearless of man, with the moth in her long beak. Her throat EXPLANATORY INDEX. 429 is snowy white, her under parts a rich brown. Her breastand all her upper plumage and long tail, glitter with goldengreen. There is light enough it seems, in the forest.The morpho, by the way, is a butterfly, and not a moth. Text Appearing After Image: GREAT JACAMAK. Jaguar [Leojoardus onca).—Waterton did not see much ofthe jaguars (which he sometimes calls tigers), and certainlywas not afraid of them. Mr. Brown gives the followingaccount of the mode in which the jaguar is successfullyhunted :—- On returning to the head of the New River for provisions,we were followed for many miles by a Tiger, for on goingback we saw its huge tracks in the swampy places on ourpath. * With good hunting-dogs fine Jaguar and Puma huntingmight be obtained on the banks of this river, where withoutdoubt they are exceedingly numerous. Many of the Indian hunting-dogs, trained for deer ortapir, will hunt Tigers. When on the track of either of thoseanimals, should they come across the scent of a Tiger, their 430 EXPLANATORY INDEX. eager and confident manner of pressing on after the game isimmediately changed, and with the hair on their backs erectthey become cautious and nervous to a degree, jumping ateven the snapping of a twig. Abandoning the hunt they Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1885 bookidwanderingsinsout00wate bookauthorwatertoncharles17821865 bookauthorwoodjgjohngeorge18271889 booksubjectzoologyguyana booksubjectzoologysouthamerica booksubjectguyanadescriptionandtravel booksubjectsouthamericadescriptionandtravel
1885

Image from page 113 of
Description: Identifier: naturalhistoryof11794dono Title: The natural history of British birds, or, A selection of the most rare, beautiful and interesting birds which inhabit this country : the descriptions from the Systema naturae of Linnaeus : with general observations, either original or collected from the latest and most esteemed English ornithologists : and embellished with figures, drawn, engraved, and coloured from the original specimens Year: 1794 (1790s) Authors: Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837 Latham, John, 1740-1837 Pennant, Thomas, 1726-1798 Gilbert, Richard, 1794-1852, printer Donovan, E. (Edward), 1768-1837. Natural history of the nests and eggs of British birds Linné, Carl von, 1707-1778. Systema naturae. Regnum animale F. and C. Rivington (Firm), publisher F., C. and J. Rivington (Firm), publisher Law and Gilbert, printer R. & R. Gilbert (Firm), printer Leverian Museum (London, England) Subjects: Birds Publisher: London : Printed for the author, and for F. and C. Rivington ... Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: mouth of the hive with fliarp thorns j notwithftand-ing which, the Woodpecker finds means to prove a very deftru6liveenemy: and it is obferved to be in moil plenty where the Bees are inthe greateft numbers f. Latha?n, Its food does not confift entirely of Bees-, Alhin writes of the birdhe has figured, The guts are feventeen inches long, great and lax;the ftomach alfo lax and membraneous, full of Hexapods and Ants, Itwants the appendices or blind guts as the reft of this tribe. Its neft is capacious and deep, and is faid to be ufually built inold JJh or Poplar trees; Frifch obferves, that they often fo excavatea tree, that it is foon after blown down with the wind; and that underthe hole of this bird may often be found a bufhel of duft and bits ofwood. The female lays two or three white eggs j which colour, accordingto Willughby f, is peculiar to the whole genus, or at leaft to all thofewhich have come under his infpe^lion. * Ar^. ZqoU f Dtc, Rujf. IV. p. 9. 17. % Zool. Dank, H 2 PLATE Text Appearing After Image: PLATE XIV. MOTACILLA TROCHILUS. Willow Wren. p a s s e r e s.Bin conic, pointed. Noftrils oval, broad, naked. GENERIC CHARACTER. Bill flender, weak. Noftrils fmall, a little deprefled : Tonguecloven. The exterior toe joined at the under part to the bafe of themiddle one, SPECIFIC CHARACTER. Upper parts pale olive green j under parts pale yellow. A ftreakof yellov/ over the eyes. Wings and tail brown, edged with yellowilhgreen. Legs yellov/ifh. MoTACiLLA Trochilus. Linn. Syft. I. p. 338. N^ 49. Faun. Siiec. N° 264.—6^^/. Ann. I. N-^ 238.Krarn. el. p. 378. N° 22.—Brtin. N 286.—Muller 281.—-Frlfch. t. 24. f* 2.MoTAClLLA HisPANlCA. HaJfeJq. Foy. 287. 52,Trochilus. Gefner av, 7260AsiLUS. Aldrov, av. IL 293.Small Yellow Bird. Rail Syn, p. %o. A. 10,Little Yellowish Bird, IVilL Orn. p, 228.Green Wren.Regulus non criRatus. Alhin, IL 59, Yellow PLATE XIV. Yellow Wren. Latham Gen. Syn. IV. 512. Penn. Brit. Zool. N° 151. Jra. Zool.—Br. Muf.--Lev. Muf.Le Pouillot, ou Chantre. Br if. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectbirds bookauthorlathamjohn17401837 bookidnaturalhistoryof11794dono bookauthordonovaneedward17681837 bookauthorgilbertrichard17941852printer bookauthordonovaneedward17681837naturalhistoryofthenestsandeggsofbritishbirds bookauthorlinncarlvon17071778systemanaturaeregnumanimale bookauthorfandcrivingtonfirmpublisher bookauthorfcandjrivingtonfirmpublisher bookauthorlawandgilbertprinter
1825

Image from page 146 of
Description: Identifier: verzamelingvanui00burg Title: Verzámeling van uitgekórene zin-spreuken, en zinnebeeldige print-vercieringen : eertyds, op bevel van den aller doorlugtigsten keizer der Russen, Peter Alexis, of de Gróte, getékent en gesnéden : en nu op nieus verrykt : met agthondert en veertig byschriften in verzen Year: 1743 (1740s) Authors: Burg, Hermanus van den, 1682-1752 Mulder, Joseph, b. 1659 or 60 Marshoorn, Joannes Subjects: Emblems Conduct of life Christian ethics Publisher: Te Haarlem : By Johannes Marshoorn, boekverkooper Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: vaat ,-Als daarde gunilig is, is t eens waar dat men itaat.. 387. EenCTPRES, en GEWORMfE, Nil mihi vobifcum cd. Toiut daffaires avec vous-, %i\y Ö^ti nifijtö mit ciirij 511 fcijatfcn. Zeg, als gy taal hoord die befchadigt zonder ftigten:Ik heb met u, nog uw gezin, niets te verrigten. 388. Een gekapte O LT E BOOM. Tanto uberior. Je fouter ai avec plus de f ore e. f flj tufröc licffct aur3rcï)la3en. Zó g uwen jongeling te beter wilt doen groejen,Doe al het waterhout van zyne jeugd befnoejen. 389. Een LAURIER- en PALMBOOM, op een BERG,Ardua ad virtutem. Le chemin de la vertu efl difficile. ^cc ÜJC0 5ur Cujcnti ïft öcfcljïDcrïiclj. Verhevenheid van ilaat, is bloot aan veel gevaar;.De regte weg ter deugde, is mocjelyk en zwaar. 390. EenlVlLLlGEN-BOOM,Neglecta juventus. Je ne prodiiis rien. 5!CÖ ï>nU0C nïfl)t.0 öerfur. r,v breng niets anders voort, dan bitre en fmalle bhlden;lüij nogtans, pryit men my, om myne gróte dilden, ZlNNFCFELDIGK P R I N T - V E R GIER ING EN. t^i Text Appearing After Image: jjj R % IJl ZIN-SPREUKEN en 3Pi. Een BOOM, metVRVGTEN. Mitte non promitte. Tionne des frnits fans les prornettre. Dcrfpricl) nicïjt fonticrn gift öemc fiucjjtc. Al wie tot nut poogt van zyn even mens te léven,.Moet niet beloven, maar yolvaardig zyn in t geven.- 392. Een PALM-BOOM, en de ZON, Haud aliter. Je ne viens pas autrement. |l^ïfï)t flUtiCVft, Jk heb meer dan de Zon van Godts genaê niet nodig;Al t gene meerder fchynt, is niets ofte overbodig. 393. Een HERDER, met zyn HOND. Fidelis & fecretus. Fidele ^ fecret. CrCU UUb tJCrfdjlUÏCgCn. t Is niet genoeg, om zig zeer naerftig te begeven.Tot werk, men moet getrouen heimlyk zyn daar neven. 394. EenEIKEN-BOOMy met dunne T A K K E N Rara juvant. Les chnfes r ar es font avant ageufes. ;ï)aö fcïr5am ïft/ ifl nuf^ïicö.Myn dienft, hoe nodig, is gants niet bekendt elkeen;Dat zeldzaam is en vremdt, is nuttig in t gemeen. 395. Een J^ITRTUS-BOOM. Concufla uberior. ^Ins fertile par fes blejfures. 5fiiirïjtbavcr toon er ö^Ö ^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectemblems bookauthormulderjosephb1659or60 booksubjectchristianethics booksubjectconductoflife bookdecade1740 bookcentury1700 bookidverzamelingvanui00burg bookyear1743 bookauthorburghermanusvanden16821752 bookauthormarshoornjoannes
1825

[Portrait of Charlie Ventura, National studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Oct. 1946] (LOC)
Description: Gottlieb, William P., 1917-, photographer. [Portrait of Charlie Ventura, National studio, New York, N.Y., ca. Oct. 1946] 1 negative : b&w ; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. Notes: Gottlieb Collection Assignment No. 052 Reference print available in Music Division, Library of Congress. Purchase William P. Gottlieb Forms part of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (Library of Congress). Subjects: Ventura, Charlie Jazz musicians--1940-1950. Saxophonists--1940-1950. National studio Format: Portrait photographs--1940-1950. Film negatives--1940-1950. Rights Info: Mr. Gottlieb has dedicated these works to the public domain, but rights of privacy and publicity may apply. lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/html/gottlieb/gottlieb-copyrig... Repository: (negative) Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Washington D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print (reference print) Library of Congress, Music Division, Washington D.C. 20540 USA, loc.gov/rr/perform/ Part Of: William P. Gottlieb Collection (DLC) 99-401005 General information about the Gottlieb Collection is available at lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/html/gottlieb/gottlieb-home.html Persistent URL: hdl.loc.gov/loc.music/gottlieb.08871 Call Number: LC-GLB23- 0887
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 5128
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1946

Los Angeles, Calif. Apr. 1942. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry, loaded down with baggage entraining for Manzanar, Calif., 250 miles away, where they are to be housed in a War Relocation Authority center (LOC)
Description: Albers, Clem,, photographer. Los Angeles, Calif. Apr. 1942. Evacuees of Japanese ancestry, loaded down with baggage entraining for Manzanar, Calif., 250 miles away, where they are to be housed in a War Relocation Authority center [1 April 1942] 1 photograph : gelatin silver print ; mount 24 x 30 cm. Notes: Photograph shows unidentified Japanese Americans carrying suitcases and duffel bags while boarding a train before being incarcerated at Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California, during World War II. Title transcribed from item. No. B-20. Photographer and date from negative in the National Archives. Photograph from U.S. War Relocation Authority. Farm Security Administration and Office of War Information Collection (Library of Congress). Subjects: Manzanar War Relocation Center--1940-1950. United States.--Wartime Civil Control Administration--1940-1950. Japanese Americans--Forced removal and internment, 1942-1945 World War, 1939-1945--Japanese Americans--California--Los Angeles. Japanese Americans--Men--1940-1950. Arrivals & departures--1940-1950. Railroad trains--1940-1950. Luggage--1940-1950. Format: Photographic prints--1940-1950. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2002708960 Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.73168 Call Number: LOT 1801 [item]
Owner: The Library of Congress
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1942

Lionel Van Praag and three other motorcycle speedway riders, 9 February 1946
Description: Lionel Van Praag and three other motorcycle speedway riders, 9 February 1946, PIX Magazine negative collection, photographed by Ray Olson, State Library of New South Wales, ON 388/Box 014/Item 029, archival.sl.nsw.gov.au/Details/archive/110587383
Owner: State Library of NSW
Views: 3510
Tags: motocycles speedway lionelvanpraag riders sydney australia leathers bikes helmets 1940s
1946

We could use some identification help!  (LOC)
Description: [Interior view of a store] [1864] 1 photograph : print on card mount ; mount 9 x 18 cm (stereograph format) Notes: Title devised by Library staff Forms part of the Marian S. Carson Collection at the Library of Congress. Subjects: Stores & shops--1860-1870. Interiors--1860-1870. Format: Stereographs--1860-1870. Photographic prints--1860-1870. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/stereo.1s08781 Call Number: LOT 13696, no. 34
Owner: The Library of Congress
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1864

Portrait of a man in checked cardigan, Sydney telephone exchange, August 1946
Description: Portrait of a man in checked cardigan, Sydney telephone exchange, August 1946, ACP Magazines Ltd. photographic archive, State Library of New South Wales, ON 388/Box 022/Item 110 collection.sl.nsw.gov.au/digital/04kgXzAMwxNwB
Owner: State Library of NSW
Views: 9736
Tags: patterns telephone exchange clothing fashion 1940s 1940 war years australia
1945

Xavier Mertz Bringing in a box of Ice through the Catacombs, Antarctica,  1912, by Frank Hurley
Description: Xavier Mertz Bringing in a box of Ice through the Catacombs, Cape Denison, Antarctica, 1912, Frank Hurley, Australian Antarctic Expedition, State Library of New South Wales, collection.sl.nsw.gov.au/record/nX6mQj8Y
Owner: State Library of NSW
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Tags: antarctica australianantarcticexpedition waviermertz frankhurley 1912 capedenison exploration antarctic explorers goldenageofexploration
1912

Tom Gibbons registering at entrance, Glacier Park (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Tom Gibbons registering at entrance, Glacier Park [between ca. 1920 and ca. 1925] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. For more information, see George Grantham Bain Collection - Rights and Restrictions Information www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/274_bain.html Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Bain News Service photograph collection (DLC) 2005682517 General information about the George Grantham Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.36091 Call Number: LC-B2- 6027-5
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 1539
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1920

Judy Canty, schoolgirl Olympic representative, 27 May 1948
Description: Judy Canty, schoolgirl Olympic representative for the long jump, 27 May 1948, by R. Donaldson, State Library of New South Wales, collection.sl.nsw.gov.au/digital/6N273VdxRoQZx
Owner: State Library of NSW
Views: 4740
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1948

Male Motorcycle rider on his Rudge racing bike, ca. 1935
Description: Male Motorcycle rider on his Rudge racing bike, No. 45, city street setting, ca. 1935, State Library of New South Wales, ON 388/Box 044/Item 249 archival.sl.nsw.gov.au/Details/archive/110620631
Owner: State Library of NSW
Views: 5367
Tags: motorcycles motorbikes rudge australia 1930s bikes
1935

Trick cyclist and golfer Banner Forbutt, December 1946
Description: Trick cyclist and golfer Banner Forbutt, December 1946, photographed by Ivan Ives, Pix magazine, State Library of New South Wales, ON 388/Box 014/Item 083 collection.sl.nsw.gov.au/digital/8Zl2vRLAwKWlP
Owner: State Library of NSW
Views: 4669
Tags: golf trock golfers unicycles statelibraryofnewsouthwales
1946

Rubenstein (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Rubenstein [between ca. 1920 and ca. 1925] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Photograph shows violinist Erna Rubinstein (Rubenstein) (1903-1966). (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2019) Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. For more information, see George Grantham Bain Collection - Rights and Restrictions Information www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/274_bain.html Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Bain News Service photograph collection (DLC) 2005682517 General information about the George Grantham Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.35972 Call Number: LC-B2- 6004-9
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 1783
Tags: libraryofcongress dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain35972 ernarubinstein
1920

Is that a
Description: The Clonbrocks were out foreign again and took this interesting image while there. At first sight I thought the train was a case of a "Pushme Pullyou" as described in Dr. Doolittle but I was mistaken. The catalogue title makes note of the pump to the right and there is just so much to see in this lovely shot. Wouldn't it be lovely to see it colourised? Photographers: Dillon Family Contributors: Luke Gerald Dillon, Augusta Caroline Dillon Collection: Clonbrock Photographic Collection Date: 7 August 1901 NLI Ref: CLON682 You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie
Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Views: 5983
Tags: theclonbrockphotographiccollection lukegeralddillon baronclonbrock augustacarolinedillon baronessclonbrock dillonfamily nationallibraryofireland europe familytrip chalets
1901

The Rocks at the top of the hill.
Description: A gentleman in Tweed jacket and breeches admires a Dolmen or Cromlech at the top of a very stony hill. This image from the Clonbrock Collection has a date, but no location. Somehow rural scenes in those days seemed more rugged with rocks more exposed, and I suspect that this scene is more overgrown today? Photographers: Dillon Family Contributors: Luke Gerald Dillon, Augusta Caroline Dillon Collection: Clonbrock Photographic Collection Date: Tuesday, 10 May 1881 NLI Ref: CLON359 You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie
Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Views: 6126
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1881

[Two unidentified escaped slaves wearing ragged clothes] (LOC)
Description: McPherson & Oliver,, photographer. [Two unidentified escaped slaves wearing ragged clothes] [Baton Rouge, La.] : [McPherson & Oliver], [between 1861 and 1865] 1 photograph : albumen print on card mount ; mount 10 x 7 cm (carte de visite format) Notes: Title devised by Library staff. Notation on verso: "Contrabands just arrived. 'True to the life.' J.G.(?)W." DLC Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2016; (DLC/PP-2017:171, formerly deposit D072) Purchased from: Everitt Bowles, Woodstock, Georgia, March 2016. Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress). Subjects: African Americans--Economic & social conditions--1860-1870. Fugitive slaves--1860-1870. United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--African Americans. Format: Portrait photographs--1860-1870. Albumen prints--1860-1870. Cartes de visite--1860-1870. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519 Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.53045 Call Number: LOT 14043-2, no. 458
Owner: The Library of Congress
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1861

Description: Kimball, M. H.,, active 1863-1865,, photographer. "Rebecca, a slave girl from New Orleans" [New York] : [Kimball, 477 Broadway], [1863] 1 photograph : albumen print on card mount ; mount 10 x 7 cm (carte de visite format) Notes: Photograph shows freed slave Rebecca Huger. Title from item. Printed on verso: "The nett [sic] proceeds from the sale of these photographs will be devoted exclusively to the education of colored people in the Department of the Gulf, now under the command of Maj.-Gen. Banks." Tax stamp on verso. DLC Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2016; (DLC/PP-2016:144) Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress). Subjects: African Americans--Children--1860-1870. Girls--1860-1870. Freedmen--1860-1870. United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Children. Format: Portrait photographs--1860-1870. Cartes de visite--1860-1870. Albumen prints--1860-1870. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519 Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.40567 Call Number: LOT 14043-2, no. 103
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 13796
Tags: libraryofcongress dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpppmsca40567 rebeccahuger
1863

Understated elegance from Plumstead
Description: For a Monday morning with the lockdowns easing it is nice to celebrate, and what better way to do so than with a small wedding image. Some people, even though they have been posed, have a natural elegance, and the couple in this shot have just that. Commissioned by Mr. Holohan of Plumstead in London, this may not be that easy to add information to? Or will it? Photographer: Poole Studio Photographer Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford Date: ca. 1901-1954 Around Monday, 6 June 1938. NLI Ref: POOLEWP 4261 You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie
Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Views: 7343
Tags: ahpoole arthurhenripoole poolecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland weddingday plumstead london scroope houlihan
1938

I’m Bert, p’raps you’ve heard of me?
Description: W.J. Brennan of Market Street, Tramore may have been the dedicated follower of fashion in 1905, but in 2021 he seems the perfect caricature of “Burlington Bertie from Bow”! We know the date, the name, the place. So what more can we find out about W.J. “Bertie” Brennan? Photographer: A. H. Poole Collection: Poole Photographic Collection, Waterford Date: Saturday, 8 July 1905 NLI Ref: POOLEWP 1476a You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie
Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Views: 7918
Tags: ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland wjbrennan marketstreet tramore boaterhat walkingstick poolephotographiccollection
1905

Image from page 434 of
Description: Identifier: tradetokensissue02boyn Title: Trade tokens issued in the seventeenth century in England, Wales, and Ireland Year: 1889 (1880s) Authors: Boyne, William, d. 1893 Williamson, George Charles, 1858-1942 Subjects: Tokens Publisher: London Stock Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Grayrigg, where he carried on his business, as well as atKendal, Kirkby-Stephen, and Kirkby-Lonsdale. To the above he seems to have combined that of stationer, as appears from thefollowing entry in the accounts of the churchwardens of Kendal : 1665. Paid Mr. Richard Rowlandson for a booke of Homilies 00 06 00.—Transactions of Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian Society, ix.,p. 270. It is stated that he walked to London and back, on business, three times, andthat he was there in the time of the Great Plague in 1665. There is an entry in the parish register of burials, July 18, 1735, of RichardRowlandson, at Grayrigg, supposed to have been the issuer of this token : if so, helived to a great age, which he is said to have done. One Richard Rowlandson was Town Clerk of Kendal in 1683.—Nicolson andBurns History of Cumberland and Westmorland, i., p. 71. WESTMORLAND. KENDAL. 5. O. mercers . company . in . kendal = The Mercers Arms.R. k . k . 1657 = Arms of the Corporation of Kendal. \ Text Appearing After Image: The arms are those adopted by the Corporation of Kendal when the charter ofCharles I. was obtained, as they are not registered ; they are quarterly, first andfourth, three spindles, second and third, three woolhooks—the bearings being in-dicative of the staple trade of the town. The same arms are engraved on a silvertankard and a sword, belonging to the Corporation, with the motto Pannusmihi panis (Cloth is my bread). The letters K. k. probably stand for the initials of Kirkby-Kendal, andare engraved on the silver seal which has been in use in the Corporationsince the first charter of Elizabeth in 1576, the date of which it bears. InSnelling it is engraved without the K. k. above the shield—probably avariety. The original dies, much worn, were found in 1803 among the ruins of the NewBiggin, where the Cordwainers had their hall, and are now preserved in themuseum at Kendal.—Gateshead Observer, March 5, 1853. 6. O. company . of . shearmen = A pair of croppers shears.E. in . kendal Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookidtradetokensissue02boyn bookauthorboynewilliamd1893 booksubjecttokens bookpublisherlondonstock bookyear1889 bookauthorwilliamsongeorgecharles18581942 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto booksponsoruniversityoftoronto
1889

Image from page 114 of
Description: Identifier: conscpo00ames Title: Conscience with the power and cases thereof : Year: 1639 (1630s) Authors: Ames, William, 1576-1633 Subjects: Conscience Conduct of life Christian life Publisher: [London : s.n.] Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library Digitizing Sponsor: Princeton Theological Seminary Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hould bothyeild, andnotyeilL But that a manmayi fimply^ and purely be willing to make refinance it is notfromman himfelfe, or from any naturall power in him but• from the gift of God, and the helpe and affifiance of his grace.V h Now wee mufi objerve that when the queftion is, ivhe*ther a man may have a will to iefifi temptation ? this wordmay doth admit two fignifications • Tor it fignifies fometimes- a pofftbility which ispajftve, [in reffieti of capacity, and fame*times in regard of vertue or power, or efficiency, now it is ma*nifefi, that no man can refifi any temptation by way of efficimency,butbywayofpofftbility,oTpaffibilitymV< 11. Befides the gifts of graces and of vertues the provi-dence andproteSiion of God is necejfary for believers, thatthey may refifi temptations, and fb are thofe manifold helpswherwith God fuccors his eleft in the comb ate*Vlll.The firfi of rhefe helpes is a driving away of the enemieswherebjthey are fimetimssnot fufferedto tempt the Eleft,Job. 1. Text Appearing After Image: Of C$*fek*&* %\ eamet umpt ft mum *t tkey w#$t£ J6b, a s X# The third helpe is from the tempter himfetfe^ when eventhat very Jhape under which he tempts affords m fome help*mdinftruttion, fo the forme of the Serpent might hav$ caufedEve to havefufpe&edbis temptation. X I- The fourth helpe is from the tempt at ion it felfe, when it ei-ther ft irs npfeare in us%which is the be ft peeper, orftirs us up Ifight,and incourageth us again ft the enemy. XII* The fifth is$ anewgrace^ or an increafe of thefirmer*For to thofe that imploy their talents well God gives an in-crease either in the greatneffe% or number ^ Mat.? 5. Lukf • 19* X I I I» The ftxth is a cejfation, or peace^ or rather a trucefrom the temptation. X I Vt The feaventh is a refrefbment in the he ate of temp*tat ion, which is a mitigation of it9 aswhtn thetribulation isturned into a follace* X V# The eighth is a comforting, that is a ftengthning^and lifting up of the heart by apromifeofftrength anh vi&ory^and by a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookpublisherlondonsn bookyear1639 bookcentury1600 booksubjectconductoflife booksubjectchristianlife bookdecade1630 bookidconscpo00ames bookauthorameswilliam15761633 booksubjectconscience booksponsorprincetontheologicalseminarylibrary
1825

Image from page 69 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial4821dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: switchboard. Nothing! Not a thing! What can I do? Keep your head, for one thing, snapped Fred.We 11 give him our load to help hold him. I tried to, but look there! Jed pointed tothe synchronizing instrument. I put in theplug to hitch up with him, and look at that ! The single hand, which ought to stand uprighton the figure zero when each machine was exactlythe same speed, was a dim blur as it sped to theleft, or counter clock-wise. Fred gasped. Holy smoke! Hes running atdouble his regular speed. He speeded up his own water-wheel from ninehundred revolutions a minute to twelve hundred.The lights flamed up intensely bright. Not fast enough! he shouted to Jed. Callup the pulp-mill! Nobody there but the night-watchman!yelled Jed. Call him quick and tell him to start every 598 JACK THE KILL-O-WAITER It 11 help, even if they do motor on the place,run idle. Jed did so, and a few moments later the loadcommenced to increase. Now tell the Morrisman to screw up his circuit-breakers so they cant Text Appearing After Image: NOW! YELLED FRED. YOUR WHOLE WEIGHT—DOWN WITH II fly out, and shut his head-gates as fast as he can.Weve got to do the rest. Then he glanced at his instruments, and, notingthat he had on over three hundred more horse-power of load, sped up the great turbine. The usual high-pitched note of the generatorsincreased to a roar. Dust flew from them and thefloor shook. The speed-indicator showed twelvehundred, then fourteen, and finally sixteen hun-dred revolutions a minute before there was anychance to get in on the other circuit. Freds faceturned an ashy gray. The runaway speed—thatis, the extreme safe speed-limit for the genera- |May tors—was fifteen hundred revolutions a minuteThey were running a hundred oxer and wereliable to explode any moment in their wild raceSuddenly he threw in the connecting switch with- I he hand had stood on the zero markfor the fraction of a sec-ond. The switch held,and he leaped to thewater-wheel governorand commenced to givethe load over to the Mor-ris Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1489
Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial4821dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 638 of
Description: Identifier: saturdayeveningp1933unse Title: The Saturday evening post Year: 1839 (1830s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Graham Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d more gently,and kissed her again. Ive loved you fora thousand years! He kissed her again.And now Ive got you Im never going tolet you go! He kissed her again and againand again. She lay still and heavy in his arms, thetears trickling from her eyes. You bear! she murmured. I believeyouve broken my ribs. And she laid herhead against his cheek like a tired child. I havent, he said, kissing her again;then added a trifle savagely: But if I everhave to I certainly will. He kissed her again and set her gentlyon her feet with his right arm, a girdleof throbbing iron, round her waist—sheneeded its Support—picked up her bag andstarted with her toward the veranda steps,saying: We mustnt miss the train. Ivegot a special license in my pocket, and withany luck well be married in an hour and aquarter. How you do carry one off ones feet!she said. Well, youre as light as a feather, youknow, he said, half lifting her from theground. I believe my heart is, Tony, she said.(THE END) EVENING POST 109 Text Appearing After Image: J^OULL seldom see finercloth than in HighlandHeather overcoats. Its finished on bothsides, in different colorsand patterns; its rain-proof and warm; andthere s no end of wearin it. A Highland Heatherovercoat is a sound in-vestment where everydollar counts. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 661
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookidsaturdayeveningp1933unse bookpublisherphiladelphiaggraham bookyear1839 bookdecade1830 bookcontributoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign booksponsoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign bookcollectionuniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber638
1839

Image from page 212 of
Description: Identifier: historyofarchit02cumm Title: A history of architecture in Italy from the time of Constantine to the dawn of the renaissance Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Cummings, Charles Amos, 1833-1905 Subjects: Architecture Publisher: Boston, New York, Houghton Mifflin and company Contributing Library: PIMS - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: two great churches whichhave been described above. In the Frari,on the wall of thesouth transept, is themonument of FraPacifico Buon, whodied about 1437, abrother of the Fran-ciscan order, andbelieved by someauthorities to havebeen the architectof the church ; in SS.Giovanni e Paolo,that of the DogeMorosini. In theformer of these mon-uments, the sarco-phagus—of which theface has two squarepanels filled withdelicate reliefs, andseparated by a nicheenclosing a standingfigure of the Ma-donna, while similarniches at the angles enclose figures of Mercy and Faith — is coveredby a noble pointed arch filled with a group of sculpture in relief repre-senting the baptism of Christ. The moulded and decorated archivoltis enclosed within a broad band of sculpture consisting of a series ofbeautiful half-length figures, each within a sort of niche formed byintertwining foliage. Outside this, again, is a range of most luxuriantleafage, treated much like the crockets of S. Stefano, but continuous, Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 365. Venice. Head of Doorway, S. feteiauo. 196 ARCHITECTURE IN ITALY in the midst of which were lovely half-length figures, most of whichare destroyed. The finial which crowns the whole is a statue of the Madonna. The deco-ration of this tomb isall in terra-cotta, andwhile a cool criticismwould doubtless con-demn it as excessiveand as unsuited to thecharacter of a sepul-chral monument, yetthe grace and deli-cacy of the designare so captivatingthat the critical atti-tude is difficult tomaintain. (Fig.366.) TheMorosini tomb,of somewhat earlierdate, is of a severercharacter, yet it isnot without conces-sions to the luxuryof ornament whichcharacterized the Ve-netian artists of thetime. (Fig. 367.)Here the figure of the Doge, full of pathetic dignity and repose,lies upon a simple draped couch, upon the face of which a seriesof seven foliated brackets perhaps supported originally a line ofstatues,^ with emblematic figures at the head and feet. The pointedarch above encloses no sculptur Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 729
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 booksubjectarchitecture bookauthorcummingscharlesamos18331905 bookidhistoryofarchit02cumm bookpublisherbostonnewyorkhoughtonmifflinandcompany bookcontributorpimsuniversityoftoronto bookcollectionpimslibrary booksponsoruniversityoftoronto
1901

Image from page 36 of
Description: Identifier: astrophysicaljou43ameruoft Title: The Astrophysical journal Year: 1895 (1890s) Authors: American Astronomical Society University of Chicago Subjects: Astrophysics Spectrum analysis Publisher: [Chicago] Published by the University of Chicago Press for the American Astronomical Society Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: led in from the top, as indicated in the figure.The platinum wire used in making up these cells had been pre-viously heated to near the melting-point in a good vacuum, inorder to free it of dissolved gases. Between the last bulb and themolecular pump was inserted a liquid-air trap T. The dotted lineindicates the oven in which the cells C to iv were subsequentlyheated during exhaust. The end of the tube A was left open for PHOTO-ELECTRIC CURRENT AND ILLUMINATION 19 the introduction of the potassium (in the form of balls). A wad ofglass wool was fitted in rather loosely at g, and after the potassiumballs had been introduced into A, another plug of glass wool wasinserted at h and the open end closed up \\ith a torch. The potas-sium used was previously washed in ether and then dried betweenfilter-papers. After closing up tube A, the pump was started and the bulbsC to K heated for an hour at 350° C. ]\Ieanwhile the potassium inA was melted and allowed to run into B. During the bake-out of Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 5.^—Arrangement of apparatus to investigate photo-electric effect frommultiph distilled potassium in high vacuum. the rest of the apparatus, the metal in B was heated gently, so thatwhile it did not distil into C, it was yet kept hot enough for thegradual ehmination of any gases that might be contained in it.At the end of the hour, the oven was raised and the metal distiUedfrom B into C Only about three-quarters of the metal in one bulbwas distilled into the next. This permitted the gradual eliminationof sodium which was undoubtedly present in the potassium. After distillation into C, the bulb B was sealed off at ^, and thephoto-electric sensitiveness of the metal in C determined, whileit was still in a molten condition. The potassium was then dis-tilled in succession through the different bulbs, the latter beingsealed off after most of their potassium content had been distilled 20 HERBERT E. IVES, SAUL DUSHMAN, AND E. KARRER out. The whole operation, starting from the first di Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1895 bookdecade1890 booksubjectspectrumanalysis bookauthoramericanastronomicalsociety bookidastrophysicaljou43ameruoft bookauthoruniversityofchicago booksubjectastrophysics bookpublisherchicagopublishedbytheuniversityofchicagopressfortheamericanastronomicalsociety bookleafnumber36
1895

Image from page 433 of
Description: Identifier: cyclopediaofarch09amer Title: Cyclopedia of architecture, carpentry, and building : a general reference work ... Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: American School of Correspondence Subjects: Architecture Building Carpentry Publisher: Chicago : American Technical Society Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ng pipe with semicircular end; the semicircular endsare to be 10 inches in diameter; what must the length of c d be,so that the area of h will be equal to the area of a ? If the pipe b measured 40 X 11 inches, having semicircularends, what must the diameter of a be, so that both sections areequal in area ? If a is 20 inches in diameter and the upper section was to be 359 PROBLEMS IN MENSURATION rectangular in shape, 8 inches wide, Mhat would the lentrth of theupper section be ? Suppose the upper section Ij was desired to be square, whatmust the lencrth of each side be, to have an area similar to a ? In Fig. 11 is shown the illustration of an ordinary steel square,and the method is given of obtaining accurate diameters of pipes,round or square, without any computation whatever, the rule beingbased on the geometrical principle that the square of the hypothe-nuse of a right angle triangle is equal to the sum of the squaresof its base and altitude. To illustrate the rule. Fig. 12 has been Text Appearing After Image: ^.iJ.I.I.I-.l.l.l.l.lil.l.lil.l.lil.l.llilII^Nl^^^IIIIlilIIlililililli I 2 3 4 5 6 7 6 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 16 19 20 21 22 23 24 Fig. 11. prepared. Let A represent a round or square pipe, 20 inches across,and E a round or square pipe 12 inches across; it is desired totake a branch from the main so that the two branches B and C willequal the area of the main A. What must the size of C be ? The size of C is found by simply taking a rule 20 incheslong and placing one end on the arm of the square in Fig. 11, onthe number 12, when the opposite end of the rule will touch thenumber 16. Then 16 is the required size of the branch C in Fig.12. We can prove this by computation which, however, is notnecessary in practice. The area of a 20-inch round pipe equals314.16 in.; area of 12-in. pipe = 118.098 in.; area of 16-in.pipe = 201.062 in.; and 113.098 in. + 201.062 in. = 314.160 in.The area of a 20-in. square pipe = 400 in.; area of 12-in. squarepipe = 144 in.; area of 16-in. square pipe = 2 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectarchitecture booksubjectcarpentry booksubjectbuilding bookpublisherchicagoamericantechnicalsociety bookauthoramericanschoolofcorrespondence bookidcyclopediaofarch09amer bookyear1907 bookcontributorncsulibraries
1907

Image from page 129 of
Description: Identifier: britishentomolog03curt Title: British entomology; being illustrations and descriptions of the genera of insects found in Great Britain and Ireland: containing coloured figures from nature of the most rare and beautiful species, and in many instances of the plants upon which they are found Year: 1823 (1820s) Authors: Curtis, John, 1791-1862 Subjects: Insects Insects -- Great Britain Botany Publisher: London, Printed for the author Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ennae, tarsi, and 4 anterior tibiae rufous. InPanzers figure the body and all the legs are rufous also. Inhabits the South of France, Spain and Italy. I am notaware that it has been discovered in Britain. II. Antennae with the 3rd joint not much longerthan the 2nd. Upper wings with no discoidalcells. 3. E. fulvipes Curtis Brit. Ent. pi. 257. Mr. Dale first discovered this new insect a few miles fromDorchester; and the 22nd of last August I found a specimenunder a flag of turf in the beautiful plantations of Ramsdownnear Heron Court, Hants. 4. E. minuta Fab., Oliv., Coq. pi. 4./ 9.Smaller than the last, and entirely black. Mr. Dale has taken this insect upon Parley Heath, Dorset,where Blatta lapponica abounds; and having found them atthe same time (3rd September) and on the same spot, he con-jectures that this little Evania is the parasite of that Blatta. I am indebted to Mr. R. Chambers, F.L.S. for specimensof the pretty plant represented. Campanula hederacea (Ivy-leaved Bell-flower). Text Appearing After Image: 423.FCENUS ASSECTATOR. Order Hymenoptera. Fam. Evaniidae.Type of the Genus, Ichneumon Asseclator Lijin.F(ENUS Fab.,Lat.,Jur., Panz.,Curt.—Gasteruption Lat.—IchneumonLinn., Ssc Antennce inserted in front of the face, as long as the thorax,straioht, filiform and velvety 5 13-jointed in the male, 14-jointedin the female (19), basal joint ovate, a little the stoutest, 2ndthe smallest, cup-shaped, 4th a little longer than the 3rd, theremainder decreasing in length to the apical joint which is aslong as the 4th and linear-ovate. Labrum membranous, broad ciliated and deeply notched in thecentre, from vihence arises a tongue-shaped lobe, hairy towardsthe apex with a large triangular membrane beneath (2).Mandibles acute at the apex, oblong, truncated obliquely, onehaving a very large triangular tooth on the inside (3).MaxillcE terminated by a large oval pilose lobe, with a narrowciliated one on the inside. Palpi moderately long, slightly piloseand 6-jointed, 3 basal joints the stoutest, ob Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectbotany bookcentury1800 booksubjectinsects bookpublisherlondonprintedfortheauthor bookyear1823 bookidbritishentomolog03curt bookauthorcurtisjohn17911862 booksubjectinsectsgreatbritain bookdecade1820 bookcollectionbiodiversity
1825

Image from page 84 of
Description: Identifier: geographyoftexas00simo Title: The geography of Texas, physical and political Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Simonds, Frederic William, 1853- Subjects: Publisher: Boston, New York [etc.] Ginn & company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: to the Rocky mountains ; the badger from western North America east to Wisconsin and Texas; while the original range of the bison or buffalo was Pig. 38. Mexican from the Northwest Territory of the British Boll Weevil possessions to Mexico, and from the Rocky Adult, much mag- mountains to the head waters of the Ohio.2 nmed Again, there are animals in the north andeast which are represented in the west and southwest byclosely allied varieties, as the black bear, the coyote orprairie wolf, the foxes, the jack rabbits, and the Virginiadeer. Some of these varieties are characteristic of Texas,and in a few instances they have been dignified with therank of species, as, for example, the Texas opossum andthe Texan or fan-tailed deer. 1 Merriam, Life Zones and Crop Zones of the United States.United States Department of Agriculture, Division of Biological Sur-vey, Bulletin No. 10, p. 52, Washington, 1898. 2 See American Animals, by Stone and Cram. New York : Double-day, Page &Co., 1902. , Text Appearing After Image: FAUNA 65 60. Mammals. The class of mammals includes the high-est forms of vertebrates or backboned animals. Its mem-bers are characterized by the presence of mammary glands, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidgeographyoftexas00simo bookauthorsimondsfredericwilliam1853 bookyear1905 bookpublisherbostonnewyorketcginncompany bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionlibraryofcongress
1905

Image from page 552 of
Description: Identifier: encyclopaediabri04kell Title: The Encyclopaedia Britannica; ... A dictionary of arts, sciences and general literature Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Kellogg, D. O. (Day Otis), 1796-1874 Baynes, T. Spencer (Thomas Spencer), 1823-1887 Smith, W. Robertson (William Robertson), 1846-1894 Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries Publisher: New York : Werner Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: warehouses.But in house building according to the practice of themedi.-Eval period, these timbers would be left exposed.They would all require to be planed smooth, the girdersmoulded, the binders partly so, and the joists perhaps onlystop-chamfered, which is done by cutting the arris of thetimber to an angle along its whole length, but stoppingshort of the ends by a few inches, when it is returnedinto the arris by a cant. The underside of the joists in aframed floor may be lined with chamfered boarding orformed into panels and ornamented,—a boltel or a set ofmouldings forming a frame or cornice all round against thebinder. The girders would rest upon stono corbels, eithermoulded or decorated with foliage or figures, or all threeunited. Viollet le Due, in his valuable Dictionnaire raisonnede rArchitecture, gives several examples of such a floor. 484 BUILDING [CAEPENTEX of one of which we avail ourselves, from a house at Rheimsof the 16th century (fig. 37). He gives an example also of Text Appearing After Image: JOIST FiQ. 37.—Mediffival Flooving. a floor formed of a girder into which joists are laid formedof square timbers cut in half through the diagonal. Theseare fixed close together like a succession of vs, thus vvvvv,and boarded over. The top of the angle space formed by twojoists is filled up with a small angle fillet presenting a flatsurface. The whole effect is unique. In medijeval carpenters work it was always the ruleonly to mould the useful members, and so it was also asregards the carving. Most of the old wood carving is socontrived as to be wrought out of the same plank orthickness as that which is moulded, or else is a separatepiece of wood, in a spandril for instance, enclosed withinthe constructional members. In joining their work, whichwas of oak, they Uusled entirely to tenoning and pinningwith stout oak pins. PilUra. Although cast-iron columns and stanchions have for Bome years been preferred to timber posts as supports togirders of warehouse floors, lately the latter hav Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionaries bookauthorkelloggdodayotis17961874 bookauthorbaynestspencerthomasspencer18231887 bookauthorsmithwrobertsonwilliamrobertson18461894 bookpublishernewyorkwerner bookidencyclopaediabri04kell bookcollectionamericana
1902

Image from page 413 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924003330374 Title: Orchids for everyone Year: 1910 (1910s) Authors: Curtis, Charles H Subjects: Orchids Publisher: London, J.M. Dent New York, E.P. Dutton Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: on to need and appreciatenew rooting material now. Calanthes not yet potted, late floweringDendrobiums, Catasetums, Chysis, Cycnoches, and Lycastes thathave finished flowering will all need attention. Damp down the floors and stages early in the day, as soon asthe temperature rises by natural heat. Pay great care to shading, and ventilate with equal care.Admit air chiefly by means of the lower ventilators; top ventila-tion tends to dry the atmosphere quickly and severely. Leave thelower ventilators on the lee side of the cool houses open a littleall night. Odontoglossums not in flower may be sprayed very lightlyoverhead in the morning on all bright days. Sphagnum will grow freely at this season, and care must betaken to prevent it from overgrowing seedlings, or endangering thenew growths of older Orchids. Clip off^ excessive sphagnum growthwith sharp scissors. MAY Ventilate early in the day, and close the houses early in theafternoon. Open the lower ventilators of cool houses a little Text Appearing After Image: l-H 6 P minOhJOOHZ o QO A CALENDAR OF REMINDERS 211 towards evening. Almost all Orchids will need abundance ofatmospheric moisture at this season. Vanda teres will need potting as soon as its flowers have faded. Pot Anguloas as they pass out of bloom. Shade Odontoglossums early in the day, and if the housesface south or east, it may be desirable to thinly coat the roof glasswith a permanent shading of whitening and milk, or other suitablepreparation, as this will obviate the need of lowering the blinds sovery early, and allow them to be drawn up earlier in the afternoonthan would be otherwise possible. As Summer-flowering Cypripediums pass out of flower theyshould be potted as necessary. Miltonia vexillaria flowers this month, and before the bloomsexpand the plants should be very carefully cleaned, so that thripsor other insects do not damage the flowers. Lycaste Skinnerii flowers over a long period, and as theflowers fade the plants should have prompt attention, and bepotted if they Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1910 bookpublisherlondonjmdent bookpublishernewyorkepdutton booksubjectorchids bookidcu31924003330374 bookauthorcurtischarlesh bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionamericana
1910

Image from page 172 of
Description: Identifier: wondersofsculptu00viarrich Title: Wonders of sculpture Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Viardot, Louis, 1800-1883 Subjects: Sculpture Publisher: New York, Scribner, Armstrong, and Company Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fi£j. 29.—The Torso of the Belvedere. (Rome. Vatican.) , ^ of IBM ^ GRECIAN SCUl.rrURE. 143 old aee, when he was almost blind, he still likedto trace those outlines with his trembling fingersat which he had so often gazed with admiration.True or false, this anecdote shows the spirit of the Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 2j. The Dancing I-,iun. (Xaples.) age, and the enthusiasm of great artists for anti-quity ; and it paints the portrait of the man who,from his birth to his death, loved art and art alone,In the museum dcgli Studj at Naples, there are 144 GRECIAN SCULPTUIiE. some bronze antiquities obtained in excavations atPompeii, Herculaneum, and Stabiae. They are very-rare, as numbers of the same kind were destroyedin barbarous times, for the sake of the valuablematerial. Of about a hundred of these figures, thebest are—the little Dancing Faun, a perfect gem,a very marvel of grace, ease, and vivacity ; theSleeping Fami; the Drunken Faun, leaning overhis bottle and snapping his fingers; the SeatedMercury, which evidently belongs to the best ageof Grecian art; the figure called Sappho, also thebust of Plato, the hair of which is most delicatelychiselled ; a horse, sole remnant of the quadriga^ ofwhich it formed part. Amongst the marbles of the Stndj, the Vejius ofCapita and the Venus Callipygo Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1873

Image from page 446 of
Description: Identifier: annualreportofbo1929smit Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution Year: 1846 (1840s) Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents United States National Museum. Report of the U.S. National Museum Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary Subjects: Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Institution. Archives Discoveries in science Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: g airplane does. The wings ofinsects must furnish not only the driving power, but a lifting force aswell, which is to say, the movement of the wings must create a regionof lowered pressure both before and above the body of the insect. An interesting and instructive study of the effect of the wing move-ments of insects on the surrounding air has been made by Demoll(1918). By means of a simple apparatus consisting of a frame withseveral horizontal cross bars on which were suspended rows of fineowl feathers, Demoll was able to demonstrate the direction of theair currents created by the wiags in vibration when the insect itselfis held stationary. The lightness of the feathers made the latterdelicately responsive to any disturbance of the air in their immediateviciaity, and thus the air currents set up by the whirring wings of aninsect, secured by the body in such manner that the wing movementswould not be hindered, were registered in the displacement of the HOW INSECTS FLY—SNODGEASS 415 Text Appearing After Image: feathers. Experimenting in this way with insects of different orders,Demoll found that the currents of air drawn toward a stationary insecthy the vibrations of its wings come not only from in front, but alsofrom above, from the sides, and from below, and that the currentsgiven off are all thrown out to the rearward. (Fig. 24.) The strengthof the currents, how-ever, is not the samefrom all directions,as is indicated by therelative thickness ofthe arrows in thediagrams. The airis drawn toward theinsect most stronglyfrom before andabove the anteriorpart of the body;the outgoing cur-rents are strongestin a horizontal orslightly downwarddirection. Most ofthe oncoming cur-rents, therefore, areturned to the rear inthe neighborhood ofthe insects body, andcondensed in a smallregion behind it. If the insect isfree to move, themechanical effect ofthe vibrating wingson the air will be thesame as when theinsect is held sta-tionary; but, insteadof moving the air,or instead of movingthe air to the s Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 bookauthorsmithsonianinstitutionboardofregents bookauthorunitedstatesnationalmuseumreportoftheusnationalmuseum bookauthorsmithsonianinstitutionreportofthesecretary booksubjectsmithsonianinstitution booksubjectsmithsonianinstitutionarchives booksubjectdiscoveriesinscience bookyear1846 bookidannualreportofbo1929smit
1846

Image from page 160 of
Description: Identifier: horsehisdiseases00jenn Title: The horse and his diseases : embracing his history and varieties, breeding and management and vices; with the diseases to which he is subject, and the remedies best adapted to their cure Year: 1863 (1860s) Authors: Jennings, Robert Subjects: Horses Horses -- Diseases Publisher: Philadelphia : John E. Potter Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rse, the case is different. In some species of lameness, asin chronic diseases of the joints, the slow but constant exercisethus rendered necessary is highly beneficial; but the exertiondemanded by a bare pasture is unfavorable to any sprain orlameness arising from disease in the ligaments and tendons.Lameness, when very great, no mattoi vrhere seated, forbidspasturing, even though the grass be knee-high. The pain ofstanding, and moving on two or three legs, may be so greatihat the horse will be obliged to lie down before he ha^ob- PASTURING. 157 taincil Iialf a meal. It is for slight lameness only that horsesslionld be turned out; and the pasture should be such as toafford suSicieut nutriment, without giving the horse more ex-ercise than is good for the disease. The legs of fast-working horses often become turned, shape-^^^^^^^^^^* less, tottering, bent at the knee, and ^^ straight at the pasterns. These ^ always improve at— pasture, as, indeed,they do in the sta-ble, or loose-box, Text Appearing After Image: =j^^,~i^ when the horse isthrown out of work.Grazing exercisedoes not appear toPASTURING. be unfavorable to their restoration ; but when the knees are very much bent, thehorse is unfit for turning out; he cannot graze ; when his headis down, he is ready to fall upon his nose, and it costs himmuch effort to maintain his balance. The position of the head in the act of grazing is unfavor-able to the return of blood from the brain, from the eyes,, fromall parts of the head. Horses that have had staggers, or badeyes, those that have recently lost a jugular vein, and thosethat have any disease about the head—strangles, for instance-should not be sent to pasture. The disease becomes worse, or,if gone, is apt to return. Even healthy horses are liable toattacks on the brain, when turned to grass, particularly whenthe weather is hot, and the herbage abundant. Horses that have been for more than a year in the stable, 158 PASTURING. and especially those that have been reined up in harness, ofte Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjecthorses booksubjecthorsesdiseases bookdecade1860 bookidhorsehisdiseases00jenn bookauthorjenningsrobert bookpublisherphiladelphiajohnepotter bookyear1863 bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc
1863

Image from page 711 of
Description: Identifier: bonnierskonversa09centuoft Title: Bonniers konversations lexikon Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Centerwall, Sture Lorents, Yngve Samuel, 1887- Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries, Swedish Publisher: Stockholm : A. Bonniers Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: undersida. Total-längd c: a 1 m. — P u n g n ä b b -m u s e n, Phascologale penicil-lata, är ovan grå, under vitaktig.Längd c:a 4.5 cm., varav svansen22 cm. Australien. Skicklig träd-klättrare. — Pungmyrsloken.Mifrmecobius fasciatus, saknarpung. Ryggen är framtill gul. bak-till svart med ljusa tvärband, bu-ken gulvit. Längd o:a 43 cm., var-av svansen 18 cm. S. och v. Austra-lien, i skogsmarker. Lever huvud-sakl. av myror, som den fångarmed sin långa tunga. Rovraps, se Brassica. Rovriddare, se R i d d a r v ä -s c n. Rovsteklar, Sphc(jidac. en fam.solitärt levande G a d d s t e k -1 a r, som livnära sig sjiilva avblomsafter men mata sina larvermed andra insekter och spindlar,som förlamats genom ett styng avgadden. Aggen läggas i rörformigabon, som utgrävas i jorden 1. min-ken ved. — B i v a r g e n, Philan-thus triattfiulum, är svart medgula teckningar. Längd 12—16mm. Larvernas föda utgöres avlambin. Siillsvnt i .-^verige. — 1399 Rovtand—Royalty 1400 Text Appearing After Image: Rovsteklar. Aiuiuophila sabulosa. Ammop]iihi sahulosa har lång-skaftad, röd, i spetsen mörkblåbakkropp. Längd 12—23 mm. In-samlar nattflylarver. Rovtand, se E o v d j u r. Rowuma, gränsflod mellanTanganyikaterritoriet ocli Port.Öst-Afrika. C:a 800 km. Roxane, d. 311 f. Kr., Alexan-der den stores gemål, dotter av enpersisk satrap. Roxburgh [råkksbra], grev-skap i s.ö. Skottland, på gränsenmot England. Jordbruk, boskaps-skötsel, ylleindustri. 42,000 inv.Huvudstad Jedburgh. Roxen, 96 kvkm. stor insjö iÖstergötland, genomfluten av Mo-tala ström. R., som är en förkast-ningssjö med n. stranden brant,ligger 33 m. ö. h. och är grundmen av betydelse som trafikled;genomlöpes av Göta kanal. I R. ut-falla bl. a. Svartån och Stångån. de Roy [råj], Arent, neder-ländsk arkitekt, verksam i Sverigeunder 1500-t:s senare hälft. R.ledde bl. a. uppförandet av Vad-stena slott. Royal [eng. utt. råjal, fr. roa-jall], kunglig. — Textil. En ge-nom försättning av s. k. tvä Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 bookidbonnierskonversa09centuoft bookauthorcenterwallsture bookauthorlorentsyngvesamuel1887 booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionariesswedish bookpublisherstockholmabonniers bookleafnumber711 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto
1922

Image from page 53 of
Description: Identifier: advertisingselli00holl Title: Advertising and selling : principles of appeal and response Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Hollingworth, Harry L. (Harry Levi), 1880-1956 Duke University. Library. Wayne P. Ellis Collection Subjects: Advertising Selling Publisher: New York London : D. Appleton and Company Contributing Library: Duke University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Duke University Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: dyknown, or excite curiosity concerning a com-modity about to be announced. (1) Its psychology is usually mechanical—utilizing the principles of size and con-trast. (2) Its mnemonic psychology is also me-chanical, utilizing chiefly the principle ofrepetition. (3) But it also involves the psychology ofnames, that of trade marks and that ofthe memorability of different hinds offacts. III. Display Advertisements.—In display ad-vertisements the role of psychological factors ismost prominent. The display advertisement ex-plicitly takes the place of the salesman; it is adirect appeal, and is calculated to provoke a moreor less direct, and more or less immediate re-sponse. According to its kind, it may workthrough the rational circuit or the feeling circuit.All parts of the arc are thus involved. It is con-sequently on this type of advertisement that we 35 PRINCIPLES OF APPEAL AND RESPONSE will base most of our analysis, chiefly because ofits ideal character. But all that is said of this Text Appearing After Image: Display Appeal type will be seen to apply in greater or lessdegree to the two other types, and to all forms ofbusiness appeal which have elements in commonwith advertisements. 36 ANALYSIS OF TASK AND MEDIA Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookpublishernewyork bookauthorhollingworthharrylharrylevi18801956 booksubjectselling bookidadvertisingselli00holl bookauthordukeuniversitylibrarywaynepelliscollection bookpublisherlondondappletonandcompany booksubjectadvertising
1913

Image from page 379 of
Description: Identifier: historyoffamilv100seto Title: A history of the family of Seton during eight centuries. [With plates, including portraits, illustrations, facsimiles, a bibliography and genealogical tables.] Year: 1896 (1890s) Authors: Seton, George, 1822-1908 Subjects: Publisher: Edinburgh : T. & A. Constable Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 1713 he was appointed Ensign of thered and yellow colours of the train-bands. Like his brother James, hewas twice married, and appears to have had issue by both of his wives,viz., Ann, daughter of Thomas Caddell, brewer, and Jean, daughter ofAlexander Clerk, late of Pitteuchar. The eldest son of David Seton, burgess of Burntisland and Edin-burgh, was presumably 2. John Seton, who held the office of Town Clerk of Burntisland, and was admitted a burgess of Edinburgh, in right of his father,30th November 1709. His signature, asa notary-public, appears in the Registerof Sasines for Burntisland from 1683 to1712. Prior to 1686 he married JanetAngus, by whom he had at least four sonsand two daughters :— 1. David, who does not appear tohave left any descendants. 2, 3. James, John, of both of whomafterwards. 4. Robert, born 1709. 5, 6. Margaret, born 1704, and Agnes,born 1706. The line of succession appears tohave been carried on by the second sonof John Seton, Clerk of Burntisland,viz. :— Text Appearing After Image: 1 Dysart Parochial Register. 2 Burntisland Parochial Register. Edinburgh Council Records. JAMES SETON OF BELSHES 323 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1896

Image from page 238 of
Description: Identifier: saintpierrederom00mortuoft Title: Saint-Pierre de Rome : histoire de la basilique vaticane et du culte du tombeau de Saint Pierre Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Mortier, Daniel Antonin, 1858- Subjects: Peter, the Apostle, Saint Basilica di San Pietro in Vaticano Piazza San Pietro (Vatican City) Publisher: Tours : Alfred Mame et Fils Contributing Library: Kelly - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: vir dingénieur au siège de Florence. Aussi ses travaux à labasilique Vaticane avancèrent lentement. Pauvre, découragé, vieilli, ilassista sans grande espérance à lélection de Paul III. Il faut croire que,malgré son grand âge, son talent incontestable suscitait encore desjalousies, car il mourut empoisonné, dit-on. [Kir des rivaux avides deprendre la direction de Saint-Pierre. I. A l!A>ILIoLi: VATICANF. 211 Elle échut à Antonio S.iii liallo. neveu de Julien, le rollègue deRapbail tt de Fra Giocondu. Jl fit un nouveau projet, le quatrif-me depuisJules II. Croix grecque surmontée dune coupole, ornée de colonnes, depyramides, de statues, et accompagnée de deux tours, plus deux campa-niles à la façade. On était loin du plan économique de Peruzzi. Ce projetfut trouvé merveilli-nx. comme tous ceux de ses prédécesseurs. MaisAntonio San (Jallo, qui parait avoir été un homme très piatique. futplus avisé queux. Au lieu de laisser ses plans sur le papier, il fit un Text Appearing After Image: 11.m. m vil, |,..r S.l.iÉ~li;iTi.. il.l lioliibo. modrie en hois, livs ((iinplifiui, trrs (litaiih, qui cnùl;! quatre millecent quatre-vingl-qiialic éciis à la Kahriqnr de Sainl-lierre. Ce modrk.qui pailait aux ynix. eut plein succès. Il v.ilul ii laiilcNr une prime dequinze cents éciis «lu .-^uuxcr.iiii iiontilr ri ,nil:iiil de l;i |-ahrii|U(. Le iii.illirii-reux iieiil pas le temps de les touclici-. ()ccu|)é. par oidrc de r.iul 111.à c.uialiscr l;i lisiric Nclliiio ;i r( riii. il prit la lièvre et niiHiint en lôU».laul III nétait pas sans cimImi ims. OTi trouver un ;iiv|iilf(lc.* Il suppliaJules Humain den accepter la charge. Aprts dingrats et longs poui|iar-lers, le célrhie artiste, à son corps défendant, venait ilf cnnseiilir quandil mourut i\ son toiu-. On lit des ouvertures à Sansovino. i|ui ne voulutrien ciiIcikIic ii reins;! i\f ipiilliT Venise. 1/idée de Nicolas V et île•Iules II ti.iii rii ptiil. im seul imiiiiiii pouvait la sauver. -212 SAINT-PIERRE DE Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectbasilicadisanpietroinvaticano booksubjectpiazzasanpietrovaticancity bookpublishertoursalfredmameetfils bookyear1900 booksubjectpetertheapostlesaint bookidsaintpierrederom00mortuoft bookauthormortierdanielantonin1858 bookcontributorkellyuniversityoftoronto
1900

Image from page 123 of
Description: Identifier: tragicomediadeca00roja Title: Tragicomedia de Calisto y Melibea : en la qual se contiene de mas de su agradable y dulce estilo muchas sentencias filosofales : y avisos muy necessarios para mancebos : mostrandoles los engaños q estan encerrados en seruientes [sic] y alcahuetas : y nuevamente añadidos el tractado de Centurio Year: 1502 (1500s) Authors: Rojas, Fernando de, d. 1541 Subjects: Publisher: [Sevilla : s.n. Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: e como pijcn./i*»* ^ ^^^^m ouro aducrfario cñRRálas yras i fañas • C©emp:onio O ? «^^^^ ■ ^r^^vieja auarienta:muert3 t>e fed po: Dinero: no feras contenta co , , ..la tercia parte oelo ganado!.,{. t STfi ftuluM^ñícIH: no me bagays falír oc fefo:no querays que íalganf a pla^-^/^-A»ca las cofas oe calillo i vaellra6:CSé0t>9 bojcs o gritos:q tu ^ . tm copÍHsloquepiomctífte:ocupÍira6oytus&ía6.j:£liO«neíCv^»^ ^^/po: oíos el cfpadaXen lo parmeno:teio no la m<te eife ocfua^ / «^.^íJ* ^hJ) ^■ríado-rCeOjulticia )uaícia:fc(ío:cs ve5inos:)ufticia q me mataen mi cafa cftos rufianesale ftalcí•^ «caBatópuescomeníalteqnos fentiran:muera muera:oeloe I í Text Appearing After Image: f^iitn 5^ veaygTi: para quic tomites maos: muerta i^ ^C0 mí madre i mí bíc todo^ScQbuye buyeparmeno: q carga ^mucba gcte* &mtz guarte q víc el alguB5ÍÍ(;i^arO ay peca^do: oe mítque no ay po: t)o nos vamos: q ella tomada la paer^ta:C®eOfaltemo0 ocftas ventanas: no muramos en poder Dc|uftícía*(|T^arOraltaqyotraftívoy* c^aft>^ffc ^tu^^ ..©argumento oel ter5eno aucto» Jp\ efpcrfádo calillo tve Dozmír: efta fablado coníígo mífmo*2^ í^các a vn poco efta llamado a tríftá 1 otros fus criadosE.o:na a oo:mír Calífto-T^one fe tríftan ala puertarvíene foíiaUo:ando*p:eguntado be trífta: fofia cueta le la muerte t5 fempzonío T parmeno* va a xyc^iv la nueuas a calífto: el qual fabíendola verdad:ba5e gran lamentación» CCalirto^jCríftan^Sofia» ^ ^ O Como be bozmído tá amipiaser: befpues t>e aql asacara i^U., , s . do ratorpefpues t)e aql anfi^elico ra^onamígto.^iran rgpo/ infvH» c í *^ií^ fo be tenídotel roiifiego z oefcáfo pzocedé t>c mi alegri Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookauthorrojasfernandoded1541 bookidtragicomediadeca00roja bookpublishersevillasn bookcentury1500 bookdecade1500 bookyear1502 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber123 bookcontributorbostonpubliclibrary booksponsorbostonpubliclibrary
1825

Image from page 504 of
Description: Identifier: larousseuniverse02laro Title: Larousse universel en 2 volumes; nouveau dictionnaire encyclopédique publié sous la direction de Claude Augé Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Larousse, Pierre, 1817-1875 Subjects: Encyclopedias and dictionaries, French French Publisher: Paris Larousse Contributing Library: Internet Archive Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: dans la cale. par-contre n. m. Troc deffets de commerce. par-COrpS n. m. Contrainte par corps : pro-jitoncer un par-corps. parcourir v. a. Se conj. comme courir.. Sui-vre ou visiter dans toute son étendue ou dans tousles sens : parcourir une route, uneminer rapidement : parcourir un livre. Passer enrevue par la réflexion : parcourir lunivers par lapensée. parcours kour] n. m. de parcourir. Cheminque suit un véhicule, une eau courante etc le par-cours de la Seine est sinueux. Trajet eneffectuer un parcours Droit appartenant aux habi-tants de deux communes, de taire paître leurs bes-tiaux sur leurs va.nea pâtures resj clde parcours di en principe parla lui du 9 juillet \8B9 V. i lTURs, pâturage. Parcq (Le , ch.-I. de c. [Pas-de-Calais), arr. elà47 kil. dArras; 660 h. - Le cant. a 24 comm.,et 8.8;0 h. pard par n. m. Zool. Nom vulgaire du serval. pardalide n. f. du gr. pardali*. idos. pan-A ntiq. :/r. Peau de panthère, qui était un desattributs de Bacchus Dionysos). 405 — PAU Text Appearing After Image: pard alotetrès . ir. pardanthe 1 îenre diri <• o m p re-planter• ■ rig/i n a ires de ■■.ni iî a ■ dans les jardins de . ou on les désigne sous le nom diris tigrés. pardessus [rf^-sujn. m. Vêtement que lon portepar dessus les autres. Pardessus de si , mite et homme pi.1,tique français npeneau [1772-1853), On lui iremarquable tours ded ro 11 CQ m m erctal e ttection des loisniari/i»iesantérieure3au vin* siècle.par-devant prep V. par. X. m.Feuille supérieure dela carte a jouer, cellesur laquelle est impri-mée limage et -jui por-te la marque des con-tributions indirectes. pardi I par-dieu ! pardien-ne ! [di-è-nt par-dine ! ïnterj. : pourpar Dieu!). Juronfamilier. PardO(El),bourg Pardessus : 1. Dété , -2. Dhiver.dEspagne [Notivelle- Caslille, sur le Mançanarès : château bâti par Char-les-Quint (1543); agrandi en 1772 par Charles III, ilrenferme d intéressante»œuvres dart. Au Pardofut signé, en 1778, untrailé entre TEspagne etle Portugal. Pardo Bazan Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 booksubjectfrench booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionariesfrench bookauthorlaroussepierre18171875 bookpublisherparislarousse bookidlarousseuniverse02laro bookcontributorinternetarchive bookcollectioninternetarchivebooks
1922

Image from page 81 of
Description: Identifier: historyofamericap02wils Title: A history of the American people Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924 John Davis Batchelder Collection (Library of Congress) Subjects: United States -- History Publisher: New York and London, Harper & brothers Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: WE DRANK THE KiN(.f HEALTH IN CHAMPAGNE S^brnvF ° ° on VOLLEY- FROM THE JOURNAL OF M»FONTAINE-OF GOVERNOR SPOTSWOODS EXPEDITION I THE BLU1 RIDGK Text Appearing After Image: COLONEL RHET1 AND IHE PIRATE sTl.IU. BONNE] COMMON I NDERTAK1NGS ill the Bahamas, and sweeping the sea as they daredfrom Brazil to Newfoundland. But tlie day of theirreckoning was near at hand. South Carolina hadcleared her own coasts for a little at the beginning ofthe century, but the robbers swarmed at her inlets againwhen the Indian massacres had weakened and dis-tracted her, and the end of the war with France setmany a roving privateersman free to return to piracy.The crisis and turning-point came in the year 1718.That year an English fleet crossed the sea, took NewProvidence, purged the Bahamas of piracy, and madehenceforth a stronghold there for law and order. Thatsame year Stede Bonnet, of Barbadoes, a man whohad but the other day held a majors commission inher Majestys service, honored and of easy fortune,but now turned pirate, as if for pastime, was caughtat the mouth of the Cape Fear by armed ships underredoubtable Colonel Rhett, who had driven the Frenchout of Charleston h Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 bookpublishernewyorkandlondonharperbrothers booksubjectunitedstateshistory bookauthorwilsonwoodrow18561924 bookauthorjohndavisbatcheldercollectionlibraryofcongress bookidhistoryofamericap02wils bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary
1902

Image from page 275 of
Description: Identifier: transactionsofam2519amer Title: Transactions of the American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for the year ... Year: 1912 (1910s) Authors: American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Subjects: American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Gynecology Obstetrics Gynecology Obstetrics Publisher: Philadelphia : The Association Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: did not see this boy again until August 9, on theoperating table, as a belated steamboat had landed him, accom-panied by his family physician. Dr. H. S. Rowlett, of CarrollCounty, Ky., in Louisville late the night before. I made anincision along the outer border of the right rectus muscle, 5inches long, down to the cyst wall, the posterior and anteriorperitoneum were clamped together, thus rendering the subsequentwork practically extraperitoneal. The bulging cyst was tappedand five pints of amber-colored fluid drawn off, to all appearances 196 AP MORGAN VANCE, perfectly fresh urine, leaving about one-fourth of the contentsin the sac to facilitate the enucleation. This was begun. Theseparation of the sac wall accomplished with little difficulty.I soon came to the right ureter at the bottom of the sac in thepelvis. This was cut between clamp and ligature, and theseparation continued over into the left iliac region and up theleft side of sac. To my great surprise I came upon another tube Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 4.—Case IV. running from the sac across the spinal column to the left. Iimmediately verified the existence of a left ureter, finding one ofgood size. I traced this short, thick tube to the very large leftkidney. It came away near the normal ureter. I tied it off,ligating it as near the kidney as I could, clamping the partnearer the cyst. My greatest trouble was yet to come—I meantrouble in deciding what to do, as I had fallen into new fields—anyway, new fields to me. The enucleation was continued up-ward, under the ribs, and the upi)cr part freed and brought down, ABDOMINAL CASE. 197 revealing a small kidney, about the size and shape of an Englishwalnut, with a broad, thick band of kidney tissue connectingit with the hypertrophied left kidney. I hesitated for a moment,as the blood supply of this little kidney looked so large that Ifeared it might be serving both. I had to go ahead, as backingout was out of the question. After ligating the vessels and theconnecting band with Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectobstetrics booksubjectgynecology bookyear1912 bookdecade1910 bookidtransactionsofam2519amer bookauthoramericanassociationofobstetriciansandgynecologists booksubjectamericanassociationofobstetriciansandgynecologists bookpublisherphiladelphiatheassociation bookcollectionamericana
1912

Image from page 13 of
Description: Identifier: outing63newy Title: Outing Year: 1885 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Leisure Sports Travel Publisher: [New York : Outing Pub. Co.] Contributing Library: Tisch Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ENBERG A dull gray sky at end of day, a blood red sun at morn,*»■ Signs of wrath in the stormy path of the Waters round the Horn.The pumping of a falling glass, a cloud rack hurrying low,And the shrill pipe of the mollyhawk warned us of the southern blow.Cold Staten Land loomed close aboard; with topsIs shaken free,We ratched our ship from the rockbound coast that threatened on our lee.Our topsls spread soon split to shreds before the rising gale,And hove to wind we drifted off, our yards bereft of sail.Driven before the hungry seas that rushed us night and day,Nor paused to lick the dripping oil we fed them on their Way,For twenty storm-swept ocean leagues, the sleety ice bred blastHaled us to south of Ramirez; we rounded it at last.The westerly gale that Veered to south, a head wind off the Horn,Was a fair breeze round Ramirez, as we hauled to the north that mom,We bent our topsls, squared away, set evry kite on high,And raced our ship to a warmer sea where the flying fishes fly. Text Appearing After Image: TWO TURTLE HUNTERS PADDLED TO OUR CAMP Illustration for The Fountain of Youth, page 26. OUTINGouting63newy Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1885

Image from page 37 of
Description: Identifier: premiumlistregul17nort Title: Premium list and regulations ; of the ... great State Fair of North Carolina Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: North Carolina Agricultural Society Subjects: Agricultural exhibitions Publisher: Raleigh, N.C. : The Society Contributing Library: State Library of North Carolina Digitizing Sponsor: State Library of North Carolina View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: play of Mahogany Wrappers, Heavy-bodied Cut- ters. Stemming Lugs, Mahogany Fillers, and Dark Eng-lish Strips by any County Fair or Community Fair. . 15.00 7.50Each contestant for any tobacco premium will be permitted to place on eachsample his of her own tag, and the manner in which the tobacco is handledwill be taken into consideration by the judges in awarding premiums.Manufacturers Contests. 77. Best display of Chewing Tobacco in original pack- ages Gold Medal Diploma 7S. Best display of Smoking Tobacco in original pack-ages Gold Medal Diploma 79. Best box Plug Tobacco Diploma 50. Best display Cigarettes Diploma 51. Best display Cigars Diploma 35 Burpees Seeds Grow, Burpees Seeds are grown not only tosell but to grow again. Burpees Annual for 1917 The Leading American Seed Catalog, contains 204 pages in colors and better thanever, it is a safe guide to success inthe garden. It is mailed free. Write today.A postcard will do. W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Seed Growers, Philadelphia, Pa. Text Appearing After Image: BENTHALL PEANUT PICKERS BEST BY TEST Will not break hull. Saves vines for feed. Morethan 2,000 satisfied users. Write for Catalog and Prices.BENTHALL MACHINE COMPANY, Inc. SUFFOLK, VIRGINIA 36 PEAS FOR FOOD, PEA VINES FOR FEED. DEPARTMENT A—FIELD AND GARDEN CROPS. 82. Best display Cheroots Diploma S3. Best display Fine-cut Chewing Tobacco Diploma SECTION G—RICE. 84. Best peck Rice, rough $2.00 $1.00 85. Best peck Rice, cleaned 2.00 loo 86. Best sheaf upland Rice, to measure twelve inches round 1.00 .50 87. Best sheaf lowland Rice, to measure twelve inches around 1.00 .50 88. Largest and most artistic display of rice Diploma. SECTION H—COWPEAS (FIELD PEAS.) A S9. Best peck of Unknown or Wonderful Peas .$2.00 A 90. Best peck of New Era Peas 2.00 A 91. Best peck of Brabham Peas 2.00 A 92. Best peek of Whipporwill Peas 2.00 A 93. Best peck of Taylor or Whittle Peas 2.00 A 94. Best peck of Red Crowder Peas 2.00 A 95. Best peck of Red Ripper Peas 2.00 A 96. Best peck of Black Peas 2.0 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthornorthcarolinaagriculturalsociety bookidpremiumlistregul17nort bookpublisherraleighncthesociety bookyear1911 booksubjectagriculturalexhibitions bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber37
1911

Image from page 348 of
Description: Identifier: travellettersfro00howe Title: Travel letters from New Zealand, Australia and Africa Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Howe, E. W. (Edgar Watson), 1853-1937 Subjects: Publisher: Topeka, KS : Crane & Co Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hen I first saw the falls, and all agreedthat, in places, the river a few hundred feet below wasnot more than fifty feet wide, although the guidebookssay the width is greater. And this narrow river is notgreatly disturbed a few yards below the great VictoriaFalls; there is no swirling, leaping rapids, as may beseen four or five miles below Niagara. When lookingat Victoria Falls, very much more water seems to pourover the brink than at Niagara; when looking at theriver below, you are disposed to think the quantity ismuch less—as a matter of fact, the quantity is aboutthe same, with Niagara a little in the lead. ... AtNiagara, you may see the falls from an electric car,and go down the Niagara river on top of the hills, andreturn beside the whirlpool rapids; but seeing Victoriais much more difficult. For nearly a mile you walk inwhat seems a pouring rain, but which is actually sprayfrom the falls. Most visitors put on old clothes atthe hotel, and quietly submit to the ducking; on their Text Appearing After Image: NEW ZEALAND, AUSTRALIA, AND AFRICA. 333 return, they take a hot bath, put on dry clothing, andsit on the verandas, and talk about the wonderful trip.During this walk of half a mile in pouring rain fromthe spray of the falls, you pass through what is calledthe Rain Forest. As rain is always falling, the vege-tation is luxuriant, but not as luxuriant as I had ex-pected. The path through the rain forest is alwayswet; sometimes you step into water over your shoe-tops, and the trees are always dripping; you cannotsee the falls to the best advantage wdthout passingthrough this Rain Forest, and you cannot make this tripwithout becoming as wet as though you had plungedinto a lake with your clothes on. During this tripyou frequently stand not a hundred feet from the falls,and the spray coming up from the pool is so thick thatyou cannot see a hundred feet beyond you. And allthe time the great roar is in your ears, and the rainshifting with the wind. The sun nearly always shineshere, and on this Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1913

Image from page 23 of
Description: Identifier: frmont49storyo00dell Title: Frémont and '49 : the story of a remarkable career and its relation to the exploration and development of our western territory, especially of California Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Dellenbaugh, Frederick Samuel, 1853-1935 Subjects: Frémont, John Charles, 1813-1890 Frémont, John Charles, 1813-1890 Discoveries in geography Explorers Publisher: New York London : G.P. Putnam's Sons Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: iety—Slavery and Anti-Slavery Again—The Mariposa Problem— xiv Contents PAGE Rough-and-Ready Forty-niners—Fremont Arrested in Eng-land—A Sojourn in Paris—On the Trail Again—Fifth and LastExpedition—Named for President—Starving through the Moun-tains—A Pathfinder—Death of Oliver Fuller—Friendly Mor-mons of Parowan—Mental Telepathy. CHAPTER XXPolitics, War, and Finance 450 No Obstacle to a Railway—Bentons Defeat—Sutter Goes Down—Fremont Continues West from Parowan—Crossing Nevada—Balked by the Sierra—Reasons for a Railway to the Pacific—Nominated for the Presidency—A Bitter Campaign—No Helpfrom Benton—Champion of Freedom—Defeat—Mariposa Again—Fighting Claim-jumpers—Financial Complications—BretHarte and Black Point—A Major-General—Emancipation Pro-clamation—Relieved of Command—The Virginia Campaign—Mariposa Revived—Fremont Loses—A Major-General oncemore—Across the Range—New Yorks Monument. Bibliography 483 Index 503 Text Appearing After Image: ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS FACP On the Barrier ...... Frontispiece Original painting by F. S. Dellenbaugh. St. Louis, Missouri Metropolis of the West in the time of the Fremont Expeditions.From Meyers Universum.Drawn from nature. Fort Snelling, Minnesota Where St. Paul now stands. In 1838 when Fremont was there with Nicollet, it was the centre of all operations in the North-West.A part built of stone in 1820 still stands in the present military reservation.From Meyers Universum. Type of Missouri River Steamboat Prior to 1840 . From A History of the Missouri River, by Phil. E. Chappell,Kansas Historical Association Collections, vol. ix. The British Idea of Western North America in 1782 Reduced from Thomas Jefferys Map. Shows the Peninsula only, called California, while Drakes nameof New Albion is given to what the Spaniards claimed asCalifornia Alta. The Columbia River is indicated as the Riverof the West, and another course for the River of the West isgiven farther south, flowing into the Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectdiscoveriesingeography bookdecade1910 booksubjectexplorers bookpublishernewyork bookyear1914 bookpublisherlondongpputnamssons booksubjectfrmontjohncharles18131890 bookidfrmont49storyo00dell bookauthordellenbaughfredericksamuel18531935
1914

Image from page 90 of
Description: Identifier: selectionofdrawi00vict Title: A selection of drawings by old masters in the Museum collections Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Victoria and Albert Museum. Dept. of Engraving, Illustration, and Design Reitlinger, Henry Subjects: Drawing Publisher: London : Printed under the authority of H.M. Stationery off. Contributing Library: University of British Columbia Library Digitizing Sponsor: University of British Columbia Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: c- -c I Plate V Text Appearing After Image: 13. RAPHAELPortrait of a girl I i Plate VI Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectdrawing bookyear1921 bookidselectionofdrawi00vict bookauthorvictoriaandalbertmuseumdeptofengravingillustrationanddesign bookauthorreitlingerhenry bookpublisherlondonprintedundertheauthorityofhmstationeryoff bookleafnumber90 bookcontributoruniversityofbritishcolumbialibrary
1921

Image from page 7 of
Description: Identifier: scientific-american-1897-03-27 Title: Scientific American Volume 76 Number 13 (March 1897) Year: 1897 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: scientific patent tion apparatus munn cents american bicycle scientific american adapted white corpuscles high grade medicinal herbs horse power san joaquin declination north long distance transmission plant ten years Publisher: View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: by transmittedelectric power. This has begun to be done and in fiveor ten years will be completed, and the factory fire andboiler will be a thing of the past. The city of the future, and no very distant future,will have no trolley poles or wires and no horses. Allmovements will be on rail by silent air motors or byhorseless carriages equally silent. All pavements willbe asphalt. Unlimited light will be as cheap asunlimited water is to-day. No coal will be delivered atprivate houses and no ashes taken from them. Withno horses, no coal and no ashes, street dust and dirtwill be reduced to a minimum. With no factory fire>-and no kitchen or furnace fires, the air will be apure in the city as in the country. Trees will have achance; houses be warmed and lighted as easily andcheaply as they are now supplied with water. A city will be a pretty nice place to live in whenthe first twenty years of the twentieth century are ) 1897 SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, INC. 200 Sftunixiu %mman. [March 27, 1897. Text Appearing After Image: THE LONG DISTANCE TRANSMISSION PLANT ATFRESNO, CAL. One of the latest and, in many respects, one of themost remarkable long distance transmission plants isthat which has been built by the San Joaquin ElectricCompany to supply the town of Fresno with light andpower. Nature has made abundant provision for fur-nishing electricpower alongthe valleys ofthe Pacificcoast, the manystreams whichflow down theSierra and theCascade Moun-tains providinga n abundantand never fail-ing supply ofwater for thispurpose. Fresno is athriving agri-cultural townof about 15,000inhabit ants,which lies inthe midst ofthe far famedSan JoaquinValley, inSouthern Cali-fornia. Found-ed about twen-ty-five yearsago, its growthand presentprosperity aredue almost en-tirely to its ag-ricultural i n -terests. Manu-facture on a large scale has been handicapped by the prohibitivecost of transportation and particularly by the highprice of coal, which costs delivered in Fresno about$9 per ton. Like many another town in the Sa Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1897 booksubjecttenyears booksubjectcents booksubjectscientific booksubjectadapted booksubjecttion booksubjectapparatus booksubjectbicycle
1897

Image from page 185 of
Description: Identifier: coloradocollegen51904colo Title: Colorado College Nugget (yearbook) Year: 1904 (1900s) Authors: Colorado College Subjects: Colorado College - yearbooks Publisher: Colorado College Contributing Library: Colorado College, Tutt Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s The Funny Little Fellow Riley Bert Wasley The Pet Coon Jackson 179 Poem. Author. Unanswered Prayers Wilcox.. . Contrasts The Preachers Boy Riley. . . Nothing, But Leaves Akerman . Babyhood Riley. . • . Revised by Naught Six M. Jencks and I. Whitehurst Teddy Hunt Prof. Smith Cutler Academy Love Thyself Last Wilcox Geo. Gardner, Jr. The Funniest Thing in the World .. Riley Ray Shaw Curly Locks M. C. Hall The Tiger Blake Pettibone The Question Wilcox C. C. Miller Jolly Old Pedagogue Arnold Prof. Strieby What We Need Wilcox Prest. Slocum Why? Ritter Emma Montgomery Behave Yoursel Before Polk Rodger A. Bush and E. Collier The Young Gray Head Southey M. Carpenter Optimist Wilcox Maude Stoddard Pessimist Sadie McDowell Where Are the Men? Talkaiarn Klla Warner Unknown Poets Wordsworth Vories and Stillman ~, t- • j wt\ \ Eleanor Warner, W. A. 1 hree Pnends Wilcox 1 ( Leighton and H. Reed To Very Young Lady Sedley Irene Thomas The Silent Woman Jonson Lotta Meacham Text Appearing After Image: The Annual Board Scooping Up Material 180 MIGHTY MIXINV At a recent faculty meeting, President Slocum was astonished when metby a complaint from various members of the faculty that they were tired of thebranches of learning which they were trying to implant in the vacant brain spaceof their disciples and that they desired a change of program. The Presidentwas s-somewhat p-puzzled for aw-while, but s-s-suddenly he was il-luminatedby a b-brilliant idea which he p-p-proceeded to p-p-put into pr-practice. Whynot occasionally allow the various professors to change classes? This wouldafford them the opportunity of resurrecting some of their submerged learningand would deprive the students of their usual knowledge as to what the nextquestion was to be. We cite a few of the results. Professor Parsons assumes the duties of the chair of Greek: Class strolls in and listens to the roll-call. Prof, (with an unaccustomed smile) : You see Im a little rusty in this subject and I havent had time to re Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1904 bookpublishercoloradocollege bookidcoloradocollegen51904colo bookauthorcoloradocollege booksubjectcoloradocollegeyearbooks bookleafnumber185 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcoloradocollegetuttlibrary
1904

Image from page 124 of
Description: Identifier: transactionsofbr7188bris Title: Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society Year: 1882 (1880s) Authors: Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. cn Subjects: Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society Publisher: Bristol, Eng. : The Society Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: this is divided into two parts by an archspringing from over the centre of the arch into the aisle, andfrom the corner, formed by the splay on the east side of therecess, the arch is double-cusped and four-centred, and is sup-ported on angel corbels; the main cusps terminate in goodfoliage carving, and the spandrels are filled in with open tracery.The ceiling on the chancel side of this arch is flat and plain, butwithin the arch, it is enriched with six arched and cusped panels,placed head to head. It can well be imagined that the whole,with its painted glass in the window, (described later on), formsa most pleasing and picturesque feature. We must not forget tomention that the arch and some of the steps to the rood-loftstill remain, and on the north side of the chancel arch are remainsof a shallow niche, which has been flanked by buttresses, pinnacles,and arched with a cusped and crockctted head, and we must finishthis description with the mention of the stained glass and theseats. i Text Appearing After Image: i Bledington Church. 85 Of later date are some of the bells; the hour-glass stands bythe pulpit, the communion rail, with Jacobean ballusters, (the railand sill being formed out of some older moulded oak-work, possiblyportions of the old screen; and the sundial on the south-west cor-ner of the aisle parapet. There are also, in the parish chest, anold book-cover with chain, an old copy o*f Foxs Book of Martyrs,and a black letter printed circular-letter of the date 1668, requiringa collection to be made for re-building the London churches afterthe great fire of 1666. Among minor matters we must not omit tomention the piscina on the south side of the aisle; the remains ofan old hinge stamped all over with Lombardic A s, and a corbelin the east wall of the chancel, on each side of the east window. We have, as yet, only just mentioned one of the churchs chiefremaining beauties—the painted glass—this, with the sculpturein the jambs, must have made the church glorious, and the remainstha Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1882 bookauthorbristolandgloucestershirearchaeologicalsocietycn booksubjectbristolandgloucestershirearchaeologicalsociety bookpublisherbristolengthesociety bookidtransactionsofbr7188bris bookleafnumber124 bookcollectionamericana booksponsorinternetarchive
1882

Image from page 344 of
Description: Identifier: eighteenyearsinu00tuck Title: Eighteen years in Uganda & East Africa Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Tucker, Alfred Robert, 1849-1914 Subjects: Church of England Missions -- Africa, East Africa, East -- Description and travel Publisher: London : Edward Arnold Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ,000 square miles.This population consists mainly of two races—the ruling class,the Bahima, and the servile class, the Bairu. The former,the great cattle-keepers of Central Africa, are the aristocracy ofNkole. Tall, light-coloured, with comparatively intellectualfeatures, they remind one in their cast of countenance of theancient Egyptians. Here is a man the very image, you wouldsay, of Rameses II. as his likeness has come down to us. Hereis another who speaks in every feature of his countenance of highdescent from a ruling caste. In Toro, Bunyoro, and Uganda,and indeed in all Central Africa, these people are found, allhaving the same characteristics as the Banyankole—all herds-men, and all observing practically the same manners and cus-toms. Their women are to a large extent secluded, and live alife in which physical exertion finds the smallest possible place.The consequence is (as their diet is a milk one) that they areoften of enormous size—almost unable to move from obesity. Text Appearing After Image: NKOLE 273 The Bairu, as the servile class is called, are cultivators ofthe soil, and are no doubt the original inhabitants of the land.They are poorly clad, mostly in skins or in a very rough kind ofbark cloth, and their lot is a hard one—hewers of wood anddrawers of water for their Bahima masters. They have theusual negroid cast of countenance, and neither their physicalnor intellectual capacity is of a high type. They live inwretchedly poor huts of the beehive shape, and their food ismainly a grain called bulo and sweet potatoes. Bananasare to a small extent cultivated, but generally for the purposeof beer-making. The language of the Banyankole is, broadly speaking, Lunyoro,a Bantu tongue, but differing from the dialects spoken in Toroand Bunyoro in several important particulars. It is a verywidely spoken language—much more widely spoken, indeed,than Luganda. It is the language of the Baziba, the Baruanda,and also the people of Karagwe. It extends as far south asLake Tanganyika, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectchurchofengland bookdecade1910 bookyear1911 bookpublisherlondonedwardarnold booksubjectafricaeastdescriptionandtravel bookideighteenyearsinu00tuck bookauthortuckeralfredrobert18491914 booksubjectmissionsafricaeast bookcollectionamericana
1911

Image from page 148 of
Description: Identifier: southerncalifor00keel Title: Southern California; Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Keeler, Charles Augustus, 1871-1937 Keeler, Louise M., ill Subjects: California, Southern -- Description and travel Publisher: Los Angeles : Passenger Dept., Santa Fé Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hinewarms the heart as well as the body. One cannot butbe light-hearted when the birds sing all day long and theflowers bloom in winter as in summer. The stir andstimulus of city lifeis here and the peace ~^,t yand rest of nature ^ • Money and thoughtare being expendedwith unremittingeffort upon this fa-vored corner of the world to make it real-ize all the promise ofnature. Homes springup almost in a daj, and green lawns and waving treessurround them in a season. It is a country that mothers love to come to withtheir babies, for here the little ones play out of doors allday long and nearly every day in the year, growing fatand rosy and merry. It is a land of prosperous homesand orange groves; the refinement of the East andWest is united here in the one endeavor to make ofSouthern California a fruitful, beautiful, and so far as lieswithin human power, an ideal region. No wonder itsresidents are proud of what they have accomplished !Each settlement is the model colony and each town is Text Appearing After Image: ^:. ii^> ■-. -^i ■^^; /In5«l destiued to be the metropolis, but it is a pardonablepride when we realize how vital the interest of each manis in his own home and section, when we realize that hehas made it out of a waste of sand and sagebrush by hisown toil, and that to him it seems a veritable miracle,p.^ this sudden sjiringing of a gar- %deu out of a desert.Perhaps there is no featurewhich so fully insures the futuregreatness of Southern Califor-nia, and which is so frequently ___ overlooked by its admirers as R«J.n«. ^^.g excellent school system. The influence of the State University has been mostimportant in elevating the standard of instruction, forboth the pul)lic and private schools are annually exam-ined by its professors, and onl}- those schools placed onthe accredited list can admit students to the Universitywithout examinations. It is sufficient to add thatalthough the requirements are rigidly enforced, thegraduates of a large percentage of the high schools, evenin Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookauthorkeelercharlesaugustus18711937 bookidsoutherncalifor00keel bookauthorkeelerlouisemill booksubjectcaliforniasoutherndescriptionandtravel bookpublisherlosangelespassengerdeptsantaf bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1901

Image from page 28 of
Description: Identifier: lesfeuxdelasaint00alla Title: Les feux de la Saint-Jean Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Allard, Roger, 1885- Subjects: Publisher: Paris : Camille Bloch Contributing Library: University of Ottawa Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ulamite ? Sil faut vous endormir avec un conte bleuLantan qui jaunissait au fond des avenuesFleurira ces gazons de volants hasardeux. Ici tout nest quhiver. Vous voici revenue En la tiédeur de linutile appartement, Mais dun feu vrai teignant une cheville nue. 21 Si naguère je fus cet égoïste amant Consumant son objet alors quil -le cajole, Ma guitare en ce lieu vous tisse un bois dormant. Nul baiser ne trahit, fors celui qui consoleEt la pitié, de tous les maux le plus amer.Accable un sein meurtri par nos lèvres frivoles. Vous souvient-il des châteaux aux bords de la mer, Philis, vous souvient-il du tennis blanc, parure Du sombre été, des voix fraîches dans le vieux parc, Des robes à la mode vers mil-neuf-cent-six,Du chapeau cloche et de vos petites amies,Trois sourires décume au bord dun ciel marin ? Toute la chair alors navait quun doux pli dombreEt vos mains ignoraient les veines violettes...Mais la brise a fermé lombrelle des beaux jours. 22 ..•••^^*fe ?/■*■ Text Appearing After Image: a/ •% / ■^?*!. l^ r V^»t-. .A - 1I «•y ■/ // . .•.;.5£.?::s •n *^, m \i % /. .. •.V. /• >^ ^•A •NV ^. ;s^ è-. ^ Mille désirs ne font déjà quun seul regret Et, Belle au cœur pesant, vous savez quel arôme Ont les acres baisers doù sexilent les roses. Or, souffrant plus de maux que vous neûtes dattraitsAssise au seuil fatal dune patrie arideVous respirez la vie ainsi quun flacon vide. Ah! puisque désormais lautomne vous propose Sa délectation solitaire et morose Ne tentez plus de rallumer un faux sourire ; Mais fidèle à lhonneur dont mes chants sont le prix. Eteignez-vous, pareille à la flamme qui danse Le front dans la lumière et le pied dans la cendre! Paris, an printemps de 1914. UnivBrsiffljBIBLIOTHECA VINGT EXEMPLAIRES SUR PAPIERDE CHANVRE NATUREL ET TROISCENT QUARANTE EXEMPLAIRES SURVERGÉ DARCHES NUMÉROTÉS A LAPRESSE ONT ÉTÉ TIRÉS DE CETOUVRAGE ACHEVÉDIMPRIMER, SURLES PRESSES DE FRAZIER-SOYE,POUR CAMILLE BLOCH, LE QUINZEJANVIER MIL-NEU Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 bookidlesfeuxdelasaint00alla bookauthorallardroger1885 bookpublisherpariscamillebloch bookcontributoruniversityofottawa bookcollectionuniversityofottawa booksponsoruniversityoftoronto bookleafnumber28
1920

Image from page 24 of
Description: Identifier: schwillsannualde1910otto Title: Schwill's annual descriptive catalogue : high class seeds, trees and plants Year: 1910 (1910s) Authors: Otto Schwill & Company Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) Tennessee Memphis Catalogs Nursery stock Tennessee Memphis Catalogs Flowers Tennessee Memphis Catalogs Vegetables Tennessee Memphis Catalogs Fruit Tennessee Memphis Catalogs Gardening Tennessee Memphis Equipment and supp Publisher: Memphis, Tenn. : Otto Schwill & Company Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Market Gardeners Beet. OTTO SCHWILL & CO., 18-20 SOUTH FRONT ST., MEMPHIS, TENN. 17 BUSH, DWARF OR SNAP BEANS. One quart to 100-foot drill; 1% bushels to the acre indrills. Planting and cultural directions sent free on requestwith all orders amounting to $25c or more. Pint and quart prices include postage. If wanted by express or freight, deduct for postage 8cents per pint, 15 cents per quart. Large packets of any variety Bush Beans are sold at10c each, postage paid, 7 for 50c, unless otherwise noted.Onft-half pint packages are all 15c each, postage paid,any variey. Text Appearing After Image: DWARF GREEN POD VARIETIES. Lightning Earliest Valentine—This variety is earlier thanthe Early Red Valentine, and it is usually ready to pickin 45 days from planting. On account of its greatearliness it is largely grown by market gardeners.1 pt., 25c; 1 qt., 45c, postage paid. By express, 4 qts.,75c; peck, $1.35. Improved Early Red Valentine—Desirable for market orfamily use, being early, productive and tender. Thepods are round. 1 pt., 20c; 1 qt., 40c, postage paid. Byexpress, 4 qts., 75c; peck, $1.25. Burpees Stringless Green Pod—This is the best absolute-ly Stringless Bean. Ready for market several daysearlier than the best strain of Red Valentine or EarlySix Weeks. Pods are very tender and fine flavor. 1pt., 25c; J qt., 43c, postage paid. By express, 4 qts.,75c; peck, $1.35. Black Valentine—Resembles the old Red Valentine andis a good forcer; the pods are round, very fleshy andentirely stringless; for early or late planting it is amost valuable bean. 1 pt., 25c; 1 qt., 45c, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1910 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection bookauthorottoschwillcompany booksubjectnurserieshorticulturetennesseememphiscatalogs booksubjectnurserystocktennesseememphiscatalogs booksubjectflowerstennesseememphiscatalogs booksubjectvegetablestennesseememphiscatalogs booksubjectfruittennesseememphiscatalogs
1910

Image from page 63 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924031296126 Title: Scientific amusements Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: Tissandier, Gaston, 1843-1899 Frith, Henry, 1840- Harry Houdini Collection (Library of Congress) DLC Subjects: Scientific recreations Publisher: London, New York [etc.] Ward, Lock & Co Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: roducing ■gaseous currents, and which will assist us in Our ScientificAmusements—viz., our ittouths ! Place a halfcrown flaton the table, then,seize it between two pins held at theextremities of the same diameter. You may raise it thuswith,out any trouble. Blow against the upper surface,and you will see the- coin revolving with considerablespeeid between the pins. The illustration (Fig. 3 5) shows the 46 DENSITY, HYDROSTATICS, ETC. manner in which this feat can be accomplished. The coincan be made to revolve (by blowing on its upper surface)with such rapidity as to make it appear a metallic sphere.In this we have an illustration of the persistence of impres-sions on the retina, of which we shall speak hereafter. ; TO KEEP A PEA IN EQUILIBRIUM BY MEANS OF ACURRENT OF AIR. Choose as rounded a pea as you can find,. and softenit, if dry, in water. Then skilfully impale it on a pin,so as not to damage its exterior surface and shape.Then get a pipe, of very small bore, and place the pea Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 36.—Pea sustained in the Air by blowing through a Tube. on one of its extremities, where it is maintained by thepin which has been inserted in the tube. Throw yourhead back until the pipe is in a vertical position, andthen blow gradually and slowly through it. The peawill rise up; then blow more forcibly, and it will be,sustained by the current of air turning on itself when thebreath strikes the pin (Fig. 36). THE MOVEMENTS OF GASES. 47 Here is another experiment of the same kind :—Take a metallic penholder which is closed at one ofits ends. At a little distance from the closed extremitydrill a tiny hole. Then blow up through the aperture,thus formed, regularly and steadily. A small bread pellet,perfectly round, can then be kept up, as shown in theillustration (Fig. 37). The pellet should be as spherical as possible, its sizevarying with the density of the material of which it is Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectscientificrecreations bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 bookauthortissandiergaston18431899 bookidcu31924031296126 bookauthorfrithhenry1840 bookpublisherlondonnewyorketcwardlockco bookauthorharryhoudinicollectionlibraryofcongressdlc bookleafnumber63
1890

Image from page 581 of
Description: Identifier: petriandreaematt00matt Title: Petri Andreae Matthioli Senensis serenissimi Principis Ferdinandi Archiducis Austriae & c., Medici, Commentarii secundo aucti : in libros sex Pedacii Dioscoridis Anazarbei de medica materia. Adiectis quàm plurimis plantarum, & animalium imaginibus quae in priore editione non habentur, eodem authore : his accessit eiusdem apologia adversus Amathum Lusitanum cum censura in eiusdem enarrationes Year: 1558 (1550s) Authors: Mattioli, Pietro Andrea, 1500-1577 Dioscorides Pedanius, of Anazarbos Subjects: Botany, Medical Materia medica Zoology Materia Medica Zoology Publisher: Venetiis : Ex officina Erasmiana, Vincentij Valgrifij Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Hypetici,&congenetunjconndor. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1550 booksubjectmateriamedica bookauthordioscoridespedaniusofanazarbos bookcentury1500 booksubjectzoology bookyear1558 bookidpetriandreaematt00matt bookauthormattiolipietroandrea15001577 bookpublishervenetiisexofficinaerasmianavincentijvalgrifij booksubjectbotanymedical
1825

Image from page 470 of
Description: Identifier: universitiesthei04cham Title: Universities and their sons; history, influence and characteristics of American universities, with biographical sketches and portraits of alumni and recipients of honorary degrees Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence, 1828-1914. ed Thayer, William Roscoe, 1859-1923. joint ed Smith, Charles Henry, 1842- joint ed De Witt, John, 1842- joint ed Williams, Jesse Lynch, 1871-1929. joint ed Van Amringe, John Howard, joint ed Wingate, Charles Edgar Lewis, 1861- joint ed Lee, Albert, 1868- joint ed Paine, Henry G., joint ed Subjects: Harvard University Yale University Princeton University Columbia University Universities and colleges -- United States Publisher: Boston, R. Herndon company Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rved inthe Civil War, retiring at its close as Captain BrevetMajor of the One hundred and twenty-first NewYork Volunteers, afterwards engaging in the practiceof law in New York City, and was an author of note.The family is an old Scotch one, originally descendedfrom the Lords of .Argyll, the first scion of which inAmerica settled in Cherry Valley, New York, as oneof the pioneers in 1728, and which has furnished many distinguished members since that time. Thesubject of this sketch fitted for College at St. PaulsSchool in Concord, New Hampshire, matriculatingat Vale in 18S4 and graduating with the degree ofBachelor of Arts in 1888. He studied law at theHarvard Law School, taking the degree of Bachelorof Laws in 1890, and came to New York, enteringthe law office of Evarts, Choate & Beaman. Afterhis admission to the New York Bar in 1891, hepractised law with Evarts, Choate & Beaman until1893, beginning practice alone in the latter year.He married, May 16, 1893, Marian H. Dunbar of Text Appearing After Image: WM. \. CAMPBELL Augusta, Georgia. They have no children. Mr.Campbell is a member of numerous clubs and soci-eties, among them the Union, University, Univer-sity Athletic and Harvard Clubs, the Bar Associationof the City of New York, Military Order of theLoyal Legion, Society of the Colonial \\ars, andothers. He has never taken an active interest inpolitics. BROTT, George Olney Yale B.A. 1888.Born in Calhoun, Miss., 1867; educated in publicschools of Thompson, Conn., prepared for College atDean Academy, Franklin, Mass. ; graduated Yale 1888 ;student in Columbia Law School, 1888-90; admitted toNew York Bar, 1890; practised in New York City, 460 UNIlERSiriES AND THEIR SONS 1891-94; in Hartford, Conn., since 1894; member ofCity Council since i8g6. GKORGE OLNKV liROTl, Lawyer, was bornin Calhoun, Mississippi, March 4, 1867,tile son of George Fuller and Lucy Klizalx-th(OIney) Brott. He is descended from early Dutchsettlers in the Mohawk Valley, New York, who wrotethe name Van Bradt. The ori Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectharvarduniversity booksubjectprincetonuniversity bookyear1898 bookiduniversitiesthei04cham bookauthorchamberlainjoshualawrence18281914ed bookauthorthayerwilliamroscoe18591923jointed bookauthorsmithcharleshenry1842jointed bookauthordewittjohn1842jointed
1898

Image from page 631 of
Description: Identifier: americanhomesgar41907newy Title: American homes and gardens Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening Publisher: New York : Munn and Co Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: white, and the roof is covered withshingles and stained tobacco brown. The entrance is from the side, thereby giving a certainamount of privacy to the front piazza. The reception-hall and the living-room are irregular in form; they are bothtrimmed with chestnut and finished in a Flemish brown. Thehall has a bay-window and an ornamental staircase, which isin combination with the kitchen stairs, and the space usuallyallotted for a staircase is utilized for other purposes. Theliving-room is separated from the hall by a grille and arch.It has an attractive corner fitted with an open fireplace builtof bricks, with the facings and hearth of similar brick and amantel of good design. From the fireplace a paneled seatextends along the wall and returns to the bay-window onthe front. The dining-room is at the rear of the hall andis painted old ivory white. The pantry and kitchen are.trimmed with chestnut and are finished natural. Each isfitted with all the best modern conveniences complete. The Text Appearing After Image: ~W^^. .*--»»■■ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectarchitecturedomestic booksubjectlandscapegardening bookidamericanhomesgar41907newy bookpublishernewyorkmunnandco bookyear1905 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries booksponsorbiodiversityheritagelibrary
1905

Image from page 770 of
Description: Identifier: vanityfair01thac Title: Vanity fair Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Thackeray, William Makepeace, 1811-1863 Fiske, Minnie Maddern, Mrs., 1865- [from old catalog] Subjects: Waterloo, Battle of, Waterloo, Belgium, 1815 British Female friendship Social classes Married women Publisher: New York and Boston, H. M. Caldwell company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: g perhaps to listen at the parlordoor, found Loll Jewab shaking upon the hall bench under the coats,moaning in a strange piteous way, and showing his yellow eyeballsand white teeth. For, you see, we have adroitly shut the door upon the meetingbetween Jos and the old father, and the poor little gentle sister inside.The old man was very much affected ; so, of course, was his daugh-ter ; nor was Jos without feeling. In that long absence of ten years,the most selfish will think about home and early ties. Distancesanctifies both. Long brooding over those lost pleasures exaggeratestheir charm and sweetness. Jos was unaffectedly glad to see andshake the hand of his father, between whom and himself there hadbeen a coolness—glad to see his little sister, whom he rememberedso pretty and smiling, and pained at the alteration which time, grief,and misfortune had made in the shattered old man, Emmy hadcome out to the door in her black clothes and whispered ko him of iiiiiit. , I* ::iij!iiieiilll Text Appearing After Image: 66d vanity fair. her mothers death, and not to speak of it to their father. Therewas no need of this caution, for the elder Sedley himself began im-mediately to speak of the event, and prattled about it, and weptover it plenteously. It shocked the Indian not a httle, and madehim think of himself less than the poor fellow was accustomed todo. ^ The result of the interview must have been vety satisfactory, forwhen Jos had re-ascended his post-chaise, and had driven away to hishotel, Emmy embraced her father tenderly, appealing to him with anair of triumph, and asking the old man whether she did not alwayssay that her brother had a good heart ? Indeed, Joseph Sedley, affected by the humble position in whichhe found his relations, and in the expansiveness and overflowing ofheart occasioned by the first meeting, declared that they shouldnever suffer want or discomfort any more, that he was at home forsome time at any rate, during which his house and everything hehad should be theirs; and t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectbritish booksubjectsocialclasses bookyear1900 bookidvanityfair01thac bookauthorfiskeminniemaddernmrs1865fromoldcatalog booksubjectwaterloobattleofwaterloobelgium1815 booksubjectfemalefriendship booksubjectmarriedwomen
1900

Image from page 124 of
Description: Identifier: harpersweeklyv9bonn Title: Harper's weekly Year: 1857 (1850s) Authors: Bonner, John, 1828-1899 Curtis, George William, 1824-1892 Alden, Henry Mills, 1836-1919 Conant, Samuel Stillman, 1831-1885? Schuyler, Montgomery, 1843-1914 Foord, John, 1842-1922 Davis, Richard Harding, 1864-1916 Schurz, Carl, 1829-1906 Nelson, Henry Loomis, 1846-1908 Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862-1922 Harvey, George Brinton McClellan, 1864-1928 Hapgood, Norman, 1868-1937 Subjects: Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: .1.., r thing I had in the world (no greai, certainly) was being used by the yin No. 20, without any compunction o I we dow early. The servant had ju-f retired afterositing my colice-pot and toast upon the table,in a cab drove up to No. 20, and a visitor withie luggage arrived. Never shall I forget myings as I looked at that mar ™ : ihenomoncr with a plu-ent the willing slaveyurned with the exciting There were four people . ,. concluded to be the daughters. Their drawing-room was a double room, just on a level with mine,but not so exactly opposite that I could not see the fire-place, near which, it being December, the ladieswere generally grouped. When t1 r ; Christmas-eve, keeping with his figure t 11,-,i hi.. snobby, ■ Ie; and ilh ssr ling hatred, and left only a strung di.-like ta Stood on a chair and dressed Ihe lamp;she took this duty on account of her su-■ight ; perhaps (lie \ lllaiu recommended it,noil beside her. ami, breaking the holly andpieces, handed them up to her. Text Appearing After Image: 11 was the twelfth of February, a ■ iv.nling of th paper, even to the la t ofrti-ement-, and h.niid myself pondering o I miles distant Then I transcribed the verses with great care, writing the seventh verso and the last in capitals,that they might point the moral I felt a delicacy indrawing more opcnlv, and 1 considered this as ade-cidedly telling hit. By this time my poor Muse wag pumped dry. rt, .-till undaunted, I cried, -Now for Helenas! oubtless the villain will write her half a dozen at 30(1 standard verses will he very respectful and ve-getable. So I cast about in my mind what poet.iould lie honored by selecting from. Of right I oughti have told her her eyes were lode-stars, and her i-he~r.-i n Jit. ■ome.sillv Mlow -ending a boughtnia. ToHermia! I writhed at-ueh a thing as the villain would■ old ha Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookauthorcurtisgeorgewilliam18241892 bookauthorhapgoodnorman18681937 bookyear1857 bookpublishernewyorkharperbrothers bookauthorbangsjohnkendrick18621922 bookidharpersweeklyv9bonn bookauthorbonnerjohn18281899 bookauthoraldenhenrymills18361919
1857

Image from page 111 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924013104199 Title: The community capitol; a program for American unity Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Kelly, Melville Clyde, 1881- Subjects: Community centers Farm produce Publisher: Pittsburgh, The Mayflower press Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: yet not a single plank in the platformwould secure the approval of a majority of thevoters, if separately submitted. It is not to bewondered at that such elections do not settleissues but actually prevent their settlement bya definite expression of the people at the polls. Such a situation means popular ignorance ofthe attitude of the parties on many importantissues and as surely leads to indifference asnight follows day. The people know that theplatforms are not simple, direct statementsupon which parties ask for support, with the de-termination to embody them into law, if suc-cessful. The people know well too, that theheat and rancor of a brief campaign, permit noopportunity for accurately estimating any can-didate. They know that the epileptic fit whichseizes the politicians every four years, or everytwo years, and which they seek to communicateto the people, is not the mood for sane judgment.They know how partisanship exaggerates virtueand weakness. They have come to believe that Text Appearing After Image: s H mo Ph HW C5g PPP Back of the Ballot—and Beyond. 97 politics is the mother of lies and having no othermethod of securing information than throughpolitical literature, which deifies one candidateand spatters slime and filth on another, theyhave grown callous and indifferent to it all.Our system has palsied the American citizen-ship in the same fashion as the great eagle,which a naturalist describes as having been ex-posed to a storm of sleet and icy rain, and beingencased in a veritable coat of mail. Its wingsbecame helpless and it was led along the sea-shore by a boy it could have carried off in itstalons, had it possessed its full powers. Truth and Cleae-Thinking Must DecideElections. We must make it impossible for falsehood,misrepresentation and abuse to be the determin-ing factors in elections. What is needed istruth, not denunciation; clear thinking, andhonest utterances, not muddy anger and distor-tion of facts. The present system gives powerto those who are poisoners of the Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 bookidcu31924013104199 bookauthorkellymelvilleclyde1881 booksubjectcommunitycenters booksubjectfarmproduce bookpublisherpittsburghthemayflowerpress bookleafnumber111 bookcollectionamericana
1921

Image from page 222 of
Description: Identifier: manualofpersonal00pyle Title: A manual of personal hygiene : proper living upon a physiological basis Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Pyle, Walter L. (Walter Lytle), 1871-1921 Subjects: Hygiene Publisher: Philadelphia : W.B. Saunders Co. Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: plate of the camera, it is simply stimulatedby the impingement of the light-rays, and theimpressions caused thereby are transmitted to thecenters of sight in the brain by means of the opticnerve, optic tracts, etc., in a manner somewhat analo-gous to telegraphy. It must be remembered that the eyeball does notsee. It is only a sensitive end-organ which receivesand transmits impressions to the higher centers ofsight. The act of vision is performed in the brain. For the performance of perfect vision the followingconditions are necessary: (i) The media of the eye AMETROPIA AND EYE-STRAIN. 205 must be perfectly transparent; (2) rays of light enter-ing the eyeball must be transmitted through thepupil and focussed exactly on the retina; (3) theretina, optic nerve, and its continuations must beperfect; (4) the visual centers in the brain must beintact. In other words, the receiving, transmitting,and interpreting apparatus must all be perfect. Adisturbance of any component of the visual system Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 44.—A camera obscura and the eyeball compared : A B, object;d, diaphragm (iris); /, lens ; r, sensitive plate (retina) ; a b, image oi A B\c, cornea. may cause defective vision, and even blindness. Incases of cataract, the retina, optic nerve, and brainmay be healthy, but the opaque lens behind the pupilprevents light from reaching the retina. In atrophyof the optic nerve or disease of the retina, the mediaof the eyeball may be perfectly transparent andproperly direct rays of light to the retina, and thebrain may be healthy, but blindness ensues because 206 THE EYE. the impressions either are not received or are nottransmitted. In disease of the visual centers of thebrain the whole eyeball may be normal and the opticnerve perfect, but blindness results from the inabilityof the brain to interpret the impressions transmittedto it. In this discussion it is with the focussing powerof the eyes that we are chiefly concerned. Thisproperty of bending nearly parallel rays of light fromd Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjecthygiene bookdecade1910 bookidmanualofpersonal00pyle bookauthorpylewalterlwalterlytle18711921 bookyear1917 bookpublisherphiladelphiawbsaundersco bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc bookcontributoruniversityofconnecticutlibraries
1917

Image from page 57 of
Description: Identifier: littlejourneysab00warr Title: Little journeys abroad Year: 1895 (1890s) Authors: Warren, Mary Bowers Boughton, George Henry, 1834-1905, ill Sacker, Amy M., binding designer Subjects: Publisher: Boston : Joseph Knight Co. Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: PARISIAN PASTIMES. ^THERE is nomore agreea-ble spot to be foundthan the AvenueTrocadero inJune, when thechestnut-trees are inbloom, andcarriagesare continually passing on the way to theBois de Boulogne, and riders are trottingby on the bridle-road in the centre of thestreet, and the Moorish outlines of theTrocadero Palace, and the spider-like ones Text Appearing After Image: A PARISIENNE. PARISIAN PASTIMES. 37 of the Eiffel Tower are outlined clearlyagainst the sky. It was sufficient for us to see thosespider-like outlines, however, for we felt noairy aspirations, and were content to allowour friends to journey skyward, whilewe took our way on foot to the TrocaderoPark, and continued on to the Bois. Itwas cool and pleasant, for we were onhigh ground, and near the Seine; and weenjoyed returning to the wide avenueand pure air after excursions dutifullyundertaken to the Louvre and the oldquarters of Paris. Until 1866, said ourguide-book, this land was nothing but apiece of waste ground, although NapoleonI. had once entertained the idea of build-ing a marble palace here for the Kingof Rome. But in 1867 the undulatingground was laid out in terraces, and usedas a place for popular festivals, and for theexhibition of 1878 the present palacewas constructed. 38 LITTLE JOURNEYS ABROAD. With our friends in the pension we werea party of five,— the five lively ladie Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1895 bookdecade1890 bookidlittlejourneysab00warr bookauthorwarrenmarybowers bookauthorboughtongeorgehenry18341905ill bookauthorsackeramymbindingdesigner bookpublisherbostonjosephknightco bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber57
1895

Image from page 196 of
Description: Identifier: notablestlouisan00coxj Title: Notable St. Louisans in 1900; a portrait gallery of men whose energy and ability have contributed largely towards making St. Louis the commercial and financial metropolis of the West, Southwest and South Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Cox, James, 1849-1901, ed Subjects: Saint Louis (Mo.) -- Biography Portraits Publisher: St. Louis, The Benesch Art Publishing Co. Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: LACLEDE J. HOWARD, PRESIDENT,EVENS & HOWARD FIRE BRICK CO. CHARLES S. RUSSELL, PRESIDENT, PARKER-RUSSELL MINING & MFG. CO.,FIRE BRICK, ETC. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidnotablestlouisan00coxj bookauthorcoxjames18491901ed booksubjectsaintlouismobiographyportraits bookpublisherstlouisthebeneschartpublishingco bookyear1900 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary bookcollectionnewyorkpubliclibrary
1900

Image from page 576 of
Description: Identifier: annualreportofbo1888smiths Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution Year: 1846 (1840s) Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents United States National Museum. Report of the U.S. National Museum Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary Subjects: Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Institution. Archives Discoveries in science Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: In front of the feast house of ChiefSkowl, at Kasa-an village, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Fig. 294. Carved Mortuary or Commemorative Column. In front of the houseof Chief Kootenah, at Tongass village, Alaska (Tlingit). Fig. 295. Tiki. At Raroera Pah, New Zealand. Introduced here by way of con-trast with the carvings of the Haida. From Woods Natural History,page 180. Of this he says: This gigantic tiki stands, together withseveral others, near the tomb of the daughter of Te Whero-Whero,and, like the monument which it seems to guard, is one of the finestexamples of native carving to be found in New Zealand. The preciseobject of the tiki is uncertain, but the protruding tongue of the upperfigure seems to show that it is one of the numerous defiant statueswhich abound in the islands. The natives say that the lower figurerepresents Maui the Atui who, according to Maori tradition, fishedup the islands from the bottom of the sea. ■Report of National Museum, 1888.—Niblack. Plate LV. Text Appearing After Image: Carved Columns from the Northwest Coast and Tiki from New Zealand. THiE Indians of tHE NORtiiwEgT dOASt. B2t proboscis to tbe good lands, and said: Where the bear is there aresalmon, herbs, and good living; so that accounts for how the Haidacame to the Queen Charlotte Islands, and why bears are so abundant.This is similar to the story told Jndge Swan by Edniso of MassetjBritish Columbia. The next figure is the giant spider sucking theblood and killing a man. One of the numerous adventures of T^sTcan-ahl was to kill the giant spider, which was such a mortal enemy toman. T^skanahl overcome the spider and threw him into the fire, butinstead of burning he shriveled up and escaped as a mosquito, carry-ing away with him a small coal of fire in his proboscis. Now insteadof killing men he can only suck a little blood, but in revenge he leavesa coal of fire in the bite. My informant, a Kaigani, stated that it wouldtake three days to relate all the adventures of T^slcan-ahl. The lowestfigure is Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 bookidannualreportofbo1888smiths bookauthorsmithsonianinstitutionboardofregents bookauthorunitedstatesnationalmuseumreportoftheusnationalmuseum bookauthorsmithsonianinstitutionreportofthesecretary booksubjectsmithsonianinstitution booksubjectsmithsonianinstitutionarchives booksubjectdiscoveriesinscience bookyear1846
1846

Image from page 123 of
Description: Identifier: descriptionhisto00sociuoft Title: A description and history of vegetable substances, used in the arts, and in domestic economy Year: 1829 (1820s) Authors: Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (Great Britain) Subjects: Botany, Economic Publisher: London C. Knight Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: he largeknots which the trees put forth, into vases, which,although fashioned with their rude knives, havemuch of the beauty of turnery. In Kaimtschatka alsoit is formed into drinking cups. The wood of thebirch on the banks of the Garry, in Glengarry,Scotland, is cut into staves, Avith which herringbarrels are made. It is an excellent wood forthe turner, being light, compact, and easily worked;and for undressed palings and gates, such as areused in the sheep countries, few timbers are supe-rior to it. It is not very durable, however, butvery cheap, as it thrives upon soils that are fitfor little else, and sows itself without any assistancefirom art. It grows upon rocks which one wouldthink absolutely bare ; and such is the power of itsroots, that we have seen them separate stones several THE ALDER. 115 tons in weijrht, to reach the soil. The black birch ofAmerica has been im]M)rtcd into this country. It iscompact and rather liandsonie, but it soon decays.Birch makes very ^od charcoal. Text Appearing After Image: Aider—Alnus glutinusa. The Alder (Alnus glutinosa) is not so handsome atree as the birch, and tlie timber is not applicable toso many useful purposes. The alder is a native ofalmost every part of Europe. It thrives best inmarshy situations, and by the margins of lakes andrivers, where it is generally a large shrub rather thana tree. As its shade rather improves than injuresthe grass, cojjpices of it afford good wintering for theout-door stock on mountain grazings. The bark of the alder contains a good deal oftannin ; and the young shoots dye a yellow or cinna-mon colour, the wood a brown, and the catkins of theflowers a green. The twigs of the alder are brittle,and so is the stem when green. In that state it ismore easily worked than any other timber. Whenof considerable size, the timber of one of the varieties y .}lft VEGETABLE SUBS-yANCES. (there are several of them) is red, and often so finelystreaked, that it is called Scotch mahogany in thenorth, and furniture is made of it. Th Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookiddescriptionhisto00sociuoft bookauthorsocietyforthediffusionofusefulknowledgegreatbritain booksubjectbotanyeconomic bookpublisherlondoncknight bookyear1829 bookdecade1820 bookleafnumber123 booksponsoruniversityoftoronto bookcontributorgersteinuniversityoftoronto
1829

Image from page 112 of
Description: Identifier: photographichist6667mill Title: The photographic history of the Civil War : in ten volumes Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Miller, Francis Trevelyan, 1877-1959 Lanier, Robert S. (Robert Sampson), 1880- Subjects: War photography Publisher: New York : Review of Reviews Co. Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: BEGLNXIXG THE FIRST FLANK MO^■EMEXT In the upper picture, presented through the kindness of General G. P. Thruston, are the headquarters of General Thomas at Ringgold,Georgia, May 5, 1864. On that day, appointed by Grant for the beginning of the simultaneous movements he had planned to carryout in 186-i, General Sherman rode out the eighteen miles from Chattanooga to Ringgold with his staff, about half a dozen wagons,and a single company of Ohio sharpshooters. A small company of irregular Alabama cavalry acted as couriers. Shermans messestablishment was less bulky than that of any of his brigade commanders. I wanted to set the example, he says, and graduallyto convert all parts of that army into a mobile machine willing and able to start at a minutes notice and to subsist on the scantiestfood. On May 7th, General Thomas moved in force to Tunnel Hill to begin the turning of Johnstons flank. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthormillerfrancistrevelyan18771959 bookauthorlanierrobertsrobertsampson1880 booksubjectwarphotography bookpublishernewyorkreviewofreviewsco bookyear1911 bookidphotographichist6667mill bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber112
1911

Image from page 142 of
Description: Identifier: centralmanufactu00cent Title: The Central Manufacturing District : Chicago Junction Railway Service : a book of descriptive text, photographs & testimonial letters about Chicago Junction Railway Service and the Central Manufacturing District - the center of Chicago, "The Great Central Market" Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Central Manufacturing District (Chicago, Ill Subjects: Central Manufacturing District (Chicago, Ill Industrial districts Railroads Publisher: [Chicago? : s.n.] Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ich youask U.S to. give you our principal reasons for establishing abranch warehouse in your district near the yards, will saywe append two reasons for our locating there. The first one is a great many concerns in and ad-jacent to the yards use a large variety of our productionand the location of a branch there saved us many long hauls,and naturally was of great value to our customers in thatvlainity, who wished to call for their goods. The other reason was the fact that we found wecould load, at our convenience, 30 or over different lotsof goods, for 30 different points on 30 differant railroadsin one car at our hack door on our tracks, put the freightreceipts in the car with the goods, and have the ChicagoJunction Railroad take the car away, distribute the goodsto the different roads v/ithout any escpense to us, and re-turn the receipts promptly. This service is extremely satisfactory, and ouronly regrets are that we did not establish a branch thereseveral years ago. Yours truly.The Text Appearing After Image: 183 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1915 booksubjectrailroads bookidcentralmanufactu00cent bookauthorcentralmanufacturingdistrictchicagoill booksubjectcentralmanufacturingdistrictchicagoill booksubjectindustrialdistricts bookpublisherchicagosn booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries
1915

Image from page 546 of
Description: Identifier: reportsofexplora02unit_0 Title: Reports of explorations and surveys, to ascertain the most practicable and economical route for a railroad from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean Year: 1855 (1850s) Authors: United States. War Dept Henry, Joseph, 1797-1878 Baird, Spencer Fullerton, 1823-1887 United States. Army. Corps of Engineers Subjects: Pacific railroads Discoveries in geography Natural history Indians of North America Publisher: Washington : A.O.P. Nicholson, printer [etc.] Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: California State Library Califa/LSTA Grant View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: gathered by Drummond. Filaginopsis multicatjlis, Torr. and Gray, Fl. 2, p. 263. (Plate III.) On the Pecos and LlanoEstacado; March. Western Texas; April. Sterile corollas, naked at the summit, hut bearinga few long wooly hairs near the base. Parthenium Hysteropiiorus, Linn. Pecos and Llano Estacado. Melampodium cinereum, DC. Prodr. 5.p. 518. Banks of the Pecos to the Colorado; Marchto May. Berlandiera lyrata, Benth.; Gray, PI. Fendl. p. 78. Llano Estacado, March.Engelmannia pinnatifida, Torr. and Gray, in Trans. Amer. Phil. Soc. and Fl. 2, p. 283;Torr. in Marcys Rep. t. 11. Western Texas to the head of the Colorado; April, May.Lindheimeria Texana, Gray and Fngelm. PI. Lindh. 2p. 225. Western Texas; April.Zinnia multiflora, Linn. Near Fort Chadbourne, Texas.Echinacea angustifolia, DC. Prodr. 5, p. 554. Var. Western Texas; April.Simsia (Barrattia) calva, Gray, PI. Lindh. 2, p. 228. On the upper Colorado; April.Dracopis amplejhcaulis, Cass.; DC. Prodr. 5,p. 558. Near Fort Washita; April. Text Appearing After Image: CALYMMANDRA CANDIDA. P.S.DuvallCo bin Phil! Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectdiscoveriesingeography bookcentury1800 booksubjectnaturalhistory booksubjectindiansofnorthamerica bookdecade1850 bookauthorbairdspencerfullerton18231887 bookauthorunitedstateswardept bookauthorhenryjoseph17971878 bookauthorunitedstatesarmycorpsofengineers bookpublisherwashingtonaopnicholsonprinteretc
1855

Image from page 132 of
Description: Identifier: gazetteerofunit00hayw Title: A gazetteer of the United States of America : comprising a concise general view of the United States, and particular descriptions of the several states, territories, counties, districts, cities, towns, villages, their mountains, valleys, islands, capes, bays, harbors, lakes, rivers, canals, railroads, &c. ; with the governments and literary and other public institutions of the country; also, its mineral springs, waterfalls, caves, beaches, and other fashionable resorts; to which are added valuable statistical tables, and a map of the United States Year: 1853 (1850s) Authors: Hayward, John, 1781-1869 Subjects: Publisher: Hartford, Ct. : Case, Tiffany, and Company Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: lly pleasant; and notwithstanding the occasional violentchanges, which, however, are not of long duration, the weather is for the most part equable andmild, according to the several seasons. The mean temperature, for the whole year, is between44° and 52°. July is usually the hottest month, and January the coldest. In the southernquarters, winter commences late in December, and continues until March ; but in the northernparts of the state, the cold season sets in a month earlier, and snow does not generally dis-appear until late in March. Frosts appear in some localities as early as September. Religion. — The Friends or Quakers, successors of the first settlers, are probably morenumerous in Pennsylvania than in any other state, having some 150 to 200 congregations.The Presbyterians, however, outnumber all the other denominations; then follow in order theMethodists, Baptists, German Reformed, and Episcopalians, all of whom are numerous. Thereis also the usual variety of minor sects. Text Appearing After Image: wmmi RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. This, in territorial extent,is the smallest state in the Union. It lies between 42° and 43° north latitude, and 71° and 72°west longitude from London, and comprises an area of about 1306 square miles. It is boundednorth and east by Massachusetts, south by the Atlantic Ocean, and west by Connecticut. The STATES AND TERRITORIES. —RHODE ISLAND. 129 natural features of the state are somewhat peculiar. About one tenth part of it is water, andof the residue, a very considerable portion is made up of islands. The interior, with the excep-tion of the intervales along the streams, is generally rough and hilly, better adapted to grazingthan to the raising of grain. Most of the islands, together with that part adjoining salt water,are very fertile. The most considerable hills in the state are Mount Hope in Bristol, Pine inExeter, Easchaheague and Hopkins in West Greenwich, Chopmist in Scituate, Neutaconkanetin Johnston, Woonsocket in Smithfield Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookyear1853 bookidgazetteerofunit00hayw bookauthorhaywardjohn17811869 bookpublisherhartfordctcasetiffanyandcompany booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries bookleafnumber132 bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries bookcollectionsmithsonian
1853

Image from page 108 of
Description: Identifier: achilleshectoril00gale Title: Achilles & Hector : Iliad stories retold for boys and girls Year: 1903 (1900s) Authors: Gale, Agnes Spofford Cook Homer Subjects: Publisher: Chicago New York : Rand, McNally Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: The Shield 105 Text Appearing After Image: HE next day Achilles found in histent the glorious armor which hismother had promised him. There weregreaves for the legs, a corselet for thebody, a helmet, and a wonderful shield.On this shield were engraved many pic-tures ; first, the heavens and the stars;then a cit}^ with marriage scenes andfeasts; a court of law, and men pleadingtheir case before the judges, who sat ina circle, while heralds kept back thecurious crowd ; a cit}^ besieged by armiesas Troy was, with women and childrenwatching from the walls ; a fallow fieldwhere men were plowing, while themaster came bringing wine to refreshthem ; a field deep in ripe wheat, withreapers far and near; a vineyard also, its 106 Achilles and Hector rows of vines heavy with grape clusters,and the vintagers carrying the fruit inbaskets. And there, too, Avere a herd ofcattle being driven to pasture. Two lionshad sprung out upon a bull and draggedhim off, while men and hounds rushed tothe rescue. There also were pictured afair, broad pastur Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookauthorhomer bookyear1903 bookpublisherchicago bookidachilleshectoril00gale bookauthorgaleagnesspoffordcook bookpublishernewyorkrandmcnally bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary
1903

Image from page 224 of
Description: Identifier: geographicaldis00seeb Title: The geographical distribution of the family Charadriidae, or the plovers, sandpipers, snipes, and their allies Year: 1888 (1880s) Authors: Seebohm, Henry, 1832-1895 Keulemans, J. G. (John Gerrard), 1842-1912, lithographer Hanhart, printer of plates Dwight, Jonathan, 1858-1929, former owner. DSI Tucker, Marcia Brady, former owner. DSI Judd & Company, printer of plates Library of Congress, former owner. DSI Subjects: Charadriidae Shore birds Publisher: London Manchester : H. Sotheran & Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: undthroughout the coast; Wallace found it at the mouth of the Amazon (Sclater & Salvin,Proc. Zool. Soc. 1867, p. 591); and I have examples from Bahia, Rio Grande, and Riode la Plata. Salvin obtained an example from Guatemala (Ibis, 1866, p. 196), but it isnot known to have occurred in Chili (Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1867, p. 331). It appears to be an inland species; Bartlett found it breeding on the sandy banks ofsome of the tributaries of the Amazon in Eastern Peru (Proc. Zool. Soc. 1873, p. 309);and Durnford met with it in the extreme north-west of the Argentine Republic (Ibis, 1880,p. 424), and on dry sandy ground in the province of Buenos Ayres (Ibis, 1878, p. 67).These two localities represent, so far as is known, the southern limit of its range, whichappears to extend seven hundred miles further south on the Atlantic than on the Pacificcoasts, a boundary of distribution corresponding almost exactly with the isothermal linesfor January, which is probably the breeding-season. Text Appearing After Image: CHARADRIUS OCCIDENTALS. CABANISS SAND-PLOVER. Diagnosis. Charadritjs, subgen. ASgialophili minores, pedibus nigris : loris albis. Variations. No local races of this species are known. CHAEADEIUS.iEgialitis occidentalism Cabanis, Journ. Orn. 1872, p. 158. 175 Plates.—Cabanis, Journ. Orn. 1885, pi. vi. fig. 1 (head only).Habits.—Undescribed.Eggs.—Unknown. Synonymy. Literature. Cabaniss Sand-Plover belongs to the subgeneric group JEgialophili minores, andappears to be perfectly distinct from any of its allies, having black legs and white lores. It is only known from the mountain plateaux in the extreme north of Chili. It isquite distinct from C. nivosus, which is a smaller bird, with paler feet and a white nuchalcollar. It appears to be nearest related to C. ruficapillus, though it is probably a temperateform of its tropical ally C. collaris. It is a larger bird than any of its tropical allies, thewing from carpal joint measuring about 4f inches. It is no doubt subject to somevaria Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookauthorlibraryofcongressformerownerdsi bookpublisherlondon bookcentury1800 bookauthordwightjonathan18581929formerownerdsi bookauthortuckermarciabradyformerownerdsi bookdecade1880 bookyear1888 bookauthorkeulemansjgjohngerrard18421912lithographer booksubjectshorebirds bookauthorseebohmhenry18321895
1888

Image from page 4 of
Description: Identifier: simbolipredicabi00labi Title: Simboli predicabili estratti da sacri evangeli che corrono nella quadragesima Year: 1692 (1690s) Authors: Labia, Carlo, Abp. of Corfu, d. 1701 Zanchi, Antonio, 1639-1722 Piccini, Isabella Subjects: Publisher: Ferrara, Appresso B. Barbieri Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: /t- iV r\ Text Appearing After Image: ^11^- estratti ^ Pi sacri Euanoey, *^ NOBILE VEUEìn Prima ^<M- - \ ARCIVESCOVO DJ COW ^f^^COVO^ D ADRIA i J. ^^. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 1332
Tags: bookdecade1690 bookyear1692 bookcentury1600 bookidsimbolipredicabi00labi bookauthorlabiacarloabpofcorfud1701 bookauthorzanchiantonio16391722 bookauthorpicciniisabella bookpublisherferraraappressobbarbieri bookcontributoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign booksponsoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign
1825

Image from page 172 of
Description: Identifier: symbolorumemblem00came Title: Symboloru[m] & emblematum ex re herbaria desumtorum centuria vna[-quarta] collecta Year: 1654 (1650s) Authors: Camerarius, Joachim, 1534-1598 Somer, Mathias van, fl. 1649-1669 Subjects: Emblems Plant lore Animal lore Publisher: Francofurti : Impensis Iohannis Ammonij Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: tgregit^smtffiis a ReyuFl. (Jtnuenf Orator adDucem A4edtolanenJe7n^cumts eumnollct dtmittcre^ necpactts con uentis cnm Genuenfibusjia-re,CAptataoccaJione^obtultteidem Duct maHipuitira herbdi Ocy-?m. ^ut admirabtmdtis quidjibt hoc donum veliet, quxjivit quidret effetl Cui tile refpondt,ejtiJrnodtproprietatem hutcpLantA tnej^fe,ut ieviter acfuavtter contre6iata prdberet ^ratttm odorem, ni-misautem duriter comprcffa (jr attrtta,nonfoium omnem ftiavi-tatemptrderetjfedetiamtandemfcorpiosproduceret; habere au-temfe ingema Genuenjium eodempiane modo. Dux hoc ingeniojbadmodtlm rejfonjo pltirimum deJeciatt^s, ^Jententiam prioremmutavit, ^ legatum honorifice dtmifit. Ciementia ita^ ^ lenita-tepitira confeqtwnur qttam ntmta veijementia. Nam vere Ciati-dtantts: Peragit tranquilla poceftas,Quod violenta nequic,mandataqiie fortiiis uigec• Imperiofacjuies, EtTeirent.Adei Reipfareppen,nihile{Iehomini mcliusfacilitate atque clementia. QUO 1t EMBLEMATrM CeNTTR. J. ^^ LXXXIII. QUO MOLLIUS EO SVAVIUS, Text Appearing After Image: Officium utfaciatynimpSyoKeXynefremefkberftiSua^vtM Htf^irenty Ocyma ne terito^ Referti To A C H. C A M E JR. A R 11 S Y M BOL O R U M Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 246
Tags: booksubjectemblems bookyear1654 bookauthorcamerariusjoachim15341598 bookcentury1600 bookpublisherfrancofurtiimpensisiohannisammonij bookdecade1650 bookidsymbolorumemblem00came bookauthorsomermathiasvanfl16491669 booksubjectplantlore booksubjectanimallore
1825

Image from page 170 of
Description: Identifier: impresesacrecont02ares Title: Imprese sacre con triplicati discorsi illustrate & arricchite ... Year: 1625 (1620s) Authors: Aresi, Paolo, 1574-1644 Doino, Catarino, fl. 1596-1640 Subjects: Emblems Publisher: In Milano : Per l'herede di Pacifico Pontio et Gio. Battista Piccaglia Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hé Gio-uanni lha innalzato tanto, & ha offerto peril Cielo, quanto offerir fi poteiia , bifognarifòluerfi ai far cofc grandi, di far violenzaalla natura, à fefleflo,efopra tutto alla pro-pria carne, cóme fece Giouanni , per otte-nerlo; oh che perfettoduni^uè efemplare,oh che marauigliofa idea di virtù è Gio-uanni Santo : Iien difife egli flelTo, Egs fum , - .vox, tutto quanto è voce, tutto quello che *^*ìvedi,e fenti dìGio. è voce, la fua penitenzaèyoce,chegrida,che efclama, che facci pe-nitenza de tuoi enormi peccati j poichée^li fa penitenza con hauer ò nulla, o pocoòi che pentirfi;. Il fuo ritiramento nel del~er-to è voce, che tinfegna , che fé vuoi viuerefenza peccato, deui ritirarti daHoccaiìonedi far male, tutta la fua vita è vna predicacioquentifTima, che ti perfuade , & infegnaà fcguir lutjte le virtù, ad elTer perfetto. Gio. ha pra ilo in rtpfi.tation» il Ctelfl, MAt.f, la Gio, tUttt voce. CO- CORALLO, ImprefafdU p pi lApollo Sm Pietro i i€^ /^ Text Appearing After Image: Fipo nélfuolde rampio ettiofo ay^ent» Pianta, ehti cor chiude nel nome , ha ilpki^ Tenero st , che ad ogni moto cede Del mar turbato , ò del marino armento y Mafuelta dal natio freddo elemento ,Prefente il Sol, che lei co ra£gifiedeCangiar natura, oh gran ftupor fi vede ^ yr y^i^i*»^^ J!» Mo volta in w momento . yil pejcatorfu^ tal; tolto dal mare 0 uè ondeggiò fra Venfter vani il coreE del Sol di giuHitia a i lumi efpoH^rietra dura cofi ^ diuenne ei topo ,Che foura lei leterna mole al:^areDtJiM-Q,htefa, dtfpofe Ugran motori X 2 Xiifuf^ St franta, ftitt pregiaso morto j(he V tuo. i Simili marauiglie in j ^4 Lihro fecondo Corallo Impre/k Vi. Difcorfoprimorapra ilcorpO deU campici prati,cheGeirondeggiareimira=•^ ■ ^ /». /- •* no rifteisomare. biche flmprefa. Non pur. bello, e etatiu..fo à vedere , mercè ideifilorofeo ftelo, e porpo-rini rami, ma degno an-cora di molta marauf-glia il corallo , e comeIrà le piante par pietra,cofi Ira le pietre e pian-ta, e pietra che n a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 3900
Tags: booksubjectemblems bookyear1625 bookauthordoinocatarinofl15961640 bookcentury1600 bookdecade1620 bookauthoraresipaolo15741644 bookidimpresesacrecont02ares bookpublisherinmilanoperlherededipacificopontioetgiobattistapiccaglia booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcontributorgettyresearchinstitute
1825

[Dick Rudolph throwing ball, Boston NL (baseball)]  (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. [Dick Rudolph throwing ball, Boston NL (baseball)] [1914] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Original data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards: James, Tyler, Rudolph, Rudolph, Rudolph's hold on ball. Corrected title and date based on research by the Pictorial History Committee, Society for American Baseball Research, 2006. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.17420 Call Number: LC-B2- 3252-7
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 4762
Tags: baseball libraryofcongress rudolph nl braves boxseats baseballglove pologrounds nationalleague bostonbraves
1914