These 530,636 images need to be put on the map. Can you help pin their Where?

Lt. L.J. Maitland (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Lt. L.J. Maitland [between ca. 1920 and ca. 1925] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. For more information, see George Grantham Bain Collection - Rights and Restrictions Information www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/274_bain.html Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Part Of: Bain News Service photograph collection (DLC) 2005682517 General information about the George Grantham Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.35311 Call Number: LC-B2- 5895-16A
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 2502
Tags: libraryofcongress dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain35311 aviation aviator lesterjamesmaitland lesterjmaitland ljmaitland lestermaitland maitland birdofparadise
1920

Bergliot Bruu i
Description: Beskrivelse / Description: "Kraaka" ble skrevet av Jens Tvedt i 1909. Bildet tatt i forbindelse med oppsetningen på Det norske teater i 1918-19. Dato / Date: ca. 1918-1922 Fotograf / Photographer: Ernest Rude (1871-1948) Digital kopi av original / Digital copy of original: sv/hv papirpositiv Eier / Owner Institution: Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway Lenke / Link: www.nb.no Bildesignatur / Image Number: blds_07987
Owner: National Library of Norway
Views: 5359
Tags: actors women portretter kvinner nasjonalbiblioteket skuespillere detnorsketeater ernestrude nationallibraryofnorway portrettfotografi
1918

[Street Scene, Mexico City]
Description: Title: [Street Scene, Mexico City] Creator: Unknown Date: ca. 1910-1911 Place: Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico Part Of: Oil fields in Mexico Physical Description: 1 photographic print: gelatin silver, part of 1 volume (180 gelatin silver prints); 9 x 14 cm on 26 x 31 cm mount File: ag2006_0002_35a_opt.jpg Rights: Please cite DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University when using this file. A high-resolution version of this file may be obtained for a fee. For details see the sites.smu.edu/cul/degolyer/research/permissions/ web page. For other information, contact [email protected] For more information, see: digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/ref/collection/mex/id/2038 View the full series: digitalcollections.smu.edu/cdm/search/collection/mex/sear... View Mexico - Photographs, Manuscripts, and Imprints Collection: digitalcollections.smu.edu/all/cul/mex/
Owner: SMU Libraries Digital Collections
Views: 5099
Tags: streets mexico mansions
1910

Image from page 242 of
Description: Identifier: gri_33125008050011 Title: Military and religious life in the Middle Ages and at the period of the Renaissance Year: 1870 (1870s) Authors: Jacob, P. L., 1806-1884 Subjects: Middle Ages Civilization, Medieval Civilization, Renaissance Costume Military art and science Christian life Publisher: London : Bickers & Son Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: der of St-John of Jerusalem)—a defence which lasted twenty-fourdays, and cost the lives of four thousand of the assailants, amongst themthat of the famous pirate Dragut, the vice-sultan of Tripoli. The fort ofSt. Michael, and the suburb of that name, were reduced to ashes by the fireof the enemy ; and it was only the invincible courage of the grand master,Jean de la Valette, and of a small number of his knights, all to the last manprepared to die for their faith—even after more than two thousand of themhad already perished—that still enabled Malta to hold out. MILITARY ORDERS. Fortunately, Don Garcias de Toledo, the viceroy of Sicily, came withsixty galleys to their assistance. During the four months of the siege theTurkish forces fired seventy-eight thousand rounds of artillery, and lostfifteen thousand soldiers and eight thousand sailors. The knights of the order had on their side to deplore the loss of morethan three thousand of their brethren. Their grand master decreed that Text Appearing After Image: Fig. ] 44.—The French Priory at Rhodes (Fifteenth Century).—State of the Ruins in 1828. annually, on the eve of the festival of Our Lady of September, prayersshould be offered up in all the churches of the order, thanking God for theprovidential succours which had delivered the besieged, and that on thepreceding day a commemorative service should be celebrated in honour ofthose who had fallen in defence of the faith. Henceforward neither the town nor the island, which remained the headquarters of the order, was again disturbed by the Turks, and Jean de laValette built a new city in Malta, which was called Valetta, after him. 182 MILITARY ORDERS. The members of the Order of Malta were divided into three classes : theknights, the chaplains, and the serving brothers. The first comprised thosewhose noble birth and previous rank in other armies marked them out formilitary service. The second consisted of priests, and ecclesiastics whoperformed all the ordinary religious duties, and who Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 12527
Tags: booksubjectmiddleages booksubjectcostume booksubjectmilitaryartandscience bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectchristianlife bookyear1870 bookpublisherlondonbickersson bookidgri33125008050011 booksubjectcivilizationrenaissance
1870

Image from page 148 of
Description: Identifier: sequelle1912clar Title: Sequelle 1912 Year: 1912 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Clarion State Normal School--Students--Yearbooks. College yearbooks--Pennsylvania--Clarion. Publisher: Clarion, Pa. : Clarion State Normal School. Contributing Library: Clarion University of Pennsylvania Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: .—I list the plaintive turtle dove.And in the vacuum say. Tis love.Then heart of mine, respect the dayAnd speed a message on its way\\here tlirougfh the mists the love-lights shine ;Ior I am hers and she is mine.My sweet and charming \ alentine. When \:iu havent got your lesson And must go to Physics class,With a face that hides your secret And a countenance of brass,Just sit still and look up calmly At daddy and the rest.Thon,gh your knees are all a-quiver .And your heart has left your chest.While the lightning strikes about you Keep your courage; dont forgetThat although you are in danger There are many chances yet.As the Trc)jans were delivered From the wrath of Junos wrong,You, perhaps, may yet be rescued By the ringing of the gong. Lines of \irgil all remind us We can make our lives sublime And by asking silly questionsTake up all of Jackies time. IIIBLIC STUDY Charles Xeale : When ilid John the liaptist die?Cataline : I didnt know he was sick. Page On The 19 12 S eq u e 11 e m Text Appearing After Image: OIL J^Kl PP£RS\\\ The Sad Tale of Two Little Boys We h.id a little stick of sjum. It tasted very good.We took that gum to schoul with us; ( )ur maninias said we could. Alas! our oscillating jawsThe teacher quickly spied. She drew the large waste-basket forthAnd said, Put it inside. It is inside. ( )h. teacher dear.Were chewing on it now. And when the other fellows lauglied.The teacher raised a row. So now we sit till five oclock,.\nd study like the deuce. The fellows say, Come out and play.We answer. Whats the use? —Pearsall and Riley. Page One Hundrcl ,ni,l /■,(y-.V, r/ze t 9 I 2 Seq uelle Senior Girls Estimate of Senior Boys 1 oo ffl p c 3 X O 30. 3 3 X M s o 0 n1 2m d i a 2 d 0 0•ac» 3- 3 tn> > > 0 2> to P 01 p d pc 0 p: £< P p : : |. 2. c : \ ■: 1; : 3 O-D. p ; 3 Robert Barlett 20|.. .. ••1 2 2 21 6 1| .. 2 1 1 2 1 42 T. 0. Beck . .|.. 262 .. 1| 15|23 21 1 •Il4|24 3 1 11 .. 6 29 11 3 i 1 101 11 4 •• 1 22 1 42 Norman Boddorf . .. | 71 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1646
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1912 bookdecade1910 booksubjectclarionstatenormalschoolstudentsyearbooks booksubjectcollegeyearbookspennsylvaniaclarion bookpublisherclarionpaclarionstatenormalschool bookidsequelle1912clar bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorclarionuniversityofpennsylvanialibraries bookcollectionclarionuniversitylibraries
1912

Image from page 878 of
Description: Identifier: clinicalgyncolog00keat Title: Clinical gyncology, medical and surgical Year: 1895 (1890s) Authors: Keating, John M. (John Marie), 1852-1893 Coe, Henry Clark, 1856- Subjects: Women Gynecology Publisher: Philadelphia, Lippincott Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: projectingfrom the vestibule and filling up the vulvar orifice. The external meatusof the urethra, situated in the centreof the tumor, was dilated and funnel-shaped, resembling very much theostium of a Fallopian tube greatlyhypertrophied and swollen. Thetumor bled easily when touched. Thegrowth was removed with the scalpel,and the urethral mucous membranestitched to the external mucosa withinterrupted silk sutures. Recovery. Case III.—A child, seven yearsof age, had been suffering from hema-turia for some days. Examinationdemonstrated a dark-red or purpletumor, about the size of a cherry,projecting from the vestibule, the meatus being situated a little below thecentre of it. It bled easily when touched, and on inquiry it was foundthat the child had from time to time suffered from hemorrhages, but hadat no time complained of pain. The same procedure was adopted as inCase II., with entire success. (Fig. 2.) Etiology.—A relaxed condition of the urethra, together with a loose Fig. 2. Text Appearing After Image: Prolapse of urethral mucous membrane in achild. (Bagot.) 1 Dublin Journal of the Medical Sciences, September, 1891. 830 DISEASES OF THE URETHRA, BLADDER, AND URETERS. attachment of its mucous membrane to the submucous structures, is gen-erally assumed as a predisposing cause of the prolapse. Age and debilityundoubtedly favor its development. Vesical or rectal tenesmus of whatever origin, and, in children, violentand prolonged paroxysms of coughing, are regarded as exciting causes. Bagot observes that in the cases reported by him the results of micro-scopical examination went to confirm the opinion that cases which arecommonly described as complete prolapse of the urethral mucous mem-brane are rarely, if ever, instances of true primary prolapse, but that theprolapse of the mucous membrane is secondary to some neoplastic changein it, the most usual being, according to the investigations of Ruge andMartin, angioma. Symptoms.—Vesical tenesmus and dysuria are marked in proportionto the d Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6023
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectgynecology booksubjectwomen bookyear1895 bookdecade1890 bookpublisherphiladelphialippincott bookauthorkeatingjohnmjohnmarie18521893 bookidclinicalgyncolog00keat bookauthorcoehenryclark1856 bookcollectionamericana
1895

Image from page 137 of
Description: Identifier: royalnaturalhist47lyde Title: The royal natural history Year: 1893 (1890s) Authors: Lydekker, Richard, 1849-1915 Sclater, Philip Lutley, 1829-1913 Frostick, W. B., former owner. DSI Brooks, W. T., former owner. DSI Subjects: Zoology Natural history Publisher: London and New York : Frederick Warne & Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: with severalspecies, distinguished by the long tail, the somewhat compressed form of thebeak, in which the nostrils open in a completely naked cere, and the absence ofa tufted oil-gland. The species figured on the opposite page is the largest of thegenus, measuring 10 inches in total length, whereas some of the others are less than7. It takes its name from the all-pervading green of the plumage, to which theonly exceptions are the blue primaries and primary coverts, a slight tinge of olive-brown on the lesser uj^per wing-coverts, and of blue on the middle tail-feathers.This species is an inhabitant of Eastern Brazil; the range of the genus extendingfrom that country, Peru and Bolivia, to Central America. In Eastern Brazil thetirika is one of the commonest of the parrot tribe, associating in countless flocks,which may be seen flying from grove to grove, or descending to ravage the rice andmaize fields. Their cry is a short, sharp, clear scream. In captivity theseparraquets thrive well. Text Appearing After Image: BLUE-WINGED FARROTLET. Blunt-Tailed Green Parrots. Subfamily Pionix.e. The familiar Amazon parrots are among the best known representatives of alarge subfamily, containing several American genera and also a single African one.All these parrots are distinguished from the members of the preceding subfamilyby their broad and short or moderate tails, which are never of the acuminate and AAfAZO.VS. pointed form characteristic of the conures, and have the tips of the feathersrounded. In the whole of them the cere is entirely naked, and the predominantcolour of the plumage green. Usually the tail is about half the length of thewing, and may be either squared or rounded at the end; and the bill is of moderate Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6174
Tags: booksubjectzoology bookcentury1800 booksubjectnaturalhistory bookdecade1890 bookauthorlydekkerrichard18491915 bookyear1893 bookauthorsclaterphiliplutley18291913 bookidroyalnaturalhist47lyde bookauthorfrostickwbformerownerdsi bookauthorbrookswtformerownerdsi
1893

Image from page 439 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924003058561 Title: The poultry manual. A complete guide for the breeder and exhibitor .. Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Sturges, Thomas William, 1853- Subjects: Poultry Publisher: London, Macdonald and Evans Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d are nowpractically dead, being only seen occasionally in AnyOther Variety classes at the chief shows. Occasionallya first-class specimen appears, e. g. at the Birminghamshow in December 1908. I awarded the special prize,for the best bird in the four A.O.V. classes provided, toa Buff Wyandotte cockerel. The chief point is colour,which should be one even shade of buff over the entirebody. They are again a made breed, the chiefingredients being the Silver Wyandotte and the BuffCochin, to which latter blood the tendency to featherson the legs is to be attributed. The Buff Orpingtonand Buff Rock have also been infused into it, the rose-comb swiftly dominating the single. The Partridge Wyandotte This lovely coloured variety was introduced into thiscountry from America in 1896, and exhibited by Mr. J.Wharton, at Liverpool, a year later. There is no doubt that they owe their origin chieflyto the blood of the Partridge Cochin, whose exquisitepencilled plumage they inherit. The Gold Wyandotte Text Appearing After Image: PARTRIDGE WYANDOTTE COCK, The Properly ol Mr. Hubert Wright, isl Palace, igo$, cic. AMERICAN BREEDS OF POULTRY 399 gave them the comb and shape, and it is probable that,as in the Gold, the Indian Game has also been used tosecure the lacing. A glance at the two coloured illustrations, insertedby kind permission of Mr. Hubert Wright, will showtheir beauty more than words can do. The beauty ofthe hen is wonderful, and her exquisite colour and deli-cate pencilling make her one of the most beautiful ofall our domestic races of poultry. In size they areequal to any and larger than most, adult cocks weighing10 to 12 lb., and hens 7 or 8 lb. are not uncommon.This is a great point when the mis-marked specimenscome to be disposed of, and make it a desirable tablefowl. For egg production in winter they are among thebest. Though the eggs from pullet-breeding pens arenot large, they are readily saleable when eggs are scarce,and the eggs from the larger and more robust cock-breeding pullets are wel Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4141
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectpoultry bookidcu31924003058561 bookauthorsturgesthomaswilliam1853 bookpublisherlondonmacdonaldandevans bookyear1909 bookleafnumber439 bookcollectionamericana booksponsormsn
1909

Image from page 38 of
Description: Identifier: englishcostume04calt Title: English costume Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Calthrop, Dion Clayton, 1878-1937 Subjects: Costume -- Great Britain Publisher: London, A. and C. Black Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Wellesley College Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: CHARLES THE SECOND 13 keep his periwig in order for £l a year. He buysa black bombazin suit. In 1669 his wife wears the new French gowncalled a sac; he pays 55s. for his new belt. Hiswife still wears her old flower tabby gown. Soends the dress note in the Diary. JAMES THE SECOND Reigiied four years : 1685—1689.Bom 1633. Married, 1661, Anne Hyde ; 1673,Mary of Modena. THE MEN AND WOMEN In such a short spaceof time as this reignoccupies it is notpossible to show anygreat difference inthe character of thedress, but there is atendency, shown overthe country at large,to discard the earlierberibboned fashions,and to take more seriously to the long coat andwaistcoat. There is a tendency, even, to becomemore buttoned up—to present what I can only calla frock-coat figure. The coat became closer to the 14 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 675
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1906 bookpublisherlondonaandcblack booksubjectcostumegreatbritain bookidenglishcostume04calt bookauthorcalthropdionclayton18781937 bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc bookleafnumber38
1906

Image from page 114 of
Description: Identifier: augsburgsdrawing02augs Title: Augsburg's drawing, book 2 Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Augsburg, De Resco Leo, b. 1859 Subjects: Drawing Publisher: Boston, New York, Educational Pub. Co Contributing Library: Internet Archive Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: parts as indicated in the following exercises : When the draioingis based on the honzonlcd receding cijlinder, the center of vision maybe used. 25. Draw part 1 below and at the right of the eye. 26. Draw part 1 below and at the left of the eye. Removethe front face. 27. Draw part 1 l)elow the eye. 28. Draw part 2 ])elow the eye. Remove the top face. 29. Draw part 2 below and at the right of the eye. Removethe top face. Text Appearing After Image: 112 AUGSBURGS DRAWING. 30. Draw part 2 l)elow and at the left of the eye. Removethe curved face. Figs. 6-13 represent the front face of cylinders drawn directlyin front of the eye. On each face is marked a problem ; the partmarked X on each cylinder is to be removed as follows : 31. Draw Fig. 6 below the eye and remove the part markedX. (See Fig. 10.) 32. Draw Fig. 6 below and at the left of the eye andremove X. 33. Draw Fig. 7 below the eye and remove the part markedX. (See Fig. 14.) 34. Draw Fig. 7 ])elow and at the right of the eye andremove the part marked X. 35. Draw Fig. 8 below and at the left of the eye and removethe part marked X. 3(3. Draw Fig. 9 below and at the left of the eye and removethe part marked X. 37. Draw Fig. 11 below and at the right of the eye andremove the part marked X. 38. Draw Fig. 12 below the eye and remove the parimarked X to above the eye directly over the part marked Y. 39. Draw Fig. 13 below and at the right of the eye andremove the part marked X. KAL Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4113
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 booksubjectdrawing bookidaugsburgsdrawing02augs bookauthoraugsburgderescoleob1859 bookpublisherbostonnewyorkeducationalpubco bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber114 bookcontributorinternetarchive
1901

Image from page 733 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: cousin nellys school closed yesterday, and she will be here this afternoon. Text Appearing After Image: -,J fk v BHALU—THE INDIAN JUNGLE BEAR. a By J. M. Gleeson. \j*i For the wolf-boy Mowgli no more appro-priate animal could have been adopted as play-mate, guardian, and instructor than old Baloo,or Bhalu, the big black, hairy sloth-bear ofIndia. Kaa, the python, making of his sinuousfolds a jeweled hammock for his boyish play-mate, is a fascinating companion; Bagheera,the black panther, satisfies completely our desirefor something strong, beautiful, and terrible.But old Baloo, humming his sing-song say-ings of the jungle-law like some old lamamurmuring his prayers, gives to the picture thefinal touch of completeness. And we feel, too, that he would foster the naked cub, for his nature among his ownpeople is one of affection ; and because of hishabits as an eater of fruits, roots, flowers, andhoney he would find it very easy to give theboy a diet suitable for him. Furthermore, owing to his size, and thecustom among the bear people of carryingtheir young on their backs, he could not on Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4917
Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial31dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 177 of
Description: Identifier: debris00purd_12 Title: ... Debris Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Purdue University Subjects: Purdue University College yearbooks Universitites and colleges Publisher: Indianapolis, Ind. : Press of Baker & Randolph Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ht them news of the terrible weapons of defense to be employed, they were craven-hearted, and their ranks melted away into the darkness. Some time later one of the spies cameby stealth to visit his kinsman, but the ever-watchful Demons captured him, and to remove alltraces of unbelief, he was baptized three times in the Jordan. lie was then disrobed and madeready for the sacrifice. When all was ready he was placed upon the alter, the lightnings ol Jovecame down and enveloped him in a flash of blinding light, while the smoke from the incensehovered above as a cloud. Many of theouter world wandered in, saw the error oftheir ways, and were baptized in the cool andsparkling waters of the Jordan. But themultitude stood afar off, for they had heardrumors of the coldness and purity of thiswater. Vague mysteries floated in the atmos-phere around the Dorm. Belated travelerswhispered fearfully that little drops of waterhad fallen like thunderbolts from a clear sky I I KIM II) E I! l< I SI902 Text Appearing After Image: when they ventured too near. But of late an atmosphere of unrest pervades the Dorm. Word has gone forth that the Powers that Decree have planned to remodel the grand old building and change it from a life center to a set of dead classrooms, where weary students sleep through P U R D U E interminable lectures and recitations. Strange footsteps are heard in its halls at the dead hours DEBRIS of the night, and solitary and smothered moans. It is the spirit of the Ancient Dorm Devil, who I o O 2 comes forth from his secret recess to view his old abode, so soon to be destroyed, and to lament its fate. And one or two students returning to their lodgings at a late hour, have seen on the roof of the Dorm the figure of his Majesty, dimly outlined against the sky, as he takes a last sad look at his principality, which is soon to be his no more. Keepers of the Historical Scroll. Within the atmosphere of mystery.that surrounds the Old Dorm, we Dorm Devils lived inpeace, security and happiness uns Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4400
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 booksubjectcollegeyearbooks bookiddebris00purd12 bookauthorpurdueuniversity booksubjectpurdueuniversity booksubjectuniversititesandcolleges bookpublisherindianapolisindpressofbakerrandolph bookcollectionamericana
1902

Image from page 26 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924013150630 Title: Shakespeare's love story, 1580-1609 Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: McMahan, Anna Benneson, Mrs., 1846- Subjects: Hathaway, Anne, 1556?-1623 Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Publisher: Chicago, A.C. McClurg & co. Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: clers,in the wonders of romance, in legendsof popular minstrelsy, in songs andballads, in tales of that southern land [21] Shakespeares love story of Italy, where hearts beat faster andlove and jealousy are fiercer and leadto more tragic ends than in everydayEngland. Moreover, from that sameItaly, two noble Englishmen have latelybrought a new form of verse—threefour-fold strands of poesy, caught upand dexterously wound into a perfectcircle by two shining threads of gold— so the new verse form is described.Difficult of composition indeed, yetrecognized by every young poet as thefittest and sweetest medium for the ex-pression of delicate feeling. EdmundSpenser is wooing his Elizabeth inthe Amoretti Sonnets; Philip Sidney istelling a tragic tale of passion strug-gling with adverse fate, but masteredat last by high resolve, in his Astropheland Stella; and William Shakespeare,though the world knows it not, isadding to this great sonnet era its brightest and most imperishable gems. [2.] Text Appearing After Image: Shakespeares love story Already of imagination all com-pact, it matters little that he has leftthe Grammar School at the age of thir-teen, knowing small Latin and lessGreek. He drinks now from richerfounts of learning. Old books, mostlytranslations from the French or Latin,fall in his way. In one he reads thegoodly history of Romeo and Giuletta;in another the story of the rich heiresswho chose a husband by the device ofa gold, a silver, and a leaden casket;the story of the merchant whose hard-hearted creditor required the fulfilmentof his bond by cutting a pound of fleshfrom nearest the heart; the story of theEmperor Theodosius who had threedaughters—two who said they lovedhim more than themselves, and onewho said she loved him so much ashe was worthy. And the two whoprofessed most were unkind to him;but the other was the true daughter [a5] Shakespeares love story and cared for him in his need andwhen deserted by all others. At Billesley Hall, easily reached on ahalf holiday, is the Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 743
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectshakespearewilliam15641616 bookauthormcmahanannabennesonmrs1846 bookidcu31924013150630 booksubjecthathawayanne15561623 bookyear1909 bookpublisherchicagoacmcclurgco bookcollectionamericana booksponsormsn
1909

Image from page 85 of
Description: Identifier: johnsonsgardenfa1913john Title: Johnson's garden & farm manual : 1913 Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Johnson Seed Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) Pennsylvania Philadelphia Catalogs Nursery stock Pennsylvania Philadelphia Catalogs Vegetables Seeds Pennsylvania Philadelphia Catalogs Flowers Seeds Pennsylvania Philadelphia Catalogs Fruit Pennsylvania Philadelphia Catalogs Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa. : Johnson Seed Co. Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 5 10 2463. Mixed. All sorts 5 10 SALVIA, OR SCARLET SAGEGorgeous effects can be produced by massingon the lawn or in the garden, or planted in rowsalong a sunny drive. A perennial, but blooms thefirst season from seed. Per Pkt. 2523. Clara Bedman, or Bonfire. Ver\compact, with long, erect spikes ofbrilliant scarlet flowers. The finestSalvia ever introduced, and by farthe best for bedding and massing on the lawn $0 10 2525. Zurich. Of dwarf, compact growth,forming oval bushes 15 to 18 incheshigh, thickly studded with fine spikesof scarlet flowers. For bedding it isbrilliantly effective, either plantedalone or as a front row for the tallerSalvias 15 2520. Salvia Splendens. (Scarlet Sage). . 10 2521. Patens. Blue sage 10 2522. Silver Spot. Dark green leaves with cream colored spots 10 SALPIGLOSSIS (Velvet Flower)2501. Salpiglossis Grandiflora. The largeflowering Salpiglossis is one of themost beautiful flowering annuals. Inrich coloring they vie with orchids. . 5 74 JOHNSON SEED COMPANY Text Appearing After Image: JOHNSONS RAINBOW SWEET PEAS PER PACKET 5C., EXCEPT WHERE NOTED 2677. Aurora. Orange salmon on white ground 2755. Blanche Ferry. Extra early. Pink and white 2746. Coccinea. Bright cerise 2738. Countess of Radnor. Standard lavender, wings mauve 2672. Countess of Lathom. The best cream-pink, self-colored 2674. Countess Spencer. Bright pink. Packet, 10c 2756. Dainty. Pure white with pink edge 2769. D<^othy Eckford. Pure white, large flower 2796. Duke of Westminster. The best clear purple, large flower 2722. Emily Henderson. Pure white, large size, good for forcing 2690. Earliest of All. Pink and white, splendid for forcing 2673. Flora Norton. The most pronounced bright blue 2683. Gladys Unwin. Clear bright pink, large size 2671. Helen Lewis. New Giant, orange pink 2795. Helen Pierce. Gloxinia-flowered, bright blue, mottled on pure white 2678. Hon. Mrs. E. Kenyon. Deep primrose 2754. Janet Scott. Bright pink, large size 2687 John Ingman. Rose-carmine fluted flowers, very large size 2750 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6466
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection bookauthorjohnsonseedco booksubjectnurserieshorticulturepennsylvaniaphiladelphiacatalogs booksubjectnurserystockpennsylvaniaphiladelphiacatalogs booksubjectvegetablesseedspennsylvaniaphiladelphiacatalogs booksubjectflowersseedspennsylvaniaphiladelphiacatalogs booksubjectfruitpennsylvaniaphiladelphiacatalogs
1913

Image from page 304 of
Description: Identifier: gri_notiziedepro03bald Title: Notizie de' professori del disegno da Cimabue in qua : per le quali si dimostra come, e per chi le bell' arti di pittura, scultura, e architettura lasciata la rozzezza delle maniere greca, e gottica, si siano in questi secoli ridotte all' antica loro perfezione Year: 1681 (1680s) Authors: Baldinucci, Filippo, 1625-1696 Baldinucci, Francesco Saverio, 1662-1738 Rotari, Pietro, 1707-1762 Franchi, Santi, 17th/18th cent Matini, Piero, fl. 1684-1700 Manni, Giuseppe Stamperia di S.A.R. (Florence, Italy) Accademia della Crusca Subjects: Artists Art, Italian Publisher: In Firenze : Per Santi Franchi [et al.] Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: nnelli, nelle quali però nonJafcia di fcorgerfi una certa nobiltà di fantafia. Fra le opere di fua ma-no furono in San Giovanni Elemolinario di Rialto un San Marco ed unafigura del Suddiacono di quella Chielà, coli arme del Doge Cornaro.Per Ilo Principe Don Lorenzo di Tofcana di gloriofa memoria, fece unbei ritratto di una Dama Veneta, ed una mezza rigira, che rapprefen-ta la Vigilanza . Diede anche principio a dipignere tAxx te/e di buonagrandezza per diverfe Chiefe, alle quali poi non diede fine. Fu di na-tura ftudiofo,e però malinconico, e allo ttarfi folo inclinatifllmo. Co pit-tori volle fempre avere poca o niuna pratica : e tanto fu dedito allamo-re, quantaltro mai, a cagione di che e della fcarfezza di fuo avere, ca-gionatagli dall eflere {lata per ordinario ricompenfata fua virtù, più conlodi, con rime, con vifite e onore volezze, che con argento e con oro»vifle fempre una vita tormentata e ftentatiflima. NICCOLO POSSINO PITTORE DI ANDELY Difcepolo di nato 1594. # 1655. Text Appearing After Image: ALLA nobile famiglia de Pollini in Piccardia nel Contado diSoifTòn, trafle fua origine Giovanni Potimi. Quefti partitolidalla patria ne tempi delle civili difcordie, li pofe afervigjdel Re di Navarra, che poi fu Enrigo IV. Re di Francia;e trovandoli in Andely di Normandia, non molto lungi daParigi, quivi li accasò:e lanno 1594. ebbe di fuo matrimonioun figliuolo, che fu il tanto celebre Niccolò Pollino, di cui ora lÌ3mo perparlare : il quale in età crefciuto, quantunque lì fentiflè forte inclinato aldifegno, per efeguire il paterno volere, diedefi agli ftudj delle lettere, nonfenza contratto dellanimo fuo, che ad altro oggetto il chiamava; ma per-venuto all età di diciotto anni vinfe finalmente in lui il defiderio di farlipittore, e ne trovò ben pronta la congiuntura nel venirgli fatto di acco-darli a Quintino Varino, che in quella città tal profeflìone con molta lo-de efercicaya , e che di fuo pennello opere aliai aveva fatte vedere inAmiens e in Parigi. Con etto alquanto Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 498
Tags: booksubjectartists bookdecade1680 booksubjectartitalian bookcentury1600 bookidgrinotiziedepro03bald bookauthorrotaripietro17071762 bookauthorfranchisanti17th18thcent bookauthormatinipierofl16841700 bookauthormannigiuseppe bookauthorstamperiadisarflorenceitaly
1825

Image from page 691 of
Description: Identifier: centurydictiona04whit Title: The century dictionary and cyclopedia, a work of universal reference in all departments of knowledge with a new atlas of the world Year: 1896 (1890s) Authors: Whitney, William Dwight, 1827-1894 Smith, Benjamin E. (Benjamin Eli), 1857-1913 Subjects: English language Atlases Biography Encyclopedias and dictionaries Publisher: New York : The Century co. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Lantern of the Dead. Antigny. Fri(From VioUet-le-Ducs Diet, de VA Text Appearing After Image: Hondun-u t.antem-fly (a species of I.titernaria), reduced. Chinese species, also called candle-fly. The largest is theBraziltan lantern-fly, Latemaria pfwsphorea, some 8 incheslong anil r> or 6 In expanse of wings, of rich and strikingcolors. A1h4i called lantern-carrier. lantern-gurnard (Iaut6m-g6rnard), n. Sameas lantirii, H (h). lantern-jack Oantfem-jak), n. The ignis fa-tnus. lantern-jawed (lanttm-jad), a. Ha\ing lan-tern-jaws; having a long, thin face. Mine host, . . , pushing his lanUm-jaxped visage . . .rudely forward. ScoU, VVaverley, xxx. 3350 lantern-jaws (lant^rn-jaz), n. pi. Long, thinjaws or chops; hence, a thin visage. He sucked in both his cheeks till his lantern jaws andlong chin assumed the appearance of a pair of nut-crack-ers. Scott, Rob Roy, vi. lantern-keg (lantern-keg), n. Aaut., a kegtaken on board a boat at sea for holding, alongwith a small reserve supply of bread, a lantern,and sometimes fireworks, to enable the erewto indicate their whereabouts in ease of Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4297
Tags: booksubjectenglishlanguage booksubjectatlases bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectbiography bookyear1896 bookpublishernewyorkthecenturyco booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionaries bookauthorwhitneywilliamdwight18271894 bookauthorsmithbenjaminebenjamineli18571913
1896

Image from page 812 of
Description: Identifier: gri_astronomiexx04lala Title: Astronomie Year: 1771 (1770s) Authors: Lalande, Joseph Jérôme Le Français de, 1732-1807 Dupuis, 1742-1809. Mémoire sur l'origine des constellations Desbrulins, 18th cent Delagardette, Pierre Claude, ca. 1745-1792? Gaitte, Antoine-Joseph, b. 1753 Veuve de Nicolas Desaint, fl. 1771-1807? Subjects: Astronomy Publisher: A Paris : Chez la Veuve Desaint, rue du Foin Saint Jacques Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: iion droite en 1684, 877.Soleil , fes differens noms , 639 , fa rotation , tom. IV, pag. 717.StHER-E, à la fin, ajoute\: voy. cercle.-Synodique, au lieu de voy. finodique., Hfl 73 > 1418.3a£les de la parallaxe annuelle, au TABLE DES MATIERES.jtj lieu de 1157 , life\ 1148. Ajoute\pour les Tables en général le Re-cueil des Tables de lAcadémie deBerlin, en trois vol. wi-8°. Correc-tions pour mes Tables, tom. IV, p.605 8c fuiv. pag. 788. Taches du foleil, tom. IV, p. 714. Torquetvm , efpece daftrolabe, oudequatorial, tom. IV, pag. 666. Trépidation, sappliquoit aufli à lo-bliquité de léchptique , RiccioliAlmag. tom. I, pag. 166. Vénus ,Ton nom, 639, fa révolution,1153, 1173- Nouvelles Obferva-tions, tom. IV, p. 626, Tab. 781- Vîtesse de la terre , 139 toifes parféconde pour fa rotation, & feptlieues pour fa.révolution. Des corpsqui tombent, 339jU Zodiaque , comment on le divifa endouze parties, 271. Voy. lesSup-1jplémens., pag. 44», Fin <k la Table des matières! Text Appearing After Image: \ 788 111 ■ I I ■ Il Additions & corrections. Pages 34?, ajoute^ : dans lîle Rodrique, latit. ip° 41 Sud , long. 80* ji ;fuivant M. Pingre, oh 40; hauteur de la marée environ 6 pieds. 581, ligne 17, qjoute\ : M. Cagnoli, de Vérone , qui a lu une partiede lOuvrage avec autant dintelligence que de fom, 8c ma fournigrand nombre de remarques utiles, mais dont une partie na putrouver place dans ces Supplémens qui étoient deja imprimés. 606 8c Suivantes, ajoutc\ fix corrections nouvelles pour mes Tables.24. Le log. pour K 200 doit être 5,004736.39. Les différences au-deflbus de If 230, doivent être $, 3 & 6, i- 163. Léquation pour le 7 Janvier doit être 7 44. 166. Pour lépoque de 1710, au lieu fao 5 8 $0, l\ft\ o $ 58 jo.Cette correction eft importante. 172. Après 171% y Hft\ 1713. a 16. Lafcenfion droite de ^ d Hercule eft trop forte de 15 ,iuivantM. Darquier, pag. 27f- . . . 660, à la fin, M. Pingre sen tient à 88 (Mtm. Acad. i77*,p.4P) 678, ligne 15, a flw * P Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 2914
Tags: booksubjectastronomy bookcentury1700 bookdecade1770 bookyear1771 bookidgriastronomiexx04lala bookauthorlalandejosephjeromelefrancaisde17321807 bookauthordupuis17421809memoiresurloriginedesconstellations bookauthordesbrulins18thcent bookauthordelagardettepierreclaudeca17451792 bookauthorgaitteantoinejosephb1753
1825

Image from page 95 of
Description: Identifier: philipseymourorp00mgaw Title: Philip Seymour, or, Pioneer life in Richland County, Ohio : founded on facts Year: 1858 (1850s) Authors: M'Gaw, James Francis, 1823-1872 Subjects: Frontier and pioneer life Indians of North America Publisher: Mansfield [Ohio] : R. Brinkerhoff, Herald Steam Press Print Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System Digitizing Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh Library System View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: at forest flowerof yours, said Kate, after hearing Philips descrip-tion of her personal charms. Indeed,* continuedshe, ^^f your representation be correct, I shouldbe proud to own her as a sister,^ • Thank you Kate, thank you for such words ofencouragement, said Philip in ecstacy, I am cer-tain you would love her, for she is singularly beau-tiful. Her voice is sweeter than the sweeteststrains of the jEolian harp of Grecian fable, andher movements are graceful and easy. I tell youKate, she is a mysterious being. And so, the old Chief gave you an invitationto visit him in his cabin. How I should enjoy sucha visit, said Kate playfully. ^No gratification shall be denied you sister, re-plied Philip, if in my power to satisfy your de-sires. ^^ Thank you, brother, replied the affectionatesister, and the conversation was broken by the en-trance of the notable Johnny Appleseed, CHAPTER XIV. HOME SCENES. Each poor conceited mortal lias his failing.And I have mine—cant mend it much by railing Text Appearing After Image: yOHNNY Appleseed had IJ not evening forgotten to visit thecabin of Mr. Seymour everythe absence ofPhilip. Not knowing that theyoung hunter had returned heme,he had come as usual to spend theevening with the family. Well, Mr. Chapman/ saidPhilip, after bidding him a goodevening and a hearty welcome, Isuppose by this time you haveconverted the whole family, andparticularly your favorite, sisterKate, whose heart yon know is soft and tender,and susceptible of receiving Divine impressions.The eyes of both Kate and Johnny were fixedupon the j^oung man as he spoke, and both wereabout to reply, but Kate gave way, and Johnnyproceeded. *^ Young man, said he, in a sedate and serious manner, I would to God that ?/otcr heart was only half as soft as your head, tlien would I indulge the cheering anticipation of your conversion also. Philip fairly sunk under this cutting rejoinder PIONEER LIFE. 87 and Kate gcave veijt to a hearty laugh. The Dutch-man, too, seemed highly pleased, while Philip smil-ed Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 945
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectindiansofnorthamerica bookdecade1850 bookyear1858 booksubjectfrontierandpioneerlife bookidphilipseymourorp00mgaw bookauthormgawjamesfrancis18231872 bookpublishermansfieldohiorbrinkerhoffheraldsteampressprint bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber95
1858

Image from page 123 of
Description: Identifier: historygovernmen00vaug Title: History and government of New Mexico Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Vaughan, John H. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: State College, N.M., The author Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: a French Canadian, went toTaos and a few years later married into a prominent Spanishfamily. Ceran St. Vrain and Charles Bent, trading partners,early became identified with New Mexico and went intobusiness at Taos in 1832. Bent married Maria IgnaciaJaramillo (eg-na/sya ha-ra-meyo), of Taos, and thus be-came brother-in-law to Kit Carson. 133. Kit Carson. — But of all American pioneers inNew Mexico Kit (Christopher) Carson stands first. Born r - - , in Kentucky of the dogged fron-tier stock thathad come downfrom the NorthCarolina and Vir-ginia mountainsand conqueredthat wilderness,he moved to Mis-souri in childhoodand as a ladof seventeen ranaway and cameto New Mexicowith St. Vrains caravan of traders and trappers in 1826(sec. 125). He too went to Taos and there soon marriedJosefa (ho-safa) Jaramillo, a member of a well-to-doSpanish family of Taos. Born in the wilds of the UnitedStates, he loved still more the wilder regions of northernMexico. He hunted and trapped all over the Rocky Text Appearing After Image: Courtesy of R. E. TuUchell The Grave of Kit Carson at Taos THE MEXICAN PERIOD III Mountains from Montana to Chihuahua and in the fortiespiloted the western expeditions of John C. Fremont.Carson, not Fremont, was the Great Pathfinder — politi-cians and publicity agents to the contrary notwithstanding.And he probably had a wider influence in his time than anyother man who ever came into the State. The whole American pioneer element that actuallysettled down in New Mexico before the American Occupa-tion in 1846 amounted to but a few dozen. Yet theygained wide influence because of their social and businessconnections with leading Spanish families. 134. Opposition to Foreigners Reappears. — Populargovernment in the Mexican Republic was losing ground.Ambitious rulers seeking despotic power felt jealous ofthe influence of foreigners, especially Americans. Thispolitical attitude was gradually communicated to theofficials in New Mexico. And when those same despotictendencies stirred Texas Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1596
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 bookidhistorygovernmen00vaug bookauthorvaughanjohnhfromoldcatalog bookpublisherstatecollegenmtheauthor bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber123
1921

Image from page 72 of
Description: Identifier: reportonagricult95stub Title: Report on the agricultural resources and capabilities of Hawaii Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Stubbs, William Carter, 1846-1924 United States. Office of Experiment Stations Subjects: Agriculture Hawaii Publisher: Washington : U.S. G.P.O. Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 2.—Guavas (Psidium guayava). Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 2.—Rice Field. FLOEA OF THE ISLANDS. 43 Psidium guayava. Fsidium cattleyanum. Psidium sp. Pimento acris. Pimento officinalis. Eugenia hrasiliensis. Eugenia caryophyllata (clove). Eugenia jam bos. Eugenia malaccensis. Eugenia uniflora. Eugenia vulgaris. Barringtonia alba. Barringtonia edulis. Punica granaium. Passiflora spp.; all the species doing well. Carica papaya vars. Trichosanthes spp. Lagenaria vulgaris. Luff a sp. Benincasa sp. Cucumis melo. CuGumis satims. Citrulus vulgaris. Cucurbita moschata. Cucurbita pepo. Sechium edule (Mexico, 1897; entirely de stroyed by Dacus cucurbidse).Opuntia dillenii.Tangueria edidis.Coffea. arabica.Coffea liberica. Coffea bengalensis (Ceylon, China, 1899) Morinda citrifolia. Clirysophyllum cainito. Ch rysopliyllum oliviforme. Lucuma mamosa (Mammee). Acliras sapota. Bassia latifolia (Ceylon, 1895).Strychnos nux-vomica. Ipomcea batatas.Lycopersicum esculentum.Solanum melongena.Solanum tuberosum.Cy2:)homandra betacea.Capsicum vars.Piper nigrum Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 2995
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookauthorstubbswilliamcarter18461924 bookauthorunitedstatesofficeofexperimentstations bookidreportonagricult95stub booksubjectagriculturehawaii bookpublisherwashingtonusgpo bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionusdabulletinexperimentstations
1901

Image from page 754 of
Description: Identifier: nieuwereizevan00miss Title: Nieuwe reize van Misson na en door Italien : met een berecht voor de gene die voornemens zyn dezelve reize te doen : vermeerdert en opgeheldert met de Aanmerkingen van Addisson, door hem gemaakt gedurende zyne reize door Italien : vit het frans na den vyfden druk vertaelt en met schoone kopere platen versiert Year: 1724 (1720s) Authors: Misson, Maximilien, 1650?-1722 Addison, Joseph, 1672-1719 Goeree, Jan, 1670-1731 Subjects: Italy -- Description and travel Early works to 1800 Europe -- Description and travel Early works to 1800 Publisher: Te Utrecht : By Willem van de Water : Jacob van Poolsum Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ¼eié-acgiflcrë bit ih nagesien ï)eli / maar Vuanneetiïi ter pïaatfp 3elfé ben een en ben anbec baar oiiecgetijaagt ïjeb/ i^ ïjet Ibuiia nooit geDeiirt bat aïlexm ïjet 3eïtie anttooojt gegelien ïjcbben. 5B>e inen=fcöen ban een en ïjet felue ijui^ hamen niet oncc eenaï^é men ïjen bJaagt be afflaiib tuflcïjen ïjaar flab en be naöurige fïe*öen. 5Be eene bp boojbeeïb betoeect bat ec maat 1-5- of 5-6 muilen5ijn ban Florence op Bolonien ; een anbec luiï bat ei: 5-8 snn. ^cÃtei3iger 3a1[ ban bihtoü^ bebinben / bat lyct gene mm ï)em onber^^köegen beridjt / niet net 3aï obereenftomen met Ijct 0ei^-0pgifrfcbat fi\ bfni öift geef; maat Ijp 3al et egtcr tm goetgebuuh ban hm^nen maften / al30 Iju te naaflc bp bc3clbe maattcgdé 3aï ïtunnen ne^men/ aï^ of ïjp 3«c naaubalteuvig onbetregt toas?. <Dat er agt mu^ïen ban be eene pofl op be anberc 3pn / of ncgm / 3uïh,^ i^ bangeen belang.^tt geen meeflen tpb aanïeibing geeft tot be bccfdjeibenlfjeit bec Ff 2 rt- Text Appearing After Image: 2.26 Reizen door Itallen. geVïodcn^ Uiegetis^ öc diftantien , tó na bat be \vtq/ geinaïiMfjft ofon^cuiaUfteiijU ijê. 5r>!ttt)alVien / sonbec üan Ijet boojbcdt bat iïjp.a\!gei)aaït ï}eü/ af tcVoijhcn/ reUent men gcmeenïijït f^ mijlen öan Bolonicn Op Florence ; om bat Ijct be luate diitantie i^ / tik Cï tuiTcijcn öte tlnce iïciitu i^; autim rclicnen ec tot j-S / om bat ssnujltn in een bctgagtiij ïanb 50 tieel of meer tub en moeute *⦠zokomtVJeccifTcljen/ a\é 5-8 muien in een Ulaïi laub souben boen.het (iat de ^aac iö een tiuebe reben ban bic lierfeljcibe vefteningen / in3onber-ecue 10. ijeit Wanneer be piaatfen oliec lueiHei^s diftantie men in Uerictjil i^ fmylen re niei1ui[ift Uau lïiaïKanberen aficcjgen. 25p tioojibcelt 50 mrn eenoj3>kent van teilinij maaljt ban be beifcljeibe diftantien bie ec ban ftab tot ftat^Fondi op 3jjj.^ tiiffcöen Romen m Napels, 3al[ men üebinben bat t>ic tïvtt laat-Moia, cnpjj, ^^..^^^^ j^q mvilm ban elïianberen leggen; ma Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 583
Tags: booksubjecteuropedescriptionandtravelearlyworksto1800 bookauthorgoereejan16701731 booksubjectitalydescriptionandtravelearlyworksto1800 bookdecade1720 bookcentury1700 bookauthoraddisonjoseph16721719 bookyear1724 bookidnieuwereizevan00miss bookauthormissonmaximilien16501722 bookpublisherteutrechtbywillemvandewaterjacobvanpoolsum
1825

Image from page 170 of
Description: Identifier: forfardirectoryy1905unse Title: The Forfar Directory and Yearbook 1905 Year: 1904 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: W. Shepherd, Castle St, Forfar Contributing Library: Angus Council Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THOMSON & Co., Painters, Paperhangers, & Decorators, 17 WEST HIGH ST., FORFAR. ^igU {^Titing . . N8^ An Extensive Choice of ^ FRESH PAPERHANGINGSgilding .... ^S^ always in hand. ImitatiOTl of ^J^OOds . ^IU» Glcesers & Bon-Accord Enamels. ^^r© Gold Paint and Lacquers JmitatioTi of Jfffarhles . / always in stock. CHARGES STRICTLY MODERATE. SMITH, HOOD & Co. LTD., Coal Merchants and Colliery Agents. AH Descriptions of HOUSEHOLD COAL. STEPENDS CAKING COAL. BEST HAMILTON ELL and DUNFERMLINE SPLINT COALS. BEST JEWEL HOUSEHOLD COAL. BALQUHATSTONE and WISKAW NUTS for KITCHEN RANGES. SMALL COAL, ANTHRACITE COAL, and COKE for VINERIES. Price List on Application. Quotations by the Wag-on. OFFICE & DEPOT—Old Station Gate, Vietopia Street, Forfar. BRANCH OFFICES-HUME STREET, Montrose. i N.B. STATION, Inverkeilor.SPINK STREET, Arbroath. I N.B. STATION, Bervie.STATION ROAD, Carnoustie. I BROOK ST., Broughty Ferry, Regristered Office—48 UNION ST., DUNDEE. ADVERTISEMENTS. 155 Text Appearing After Image: Agent forLoyalty, Royal Fedora, and Marchioness Boots and Shoes, As Manufactured for Royalty by Special Appointment. David Robertson, Boot and Shoe Merchant, 60 EAST HIGH ST., FORFAR. HIGH-CLASS FOOTWEAR IN ALL THE LATEST STYLES for Ladies,Gentlemen, Boys, and Girls. JOHNR.ABEL&Co., CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS, 2i EAST HIGH STREET, FORFAR. Sick Room Requisites in all varieties, including- Hot WaterBottles, Feeding Cups, Clinical and Bath Thermometers,Chest Protectors, Medicine Glasses, Enemas, Syringes,Elastic Bandage and other Elastic Goods. Our Dispensing Department commands personal attention, andonly Drugs of the very purest quality are used and suppliedat Moderate Prices. Patent Medicines of all kinds kept in Stock. Infant and InvalidFoods. Toilet Soaps and Perfumes a specialty. JOHN R. ABEL & Co. are Sole Agents for Messrs W. & A. Gilbey—a selection of whose Wines andSpirits they have always in Stock. Price Lists on Application. Thej^ also stock Aerated Watersmanufactur Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4547
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1904 bookpublisherwshepherdcastlestforfar bookidforfardirectoryy1905unse booksponsornationallibraryofscotland bookcollectionnationallibraryofscotland bookcollectioneuropeanlibraries bookleafnumber170 bookcollectionscottishdirectories
1904

Image from page 62 of
Description: Identifier: somesongsverses00hasw Title: Some songs and verses Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Haswin, Frances Rosina. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: [Wausau, Wis., Van Vechten & Ellis] Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: keenest sight Woodland, and field, and meadow, And the sky-born stream in its flight; Forgets that the snows about him, Melting beneath Gods smile, Are feeding the river that floweth Through the vale for many a mile; Sees not the weary yeoman Tilling his stony field Secure in faith that a harvest The generous earth will yield; Thinks not the noisy torrent Leaping oer rocky falls. Rushing with loud complainings Between its earth-worn walls, 61 62 YourLifeandMine Turbid, and soiled, with travel Oer many a miry bed. May water seed that shall blossom, And fruit, when we lie dead. Thus you, unseeing my pathway. Would have me walk as you. But both of us are Gods children, And 1 trust He will lead me too. And the avalanche slide of your mountain. With its tons of glistening snow. May join the spring in my valley When it melts in the rivers flow; And the flake that flashed on the utmost peak. And the dew that fell in the rose May reach the ocean together In the twilight of Lifes close. SIESTA Text Appearing After Image: |ANNED by the breath of roses in the airMy brain lets go her moorings» and I feelMy bark slip downward on the velvet stream of dreams.In through my senses drowsily there stealsThe restful murmur of soft waves upon the shore. The lazy ships that pass, their sails sun-kissed, Arc woven from the warp of Fancys loom. Upon this stream, that bears in sweet content Both sad and joyous hearts, 1 rest serene. Oh blessed sleep! Oh blessed visions! Ye Are but the touch of angels wings upon the brow. 63 LAST NIGHT J J NLY last night, your eyes upon me beaming,Brought back the radiance of Summer skies, * Only last night, upon your fond heart dreaming, 1 found again Loves rapturous paradise. 64 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 612
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 bookidsomesongsverses00hasw bookauthorhaswinfrancesrosinafromoldcatalog bookpublisherwausauwisvanvechtenellis bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookleafnumber62 bookcollectionamericana
1902

Image from page 146 of
Description: Identifier: poemsmychildren00john Title: Poems my children love best of all Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Johnson, Clifton, 1865-1940, ed Subjects: Children's poetry. [from old catalog] Publisher: New York, L. A. Noble Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: certainly, we have no cause for alarm;For, were they to try, they could do us no harm. 124 Little Folks Book of Verse Now look! it has got to its home; do you seeWhat a delicate web it has spun in the tree?Why here, my dear Ann, is a lesson for you;Come learn from this spider what patience can do! And when at your work you are tempted to play,Recollect what you see in this insect today.Or else, to your shame, it may seem to be true,That a poor spider is wiser than you. Jane Taylor. THE FOX AND THE CROW To a dairy a crow Having ventured to go,Some food for her young ones to seek, Flew up in the trees With a fine piece of cheeseWhich she joyfully held in her beak. A fox who lived nighTo the tree saw her fly, And to share in the prize made a vow!For having just dinedHe for cheese felt inclined;So he went and sat under the bough. She was cunning, he knew, But so was he, too,And with flattery adapted his plan; For he knew if shed speak It must fall from her beak.So, bowing politely, began; Text Appearing After Image: The Clouds The Clouds 125 Tis a very fine day; (Not a word did she say)The wind, I believe, maam, is south. A fine harvest for peas. He then looked at the cheese,But the crow did not open her mouth. Sly Reynard, not tired, Her plumage admired,And said: Ah, how brilliant its hue! The voice must be fine Of a bird so divine!Now let me just hear it—pray do! Believe me, I long To hear a sweet song.Then to sing the crow foolishly tries; But no sooner did squall Than the cheese she let fall,And the fox ran away with the prize. Bernard Barton. THE CLOUDS Boats sail on the rivers, And ships sail on the seas;But clouds that sail across the sky Are prettier far than these. Christina G. Rossetti. 126 Little Folks Book of Verse A WINTER VISITOR Come here, little sparrow, and dont be afraid, I would not harm even a feather;Come here, little sparrow, and pick up some bread To feed you this very cold weather. I dont mean to hurt you, you poor little dear, And pussy cat is not behind me;So hop about Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4503
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1917 bookidpoemsmychildren00john booksubjectchildrenspoetryfromoldcatalog bookpublishernewyorklanoble bookauthorjohnsonclifton18651940ed bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber146 bookcollectionamericana
1917

Image from page 181 of
Description: Identifier: storyofsunmoonst00gibe Title: The story of the sun, moon, and stars Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Giberne, Agnes, 1845- [from old catalog] Subjects: Astronomy Publisher: Cincinnati, National book company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: and thoughtful monk seems to have been wise farbeyond the age in which he lived, and remarkablefor his independence of mind. He had a profoundsagacity, and a wide general grasp of scientificsubjects. The extremely complicated and cumbrous natureof the Ptolemaic system appeared to his judgmenthardly compatible with the harmony and simplicityelsewhere characteristic of nature. Moreover, he wasimpressed and perplexed by the very marked changesin the brilliancy of the planets at different seasons.These changes now are no difficulty at all. Venus,Mars, Jupiter, when on the same side of the sun asourselves, are comparatively near to us, and naturallylook much more bright in consequence of that near- 176 STORY OF THE SUN, MOON, AND STARS. ness than when they are on the opposite side of thesun from ourselves. But under the Ptolemaic system,each planet was supposed to revolve round our earth,and to be always at about the same distance from us;therefore, why such variations in their brilliancy? Text Appearing After Image: NICOI^AUS COPERNICUS. During thirty-six long years he patiently workedout this theory, and during part of those thirty-sixyears he wrote the one great book of his lifetime, ex-plaining the newer view of the Solar System which YET MORE ABOUT THE MOON. 177 had taken hold of his reason and imagination. Thisbook, named De Revolutionibus Orbium Ccelestium,or, Concerning the Revolutions of the CelestialSpheres, which came out only a few hours before hisdeath, was dedicated to the Bishop of Rome—a littletouch of worldly wisdom which doubtless staved offfor a while the opposition of the Vatican. Copernicus was not the first who thought of in-terpreting the celestial motions by the theory of theearths motion. That immortal astronomer has takencare to give, with rare sincerity, the passages in theancient writers from which he derived the first idea ofthe probability of this motion—especially Cicero, whoattributed this opinion to Nicetas of Syracuse; Plu-tarch, who puts forward the names of Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1299
Tags: booksubjectastronomy bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookidstoryofsunmoonst00gibe bookauthorgiberneagnes1845fromoldcatalog bookpublishercincinnatinationalbookcompany bookyear1898 bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress
1898

Image from page 398 of
Description: Identifier: americanspiderst02mcco Title: American spiders and their spinningwork. A natural history of the orbweaving spiders of the United States, with special regard to their industry and habits Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: McCook, Henry C. (Henry Christopher), 1837-1911 Subjects: Spiders -- United States Publisher: [Philadelphia] author, Academy of natural Sciences of Philadelphia Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: very from the poison, and that death is suspended forabout two weeks. I do not know the exact period required for the development of thewasji egg to a feeding larva, but it is sometliing longer than two weeks.In some cases I have found the spiders within the wasps nidus dead and ENEMIES AND THEIR INFLUENCE. 383 shriveled, the egg probably having proved infertile. Again, a few spiderswould be dried up, while others were plump and edible, a condition inwhich more frequently most of them are found. It is certainly one ofthe unhappy possibilities in the destiny of the spider that it may be con-strained to abide in a living death within this dark vault awaiting theawakening appetite of a voracious worm. It is to be hoped that a kindlyNature has so far tempered this hard doom as to deprive the entombedcreature of all consciousness of her condition and consequent sufferingtherein. Indeed the evidence is well nigh conclusive that sensation iswholly suspended at the prick of the insects sting. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 325. The Cicada wasp (Sphecius speciosus.) III. With the single exception, perhaps, of one small order, Neuroptera, noorder of insects is exempt from the attacks of the all devouring wasps.Some provision their nests with grasshoppers, some with cockroaches, somewith snoutbeetles of various kinds,some with ants and bees, a few with different kinds of bugs, frog spittle, XT^^;>—i^^^s^ |insects, and plant lice; a great num- ^—=.——s^^Ciber of them with various kinds oftwo winged flies, and a still greaternumber, perhaps, with the larvte ofvarious motlis. ^ Most observing coun-try lads have noticed the assault ofthe handsome digger wasp, Spheciusspeciosus Drury (Sphex), (Fig. 325),upon the so called locust, the cicada or harvest fly, and I have dugthat insect. Cicada pruinosa, out of a burrow of this wasp in the terraceof a West Philadelphia yard. Those wasps which prey upon spiders comprise many distinct speciesbelonging to widely separated genera. Some of these gather man Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 925
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 booksubjectspidersunitedstates bookpublisherphiladelphiaauthoracademyofnaturalsciencesofphiladelphia bookidamericanspiderst02mcco bookauthormccookhenrychenrychristopher18371911 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionamericana bhlconsortium
1890

Image from page 101 of
Description: Identifier: popularhist02knig Title: The popular history of England : an illustrated history of society and government from the earliest period to our own times Year: 1883 (1880s) Authors: Knight, Charles, 1791-1873 Subjects: Publisher: London New York : F. Warne Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d have been soon abandoned had not the distractions of Fr.anceoffered an irresistible temptation to his enthusiastic ambition. For he wasan enthusiast. He had an undoubting confidence in the justice of his claim;he had no apprehensions of its impolicy. His bravery, fortitude, and per-severance won the admiration of the English people, as such qualities willalways command the applause of a military nation. In England every manwas trained to arms, and the brilliant achievements of the great soldier werefar more valued than the substantial merits of the just lawgiver. But thecareer of Henry V. was not without its nation.al benefit. From his timethere was no false estimate in Europe of the prowess of the English ; fromhis time there was no dream that the proud island might be subjugated.Even in the civil wars of the half century which succeeded Henry, Englandwas unmolested from without. No king of France ever thought to avengeAgincourt by wearing the crown of England in right of conquest. Text Appearing After Image: Helmet, Shield, aud Saddle of llcury V. buspcuded over his Tomb. When the death of Henry V. was known in London, some of the leadingpeers assembled, and issued writs for a new parliament. The duke ofGloucester had been named by the dying Henry as regent of England; butupon the roll of parliament it was entered that the king, considering histender age, appoints the duke of Bedford, or, in his absence beyond scii, theduke of Gloucester, to be protector and defender of the kingdom. Fromsubsequent proceedings recorded in the rolls of parliament it appears that 1422.] DEATH OF CHARLES VI.—REGENCY OF BEDFORD. 77 Gloucester bad claimed to be regent according to the desire of his brother;but that the lords had resisted that claim, saying that the king could notgrant governance of the land to any person except while he lived; and tliatalthough it was agreed that Gloucester should be chief of the Council, inabsence of the duke of Bedford, he was to hold his position, not under thename of tuto Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 299
Tags: bookpublisherlondon bookcentury1800 bookyear1883 bookdecade1880 bookpublishernewyorkfwarne bookauthorknightcharles17911873 bookidpopularhist02knig bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsorinternetarchive
1883

Image from page 109 of
Description: Identifier: triptomexicobein00bech Title: A trip to Mexico, being notes of a journey from Lake Erie to Lake Tezcuco and back, with an appendix, containing and being a paper about the ancient nations and races who inhabited Mexico before and at the time of the Spanish conquest, and the ancient stone and other structures and ruins of ancient cities found there Year: 1880 (1880s) Authors: Becher, Henry C. R Subjects: Mexico -- Description and travel Mexico -- Antiquities Publisher: Toronto : Willing and Williamson Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rses and harness perfect. You see ladies beau-tifully dressed, and you see the dress and get up,by thousands, of everybody in the country, high andlow, and of very many who come from other lands.The paseo in the afternoon is a sight to see againand again. For a certain length, about three miles,it is guarded by cavalry on either side, doing dutyas mounted police : beyond, some two miles or so,is Chapultepec, which was the home of Montezumaand his race; and beyond that again, some twomiles, is Tacubaya, a large village with beautifulparks, villas and gardens, where the rich of Mexicolove to dwell and to visit. We have been to Chapultepec again and again :it is surrounded by a high fence : entering by alarge gate close to the high road, we are at once inits grounds, and among huge venerable trees, oneof which, a Cyprus, ^fi/ty feet in circumference, iscalled Montezumas tree, from his being muchaccustomed to sit under it. Not far from thistree rises abruptly the high hill or mass of rock Text Appearing After Image: 5 CHAPULTEPEC. 71 on which is the picturesque building called thecastle of Chapultepec, built by the Viceroy Galvezin the seventeenth century. We found its topmosttower being fitted up for the convenience of someastronomers who were shortly to be in Mexico towatch the transit of Venus. The rooms are, someof them, fine, but everywhere there is a lookof desertion—of the empty house. It is usedbut now and then, and only for State occasions, andthough Maximilian delighted in it, there is little ornothing within its walls that we are permitted tosee to remind us that he was ever here. I cannot properly describe the view from thecastle. It is beyond me. Immediately below it,are its own beautiful grounds ; beyond, the villas.churcheS; groves, parks, and gardens of Tacubaya.Again, beyond them, Popocatapetl and Iztaccihuatl.To the left, and in front, are the distant city andvalley, with vistas of the lakes, intensely brilliant inblue : more to the left are the sierra of Guadalupe;and everywh Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1678
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 booksubjectmexicodescriptionandtravel bookyear1880 bookidtriptomexicobein00bech bookauthorbecherhenrycr booksubjectmexicoantiquities bookpublishertorontowillingandwilliamson bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1880

Image from page 91 of
Description: Identifier: everythingforgar19pete_17 Title: Everything for the garden : 1920 Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Peter Henderson & Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Seeds Catalogs Gardening Equipment and supplies Catalogs Books Catalogs Lawn mowers Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Catalogs Flowers Catalogs Publisher: New York : Peter Henderson & Co. Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Poppy-Flowered Anemones St. ANEMONES 1092 A. St. Brigid. These beautiful Irish Poppy-fli»wered varieties produce inabundance large single, semi-double and double flowers 3 to 5 inches across, inan endless variety of colors, from maroon and brightest scarlet to rlest-pink andfrom lilac to purple. Some are mottled, striped, ringed, etc. For cutting theyare unsurpassed, and in the garden they flower until after frost; hardy perennialsflowering-from seed the second year and thereafter Pkt. 10c. ARNEBIA CORNUTA 1192 A charming annual, growing in bushy form about 2 feet high and aboutthe same breadth. It blooms with profusion the whole summer. Beautifulflowers, % of an inch across, of a rich primrose-yellow, marked with five blackspots; the spots change on the second day to a rich maroon, and on the third dayvanish, leaving the flower a clear, bright yellow Pkt. 10c. ARGEMONE 1182 Hybrida Grandiflora. These new large-flowering Prickly Poppies form branch-ing plants about 3 feet high and IS Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6943
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection booksubjectgardeningequipmentandsuppliescatalogs bookauthorpeterhendersonco bookpublishernewyorkpeterhendersonco booksubjectseedscatalogs booksubjectbulbsplantscatalogs bookideverythingforgar19pete17
1920

Image from page 228 of
Description: Identifier: picturesqueameri01brya Title: Picturesque America; or, The land we live in. A delineation by pen and pencil of the mountains, rivers, lakes, forests, water-falls, shores, cañons, valleys, cities, and other picturesque features of our country Year: 1872 (1870s) Authors: Bryant, William Cullen, 1794-1878, editor Bunce, Oliver Bell, 1828-1890 Subjects: Publisher: New York, D. Appleton Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s thatform into such rich pictures inan old town, these things wouldbe sure to catch his eye anddelight his fancy. In thesesemi-tropical places there are ahundred bits that would be ad-mirable for a sketch in oil orwater colors, that would losetheir value in black and white.It is a pity that divine colorcannot enter into engraving. The search for the pictu-resque that would meet thenecessities of our purpose wasnot expeditious. It is onlyafter walking around a place,and surveying it from differentsituations, that an artist can set-tle upon his point of view. Wewere three days in Charlestonere Mr. Fenn discovered theprospect from St. Michaels bel-fry, and to this the readersattention is solicited. If hedoes not think it very good,we shall be tempted to de-nounce his artistic appreciation.Note the far stretch of sea andthe long, low shores; there isFort Sumter far down thebay, and nearer the famousCastle Pinckney, a fortress thatstands guard in the direct ap-proach to the town. The por- Text Appearing After Image: A GLIMPSE OF CHARLESTON AND BAY, FROM ST. MICHAELS CHUftCH 26 202 PICTURESQUE AMERICA. tion of the city which this view commands is its most ancient quarter. Many of thebuildings were erected in colonial times, and up to the period of the Revolution thiscomprised nearly the entire city. The chimneys are of a quaint fashion, and the roofs aremostly of grooved red tiles. The wide street to the left of the picture is the CharlestonWall Street, where congregate all the banks and banking-houses, brokers offices, andlaw-offices. Here assemble the merchants and brokers; here are effected those trans-actions in commerce and finance so dear to the heart of the money-making world. Thebuilding at the foot of the street is the ancient custom-house, which, during the recentwar, was rudely hustled by many an irreverent shell, unceremoniously battered by balland petard, and now stands a broken and shattered reminiscence of by-gone belligerency.This structure, which dates back before the independence Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6918
Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1872 bookpublishernewyorkdappleton bookidpicturesqueameri01brya bookauthorbryantwilliamcullen17941878editor bookauthorbunceoliverbell18281890 bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversitylibraryuniversityofnorthcarolinaatchapelhill
1872

Image from page 339 of
Description: Identifier: rntgenraysinmedi1907wals Title: The Röntgen rays in medical work Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Walsh, David Subjects: X-rays Radiography X-Rays Radiography Publisher: New York : William Wood Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: cate shoulder-blade is well recorded, and the lower marginof the thoracic cavity sharply defined by the edge of the midriff. Inthe head, the fangs of some of the teeth can be seen in their bonysockets, especially in the molars of the lower jaw. The cartilagesof the nose and the ears are faintly shadowed, and various muscularand tendinous structures can be made out in the neck. The abdomen of this cat was by no means so clearly mappedout by the rays, but, nevertheless, contained several valuableindications. The main mass of the liver, for instance, wassharply outlined in its upper, but diffuse in its lower margin, whilea light space beneath it corresponded with the stomach. The broadlight band that curved from the centre of the diaphragm to the 317 318 THE RONTGEN RA YS IN MEDICAL WORK lower part of the lumbar spine appeared to represent large intestine.Other convolutions of intestine were clearly shown, especially in thecase of a coil of gut that had an extremely light record near the Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 158.—Half-grown Cat, showing Bronchi, Liver, Heart, etc.Keduced one-half. By Mr, Cox, Parkstone. pelvis. This knuckle of intestine had, most likely, been full ofgas, and had lain close to the surface of the sensitive plate duringexposure. MEDIOAL AND SURGICAL APPLICATIONS 319 The tendons, passing from the leg to the os calcis behind, and tothe instep in front, were plainly pictured in the original print. This photograph has been dwelt upon at some length because itgives a good idea of what may be readily attained. Ifc was takenwith a coil giving a spark of over 1 foot in length. Its clearnessof definition was largely owing to the fact that the animal wasdead, so that there was no blurring of the shadows by the respira-tory or other movements. There seems little doubt that what ispossible with lower animals will one day be attainable in the case ofliving adult human beings, so that all deep-seated organs will bebrought within the reach of this method of exact investigation. Inot Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 5898
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidrntgenraysinmedi1907wals bookpublishernewyorkwilliamwood booksubjectxrays booksubjectradiography bookyear1907 bookauthorwalshdavid bookcontributorfrancisacountwaylibraryofmedicine booksponsoropenknowledgecommonsandharvardmedicalschool
1907

Image from page 460 of
Description: Identifier: belltelephonevol3132mag00amerrich Title: Bell telephone magazine Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept Subjects: Telephone Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.] Contributing Library: Prelinger Library Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: employees was ineffect, but was not nearly as thor-ough-going as the expected needs fornew employees required. When Itwas decided substantially to expandthe program interdepartmentally, aman to head the activity was selected,and a review of programs already Ineffect In other parts of the Bell Sys-tem was made by visits to those local-ities and with people in the A. T.& T. Companys Department of Op-eration and Engineering. As a result of all these visits, itbecame clear in the Twin Cities that: (i) // viaximum results wereto be achieved, all men andwomen—management and non-management—in all depart-ments must participate; (2) departmental participa-tion must be motivated by theneeds of the company as a wholeand not by departmental require-ments, since there is a wide dif-ference in need between depart-ments; and (3) a complete understand-ing of the employment problemamong all employees must beestablished by giving them asmuch background as possible. 1953 Recruiting Employees 163 Text Appearing After Image: District traffic superintendent^ chief operator, ayid recruiter review a visual aid chartwhich is an important tool in the recruiting program Orgafiizing to Produce Once a basic plan of operation hadbeen developed, and had received ex-ecutive approval, committees werecreated to put It Into operation.These had, among them, responsi-bility for over-all policies and pro-cedures, and for telling every em-ployee what It was all about. The big—the fundamental—stepcame with the appointment of 35full-time recruiters. These peo-ple, both men and women, are allfrom craft groups, and all principaldepartments have their own recruit-ers, to work with their own people.The recruiters have, of necessity, en-thusiasm, tact, sales ability, and therespect of their fellow workers. Thework was new, however, and theyneeded special briefing on the em-ployment program, the techniques of interviewing, qualifications for start-ing jobs, and the work of the employ-ment offices. Once those matterswere out of Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4518
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 bookauthoramericantelephoneandtelegraphcompany bookauthoramericantelephoneandtelegraphcompanyinformationdept booksubjecttelephone bookpublishernewyorkamericantelephoneandtelegraphcoetc bookidbelltelephonevol3132mag00amerrich bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionadditionalcollections
1922

Image from page 152 of
Description: Identifier: audubonhisjourna00audu Title: Audubon and his journals Year: 1899 (1890s) Authors: Audubon, John James, 1785-1851 Audubon, Maria Rebecca, 1843-1925 Coues, Elliott, 1842-1899 Subjects: Birds Publisher: New York, C. Scribner's Sons Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: guns are set up, and even eyes arekept out by high walls. Everywhere we meet beggars, forEngland though rich, has poverty gaping every way youlook, and the beggars ask for bread, — yes, absolutely forfood. I can only pray, May our Heavenly Father havemercy on them. August 17. Green Bank. This morning I lay on thegrass a long time listening to the rough voice of a Magpie ;it is not the same bird that we have in America. I droveto the Institution with the Queen Bee of Green Bank, andthis afternoon began a painting of the Otter in a trap, withthe intention to present it (if it is good) to my friend Mr.Roscoes wife. This evening dined at Mr. Wm. Rathbones, and there met a Quaker lady, Mrs. Abigail , who talked much and well about the present condition of Eng-land, her poor, her institutions, etc. It is dreadful to knowof the want of bread here; will it not lead to the horrors ofanother revolution ? The children of the very poor areoften forced by their parents to collect daily a certain Text Appearing After Image: 5 f^ t [In 2 THE EUROPEAN JOURNALS II5 amount by*begging, or perhaps even stealing; failing toobtain this they are cruelly punished on their return home,and the tricks they resort to, to gain their ends, are num-berless and curious. The newspapers abound with suchaccounts, and are besides filled with histories of murders,thefts, hangings, and other abominable acts; I can scarcelook at them. August 19. Dined with Mr. A. Melly in Grenville St.The dinner was quite d la franqaise, all gayety, witticism,and good cheer. The game, however, was what I callhighly tainted, the true flavor for the lords of England, August 21. I painted many hours this day, finished myOtter; it was viewed by many and admired. I was againinvited to remove to Green Bank, but declined until I havepainted the Wild Turkey cock for the Royal Institution,say three days more. September 4. Having been too busy to write for manydays, I can only relate the principal facts that have takenplace. I have been to two very notabl Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 2460
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectbirds bookdecade1890 bookpublishernewyorkcscribnerssons bookauthorcoueselliott18421899 bookauthoraudubonjohnjames17851851 bookidaudubonhisjourna00audu bookauthoraudubonmariarebecca18431925 bookyear1899 bookleafnumber152
1899

Image from page 268 of
Description: Identifier: naturalistslibra00gould Title: The naturalist's library : containing scientific and popular descriptions of man, quadrupeds, birds, fishes, reptiles and insects Year: 1852 (1850s) Authors: Gould, Augustus A. (Augustus Addison), 1805-1866 Dwight, Jonathan, 1858-1929, former owner. DSI Tucker, Marcia Brady, former owner. DSI Myers, C., former owner. DSI Subjects: Zoology Publisher: Boston : Phillips, Sampson, and Company Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: seeing it again.It is fat; and the flesh is tender, but, like that of the otter, rather of a fishytaste ; the head, however, is not bad; and this agrees with Avhat is said ofthe beaver, whose exterior parts have a taste like fish. The cabiai is quiet and gentle; it is neither quarrelsome nor ferociouswith other animals. It is easily tamed, comes at call, and willinglyfollows the hand that feeds it. We do not know the time of their bringingforth their young, their growth, and consequently the length of life of thisanimal. They are very common in Guiana, as well as in Brazil, in Ama-zonia, and in all the lower countries of South America. ^H>jdroch(Eruscajnjbara,h\t^. The E^enus flj/rfroc/io^rus has two upper and two lowerincisors; no canines; ten upper and eight lower molars. Molars composed of laminae;eyes large; ears rounded ; fore feel with four, the hinder cues with three palniatod toes;no tail; two mammae ; hair scattered and bristly. MAMMALIA—GUINEA-PIG. 261 THE GUINEA-PIG i Text Appearing After Image: TnoTJGH originally a native of the warm climates of Brazil and Guinea,lives, however, and breeds in temperate and even cold countries, providedIt is properly taken care of. Its skin is of little or no value; and the flesh,though people may, and actually do eat it, is very indifferent food; a cir-cumstance which might, in some measure, be removed, were they to bereared in warrens, where they might have air, space to range in, and aproper choice of herbs. Those which are kept in houses have nearly thesame taste as the house rabbit; and of those which have passed the summer in a garden, the taste is less disagreeable, but is still insipid. The Guinea-pig is much less than the rabbit; its upper lip is only halfdivided ; it has tv.o cutting teeth in each jaw ; large and broad ears; itshair is of different colors, white, varied with orange and black, in irregularpatches. It has no tail, and is very restless, from which latter circumstanceit derives the epithet affixed to one of its names. T Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 814
Tags: booksubjectzoology bookcentury1800 bookauthordwightjonathan18581929formerownerdsi bookauthortuckermarciabradyformerownerdsi bookdecade1850 bookidnaturalistslibra00gould bookyear1852 bookauthorgouldaugustusaaugustusaddison18051866 bookauthormyerscformerownerdsi bookpublisherbostonphillipssampsonandcompany
1852

Madison Square Park
Description: Accession Number: 1977:0144:0043MP Maker: George P. Hall & Son (American, active 1875–1914) Title: Madison Square Park Date: 1904 Medium: gelatin silver print printed 1977, from original negative Dimensions: 45.0 x 27.0 cm. George Eastman House Collection General information about the George Eastman House Photography Collection is available at http://www.eastmanhouse.org/inc/collections/photography.php. For information on obtaining reproductions go to: www.eastmanhouse.org/flickr/index.php?pid=1977:0144:0043MP.
Owner: George Eastman Museum
Views: 7665
Tags: georgeeastmanhouse photoprocess color:rgbavg=5b5b5b geh:accession=197701440043mp manhattan newyorkcity madisonsquare madisonsquarepark madisonsquaregarden madisonsquaregardenii
1904

Dulcie Deamer, 1 April 1950
Description: Dulcie Deamer at her writing desk, novelist, poet, journalist, actor and founder and committee member of the Fellowship of Australian Writers, 1 April 1950, photographed for People magazine, from original negative, ON 388/Box 066/Item 026 digital.sl.nsw.gov.au/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?emb...
Owner: State Library of New South Wales collection
Views: 15634
Tags: dulciedeamer australian writers novelists actors poets journalists 1050s female women
1950

Serie 204. Fotografering på fjellet
Description: Dato / Date: utgitt ca. 1916 Fotograf / Photographer: ukjent / unknown Utgiver / Publisher: Oppi Digital kopi av original / Digital copy of original: trykt postkort, farge Eier / Owner Institution: Nasjonalbiblioteket / National Library of Norway Lenke / Link: www.nb.no Bildesignatur / Image Number: blds_07380
Owner: National Library of Norway
Views: 3789
Tags: winter vintage photography vinter postcards snø oppi aking fotografering postkort
1916

Image from page 379 of
Description: Identifier: structuredevelop00camp3 Title: The structure and development of mosses and ferns (Archegoniatae) Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Campbell, Douglas Houghton, 1859-1953 Subjects: Publisher: New York, Macmillan Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hich ap-proaches more or less the tetrahedral form of the true Lepto-sporangiates, but shows a good deal of variation. As in thesethe wall of the sporangium is only one-layered, and the tapetumordinarily two, but occasionally three-layered. The fully-de-veloped sporangium is in shape much like that of BotrychiumVirginianum, and has a very short massive stalk. Like Hel-minthostachys and Angiopteris, it opens by a vertical cleft, andlike the latter there is a rudimentary annulus consisting of agroup of thick-walled cells (Fig. 207, r). The GleicheniacetE These comprise about twenty-five species of tropical and sub - tropical Ferns,which may be all placedin two genera (Di^ls(I))— Stromatopteris,with a single species 5.moniliformis andGleichenia with about25 species. The bestknown is G. dichotoma,an extremely commonFern of the tropics ofthe whole world. It hasvery long leaves, whichfork repeatedly, andmay be proliferous fromthe growth of buds de-veloped in the axils ofthe forked pinnae. Text Appearing After Image: X4; Fig. 208.—Gleichenia pectinata. Prothallia, B, a large prothallium seen from below, show-ing a dichotomy of the apex; C, the youngsporophyte attached to the prothallium. The Gametophyte The development of the prothallium has been studied byRauwenhoff ( i), and shows some interesting points in which itis intermediate between the Osmundacese and the other Lep-tosporangiatse. The spores of Gleichenia are usually tetra- THE HOMOSPOROUS LEPTOSPORANGIATJE 367 hedral, and contain no chlorophyll. When the ripe spores aresown, after a few days the oil-drops become much smaller butmore numerous, and the first chloroplasts become evident.The latter increase in number and size, and small starch grainsare developed. The exospore is ruptured in from two to threeweeks from the time the spore is sown, and the spore contentssurrounded by the intine project through the opening. Thefirst wall usually separates the first rhizoid, which, like that ofOsmiinda, often contains a good deal of chlorophyl Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 10376
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorcampbelldouglashoughton18591953 bookyear1918 bookidstructuredevelop00camp3 bookpublishernewyorkmacmillan bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionnybotanicalgarden bookcontributortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden booksponsortheluesthertmertzlibrarythenewyorkbotanicalgarden
1918

Image from page 1058 of
Description: Identifier: Highland_Echo_1915-1925 Title: Highland Echo 1915-1925 Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Maryville College student body Subjects: Maryville College Publisher: Maryville, TN : Maryville College Contributing Library: Maryville College Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THE HIGHLAND ECHO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1923 Mr. R. A. N. WILSONWilson Now SojournsPrinceton Seminary. at He informs us that the study oiHebrew and Homiletics is not so de-lightful as kidding around the cam-pus with Freshmeiflappers. R. A. Nwho was presidesof our StudeniCouncil last yea:complain: that aPrinceton they donneed such an orgfaiuzadon be ausethey already have lights all nigh;,hot water and no Co-eds. Text Appearing After Image: »»»»#^»#»#^##^<^»^^»^»^#^»^##^^^^l^^^^^^J Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 350
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1915 booksubjectmaryvillecollege bookidhighlandecho19151925 bookauthormaryvillecollegestudentbody bookpublishermaryvilletnmaryvillecollege bookcollectionamericana bookcontributormaryvillecollege bookcollectionmaryvillecollege
1915

Image from page 552 of
Description: Identifier: fieldgenealogybe02pier Title: Field genealogy; being the record of all the Field family in America, whose ancestors were in this country prior to 1700. Emigrant ancestors located in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Virginia. All descendants of the Fields of England, whose ancestor, Hurbutus de la Field, was from Alsace-Lorraine Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Pierce, Frederick Clifton, 1855-1904 Subjects: Field family Publisher: Chicago, W. B. Conkey Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: WALTER T. FIELD.See page 1050. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 218
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherchicagowbconkey bookauthorpiercefrederickclifton18551904 bookidfieldgenealogybe02pier booksubjectfieldfamily bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana
1901

Image from page 194 of
Description: Identifier: junglebookkipl Title: The jungle book Year: 1894 (1890s) Authors: Kipling, Rudyard, 1865-1936 Subjects: Animals Publisher: New York : The Century Co. Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: a mongoose, because he is eaten up from nose totail with curiosity. The motto of all the mon-goose family is, Run and find out ; and Rikki-tikki was a true mongoose. He looked at the RIKKI-TIKKI-TAVI 177 cotton-wool, decided that it was not good to eat, ran all round the table, sat up and put his fur in order, scratched himself, and jumped on the small boys shoulder. Dont be fright-ened, Teddy, saidhis father. That shis way of makingfriends. Ouch! He stickling under mychin, said Teddy. Rikki-tikki lookeddown between theboys collar and neck, J e RIKKI-TIKKI LOOKED DOWN BETWEEN snuffed at his ear, the boys collar and neck.and climbed down to the floor, where he satrubbing his nose. Good gracious, said Teddys mother, andthats a wild creature! I suppose he s so tamebecause we ve been kind to him. All mongooses are like that, said her husband. If Teddy does nt pick him up by the tail, or try toput him in a cage, he 11 run in and out of the houseall day long. Lets give him something to eat. Text Appearing After Image: 178 THE JUNGLE BOOK They gave him a little piece of raw meat.Rikki-tikki liked it immensely, and when it wasfinished he went out into the veranda and sat inthe sunshine and fluffed up his fur to make it dryto the roots. Then he felt better. There are more things to find out about inthis house, he said to himself, than all my family Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4662
Tags: boy teddy mongoose tickling rikkitikkitavi rikkitikki bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectanimals bookyear1894
1894

Image from page 72 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924003182387 Title: Poultry for the farm and home Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Wigent, Zella Subjects: Poultry Publisher: Chicago. International harvester co., inc. Agricultural extension division Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Four-year-old Norman Uerr ofSikeslon, Mo., feeding his pelLight Brahma cock whieh is almostas big as he is. The Light Brahma is a popular meathrccil. America owes a large debt toI he meat breeds, for practically all ofour general-purpose breeds originatedthrough crossing with the Asiatics. There is only a limited de-mand for large meat fowls andit is probable that these breedswill never be grown in greatnumbers in this country. A few feu-mers who giveextra fme attention to theirchickens and have a goodmarket find it profitable tocaponize the cockerels. Caponsmake good use of their feedand demand several centspremium in the markets. DUCKS, GEESE AND TURKEYS Text Appearing After Image: Pckin ducks. On many farms ducks, geese and turkeys^re the source ol con-siderable income. Ducks. Ducks are the meat birds (jC poulliy. They archardy and with the exception of pickin<^ arc easy to handle. A duck, if well-cared for,weighs five pounds at the endof 10 weeks. It takes achicken twice as long to growto this size. Ducks are good egg pro-ducers. The eggs are largerthan hens eggs. The Pekin and India Runner are popular breeds. Geese. A few geese can be grown each year almost withoutexpense. They are the easiest of all poultry to handle. Agosling hatched means a goose for market, is an old saying whichholds true. They grow best where there is good pasture andplenty of fresh water. The breeds common on American farmsare Embden and Toulouse. Turkeys. Turkeys are a great aid in keeping grasshoppersunder control. They require little feed and little investment inthe way of buildings. Their need of a wide, free range makes itsomewhat difficult to grow them in thickly settled count Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 502
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 booksubjectpoultry bookidcu31924003182387 bookauthorwigentzella bookpublisherchicagointernationalharvestercoincagriculturalextensiondivision bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber72 booksponsormsn
1921

Image from page 85 of
Description: Identifier: comedieshistorie02shak Title: The comedies, histories, tragedies, and poems of William Shakspere Year: 1851 (1850s) Authors: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Knight, Charles, 1791-1873 Subjects: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 Publisher: London : Charles Knight Contributing Library: Brandeis University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Brandeis University Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ^ bypainting him stark naked, with a pair of shearein his hand, making his fashion of attire accord-ing to the vain conception of his brain-sickhead, not to comeliness and decorum. 74 ILLUSTBATIONS. The print from which we copy is in BordesIntroduction of Knowledge ; and we subjointhe verses which are given under it:— Text Appearing After Image: ^ Scene III.—Stalh on, stalk on: the fowl sits. The stalking-horse is thus described in anancient tract, New Shreds of the Old Snare,by John Gee :— Methinks I behold the cun-ning fowler, such as I have known in the fen-countries and elsewhere, that do shoot at wood-cocks, snipes, and wild-fowl, by sneaking behinda painted cloth which they carry before them,having pictured on it the shape of a horse;which, while the silly fowl gazeth on, it isknocked do-rni with hail-shot, and so put in thefowlers budget. There were stalking-bulls aswell as stalking-horses; and the process ofdecoying partridges in this way into a net is de-scribed in Willughbys Ornithology. I am an Englishman, and naked I stand here,Musing in my mynde what rayment I shall were;For now I will were this, and now I will were that.Now I will were I cannot tell what. ACT * Scene J.— Haggards of the rockSimon Latham, in his Book of Falconry, thusdescribes the wild and unsocial nature of thisspecies of hawk:—She keeps Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4171
Tags: bookauthorshakespearewilliam15641616 bookcentury1800 booksubjectshakespearewilliam15641616 bookdecade1850 bookyear1851 bookauthorknightcharles17911873 bookpublisherlondoncharlesknight bookidcomedieshistorie02shak bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionblc
1851

Image from page 300 of
Description: Identifier: recordofpartners1920will Title: Record of partners, staff and operatives who participated in the Great War, 1914-1919 Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: William Graham & Co Subjects: William Graham & Co World War, 1914-1918 Publisher: Glasgow : W. Graham & Co. Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Pte. W. SHAW. 7th Lancashire Fusiliers. Missing 1915 ; reported killed in action, January, 1917. Pte, William Shaw. 7th Lancashire Fusiliers. Pte. William Shaw, Portuguese Department. Mobilisedwith the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers at the outbreak of war.He saw service with his battalion in Egypt and after-wards in Gallipoli. He was twice wounded, and laterreported missing. Officially reported killed in action,January, 1917. Sergt. Jack Porter. Lancashire Fusiliers. Sergt. Porter, Counting House. Enlisted on the 13thof February, 1917, in the Lancashire Fusiliers, and waskilled in action, 2nd October, 1918. ManchesterStaff Text Appearing After Image: Sergt. JACK PORTER. Lancashire Fusiliers. Killed in action, 2nd October, 1918. Wounded. INDEX Dhootie Department. 2nd Lieut. G. R. Belshaw Royal Fusiliers. Pte. Percy Sharp - - Manchester Regiment. Portuguese Department.L/Cpl. A. WarnerBombardier J. Swan -Pte. R. M. Hadland -Pte. G. Darbyshire - Manchester Regiment.Royal Field Artillery.Manchester Regiment.Manchester Regiment. Grey Department. Capt. Edward Greenwood Lancashire Fusiliers. Counting House. Gunner L. NeedhamPte. M. Barnett Pte. H. DUNKERLEY Royal Artillery. Manchester Regiment. Gordon Highlanders and Tank Corps. Cash Department. Lieut. H. GreenwoodPte. A. E. OrangeSergt. T. Mattinson - Lancashire Fusiliers.Gordon Highlanders.Royal Army Medical Corps. ManchesterStaff Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 962
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectworldwar19141918 bookyear1920 bookidrecordofpartners1920will bookauthorwilliamgrahamco booksubjectwilliamgrahamco bookpublisherglasgowwgrahamco bookcontributornationallibraryofscotland booksponsornationallibraryofscotland
1920

Image from page 271 of
Description: Identifier: poeticalworksofs00sco Title: The poetical works of Sir Walter Scott, baronet; ed. with a careful revision of the text Year: 1888 (1880s) Authors: Scott, Walter, Sir, 1771-1832 Rolfe, W. J. (William James), 1827-1910, ed Subjects: Publisher: Boston, Ticknor and company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: l none a requiem say ? — For thee, who loved the minstrels lay,For thee, of Bothwells house the stay.The shelter of her exiled line.Een in this prison-house of thine,I 11 wail for Alpines honored Pine ! What groans shall yonder valleys fill!What shrieks of grief shall rend yon hill!What tears of burning rage shall thrill.When mourns thy tribe thy battles done,Thy fall before the race was won,Thy sword ungirt ere set of sun !There breathes not clansman of thy line,But would have given his life for thine.O, woe for Alpines honored Pine! Sad was thy lot on mortal stage ! —The captive thrush may brook the cage.The prisoned eagle dies for rage.Brave spirit, do not scorn my strain!And, when its notes awake again,Even she, so long beloved in vain.Shall with my harp her voice combine.And mix her woe and tears with mine.To wail Clan-Alpines honored Pine. Ellen the while, with bursting heart. Remained in lordly bower apart, Wliere played, with many-colored gleams, 244 SCOTTS POETICAL WORKS. Text Appearing After Image: And lightened up a tapestried wall,And for her use a menial trainA rich collation spread in vain.The banquet proud, the chamber gay,Scarce drew one curious glance astray;Or if she looked, t was but to say,With better omen dawned the dayIn that lone isle, where waved on highThe dun-deers hide for canopy ;Where oft her noble father sharedThe simple meal her care prepared.While Lufra, crouching by her side,Her station claimed with jealous pride.And Douglas, bent on woodland game,Spoke of the chase to Malcolm Graeme,Whose answer, oft at random made.The wandering of his thoughts betrayed.Those who such simple joys have knownAre taught to prize them when they re gone. Through storied pane the rising beams.In vain on gilded roof they fall. But sudden, see, she lifts her head,The window seeks with cautious tread.What distant music has the powerTo win her in this woful hour ?T was from a turret that oerhungHer latticed bower, the strain was sung. ILag Df ti[)e Emprtsonctr pJuntsman. My hawk is Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 865
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1888 bookauthorrolfewjwilliamjames18271910ed bookpublisherbostonticknorandcompany bookauthorscottwaltersir17711832 bookidpoeticalworksofs00sco bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana
1888

Image from page 543 of
Description: Identifier: localregionalane00allerich Title: Local and regional anesthesia; with chapters on spinal, epidural, paravertebral, and parasacral analgesia, and other applications of local and regional anesthesia to the surgery of the eye, ear, nose and throat, and to dental practice Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Allen, Carroll Woolsey, 1874- Subjects: Publisher: Philadelphia, Saunders Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 163.—Regional anesthesia by way of infra-orbital foramen. (After Fischer.) r^ i 1 I: Li- Fig. 164.— Resulting area of anesthesia after bin kint; both infra-orbital nerves at infra-foramen. (Braun.) of the fifth nerve are involved in the field of operation it is alwayspreferable to block the gasserian ganglion when possible, but for 534 LOCAL ANESTHESL^ various reasons this may not be feasible we must then have alterna-tive measures such as above. In operations within the mouth which are not readily accessible,as in lesions far back on the tongue, cheek wall, pillars of the pharynx,etc., we often slit the cheek back to the ramus of the jaw, thus securing Text Appearing After Image: Post. sup. dental nn. Infra-orbital nn Post. sup. dental nn. Incisors an 1 Bicuspids Middle superior dental nn.canines Fig. 165.—Areas of nerve supply of maxilla. Oblique shading: anterior superiordental nerves (incisor and canine region). Horizontal shading: middle superior dentalnerve (bicuspid region); vertical shading: posterior superior dental nerves (molarregion). (After Fischer.) greater room and freer access for work on these deeper parts. Suchincisions in the cheek, when properly closed, leave simply a linearscar. For the areas of distribution of the branches of the fifth nerveto the maxillae, teeth, gums, and hard palate see Figs. 165-168, whilethe points of emergence of the peripheral branches uj)on the face THE HEAD, SCALP, CRANIUM, BRAIN, AND FACE Nasopaliiline notch 535 Anastomosis between anteriorpalatine and nasopalatine Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 625
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 bookidlocalregionalane00allerich bookauthorallencarrollwoolsey1874 bookpublisherphiladelphiasaunders bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsormsn bookcollectioncdl
1920

Image from page 1412 of
Description: Identifier: literarydigest60newy Title: The literary digest Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: New York : Funk & Wagnalls [etc.] Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: nOKeliy, delegate of the jirovisional IrishRepublic to the Peace (^inference, de-clares in a statement issued in Paris. The Albanian Delegation to the PeaceConference, after a h(>aring by thegr pla(»> in Belgiumthan Si)a, where they were hmken otT on^larch (). A method has iieen agreedon to assure the delivery of Germanmerchant ships to the .Mlies and tofurnish Germany with food to be paidfor by credits and foreign securitiesheld in Germany. The .\inerican delegiition, says a dispatchfrom Paris, has decided to leave to theAllies the punishment of the authors ofthe war. The Literary Digest for March 22, 1919 131 Text Appearing After Image: The mimic! its a new sort of parrot-zj/;? that the Mimeo-graph has brought into the world. At the great speed of five thou-sand copies an hour it exactly reproducestypewritten letters, forms, drawings, mapsand the like. Throughout civilization it isused by business enterprises, governments,armies, navies and educational institutionsas a quick means of saving a great deal oftime and money. It works surprising refor-mations in methods and systems. Costs littleto install and maintain. Cuts printing expensesdown to minimum. What its great powers ofmimicry have done for others they may do foryou. Booklet L on request—today—fromA. B. Dick Company, Chicago—and New York. niiuniiiiitniiiMinfrnminininniii ||l in||jp|i|j l[I3HlEB3Ha IlllillllllU IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUlll! ll<iniiii(iii»)UiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiMiiiiii| •Wnrnoiiii y 132 Tlie Literary Digest for March 22, 1919 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 292
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 bookidliterarydigest60newy bookpublishernewyorkfunkwagnallsetc bookleafnumber1412 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto booksponsoruniversityoftoronto bookcollectionrobarts bookcollectiontoronto
1890

Image from page 198 of
Description: Identifier: pacificwinespiri29sanfrich Title: Pacific wine and spirit review Year: 1893 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: Wine and wine making Liquor industry Olive industry and trade Publisher: San Francisco : R.M. Wood & Co. Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: The Wine Librarians Association View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ^ SAN pRANCISCO- -/JEWYoRK^ .S<iH rraiirisco Office, .s. /v. f OK. .M.iiiKicT <t- .sEro.v/j sr.s. Aeif lorfc Ilramli. s WAHi{i:y street. ISTe^w^ HE^idi^j^tjlio ATT^ii^E IPi^ess. MOST RAPID PRESSING Can he srI ii|i iiiiywIiHTin a Wine Oliiii as llie 1 Movable Tiiniiis can kwlieeled from iinc lank Text Appearing After Image: NEVER STOPS CONTINUOUS One i\\m liT|iartil Iiesseil,SE\DFOIULLlSTI!.\TI:i) MANUFACTURE ALSO GRAPE ELEVATORS, CRUSHERS AND STEMER COMBINED AND ALL KINDS OF WINE MAKERS TOOLS. TOULOUSE 8t DELiOl^IEUX, 620-2S COlvdllivdlEI^GI^L ST., S^ItT I^I^J^IsrCISCO, CJ^L. 26 f/cSlfie WIJSiE /cJSID SflF^IT f^EVIEW. B-RA/NDg TO GE-RMA/^g. AVe hiivorpcii veil the fdlldwiii}.- Ictlcr from Messrs. K. ().Hoyti & isfor the reii.son lli;vt some of your brandy distillers may wish toavail Iheni.selves of the ojiportunity of e.xporting their surplusbrandy rather than to ta.\-|iay it at nialurity. Of course ycmknow thai brandy improves with agejust as whi.sky does, Ixieptthat biandy re(|uire.s moic tinu to age as a rule than w hisky.that is to say whisky three yea Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 639
Tags: booksubjectwineandwinemaking bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookidpacificwinespiri29sanfrich booksubjectliquorindustry booksubjectoliveindustryandtrade bookpublishersanfranciscormwoodco bookyear1893 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsanfranciscopubliclibrary
1893

Image from page 672 of
Description: Identifier: industrialmedici1919mock Title: Industrial medicine and surgery Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Mock, Harry E. (Harry Edgar), 1880- Subjects: Occupational diseases Working class Surgery Medicine Publisher: Philadelphia and London : W. B. Saunders Company Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 190.—Application of the second strip, seen from the outer side. (From MedicalWar Manual No. 4, Military Orthopaedic Surgery.) rigidity is more marked it may be necessary to adopt forciblemanipulation under anesthesia. After the condition has becomeflaccid it can be treated as described above or in the more serious casesit may be necessary to apply plaster-of-Paris dressings. In the spastic type it is often necessary to resort to tenotomy of Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 191.-—Application of the second strip, seen from the inner side. {From MedicalWar Manual No. 4, Military Orthopaedic Surgery.) the peroneal group of muscles in order to convert this into the flaccidtype, after which the treatment consists of holding the foot in theposition of supination and adduction for three or four weeks by meansof plaster-of-Paris casts. After this, strapping of the foot, proper foot 666 INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE AND SURGERY exercises and alterations of the shoes must be carried out until recoveryis complete. These conditions of the feet, which are commonly considered asbelonging to the round of orthopedic surgery must receive the most Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 811
Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectmedicine booksubjectsurgery bookdecade1910 bookyear1919 booksubjectworkingclass booksubjectoccupationaldiseases bookidindustrialmedici1919mock bookauthormockharryeharryedgar1880 bookpublisherphiladelphiaandlondonwbsaunderscompany
1919

Image from page 229 of
Description: Identifier: sketchesofjewish00gers Title: Sketches of Jewish life and history Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Gersoni, Henry, 1844-1897. [from old catalog] Subjects: Jews Publisher: New York, Hebrew orphan asylum printing establishment Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: elieve in One God—there is none beside him. Hear O, Israel, the Eternal our God is One in Unity ! The Bishop pronounced anathema and raised his cross.The executioners axe glittered in the sun at the same instant,and Rabbi Abraham-ben-Abrahams spirit rose toward thesource of life and light. At the same instant a couriers trumpet was heard. In amoment the old Lady Potozky arrived at the scaffold inthe greatest haste, waving a paper in her hand. It was anauthograph fiom the king, pardoning the offense of herson and suspending his sentence. But she had brought it justtoo late. The head of her son was lying at her feet. Shefainted on the spot and died a few hours afterward. RabbiAbrahams remains were burned on the pyre the same day. A God-fearing Israelite, Eliezer Zinkes by name, gath-ered the ashes of the martyr, at the risk of falling into thehands of zealous Christians and being cruely dealt withfor the crime, and buried them in the Jewish cemeterywhere the Pear-tree now stands. END. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 789
Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectjews bookyear1873 bookidsketchesofjewish00gers bookauthorgersonihenry18441897fromoldcatalog bookpublishernewyorkhebreworphanasylumprintingestablishment bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 449 of
Description: Identifier: transactionsofco112conn Title: Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences Year: 1866 (1860s) Authors: Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences Subjects: Science Humanities Publisher: New Haven : Published by the Academy Contributing Library: MBLWHOI Library Digitizing Sponsor: MBLWHOI Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ter part of the common species have undoubtedlybeen introduced with the earth around growing plants. Several arew^ell known European species, introduced also into North America. The following species have been identified, from our collections, byDr. J. Percy Moore, who has recently published a list of the species,with descriptions. (See Proc. Philad. Acad,, liv, pp. 80-84, 2 cuts,April, 1902.) 846 A. JEJ. Verrill—The Bermuda Islands. Enchytroius marinus Moore, Vyoc. Phil, Acarl., hv, p. SO, fig. 1, 1902.White; common at and below high-tide mark, luider stones, atConey Island. Eisenia, foetida (Sav.) Mich. Figure 2;]G. Easilj recognized by its distinct bands of color. Upper sideannulated with dark purplish brown or chocolate-brown, alternatingwith pale reddish brown or flesh-color ; below light flesh-color, orpale yellowish ; clitellus reddish or deep flesh-color, with the darkannulations less conspicuous or indistinct. Length 3-5 inches. Com-mon under stones. A cosmopolitan species. Text Appearing After Image: Figure 236.—Eisenia fcetida; a, mature, with clitellus developed ; h, c, imma-ture ; nat. size ; phot, from preserved specimens by A. H. V. Pontodrilus arencB INIich. Light red or flesh-color, plain. Length, -■5-4 inches. Commonunder stones at Elbow Bay and Hungry Bay, at and near high tidemark, Helodrilus {Allolohophora) chloroticus (Sav,) Mich, High-tide mark at Hungry Bay, in March and April, under stones. Helodrilus, sp. A small immature specimen of a second species. Eadrilus Eugenim (Kinb.) Mich. A rather large species, 4 to 7 inches long ; color dark reddishbrown, with a bright purplish, iridescent luster. Under stones. A. E. Verrill— The Berinuda Islands. 847 Phereiima Schmardm (Horst.) Mich. In formalin pale buff, with a purplish or chocolate-brown clitellus.In life, often dark brownish red or sometimes greenish or olivaceous.In formalin the segments are mostly carinate or angidar, with longrows of hooks. It is a very lively species, and when disturbedwriggles about very Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 642
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectscience bookdecade1860 bookyear1866 booksubjecthumanities bookauthorconnecticutacademyofartsandsciences bookidtransactionsofco112conn bookpublishernewhavenpublishedbytheacademy bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionamericana
1866

Image from page 96 of
Description: Identifier: modernelectropla00cogg Title: The modern electroplater; a complete book considering fully the elementary principles of electro deposition of metals, their practical application and industrial use Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Coggeshall, Kenneth M Subjects: Electroplating Publisher: New York, The Norman W. Henley publishing co. Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ing the temperature, asteam pressure adjusting valve should be inserted onthe inlet side of the steam coil. SOLUTION AGITATION During the process of plating, tiny gas bubblesform on the anodes. The effect of these bubbles isto decrease the active area of the positive plate,thereby increasing the resistance to the flow of cur-rent to the electrolyte. Unless the bubbles are re-moved by some exterior means, a more concentratedplating solution must be used to counteract the detri-mental effect of the small anode area. Solution a°*i- Agitation Devices 93 tation is, therefore, often employed, with the resultthat a fine, close-grained deposit is obtained with alow current density. AGITATION WITH AIR While mechanical agitation is, perhaps, the mosteffective method available for tank work, the specialmachinery is not only expensive but it often utilizesvaluable space. On the other hand, compressed airagitation is simple and the system may be constructed iVcr/ve AirSupply ^-Insulating Coupling Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 53.—Cross Section of Plating Tank, Showing Agitation of Solution by Bubbles of Compressed Air Released From Perforations in Lead Pipe Laying on Bottom of Tank and installed in a few hours time. Compressed airis available in most shops of average size, and cer-tainly if the plating room is a department of anindustrial plant. It is only necessary to drill a largenumber of small holes in a length of one-inch leadpipe, sealed at one end. This pipe is then laid alongthe center line of the bottom of the tank, as shownin Fig. 53, the free end passing up over the tank edgewhere it is connected, through an insulating joint and 94 The Modem Electroplater regulating valve, to the air supply. The tiny bubblesof escaped air pass upward through the solution,effectively agitating it. TANK RODS While installing the heating coils and agitationsystem, it is well to keep in mind the location of thebus bars or tank rods for the anodes and the platingwork. When the tank is used almost exclusively f Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 339
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 booksubjectelectroplating bookpublishernewyorkthenormanwhenleypublishingco bookidmodernelectropla00cogg bookauthorcoggeshallkennethm bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber96
1920

Image from page 171 of
Description: Identifier: huntingtrappings00pric Title: Hunting and trapping stories; a book for boys Year: 1903 (1900s) Authors: [Price, J. P. Hyde], 1874- [from old catalog] Subjects: Hunting Publisher: New York, McLoughlin bro's Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ing tucked up in blankets and kept warm just like children.They seem to know by instinct that it is being done for their own good. Orangs are intelligent and can be taught many tricks and even be madeto sit up at a table and eat with a spoon and use a napkin. Kipling, in oneof his books, tells of a Frenchman who lived in Sumatra and who had caughtan orang when a baby and tamed it. The orang would fetch his slippers,sit in a chair at table and smoke cigars just like a human being. All wentwell for a few years until the Frenchman married a wife. The orang imme-diately became very jealous and one day, when its master was out of the way, itstrangled the woman. Sometimes when orangs-utans are caged near otherapes they become quite friendly, especially if they are young, and they willplay together through the bars. They love to get hold of a piece of lookingglass or colored ribbon. They will work themselves up into a great excite-ment and have a rough and tumble scramble for its possession. Text Appearing After Image: A SICK BABY ORANG-UTAN. STORIES OF THE ORANG-UTAN Orang-Utans eat nothing but fruit when they are wild, and they pick outthe best. When caged however they will sometimes eat warm boiled rice.Pineapples and oranges they dearly love as any one can testify who hasseen a keeper approach their cage holding one of these fruits in his hand.They leap up and down just like naughty children and scream and shake thebars of their cage until the dainties are handed in to them. What the Gorilla is to the West Coast of Africa the Orang-Utan is tothe Far East; although there is a great difference between the two creatures.The orang is not nearly as fierce, nor as large as its cousin, and moreoverthe one is colored red while the other is slaty black. One dav a hunter who was looking for small game birds suddenly cameface to face with a full grown male orang-utan. It was the first time he hadseen the ape and for a few minutes he lost all sense of fear, so interestedwas he in looking at the great creatu Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6145
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjecthunting bookyear1903 bookpublishernewyorkmcloughlinbros bookidhuntingtrappings00pric bookauthorpricejphyde1874fromoldcatalog bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation bookcollectionbiodiversity
1903

Image from page 57 of
Description: Identifier: strawbridgecloth02stra Title: Strawbridge & Clothier's quarterly Year: 1882 (1880s) Authors: Strawbridge & Clothier Subjects: Department stores Mail-order business Clothing and dress Fashion Home economics Clothing and dress Consumer goods Dry goods Publisher: [Philadelphia : The Company] Contributing Library: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: No. 2.—Tidy, of NuUingham Lacesizes: 23X23 inches; i8vi8 inches;14X14 inches. Prices: 45c., 25c., and18c. No. 3.—Tidy of Cluny Lace ; with blueor red satin ribbon. Size, 12X12inches. Price, 95c. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 145
Tags: booksubjectclothinganddress bookcentury1800 booksubjectfashion bookdecade1880 bookyear1882 booksubjectdepartmentstores booksubjecthomeeconomics bookpublisherphiladelphiathecompany bookidstrawbridgecloth02stra bookauthorstrawbridgeclothier
1882

Image from page 185 of
Description: Identifier: proceed00newj Title: Votes and proceedings of the General Assembly of the state of New-Jersey Year: 1776 (1770s) Authors: New Jersey. Legislature. General Assembly Subjects: Publisher: [Burlington, N.J. : Isaac Collins] Contributing Library: New Jersey State Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: inten-sity of sunhght striking :ne earth on cloudlessdavs Bryson argues that the vanoion in sun-light is caused by the effect, of dust on thetransparency of the atmosphere Because ofthe greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide,temperatures did not fall as rapidly alter 1930as would otherwise have been the case Othermeteorologists, including Russias Mikhail Bu-dyko. who made the sunhght measurements,have speculated that the variations may becaused by fluctuations within the sun itself A grim prospect for India is suggested by thechart below drawn from data compiled by ReidBryson Droughts in northern India declined infreguency during the period when the worldwas getting warmer, but have been increasingin recent years Points on the chart indicatethe proportion of weather stations whose aver-age rainfall for the previous ten years was lessthan 50 percent of normal. The red line showsIndias population growth, which Bryson con-tends was encouraged by the unusual inter-lude of favorable climate. Text Appearing After Image: 1900 1910 1920 Bryson finds it wildly inappropriate thatit is the modern era, with its beneficentclimate, that meteorologists, by inter-national agreement, define as normal.Its perfectly obvious, Bryson says,that this has been the most abnormalperiod in at least a thousand years. Hepoints, for example, to the fact that from1918 to 1960 India experienced far fewerdroughts than would have been expectedfrom the prior record (see the chart atlower left). The comparative absence offamine in this period, he contends, hasplayed a large role, along with improvedmedical care, in causing the populationof such regions as India to more thandouble in this century. Bryson believes that the period fromabout 1890 to 1945 amounted merely toa brief respite from the little ice agethat has held the world in its grip eversince the sixteenth century. The whitening of Greenland Before the little ice age, grapes werewidely cultivated in England, and theFrench complained of English winemakers dumping their wa Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 615
Tags: bookauthornewjerseylegislaturegeneralassembly bookidproceed00newj bookcentury1700 bookdecade1770 bookyear1776 bookpublisherburlingtonnjisaaccollins bookleafnumber185 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewjerseystatelibrary bookcollectionnjstatelibrary
1825

Image from page 48 of
Description: Identifier: artisticsideofph00ande Title: The artistic side of photography in theory and practice Year: 1910 (1910s) Authors: Anderson, A. J. (Arthur James), b. 1863 Subjects: Photography Publisher: London, S. Paul & Co Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: and, learning that this distinction in tone isthe quality of pure photography, he realises thatphotography is a serious medium, with essentialqualities of its own, and not a makeshift for those whocannot draw. In the second place, an artistic person who takesup photography (and these are the very persons onwhom the future of photography depends) is attractedby the prints which most resemble the crayons andengravings that he is used to ; and, since these arecalled photographs, he is apt to overlook the truequality of the medium. In the third place, controlled photography wouldtake its proper rank and receive its proper recognition,if it were regarded as a separate craft, and not asphotography that has been interfered with. Besides, the controlled pigment process, whether ingum or oil, is a mixture of photography and manipula-tion, of the action of light and the action of the humanhand; it is of mixed origin, and has no more right tobe called photography than the child of an English- 46 Text Appearing After Image: BALLET-GIRLS. By R. Demachys 47 <g$ The Artistic Use of the Medium man and Hindoo has to be called a European. Sincecontrolled pigment is a complicated process, it shouldhave a complicated name; since it is a mixed process,we need not hesitate to mix our languages ; andPhotohomography * is almost as descriptive as Eurasian. VI. If only the term photohomogram wereapplied to a gum- or oil-print, the controlled pigmentprocess would take its place among the lesser forms ofartistic expression, and would become an admirablemethod for the man of leisure. Some time ago an artist invented a new method ofmonochrome, which he called monotype, andwhich had many of the qualities of gum-bichromate,with the exception of the photographic basis. Apolished copper plate was coated with moist pigment;the high lights were rubbed clean and the middle toneslightened, until a picture was formed ; from this asingle impression could be taken on a sheet of paper.Very delightful pictures were made by this pro Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 859
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1910 booksubjectphotography bookidartisticsideofph00ande bookauthorandersonajarthurjamesb1863 bookpublisherlondonspaulco booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries bookleafnumber48 bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries
1910

Image from page 146 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial351dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: lities of War. The book is going to be very captivating to the children,who will think they understand it all. But the things they donot understand will make it quite as attractive to older people—the whimsicality and subtle humor, the sympathy and under-standing, and finally the exceptional beauty of the music. Theseare the qualities that brought such success to When Little BoysSing, and the discriminating persons who recognized its differ-ence from conventional juveniles are assured that these same pointsare even more a feature of Mr. and Mrs. Carpenters new book. With many quaint illustrations in color. Oblong folio, llxl4inches. iV^f$1.50 WHEN LITTLE BOYS SING (El?i?g«) By John and Rue Carpenter. Uniform with Improving Songs for Anxious Children.Written and illustrated in the same delightful manner. Net $ 1.25- By Marian PooleMcFadden. A com-pilation. With decorations in tint by Abram Poole, Jr. Oblong 4to. Boards. Net $1.25 THE BABIES HYMN-AL JIT JILL LEJtDING BOOKSTORES or of Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 291
Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial351dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookleafnumber146
1873

Image from page 153 of
Description: Identifier: acmemagazine00acme Title: The acme magazine Year: 1906 (1900s) Authors: Acme Publishing Company (Trenton, N.J.) Subjects: Publisher: Trenton, N.J. : The Acme Publishing Co. Contributing Library: New Jersey State Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: h boyish dec-orations. Every boy has some aestheticideas along these lines that may be de-veloped to his lasting benefit. Industrious Americans in middle lifeusually have the means necessary to pro-vide a comfortable home with accommo-dation for the boys, and girls too, thatare at once more attractive and satisfy-ing than any outside influence. A tower room is attractive especiallyto a boy because it is something out ofthe ordinary, and because it is shut awayfrom the main part of the house, wherehe can make all the noise he wants towithout being continually hushed up*.Anyone contemplating building thishouse could not do a wiser thing thanplan this little tower room for one ofthe children. It is not very large, but itis big enough. Give it to the boy, let itbe his own exclusively until he outgrowsit. Do not pile in some old trash justbecause it happens to be a handy cornerto stow away something that you do notwant, but consult the young fellowstaste, think about what he would like and Text Appearing After Image: LOW COST HOMES. 79 help him arrange it in a style peculiarlyhis own. It is well lighted with two dou-ble windows, and if he needs more roomhe will find a perch on the roof. And ifhe makes the roof part of his playgrounddo not scold him for splitting a shinglenow and then. Shingles are cheaper thanboys. This house plan provides for twogrates. I wish every house in Americacontained provision for an open fire.There would be less crime if homes weremade more cheerful. The one thingabove all others that lends good cheer toevery inmate and every visitor is the openfire. It was the only luxury known toprehistoric man. Its welcome light andwarmth have been bred into the marrowof the human race. No other institutioncan possibly take its place. It is part ofhuman nature to enjoy an open fire, andit cannot be, and never will be, elimin-ated. A fireplace may be cheap and it maybe expensive; so long as the fire is burn-ing the furnishings are not criticised ; andit is by no means necessary to negl Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 479
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1906 bookidacmemagazine00acme bookauthoracmepublishingcompanytrentonnj bookpublishertrentonnjtheacmepublishingco bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewjerseystatelibrary bookcollectionnjstatelibrary bookleafnumber153
1906

Image from page 536 of
Description: Identifier: traillsocialengl06trai Title: Social England : a record of the progress of the people in religion, laws, learning, arts, industry, commerce, science, literature and manners, from the earliest times to the present day Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Traill, H. D. (Henry Duff), 1842-1900 Mann, James Saumarez, 1851- Subjects: Publisher: New York : Putnam Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: leased to contractors, werevested in that Corporation by statute in 1836.^ The Scottish andIrish lights are under boards established towards the end of theeighteenth century, all three autliorities being subjected by the 6 & 7 Willium IV., cap. Til. The five were the Skerries (Vol. V.. p. 2,)).Long9hip.<. Smalls, Spurn, and Tynemouth Castle. THE MEUCANTILK M.lUiyK. 467 Statute in question to tlie control of the Board of Trade. Lightdues are still regarded as tolls chargeable on the ships whichprofit by the lighthouses, and so retain a trace of their origin.During the nineteenth century, particularly its latter half,immense progress was made. A host of lighthouses provedthat modern engineering could build successfully alike on storm-swept rocks or on shifting sands. Of the first class are thelighthouses on the Bell Rock (1S08-1811); Skerryvore, of! Tiree(1836-ltS44); Bishop Rock (piobably the most exposed lighthousein the world, built 1852-18.58 raised and strengthened in 1888- Text Appearing After Image: MODEL OF THE GREAT BRITAIN.(Victoria and Albert Museioii.) 1.S87); the Wolf Rock, near Scilly (1862-1869), and the existingEddystone, the fourth built eastward of Smeatons in 1878-1882partly because the foundation of the third lighthouse was beingundermined. Of the second class the Maplin may serve asan example. The medieval coal tires survived in some fewcases as illuminants till nearly the second quarter of thenineteenth century, and candles in sonic places till the third.Now, oil burners and coniiilicated reflectors have been devi.scd,the electric light has come into use, though not extensively:mechanism has provided an additional means of identifyingliffhthouses bv the number and length of flashes they emit,and the invention of oil gas and acetylene has made it pos-sible to place on buoys or beacons lights which need only 468 THE RULE OF THE MIDDLE CLASS. [1846-1865 occasional attention. In addition, elaborate horns and steamsirens are replacing the bells, gongs, and guns formerly Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 721
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookpublishernewyorkputnam bookidtraillsocialengl06trai bookauthormannjamessaumarez1851 bookauthortraillhdhenryduff18421900 bookleafnumber536 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1901

Image from page 1765 of
Description: Identifier: appendixtojourna19151cali Title: Appendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California Year: 1853 (1850s) Authors: California. Legislature Subjects: Legislative journals Publisher: Sacramento : State Printing Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s of albacore to be shipped frozen. At least three companies areputting up salted and smoked albacore or tuna. One of these firms, theRedondo Fish Company, will put up 350 tons this year if they can getthe fish. Method of Taking the Albacore in Southern California.Boats.—The boats engaged in taking albacore are good seaworthj^boats of about five tons and driven by 15 to 25 horsepower gasolineengines. They are decked in and have a cabin that accommodates thethree men of the crew. The average cost of these boats is $2,500.Placed on the deck and near the stern of each boat is a square tank forholding and keeping the sardines, anchovies and smelt used for bait. Apump connected with the boats engine keeps fresh sea water constantlycirculating through it to keep the l)ait alive. Each boat also has its ownsmall meshed net for catching this bait. Before daylight the boats startout and run to wherever they can get sardines, which are considered the REPORT OF THE FISH AND GAME COMMISSION. 117 Text Appearing After Image: 118 REPORT OF THE FISH AND GAME COMMISSION. best bait that can be used. After they have secured sufficient bait, whichis very often not easy to get, they start out into the open sea for thefishing grounds, trolling behind them a couple of jigs or lures, whichare made of bone and so fashioned that they resemble a small fish as theyare drawn through the water. These jigs are usually homemadeaffairs, each boat having its own particular pattern. When an albacoreseizes or strikes one of these lures, the boat is quickly brought to astop, the men at the same time throwing out live bait to draw the fisharound the boat. Soon they can be seen breaking at many placesabout the boat as they come to the surface after the sardines thrown out.Hand lines are then thrown over baited with the sardines, each manoperating one line. If the albacore are biting well, a ton or more arecaught in a very few minutes. When they cease to bite, the boat moveson, with the lures out as before, until another school is Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 725
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookyear1853 bookauthorcalifornialegislature booksubjectlegislativejournals bookpublishersacramentostateprinting bookidappendixtojourna19151cali bookleafnumber1765 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsanfranciscopubliclibrary
1853

Image from page 88 of
Description: Identifier: minutesofannuals1528nort Title: Minutes of the ... annual session of the North Carolina Baptist State Sunday School Convention ... [serial] Year: 1903 (1900s) Authors: North Carolina Baptist State Sunday School Convention Subjects: Baptist State Convention of North Carolina North Carolina Baptist State Sunday School Convention African American Baptists Sunday schools Publisher: [North Carolina : The Convention] Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to subcontractor UNC-CH for Duke University's Religion in North Carolina project. View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ass, D. D 5.00 Shiloh, Greensboro 5.00 Rev. J. C. Love, Durham 2.50 First Baptist, Oxford 5.00 Providence, Greensboro 5.00 Mt. Zion, E. Greensboro 5.00 Malabas X Roads, Raleigh R. F. D. No. 7 1.50 New Bethel, Rolesville 1.00 First Baptist, Charlotte 2.50 First Baptist, Washington 5.00 Mt Sinai, Greensboro. 2.50 St. James, Rocky Mount 3.00 Madison Grove, Wadesboro, R. F. D. No. 2 2.50 Stokes Chapel, Wakefield, R. F. D. No. 2 2.50 28 MINUTES OF THE NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOLARS OF THE WAKECOUNTY S. S. CONVENTION. Baptist Grove 50 Open Field 4G Macedonia 75 White Oak 50 Martin Street 125 Friendship Chapel .. 125 Lovely Hill.. . 81 Elevation 50 Riley Hill 50 Bethlehem 50 New Light 49 Providence 40 Wake Chapel 30 Balance Rock 72 Mt. Pleasant ^6 River Dell 64 Hallsville 20 Method 52 St. Matthew.. 114 Evening Star 50 Merry Grove 30 Wakefield 100 Good Hope 113 Neuse 34 1526 Representation Fee $12.00 W. H. RAY, President, R. P. D. No. 1, Raleigh, N. C.T. J. FOSTER, Secretary, Wakefield, N. C. Text Appearing After Image: 20.3 Cm ?Ls:: m 3 si-- Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 828
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1903 booksubjectsundayschools booksubjectbaptiststateconventionofnorthcarolina bookidminutesofannuals1528nort bookauthornorthcarolinabaptiststatesundayschoolconvention booksubjectnorthcarolinabaptiststatesundayschoolconvention booksubjectafricanamericanbaptists bookpublishernorthcarolinatheconvention
1903

Image from page 385 of
Description: Identifier: artofweavingbyha00gilr Title: The art of weaving, by hand and by power, with an introductory account of its rise and progress in ancient and modern times Year: 1844 (1840s) Authors: Gilroy, Clinton G Subjects: Weaving Publisher: New York, Baldwin Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: iled upagainst the reed, when the point of the click W, will again hopover a tooth, as before. In order to make this loom weave thin goods perfectly regular, itwould be absolutely necessary to have the teeth of the ratchet wheelU, as fine as the diameter of the weft thread to be used ; but wequestion whether teeth of this fineness would not be more than amatch for the eye-sight of any manufacturer in the United States.For textures having from 35 to 80 threads of weft per inch, how-ever, Mr. Stones loom will be found an acquisition. Fig. 169, represents part of the frame of a loom, with the com-mon ratchet take-up motion attached thereto, as well as an improvedmethod of governing it, receiving motion from a vibrating reed,which is arranged in a frame, precisely the same as that shown inFigs. 165, 166, 167 and 168. The improvement now to be de- 46 362 THE ART OP WEAVING. scribed, although exceedingly simple, is capable of effecting all thatMr. Stones apparatus can accomplish.* Fig. 169. Text Appearing After Image: A B B C, is the frame of the loom ; w, w, the lay; P, the reed ;g,g, two springs, for the purpose of keeping the under part of thereed frame K, pressed up. The springs g, g, are screwed by twoscrews at each end, as will be perceived by the black dots at thepoints w, w, and are governed, in regard to their pressure againstthe rail K, by means of two clasp bolts passing through the lay;which clasp bolts may be seen close to the letters g, g ; these boltshave regulating nuts, one at the back and the other at the front ofthe lay, for the purpose of setting the bolts to any required position,according to the degree of pressure intended to be communicatedfrom the springs g, g, to the rail K, of the reed frame. In theoperation of the loom, the rail K, is pressed back by the reed P, ateach vibration of the lay, a distance equal to the diameter of theweft thread, n, n, is a lever having its fulcrum at o, the upper endof which lever is kept pressed against the rail K, at the point X, bymeans of Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 231
Tags: booksubjectweaving bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 bookyear1844 bookidartofweavingbyha00gilr bookauthorgilroyclintong bookpublishernewyorkbaldwin bookcontributorncsulibraries booksponsorncsulibraries bookcollectionamericana
1844

Image from page 326 of
Description: Identifier: historyofgreatno00hyde Title: History of the great Northwest and its men of progress : a select list of biographical sketches and portraits of the leaders in business, professional and official life Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Hyde, Cornelius William Gillam, 1838- Lounsberry, Clement A., 1843- McGrath, Hugh J Stoddard, William Subjects: Publisher: Minneapolis : Minneapolis Journal Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: and gen-eral manager. This firm has enjoyed unusualprosperity. In addition to the saw mill andlumber manufacturing business in Minneapo-lis, which ranks among the largest in theUnited States, the company has a controllinginterest in a number of retail lumber yardsin Nebraska and North and South Dakota.But Mr. Smiths business activities have notbeen confined exclusively to this one firm.He is identified with a number of other enter-prises in Minneapolis and elsewhere. In poli-tics, Mr. Smith is a Republican. Though hehas taken an active interest in party affairs,he has never been an oltice seeker. He hasbeen a delegate to various conventions, localand national, and was a presidential electorin ISDO, and honored by being elected to carrythe presidential votes of the state to Wash-ington. He was one of the organizers and isa trustee of the Salem English Lutheranchurch, of Minneapolis; is a member of theboard of directors of the English LutheranSeminary of Chicago, and is treasurer of the Text Appearing After Image: CIl.VKLKS A. SMITH. Evangelical Lutheran Synod of the North-west. February 11, 187S, he was married toJohanna Anderson, a daughter of Olaf An-derson, for many years a member of theSwedish riksdag, who came to America in1857, locating in Carver county, Minn. Fromthis union five children lun e been born: Nan-na A., Addie J.. Myrtle E., Vernon A. andCarroll W. BROAVN, James Warren.—The superintendent of the Minnesota State TraininSchool for Boys and Girls, at Bed WingMinn., James ^^. Brown, is a native of Mainehaving been born in the town of Millbridge\\ashington county, of that state, April 211847. His father was Joseph B. Brown, afarmer and stone cutter in moderate circumstances. The mothers maiden name was Hebecca S. Nichols, of the same nativity. YoungJames obtained his early education in thecommon schools of his native town. He thenattended the Christian Institute at Wolfbor-ough, N. H., going from there to the WesternState Normal School at Farmingion, Me.,then under the direction Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 550
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookidhistoryofgreatno00hyde bookauthorhydecorneliuswilliamgillam1838 bookauthorlounsberryclementa1843 bookauthormcgrathhughj bookauthorstoddardwilliam bookpublisherminneapolisminneapolisjournal bookcontributoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign
1901

Image from page 1706 of
Description: Identifier: appendixtojourna19091cali Title: Appendix to the Journals of the Senate and Assembly of the ... session of the Legislature of the State of California Year: 1853 (1850s) Authors: California. Legislature Subjects: Legislative journals Publisher: Sacramento : State Printing Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: is accounted moreskillful, more powerful, more worthy of human ingenuity, to harnessthe wind or the cloud or the lightning when we have great loads tolift, rather than to tug at them with our own unassisted strength.Hercules was a foolish fellow when he took the Augean stable job not — 79 — to talk it up among all his neighbors and have some help—and thestables wouldnt have been dirty so quick in future. Well, you see my idea. Go out among the people and talk it up.Have public meetings. Send out circular letters. Get the interest andthe help of the neighborhood leaders. Appoint a day for a grand Im-provement Bee at the schoolhouse, to be attended and taken part in byall the people and all the children of the district. Get a committee of the thriftiest and most energetic men of theneighborhood to see what is wrong with the grounds, to determine howto remedy it and to remedy it. The men and boys can bring teams andplows and scrapers and wagons—and picks and shovels, hammers and Text Appearing After Image: AFTER IMPROVEMENT. This is tlie same schoolliouse, but it has been born again. Wlio will say that theseimproved outward conditions will not make inward changes in the children whomust frequent these grounds? nails. Probably there will be a carpenter and a painter and a paperhanger among them. Certainly the school can afford some money tobuy materials. Surely people would be at hand pleased and proud todonate trees, shrubs, flowers, seeds. What a transformation could bewrought by a dozen or a score of -willing workers in a day! Fencesbuilt or straightened up, repaired, painted. Trees pruned, replaced,cultivated. Grounds graded, tennis court or croquet ground laid out.Foul outhouses torn away and replaced by new, clean, and wholesomeones. Walls papered, desks stained and varnished, ceilings calcimined.Steps repaired, hitching posts put in. A flagstaff put up and a fine flagfloated to the breeze. Window panes put in, weeds chopped down, trash — 80 — gathered and burned. Not all of th Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 983
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookyear1853 bookauthorcalifornialegislature booksubjectlegislativejournals bookpublishersacramentostateprinting bookidappendixtojourna19091cali bookcollectionsanfranciscopubliclibrary bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsanfranciscopubliclibrary
1853

Image from page 127 of
Description: Identifier: historicalreview02wate Title: Historical review of Chicago and Cook county and selected biography. A.N. Waterman ... ed. and author of Historical review Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Waterman, Arba N. (Arba Nelson), 1836-1917 Subjects: Chicago (Ill.) -- History Chicago (Ill.) -- Biography Cook County (Ill.) -- History Cook County (Ill.) -- Biography Publisher: Chicago, New York, The Lewis publishing company Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: -=-■ Uc)iVlnK Text Appearing After Image: CHICAGO AND COOK COUNTY 589 judges of the court in July, 1907, to act during the absence of ChiefJustice Olson. Judge Gemmill is a resident of the Seventh ward, and has taken anactive part in the political affairs of the city and state. He servedas the Republican central committeeman of his ward from 1902 to1907. He is a strong campaign speaker, and began political speakinga number of years ago, stumping the states of Illinois and Iowaduring the campaign of 1896, and since then has always taken a mostactive part in every campaign. Judge Gemmill married, in 1892, Miss Edna Billings, of Rock-ford, Iowa, and has two children, Jennette and William B. He is apopular member of the Hamilton Club and the Law Institute. In1907 he was elected and became a life member of the Chicago PressClub. *A gentleman of the old school, and most emphatically of the nrw, might designate the polished and eloquent Luther Laflin Mills, lawyer, orator, reformer and Christian citizen. HeLuther L has all the suavi Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 382
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherchicagonewyorkthelewispublishingcompany bookauthorwatermanarbanarbanelson18361917 booksubjectchicagoillhistory booksubjectcookcountyillhistory booksubjectcookcountyillbiography bookyear1908 bookidhistoricalreview02wate booksubjectchicagoillbiography
1908

Image from page 48 of
Description: Identifier: rosalbasjournalo00dobs Title: Rosalba's journal, and other papers Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Dobson, Austin, 1840-1921 Subjects: Carriera, Rosalba, 1675-1757 Angoulême, Marie-Thérèse Charlotte, duchesse d', 1778-1851 Nichols, John, 1745-1826 Hill, Aaron, 1685-1750 Publisher: London : Chatto & Windus Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: sented it; and she is shown holding in herhand a sketch of Giovanna. Marco Pitteri en-graved this portrait, but it is not held to be asattractive as that engraved by Wagner for JosephSmith. Rosalbas social charm was great; butthat she was beautiful can scarcely be contended,though one must be an emperor like Charles VIto dare to say—as he said to Bertani—that shewas very ugly ( Ma ella e molto brutta). InWagners engraving (the original picture, if itexists, is not now traceable) she has large, pene-trating eyes and a mouth, nose, and chin inwhich her biographer professes to discover indica-tions of those qualities of intelligence, elevation,tenacity of purpose, and latent humour withwhich he credits her. Notwithstanding all hisefforts, he failed to find any trace of a lover.Rosalba had no romance! She was simply aclear-headed, hard-working, home-keeping crafts-woman, devoted to her calling and her family,and reaping deservedly the reward of her pro-longed and praiseworthy labours. Text Appearing After Image: ROSAf.BA CARRIKRA (llY IIKKSELF, AS ENGRAVED BY WAGNER) Rosalbds Journal 31 Her works are scattered in many places—in thepalaces and Academy of Venice; in her birthplace,Chioggia; at Paris and at Dresden. In the Louvreis her diploma picture; in the Dresden Gallery, hercopy of Correggios Magdalen, with her portraitsof Metastasio and the Empress Elizabeth/ Manyof her productions have, no doubt, perished; butthere must still be a considerable number lyingperdus in private houses. If she had not thefaultless draughtsmanship of La Tour or theminute finish of Liotard, she had an unquestionedfreshness and charm of her own. She has left, itis true, no piece of the persistent and ubiquitouspopularity (in its engraved form) of Liotards* Belle Chocolatiere (Mile. Baldauf). But pastelwas as much born for Rosalba as Don Ouixotewas born for Cervantes, She cultivated it suc-cessfully; she did her best to develop it; and sheis fairly entitled to the praise accorded her ofadapting to a volatile age Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 861
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1915 bookauthordobsonaustin18401921 bookpublisherlondonchattowindus bookidrosalbasjournalo00dobs booksubjectcarrierarosalba16751757 booksubjectangoulmemariethrsecharlotteduchessed17781851 booksubjectnicholsjohn17451826 booksubjecthillaaron16851750
1915

Image from page 130 of
Description: Identifier: gilbertlightexpe00lynd Title: Gilbert light experiments for boys Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Lynde, Carleton John, b. 1872 Gilbert, Alfred C. (Alfred Carlton), 1884-1961 Subjects: Light Light Scientific recreations Publisher: New Haven, Conn. : A.C. Gilbert Co. Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ll enjoy it because itsnew—nothing like it. Anentertainment made forboys who want real fun.But thats only a few of themany things you can do with GILBERTLIGHT EXPERIMENTS One of these outfits will help you to understand a great many facts about light.You can perform a number of experiments which explain the laws of light.Learn about the movie machine, the telescope and other optical instruments.Theres a big book on Light with each set, its a handy size, just right to put inyour pocket From this book and your set youll get a knowledge of light that will be helpfulto you always. Its great fun too, the kind you like. The outfit is complete withprisms, mirrors and all the apparatus youll need to perform the experiments. Ask your dealer to show you this new Gilbert toy.If he hasnt it write THE A. C. GILBERT COMPANY 507 Blatchley Ave., New Haven, Conn. In Canada — The A. C. Gilbert-Menzies Co., Limited, Toronto, Ont. In England —The A. C. Gilbert Co., 125 High Holborn, London, W. C. 1 Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 714
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectscientificrecreations booksubjectlight bookyear1920 bookidgilbertlightexpe00lynd bookauthorlyndecarletonjohnb1872 bookauthorgilbertalfredcalfredcarlton18841961 bookpublishernewhavenconnacgilbertco bookcontributorgettyresearchinstitute
1920

Image from page 91 of
Description: Identifier: histoirelittr04rive Title: Histoire littéraire de la France; ouvrage commencé par des religieux bénédictins de la Congrégation de Saint Maur, et continué par des membres du l'Institut (Académie des inscriptions et belles-lettres) Year: 1733 (1730s) Authors: Rivet de la Grange, Antoine, 1683-1749 Clément, François, 1714-1793 Clémencet, Charles, 1703-1778 Daunou, Pierre Claude François, 1761-1840 Le Clerc, Joseph Victor, 1789-1865 Hauréau, Barthélemy i.e. Jean Bartélemy, 1812-1896 Meyer, Paul i.e. Marie Paul Hyacinthe, 1840- Académie des inscriptions & belles-lettres (France) Benedictines in France. Congrégation de Saint Maur Subjects: French literature French literature Publisher: Paris, Imprimerie nationale [etc.] Contributing Library: PIMS - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: pas douter. Seulement on y trouvera des variantes quel-quefois considérables, même dans la chronologie qui y estemploïée , comme il sen rencontre dordinaire dans les di-vers manuscrits dun même ouvrage. De plus on a cousu à lafin de la première continuation de Fredegaire dans le manus-crit en question, un morceau dun de ses autres continuateurs,qui se lit à la page 682 dans lédition de Dom Ruinart, etoù il est parlé de la mort et de la sépulture de Charles Martel. Cest ce qui, joint à ce qui est précédemment dit de ce hé-ros, a fait croire au copiste, ou plutôt àquelquautre après lui, que eétoit là une histoire particulière du mêm e Martel, et p -^•qui la porté à y ajouter en letres capitales les paroles sui-vantes qui se lisent à la fin : expHcit liistoria rerum gestarumVarli Majoris domus, qui hello Vinciaco habito Rafjenfre-(ium victum fugavit, et alla quamplurima fortiter et utili- 68 AUTRES ECRIVAINS VIII SIKGLi:. 3 Le Loiij;, Ijib. Fr.3-22. 2. 323. 1. Text Appearing After Image: Pflab. act. L. I.p. 229-232.* 3. Ca\e. p. il; Mal), ib.n. 18. p. 232/ Boil. 17. Jan.177-na. P- Mab. ib.232.* p. 229- p. 27-39. (iave.Mab.1. iUi>. 1.11. 27 11. Mab. ib. p. 2S.n. 2. p. 32. 11. 10. pr. ter gessit. * La même chose est arrivée au P. le Long, qui dansce même ouvrage en a dislingué deux différents : une histoireparticulière de Charles Martel, et une chronique générale delorigine et des exploits des François. AUTRES ECRIVAINS ANONYMES. Yolci une autre classe dAuteurs anonymes qui nous pa-roissent avoir écrit quelques années avant le milieu dece siècle. Le premier est un Manceau, homme desprit etde piété, qui semble avoir été moine, en ce quil donne à S.Benoît la qualité de père. Il nous a laissé une vie de S. Ricli-inir, Abbé au Maine, mort vers 710 ou 714 au plus tard.Dom Mabillon ne fait pas difficulté de le regarder commeun auteur contemporain; et Cave a cru devoir le placervers lan 730. 11 est certain quil nexécuta son dessein gueresplus tard qu Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 840
Tags: booksubjectfrenchliterature bookdecade1730 bookcentury1700 bookyear1733 bookauthorrivetdelagrangeantoine16831749 bookauthorclmentfranois17141793 bookauthorclmencetcharles17031778 bookauthordaunoupierreclaudefranois17611840 bookauthorleclercjosephvictor17891865 bookauthorhauraubarthlemyiejeanbartlemy18121896
1825

Image from page 672 of
Description: Identifier: bostoncookingsch19hill_4 Title: The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics Year: 1896 (1890s) Authors: Hill, Janet McKenzie, 1852-1933, ed Boston Cooking School (Boston, Mass.) Subjects: Home economics Cooking Publisher: Boston : Boston Cooking-School Magazine Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: and below it. Thisis the home of Mr. Francis H. Lee,whose ancestor was one of the first citizens to build on this street. Herethe staircase is at the rear of the hall,and shows, as in the Brown house, thearchway, but simpler in ornamentation.The hall is a large one, the centralfeature of the house, broad and highand furnished in rare specimens ofcolonial times. The hallway in the home of Mr.Arthur W. West, while not strictly anold-time hall, through the introductionof modern features, is interesting indetail. An arched entrance leads tothe stairway of the second floor. Hereone finds rare pieces of antiques in desk,secretary, tables, and chairs, handeddown through generations to the presentowner. Joseph S. Cabot, one of old Salemsprominent citizens, built on EssexStreet, a house in pure colonial style ofarchitecture. Entering the porch, onesteps into a magnificent hallway, wain-scoted waist-high. Here the colonialstaircase shows a clever touch in therare carving of balustrade and newel Text Appearing After Image: Hallway in the Nichols House 462 The Boston Cooking-School Magazine post, adding a sturdy note to the soft,artistic hangings of the hall. This isone of Salems most historic houses, andis occupied by Mr. Daniel Low. Federal Street has the honor ofbeing the site of one of the finest colonialhouses in Salem, the Nichols house,built for a bride. The hallway here is achoice specimen of an old-time stair-hall. Wide and long, it ends with adoor that leads into a court-yard atthe rear of the house. The staircase,low in tread, is considered by authorities to be an example worthy of imita-tion by the architect of to-day. Historic and modern hallways areof interest in both furnishings and con-struction. There is a fascination aboutthem apart from architectural value.The stair-hall is the central feature ofthe house, and is, as it were, a keynoteto the good taste of the occupant. Itdemands more than passing attention,that each part may carefully fit intoits proper position and that, throughoutthe Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 6370
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1896 booksubjecthomeeconomics bookidbostoncookingsch19hill4 bookauthorhilljanetmckenzie18521933ed bookauthorbostoncookingschoolbostonmass booksubjectcooking bookpublisherbostonbostoncookingschoolmagazine bookleafnumber672
1896

Image from page 278 of
Description: Identifier: pennsylvan18861900penn Title: Pennsylvania Female College Catalogue Year: 1886 (1880s) Authors: Pennsylvania Female College Subjects: Chatham University--Curricula--Catalogs Publisher: Pennsylvania Female College View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ance is reached ; or by cabs at the station, which willconvey passengers to the doors of the College. Strangers, on arriving in the city at the Union Depot, may obtainall needed information by incjuiring of the Excelsior Express andStandard Cab Company, which also delivers baggage at the College. Location of the College. The College building is situated on Fifth avenue, some three andone-half miles from the center of the city. The location is the mostcommanding and beautiful within the bounds of the municipal cor-poration, is perfectly retired, and yet within three minutes walk of thecable cars, by which the -city, or other suburban parts, are reached.To use the language of one who is familiar with the scenery of thiscountry : No educational institution in the land can compare withthe Penns)^lvania Female College for beauty of situation, purity ofatmosphere, compass of view and sj)ecial adaptedness of the location toretirement, combined with ready access to the advantages of the city. Text Appearing After Image: 44 Pennsylvania Female College. The following Lectures and Musical Entertainment have beengiven at the College during the year i 88g=go. September 20—Miss Campbell,Missionary Life in China. October 1—Committee from Synod. October 24—Rev. De. Edwards,-- Present Progress. October 25—Miss Nettie Dunn,Work of the Y. W. C. A. November 4—Eev. E. R. Doneiioo,Instruction of the Blind. A. Y. Lee,Chalk Drawing. March 5—Edward Perry,Piano Recital. March Miss Amelia B. Edwards, LL. D., Talk on American Schools. March Rev. Geo. Hodges, Two Lectures, Subject : An Argument for God. April Rev. W. R. MacKay, D. D., The Good Old Times. May 5—Rev. S. F. Scovel, D. D., LL. D.,Motives for Study. I p^nns^l\)ania (^oIIg^g for O^omen. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 2366
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookidpennsylvan18861900penn bookauthorpennsylvaniafemalecollege booksubjectchathamuniversitycurriculacatalogs bookpublisherpennsylvaniafemalecollege bookyear1886 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber278 bookcontributorchathamuniversityjenniekingmellonlibrary
1886

Image from page 343 of
Description: Identifier: drevanshowtokee00evan Title: Dr. Evans' How to keep well; Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Evans, William Augustus, 1865- [from old catalog] Subjects: Medicine, Popular Hygiene Sanitation Publisher: New York, Pub. for Sears, Roebuck and co. by D. Appleton and company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: he eggsof other species can or not is unknown. A few larvae survive. The impor-tant method of winter survival is by hibernation in warm places. Mosquitoes from Cisterns.—J. H. F. writes from Joliet: In yourcatalog of breeding places for the mosquito you overlooked the cistern. Sofar as cities and villages go cisterns are the breeding ground of mosquitoes.Where cisterns are in basements it is difficult to shut the mosquito out,unless it is done at the time of construction Reply.—There are anopheles mosquitoes in Joliet, but they are notinfected with malaria. Malaria in Lexington.—Anxious Mother asks: Is there much malariaaround Lexington? We drink water from a well; is it safe? Reply.—The malaria rate in the district you mention is not high, andit is getting less year by year. Where water is from wells, the question asto safety must be answered for each well. Probably the Kentucky Boardof Health can advise you as to the safety of the well to be used. Where Mojxjuitoej* Breed— Text Appearing After Image: Jn Ponds and Riddles Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 429
Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjecthygiene bookdecade1910 booksubjectmedicinepopular bookyear1917 bookiddrevanshowtokee00evan bookauthorevanswilliamaugustus1865fromoldcatalog bookpublishernewyorkpubforsearsroebuckandcobydappletonandcompany booksubjectsanitation bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress
1917

Image from page 409 of
Description: Identifier: earlyhistorythur00blan Title: Early history of Thurston County, Washington : together with biographies and reminiscences of those identified with pioneer days Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Blankenship, Georgiana Mitchell, b. 1860 Subjects: Thurston County (Wash.) -- History Thurston County (Wash.) -- Biography Publisher: Olympia, Wash. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: dians in time for them to flee to the safety of the stock-ade at Olympia. Several of the pioneers of the early 50s canrecall Father Blanchard, who was at that time at the head,of the Mission, having taken Rev. Ricards place when thatFather moved on to establish other Catholic ]\Iissions. FatherBlanchard and his associates had a school of about forty youngIndians, who were taught the white mans ways, and to be-come good Catholics. The classes were held in the mainbuilding, which stood for many years after the mission wasabandoned, on the ground now occupied for a private garden.Dark and gloomy were the rooms, with windows high up inthe walls, so high that the light came through but dimly. Theattention of the j^oung students were not distracted by gazingout, and in the event of enmity arising between the priests andthe Indians there was no opportunity for a bullet to find itsmark by aiming through the window. The benches on whichthe students were seated were the work of their own hands, Text Appearing After Image: LEOPOLD SCHMIDT Whose Generosity Has Done Much for PriestPoint Park PIONEER REMINISCENCES 361 under the training of the priests, and was the start of themanual training classes or departments now so common in onrschools. One pioneer woman, who as a young girl, lived on a home-stead in the neighborhood, recalls visiting the ]\Iission whileschool was in session and seeing the dusky young students por-ing over their lessons. This lady also tells about the nativeslove for singing. The priests taught them the chants of theirservices to their great delight. Sometimes, she said, an In-dian would be picking berries back in the underbrush. Hewould begin to sing or chant, another voice would take upthe refrain in another part of the woods and then another andanother until the strain would reach the fishermen out on thewaters, and the clam diggers along the beach, who would jointheir voices in swelling the volume of sound until the woodsand shore would ring with the wild melody. As a means of ra Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1544
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1914 bookidearlyhistorythur00blan bookauthorblankenshipgeorgianamitchellb1860 booksubjectthurstoncountywashhistory booksubjectthurstoncountywashbiography bookpublisherolympiawash bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1914

Image from page 79 of
Description: Identifier: Bates_Student_1916 Title: Bates Student Year: 1916 (1910s) Authors: Bates College Subjects: Publisher: Lewiston, Me. : Bates College Contributing Library: Bates College, Edmund Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ST., LEWISTON, ME. University of Maine College of Law For information address WILLIAM E. WALZ, DeanBANGOR - - - MAINE FOWLES CHOCOLATE SHOPIS IN AUBURNBUT IT IS WORTH YOUR WHILE HIGH CLASS PHOTOGRAPH AT THE STUDIO OF FLAGG & PLUMMER 102 LISBON STREET Something more we give than yourmoneys worth—Its Satisfaction WILFRED RENAUD FTRST CLASS HAIRDRESSERSNew Bank Building Try Our Public Shower Baths DR. JOHN P. STANLEYDENTIST Rooms 601-602Manufacturers Natl Bldg. 145 Lisbon Street, LEWISTON, ME. POCKET KNIVES, RAZORSSCISSORS AND SHEARSPAINTS AND OILS and allarticles usually kept in a Hard-ware Store. GEO. A. WHITNEY & CO. 235 Main Street, LewUton, Maine Give your LAUNDRY WORK to ROBERT GREENE, AgentRoom 33 Parker Hall HIGH STREET LAUNDRY AUBURN, MAINE THE NEW ENGLAND TEACHERS AGENCY PORTLAND, Y. M. C. A. Building, MAINESend for our booklet and special offerG. W. Oralgie, Manager Selena Thompson, Emma F. Higgins, Asst. Managers THE BATES STCDKNT. TIUUSDAY, JINE 15, 1916 PAGE THREE Text Appearing After Image: erViceanitationatisfaction Our Watchtaords THE QUALITY SHOP 143 COLLEGE STREET Telephone 1817-W BATES COLLEGE LEWISTON, MAINE FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION AND GOVERNMENT George C. Chase, A.M., D.D., LL.D., PRESIDENT Professor of Psychology and Logic Jonathan Y. Btanton, A.M., Litt.D., Emeritus Professor of Greek Lyman G. Jordan, A.M., Ph. D., Stanley Professor of Chemistry Wm. H. Hartshorn, A.M., Litt.D., Professor of English Literature Herbert R. Purinton, A.M., D.D.. Fullonton Professor of Biblical Literatureand Religion Grosvenor M. Robinson, A.M.. Professor of Oratory Arthur N. Leonard, A.M., Ph.D.. Professor of German Fred A. Knapp, A.M., Professor of Latin Fred E. Pomeroy, A.M., Professor of Biology Halbert H. Britan, A.M., Ph.D., Cobb Professor of Philosophy George M. Chase, A.M., Belcher Professor of Greek William R. Whitehorne, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Physics George E. Ramsdell, A.M., Professor of Mathematics Frank D. Tbbbs, A.M., S.T.D., Professor of Geology and Astronomy R. R. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 605
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorbatescollege bookpublisherlewistonmebatescollege bookyear1916 bookidbatesstudent1916 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber79 booksponsorlyrasismembersandsloanfoundation bookcontributorbatescollegeedmundmuskiearchivesandspecialcollectionslibrary
1916

Image from page 160 of
Description: Identifier: americanfloraorh01stro Title: The American flora : or history of plants and wild flowers : containing their scientific and general description, natural history, chemical and medical properties, mode of culture, propagation , &c., designed as a book of reference for botanists, physicians, florists, gardeners, students, etc. Year: 1855 (1850s) Authors: Strong, Asa B Subjects: Plants Plants Wild flowers Medicinal plants Publisher: New York : Hull & Spencer Contributing Library: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden Digitizing Sponsor: The LuEsther T Mertz Library, the New York Botanical Garden View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: attached to the centre of each leaf; the Jioiccrs arelarge, solitary, of a tawny yellow, and stand upon long peduncles; thecalyx is yellowish, large, forming a horn-like nectarium behind, anddivided at the mouth into five irregular segments, which are acute,erect, and striated; the corolla consists of five petals, which are round-ish, and the two uppermost bent backwards, marked with black linesat the base, and inserted into the segments of the calyx; the three un-dermost have long claws or ungues, and are bearded at the base ; fil-aments eight, which are yellow, tapering, and spreading; tlie anthersare yellow, ovate, and four-celled; the gcrmcn is triangular; stylesimple, erect, and yellow ; stigma bifid ; fruit three, adhering, berries,compact, externally striated, containing three irregular shaped seeds.Its flowers appear from June till October. This plant is a native of Peru, growing wild in tlie low lands and on the borders of small streams. It was first introduced into France104 Text Appearing After Image: NAT. ORDER.—TRIHILAT^. 105 in the year 1684, and there called Le Grand Capuchie; two yearsafterwards it was introduced into Eiu-ope by Dr. Lumley Lloyd, andsince that time has been constantly cidtivated in the English gardens,both as an ornament and a luxury ft)r the table. In its recent state this plant, and more especially its flowers,have a smell and taste resembluig those of water-cress, and the leaveson beuig bruised, emit a pungent odor, similar to that of horse-racUsh.By distillation with water they impregnate the fluid to a considera-ble extent with the smeU and flavor of the plant. The flowers arevery much used in salads, and the capsules are by many highlyesteemed as a pickle. Elizabeth Christina, daughter of the celebra-ted Linnaeus, we are informed by her father, observed the flowersof the great Indian-cress to emit spontaneously, at certain intervals,sparks like electric ones, visible only in the evening. If this be thecase in this plant, it is probable the whole posses Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 7202
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectplants booksubjectmedicinalplants bookdecade1850 bookidamericanfloraorh01stro bookyear1855 bookauthorstrongasab booksubjectwildflowers bookpublishernewyorkhullspencer bookcollectionbiodiversity
1855

Image from page 133 of
Description: Identifier: koesterschoolboo00cowarich Title: The Koester school book of drapes; a complete text book and course of instruction in merchandise draping Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Cowan, George John, 1877- Bates, William Henry, 1879- Subjects: Show windows Display of merchandise Draperies Publisher: Chicago, The Dry Goods Reporter Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: window or for use on a counter. It consistsin draping several pieces of goods over a bar, either suspended by ribbons or by meansof uprights. One piece of goods drapes over a stool, tabourette or pedestal on the topof which is placed a bowl of flowers. A spray of flowers is fastened at one end ofthe bar. Fig. 6 is a trifling different arrangement at the top of the same stand as shown in Fig. 4. Fig. 7 shows a window divider or a specially built piece of fence on one corner ofwhich is placed a vase of flowers. Back of it are several drapes; part of the goods ofone of them drapes over the fence, while another piece of goods uses this divider asa stand on which to be draped. Fig. 8 suggests how a drape of goods can l)e made on a bay-tree. At one side isa small sketch of a framework showing how to imitate a bay-tree by placing small twigsand flowers in a circle filled in with wide mesh net. Fig. 9 illustrates two entirely difterent drapes held together by means of ribbons andfoliage. 129 Text Appearing After Image: 130 USING ACCESSORIES WITH DRAPES ELSEWHERE in this book wc liavc touclied on the subject of using various accessoriesin connection with your drapes. There are hundreds ,of suggestions along this linecontained in this l^iok, but we have collected on the page opposite ten very interestingsuggestions that should be most helpful to many trimmers. In Fig. 1 we show how several waists and a ])asket of flowers, when used with adrape of fabrics, makes a most interesting display and will tend to increase sales in boththe yard goods and in the shirtwaist departments. Fig. 2 illustrates a drape made by draping the goods over a parasol, thus the accessoryserves as part of the fixture as well as displaying itself. Fig. 3 is another drape in which a parasol enters. A belt also is introduced, havingthe top of the draping stand a round piece of wood of such a size that the belt willfit when fastened around it. Fig. 4 also contains a parasol, and the goods are draped over it in a very gracefulmanner. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1228
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookidkoesterschoolboo00cowarich bookauthorcowangeorgejohn1877 bookauthorbateswilliamhenry1879 booksubjectshowwindows booksubjectdisplayofmerchandise booksubjectdraperies bookpublisherchicagothedrygoodsreporter
1913

Image from page 264 of
Description: Identifier: exemptfiremenofs00exem Title: The Exempt firemen of San Francisco; their unique and gallant record Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Exempt Fire Company, San Francisco Subjects: San Francisco (Calif.). Fire Dept Publisher: [San Francisco : Commercial Publishing Co.] Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: n in San Chris Lee, born in Philadelphia, Pa,, Francisco, Cal.; joined the department October 31, 1852, joined the department October I, 1897; now ranks as driver at April 3, 1882, as patrolman; nowranks as House No. I of the Fire Patrol. lieutenant of House No. 2, Fire Patrol. J. M. Smith was born in Stockton,Cal., October 24, 1867; joined the de-partment May I, 1890 ; resigned OctoberI, 1892; re-entered February 4, 1896;now ranks as sergeant of House No. i.Fire Patrol. STATION NO. 2 Station No. 2 is located at 65 CityHall Avenue. It was organized June17th, 1879. The original members ofthe company were J. F. O. Comstock,lieutenant; W. K. Brown, driver; J. L.Littlefield, J. H. Colen and T, Dornin,Patrolmen. It has one service wagonwith two horses and eighty covers, withother equipments. It responds to allalarms. The present members of stationNo. 2 are Chris. Lee, lieutenant incharge; C. R. Magill, sergeant; F.Simons, driver; privates, P. Thaten, L.J. Huberts, N. Vasen and A. Obenauer. Text Appearing After Image: CHAS. R. MAHILL Chas. R. Magill was born in Troy, N.Y., July 28, i860, served in the abovecity as a fireman, and now ranks as ser-geant of House No. 2, Fire Patrol. 262 SAN FRANCISCO FIREMEN ,^-CEr33fWBIBt™ • ;^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 446
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidexemptfiremenofs00exem bookauthorexemptfirecompanysanfrancisco booksubjectsanfranciscocaliffiredept bookpublishersanfranciscocommercialpublishingco bookyear1900 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorsanfranciscopubliclibrary booksponsorsanfranciscopubliclibrary
1900

Image from page 652 of
Description: Identifier: peerageofbritish00lodg Title: The peerage of the British Empire as at present existing : arranged and printed from the personal communications of the nobility Year: 1848 (1840s) Authors: Lodge, Edmund, 1756-1839 Innes, Eliza Innes, Maria Subjects: Nobility Publisher: London : Saunders and Otley Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Peyto, thirteenth Lord, was b.4 Aug. 1738, andd. 15 Feb. 181fi ; having m. 8 Oct. 17()1, Lady Louisa North, 2nd daughter ofFrancis, 1st Earl of Guilford, by whom, who d. 2 April 1798, he had issue : 1 John-Peyto, fourteenth Lord, b. 26 June 1762, d. 1 Sept. 1820. 2 Ho)i. Louisa, b. 20 June 1769, d. .3 Feb. 1835; having m. 31 Oct. 1793, the Rev. Robert Barnard, by whom, who was b. in 1761, and rf. 25 Feb.1834, she had issue : 1 Louisa, b. 24 July 1802, ?n. 9 June 1825, Joseph Townsend, Esq., ofHonington Hall, Warwickshire. 2*Robert, b. 17 Oct. 1809, m. Georgiana-Jane, 3rd daughter of Afajor-General Thomas-William Taylor, of Ogwell, Devon, Lieutenant-Governorof the Royal Military College, Sandhurst.3 A son, b. 2 June 1815, d. young. 3 Henrv-Peyto, present and fifteenth Lord. Creation.—By writ 1492. Genealogy.—See Genealogical Volume. Motto.—^^Virtue vaunccth : Virtue prevails. Town Residence.—IX, Hill Street. Seat.—Compton Verney, near Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire. 568 WIL Text Appearing After Image: WILLOUGHBY DE ERESBY, BARON. (Drummond-VVilloughby.) Peter-Robert Drummond-Willoughby, Baron Willoughby tieEresby, and Gwydyr of Gvvydyr, Co. Carnarvon, m the Peerage ofEngland, and a Baronet, Joint Hereditary Great Chamberlain of Eng-land, P.C., and Lord Lieutenant of the County of Carnarvon; b. 19March 1782, succeeded his father as Baron Gwydyr, 29 June 1820,and his mother as Baron Willoughby 29 Dec. 1828, m. 20 Oct. I8O7,the Hon. Clementina-Sarah Drummond, only surviving child andheir of James, 1st Lord Perth, (extinct,) and by her, who was b. 5May, 178(1, has issue, 1 Hon. Clementina-Elizabeth, h. 2 Sept. 1809, m. 8 Oct. 1827, Gilbert-John Heathcote, Esq., M.P., b. 16 Jan. 1795, eldest son of Sir Gilbert Heath-cote, Bart., by Lady Sophia Tollemache.—See Dysart.^2 Hon. Elizabeth-Susan, b. 21 Sept. 1810.3 Hon. Charlotte-Augusta-Annabella, b. 3 Nov. 1815, Lady Carington.4 Hon. Frederick, b. 4 Feb. 1818, d. 17 May 1819.5*Hon. Alberic, b. 25 Dec. 1821. The present Peers father, Peter Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 820
Tags: booksubjectnobility bookcentury1800 bookyear1848 bookdecade1840 bookpublisherlondonsaundersandotley bookauthorlodgeedmund17561839 bookidpeerageofbritish00lodg bookauthorinneseliza bookauthorinnesmaria bookcontributorharoldbleelibrary
1848

Image from page 661 of
Description: Identifier: warofrebellionco32unit Title: The War of the Rebellion : a compilation of the official records of the Union and Confederate armies Year: 1880 (1880s) Authors: United States. War Dept. 1n Scott, Robert N. (Robert Nicholson), 1838-1887. cn Lazelle, Henry Martyn, 1832- Davis, George B. (George Breckenridge), 1847-1914. 1n Perry, Leslie J. cn Kirkley, Joseph W. (Joseph William), 1841-1912. 1n Ainsworth, Frederick Crayton, 1852-1834 Moodey, John Sheldon, 1842- Cowles, Calvin D. (Calvin Duvall), 1849- comp. 1n United States. War Records Office United States. Record and Pension Office United States. Congress. House. 1n Subjects: Publisher: Washington : Govt. Print. Off. Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: utant-General. Abstract from return of the Army of Tennessee. General Joseph E. Johnston,C. S. Army, commanding, March 20, 1864; headquarters Dalton, Ga. Present for 1 |5 u - i duty. 3.1 t! Command. i te o , s < 465,9034,373 14 Cheathams division a S 624 Cleburnes division Walkers division ... . 9,815 9 252 1 , ... Bates division 6 994 1 1,664 21490 1410479 17,070 16,587 21,875 21 7,0036,5027,623 :34,639 j floods corps: Staff 23 1 5.7005,15.56.225 5. .5.555.028B,078 11.990 Stewarts division 11,661 1 10 904 1 Total I 1,400 17.080 16,661.21,149 :U.6» a Eighth and Twenty-eighth Tennessee Regiments on detached duty at Atlanta, Ga.42 R R—VOL XXXII, PT III 658 KY., SW. VA., TENN., MISS., ALA., AND N. GA. [(SAip. JiSf. Abstract from return «/ the Army of Tennessee, (fcc.^Goatiiioed. ! - Battalion engineer trooj.s 1st Louisiana Infantry (Kegriilars Total infantry Text Appearing After Image: Cavalry: Wheelers cavalry corps bEscort army headquartersEscorts Hardees corps,..Escorts Hoods corps Total cavalry Artillery : Hardees corpsHoods corpsWheelers corpsReserve regiment Total artillery Grand total Army of Tennessee 6 Ninth Tennessee Battalion (aggregate present and absent, 295) assigned to Davidsons brigade. Abstract from return of the army in the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, andEast Louisiana. Lieut. Gen. Leonidas Polk, C. S. Army, commanding. March 20,1864 ; headquarters Devwpolis, Ala. Present forduty. 1 Aggregate present. 1 .Sa s * 1% be< r Command. 1 Commanding general and staff 10 10 11 Lorings division : Infantry ArtiUery 1447 i 4,07824 ! 440 4,619424 5.857 10,158 854 is Total 471 .5,118 5,043 6.:»9 11,012 18 Frenchs division : 330 1 2,17211 lfi9 2,151159 2.S21189 4,9;i5 Artillery . . 272 ! 8 Total 241 2,341 2, .310 3.010 5.207 8 Post of Demopoiis .. 3822371637 33517425481232 .•i351742M81234 .•586216.3511182M 426: 262 ■ Post of Cahaha Engineer troo Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 808
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookpublisherwashingtongovtprintoff bookidwarofrebellionco32unit bookauthorunitedstateswardept1n bookauthorscottrobertnrobertnicholson18381887cn bookauthorlazellehenrymartyn1832 bookauthordavisgeorgebgeorgebreckenridge184719141n bookauthorperrylesliejcn bookauthorkirkleyjosephwjosephwilliam184119121n
1880

Image from page 1048 of
Description: Identifier: christianherald36unse Title: Christian herald Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: Contributing Library: Christian Herald Association Digitizing Sponsor: Tisch Library, Tufts University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: seemsthe pitiful expression of the folly of a second child-hood. With a splendid life behind them, and theother world and its accounting just before them,it would be thought incredible that the empty badgeof an empty earthly honor should be made a matterof life and death. It is to be hoped that the chal-lenge will not be accepted, and that friends willlend their kind offices to prevent them from break-ing this commandment:Thou Shalt not kill. (Ex. 20: 13.) Fasted for Forty-seven Days MRS. F. W. McCANN. of Conlee, Wash., has.under the direction of her physician, fastedforty-seven days, taking nothing but water. Atpresent the fast is unbroken. Mrs. Eliza Hazard,of Seattle, is reported to have fasted forty-fivedays, and a physician of St. Paul, Minn., also forty-five days. There have been reports of sixty-onedays, but Mrs. McCann, it is claimed, has brokenthe worlds record for fasting by women. Sheweighed 14.t pounds when she began to fast, andnow weighs only 100 pounds. Mrs. McCann ob- Text Appearing After Image: THE ZEPPELIN GERMAN MILITARY AIRSHIP L-2 served the fast hoping for the cure of a chronicdisease. Fasting, as a religious exercise, has beenpracticed well nigh universally since the race be-gan. It was observed by the ancient Par sis ofIrania. The early Chinese and Hindus carried itto an injurious excess. Though the Vedas attachlittle importance to the mortification of the body, yetthe ceremony the Hindu considers necessary to hispurification requires a fast of twelve days. Whilethe only fast Moses required was the one of thegreat day of annual atonement, the Jews adoptedfasting as a necessary part of their religion.Christ bitterly rebuked the substitution of the fastfor the thing sought in the fast, and appointed noteven a day for fasting, although he taught the realmeaning and benefit of such abstinence by exampleand precept. The early church continued the fast-ing of Judaism, and soon lost the idea of penitenceand dependence and supplication it was expected tocontain and took the f Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 5339
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookidchristianherald36unse bookcollectionamericana bookcollectiontischlibrary bookcollectionblc bookcontributorchristianheraldassociation booksponsortischlibrarytuftsuniversity bookleafnumber1048
1913

Image from page 60 of
Description: Identifier: textileschoolcat1718penn Title: Textile school catalog, 1917-1918 Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art Subjects: Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art--School catalogs Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art--School catalogs Philadelphia Museum School of Art--School catalogs Philadelphia Museum College of Art--School catalogs Philadelphia College of Art-- School catalogs Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts--School catalogs University of the Arts--School catalogs Publisher: Philadelphia, PA: Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art Contributing Library: University of the Arts (Philadelphia), University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: linger Co., Phila-delphia, Pa., the Universal Winding Co., Boston, ]\Iass., and tworeels for winding direct from the cocoon. The silk department alsopossesses the entire collection of the Womens Silk Culture Asso-ciation of America, which in itself is a most valuable aid to thosemaking a study of the silk fibre. HAND-WEAVING LABORATORY The rooms devoted to hand weaving and related branches arethree in number. These rooms contain upwards of 90 looms,38 specially (lesi.^iicd and cinislruclcd, adaptalilc to the wea\ing of allclasses of textures, (iroups or sections of looms are formed, eachsection heiuLj de\r)tcd to sumc sjiecial class of got ids, such as cotton(ir union fahrics, wool and worsted fabrics for lidth mens wear andwomens wear. jaccpiard and si^ecial stuffs in cotton, wool andworsted, as well as those for plain and fancy silks, furniture cover-ings and drajieries. Several looms are devoted to such narrowfalirics as laces, bindings, ribl.ions, elastic and non-elastic webbings. Text Appearing After Image: HE.WY \VOR.STEP .SXD WOOLEN LOOM,S. POWER-WEAVING LABORATORY The fcmr laboratories in which the e(|uipment ior jiower weavingis installed are arranged so as t(j admit of satisfactory administrationin accordance with the organized eoiuses of instructi<jn. The com-pleteness and variety of this e(|uipment is unexcelled liy that of anysimilar institution, Ihe machinery is of .\merican make, from thebest makers, thoroughly up to date and exceptionally well assorted.The breadth of the Schools field of instruction necessitates thisextensive collection of machinery, the policy being to teach liy meansof tliat which is liest adapted to the fabric in question, and wdien aloom builder brings out an improvement, tlie new is sul:)stituted forthe old or new attachments added. The looms in most freciuent use by the classes are located in alarge, welbliuhted room, and the purjjoses for wdiich they are in-tended range from the finest gingham to the heaviest worsted andwoolen of the harness type, in Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 885
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthorpennsylvaniamuseumandschoolofindustrialart booksubjectpennsylvaniamuseumandschoolofindustrialartschoolcatalogs booksubjectphiladelphiamuseumschoolofindustrialartschoolcatalogs booksubjectphiladelphiamuseumschoolofartschoolcatalogs booksubjectphiladelphiamuseumcollegeofartschoolcatalogs booksubjectphiladelphiacollegeofartschoolcatalogs booksubjectphiladelphiacollegesoftheartsschoolcatalogs booksubjectuniversityoftheartsschoolcatalogs
1917

Image from page 52 of
Description: Identifier: indianindustrial00unit Title: Indian industrial school, Carlisle, Pa Year: 1895 (1890s) Authors: United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.) Subjects: United States Indian School (Carlisle, Pa.) Publisher: [Philadelphia?] Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library System Digitizing Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh Library System View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THE IRONING ROOM.The Laundry is provided with three steam washers, stationary tubs, a centrifugal wringer, a mangle, and a steam drying room. Text Appearing After Image: THE SEWING ROOM. In this department from twenty to sixty girls are daily employed in cutting, making and repairing all the clothing worn bythe girls of the School, and the boys shirts and underclothing. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3302
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1895 bookdecade1890 bookpublisherphiladelphia bookidindianindustrial00unit bookauthorunitedstatesindianschoolcarlislepa booksubjectunitedstatesindianschoolcarlislepa bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber52 bookcontributoruniversityofpittsburghlibrarysystem
1895

Image from page 232 of
Description: Identifier: popularelectric619131chic Title: Popular electricity magazine in plain English Year: 1912 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Electricity Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Popular Electricity Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: t between all POPULAR ELECTRICITY MAGAZINE 223 offices of different states the signal forclosing is given by the office belonging tothe state whose capital is situated fur-thest West. This trifling rule illustratesvividly how Berne settles a very possi-ble international quarrel between a Per-sian operator who may want to hurryhome to see his sweetheart and a Russiantelegrapher who, at the usual hour ofclosing, has still on hand a message froma prosaic London merchant ordering abale of something, by next steamer, fromhis Parsee agent in Bombay. Cat Power We do not exactly credit this reportfrom Brooklyn, but give it here in casesomeone wishes to experiment. There is no need of going to New Lon-don to prove that a cat can give off elec-tricity from its back ; right here in Brook-lyn it has been demonstrated. A block on Macon Street was infestedwith cats. The back fences were toppedwith a board about four inches wide andthis boardwalk was used by the cats asa promenade and concert stage. Text Appearing After Image: An electrician put a glass tube largeenough to push a cat into, and with a puffof compressed air pussy was shot out ofthe other end. The resultant electricitywas wired to a storage battery. Eachfamily wishing electric light had to furn-nish its own cats. This furnished, light for the block anddestroyed the yows.-—N. Y. Sun. Interesting Experiment in Magnetism One of the simplest yet most puzzlingexperiments in magnetism can be per-formed with a rod of machine steelheld in the earths magnetic field.It is well known that it is difficult to free Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 4588
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1912 bookdecade1910 booksubjectelectricity bookidpopularelectric619131chic bookpublisherchicagoillpopularelectricitypubco booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries bookcollectionsmithsonian bookleafnumber232
1912

Image from page 149 of
Description: Identifier: marvelsofnewwest1889thay Title: Marvels of the new West : a vivid portrayal of the stupendous marvels in the vast wonderland west of the Missouri River : comprising marvels of nature, marvels of race, marvels of enterprise, marvels of mining, marvels of stock-raising, and marvels of agriculture, graphically and truthfully described Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Thayer, William Makepeace, 1820-1898 Subjects: Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : Henry Bill Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: adehaste to restore thesilent rooster to hisplace on the rocks ;but thereafter hewas often humor-ously reminded ofhis stone trophy.The traveller justquoted says : — Twelve milesnorthward of Colo-rado Springs is agroup of beautifulsmall valleys knownas Monument Park,from the great num-ber of these strangesandstone rocks. Itis the liveliest of alllonely places. Youdrive over a grassyroad in the middle of a narrow green meadow, the sides of which slope up like thesides of a trough, the narrow strip of meadow ending abruptlyat the base of high yellow sandstone cliffs, covered with pines,firs, and low oak shrubs. There are frequent breaks in these cliffs,and passes through them ; and so crowded are these passes and cliff-sides with the yellow stone columns, that it is not at all hard to fancythat they are figures winding in and out in a procession, mountingguard, lying down, sunning themselves, leading or embracing eachother. Perverse people, with fancies of a realistic order, have given Text Appearing After Image: GROUP OF MONUMENTS. MARVELS OF NATURE. 109 names to many of these figures and groups: The Anvil, TheQuaker Wedding, Dunces ParHamcnt, Priest and Nun, TheDuchess, etc., etc. Photographers, still more perverse, have per-sisted in photographing single rocks, or isolated groups, with nei-ther background nor foreground. These are to be seen everywhere,labelled, Rocks in Monument Park, and are admirably calculatedto repel people from going to what would be some bare, outlying pin-nacle of the universe, on which imps had played at making clay fig-ures, with high stakes for the ugliest. A true picture of MonumentPark would give a background of soft yellow and white sandstonecliffs, rounded, fluted, and grooved, with waving pines thick on thetop, and scattering down the sides, and the statue-like rocks half inand half out among the trees ; and to make the picture perfect, itshould be given looking west, so that the green valley, with its fan-tastic yellow side walls and statues should be shut Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 7510
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 bookidmarvelsofnewwest1889thay bookpublishernorwichconnhenrybillpubco bookauthorthayerwilliammakepeace18201898 bookcontributorharoldbleelibrary booksponsorbrighamyounguniversity bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionbrighamyounguniversity
1887

Image from page 527 of
Description: Identifier: amateurworkillus11881lond Title: Amateur work, illustrated Year: 1881 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Industrial arts Handicraft Publisher: London, New York : Ward, Lock & Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: FIG. 18.—SEWING.—SEWER AT WORK Text Appearing After Image: FIG. IS.—THE BEATING HAMMER,AND METHOD OF USING IT. or thin l2mo, Svo, or 4to—bought at any bookbindersmaterial dealers. Care must be taken not to saw toodeeply—nothing looks worse than a book with greatholes in the back ; if, on the other hand, the saw cutsare not deep enough, the cord will stand out from <theback, and be seendistinctly when thebook is covered.- Anextra slight cut mustbe made head andtail, at A and B, forthe thread to lodgein : this thread beingcalled the chain-stitch or kettle-stitch—a corruption, I aminclined to think,of catch up stitch. Sewing.—The whole strength of a book is in thesewing. If the amateur wishes his books to be boundstrongly, his books must be sewn properly. Therequisites are a sewing-press, cord, some needles andgood thread. On the board supplied with the pressby Messrs. Meager will be found two holes, into theseholes are screwed two long wooden screws, and upon thescrews a cross-bar is placed ; here, then, is our sewing-press complet Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 176
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectindustrialarts bookdecade1880 bookyear1881 booksubjecthandicraft bookidamateurworkillus11881lond bookpublisherlondonnewyorkwardlockco booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries bookcollectionsmithsonian
1881

Image from page 135 of
Description: Identifier: harpersweeklyv9bonn Title: Harper's weekly Year: 1857 (1850s) Authors: Bonner, John, 1828-1899 Curtis, George William, 1824-1892 Alden, Henry Mills, 1836-1919 Conant, Samuel Stillman, 1831-1885? Schuyler, Montgomery, 1843-1914 Foord, John, 1842-1922 Davis, Richard Harding, 1864-1916 Schurz, Carl, 1829-1906 Nelson, Henry Loomis, 1846-1908 Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862-1922 Harvey, George Brinton McClellan, 1864-1928 Hapgood, Norman, 1868-1937 Subjects: Publisher: New York : Harper & Brothers Contributing Library: Lincoln Financial Foundation Collection Digitizing Sponsor: The Institute of Museum and Library Services through an Indiana State Library LSTA Grant View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: lands. An idea ofthe difficulties which beset Shkr-man in the first stage of his South Carolina cam-paign is conveyed 1 on page 137.nbly i which have been felled by the enemy, and where < infrequently harassed by rebel skiri march fromMPhers Richro Shermans movementsfrom the enemys scrutinyWashington li U knwn that there are so many columns, have, been reached, that in ev- use uiiVl.tiling witn tnereoei nuei «,i ci.nnmnikatiwi, ..nit all ehK> ia in ob-.untv. Slocums column, which is still the h-h wun„ l><-gan to move, January 27, toward Sisters Ferry The gun-boat Poniiters Ferry. The height of duced by the late freshet made Sifters Ferry a verygood temporary base for Slocum, and the lighttransports at Savannah were brought into requisi-tion for the conveyance of supplies. We give onthis page an illustration of the Pontine guarding Howard at the same time moved from Pocotaligo n the Savannah and Charleston Railroad. On page we givi Text Appearing After Image: HARPERS WEEKLY. [March 4, 1865. MAP ILLUSTRATING THE FIELD OF OPERATIONS IN VIRGINIA AND THE CAROLINAS. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 188
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1850 bookauthorcurtisgeorgewilliam18241892 bookauthorhapgoodnorman18681937 bookyear1857 bookpublishernewyorkharperbrothers bookauthorbangsjohnkendrick18621922 bookidharpersweeklyv9bonn bookauthorbonnerjohn18281899 bookauthoraldenhenrymills18361919
1857

Image from page 27 of
Description: Identifier: textbookofnervou1901dana Title: Text-book of nervous diseases; being a compendium for the use of students and practitioners of medicine Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Dana, Charles Loomis, 1852-1935 Subjects: Nervous system Publisher: New York, W. Wood and Company Contributing Library: Columbia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ted by strands of nerve fibres, andare connected closely also with the next portion of the nervoussystem, the spinal cord. The brain and spinal cord are spokenof as a cerebro-spinal axis, and this is in close relation with theperipheral nervo\is system. This peripheral nervous system is composed of two portions—first, the cerebro-spinal mixed nerves, whose origin, distribution,and relations are comparatively easy to follow; and Becond, the gan-glionic or sympathetic nervous system. This has relations whichare not so easily described, and which are as yet not wholly under- DISEASES OF THE NERVOUS SYSTEM. stood. This portion of the nervous system is composed of two setsof ganglia — one the vertebral ganglia, i.e., the chain of gan-glionic masses on each side of the vertebral column, and of cer-tain ganglia connected with the cranial nerves; secondly, a verylarge number of ganglionic masses distributed in the viscera, andknown as the peripheral ganglia. The sympathetic nervous system Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 3. -Multipolar Cell of First Type. Cell of Deiter.neuraxon (Van Gehuchten). The continuous line is the is made up very largely of nerves from the cerebro-spinal centres.Motor fibres pass out through the anterior roots of the spinal cord,sensory fibres arise from the posterior spinal ganglia, and both passin part to the peripheral ganglia and the viscera direct, and part tocells in the vertebral ganglia, with which they are connected. Theganglionic system contains also nerve cells of its own, which are,however, in dependence in the main upon influences from the cere-bro-spinal centres. Some of these cells send fibres into the spinal GENERAL ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY, AND CHEMISTRY. 5 cord, and according to Collins and Onuf the sympathetic gangliahave representations in the spinal gray matter. The General Histology of the Xervous System. The nerve cells form the central body of the neuron and areminute objects varying much in size. The largest are .1 mm. (j^- in.)in diameter and are almo Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3015
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 booksubjectnervoussystem bookidtextbookofnervou1901dana bookauthordanacharlesloomis18521935 bookpublishernewyorkwwoodandcompany bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorcolumbiauniversitylibraries booksponsoropenknowledgecommons
1901

Image from page 30 of
Description: Identifier: directoiredesign00unse Title: Directoire designs for textiles Year: 1793 (1790s) Authors: Subjects: Design Decoration and ornament -- France Decoration and ornament -- Directoire style Publisher: [n.p.] Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library Digitizing Sponsor: Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1130
Tags: bookpublishernp booksubjectdesign bookdecade1790 bookcentury1700 bookyear1793 bookiddirectoiredesign00unse booksubjectdecorationandornamentfrance booksubjectdecorationandornamentdirectoirestyle bookcontributorsterlingandfrancineclarkartinstitutelibrary bookcollectionclarkartinstitutelibrary
1825

Image from page 132 of
Description: Identifier: americanpublicsc00finn Title: The American public school; a genetic study of principles, practices, and present problems Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: Finney, Ross L. (Ross Lee), 1875-1934 Subjects: Education Publisher: New York, The Macmillan company, 1921 Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: GREAT EDUCATIONAL AWAKENING, 1835-1861 111 to the dry belt. The conditions of life and the stand-ards of living in this semi-pioneer region are describedin the fiction of Edward Eggleston, Mark Twain,Bret Harte, and Harriet Beecher Stowe. Prairie d J Chi.JndependLee 1^OshkoU Mk A VN 1a D \A^/ ^^ ^ ^ 1 nyi^uoi^^i Ulbanyr Text Appearing After Image: 86° Longftade West 85° from Oreenwich 81 Industrial Development. — It was also a period ofunprecedented industrial development. This is shownby the growth of the cities. In 1840 there wereforty-four towns of over 8000 population, in 1860there were 141. New York City was approaching 112 THE AMERICAN PUBLIC SCHOOL the million mark. Railroad building progressedrapidly. The first successful experiments with steamlocomotives were made in 1831. The Baltimore andOhio was completed to the Cumberland River in 1835.By 1860, 30;000 miles had been built; several trunklines connected Chicago with the Atlantic seaboard,and one connected Chicago and the Gulf of Mexico.The country east of the Mississippi River was prettywell netted, especially north of the Ohio. (See map.)There was a similar growth in commerce and manu-factures, following the panic of 1837. The iron in-dustry flourished. The output of coal trebled between1840 and 1860. The invention of the sewing machine,and its application to th Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 473
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjecteducation bookyear1921 bookidamericanpublicsc00finn bookauthorfinneyrosslrosslee18751934 bookpublishernewyorkthemacmillancompany1921 bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber132 bookcollectionamericana
1921

Image from page 1108 of
Description: Identifier: electricrailway451915newy Title: Electric railway journal Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Electric railroads Publisher: [New York] McGraw Hill Pub. Co Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: which usually obtain for similarwork executed under old methods or under contract. New Form of Cash and Ticket Fare Box For some time inventors have been at work on thedesign of a registering fare box to handle tickets aswell as coins. Otherwise, some other kind of fare regis-ter has to be used to register the tickets, a method moreor less unsatisfactory when there is a large percentageof ticket fares, party because it necessitates a divisionof fares handled by the conductor and partly becausethe fares cannot be handled fast enough under heavytraffic conditions. Several makes of fare boxes are now being put onthe market adapted to receive and register in a singledevice both cash and ticket fares. The coins and ticketsare separated automatically, the cash being registeredand computed in dollars and cents, as in the ordinaryfare box, and the tickets are counted, cancelled and de-livered into a separate locked compartment of the box.One of the latest types of combination cash and ticket Text Appearing After Image: CASH AND TICKET FARE-BOX, MANUALLY OPERATED, ANDON ROTATABLE BASE WITH MOTOR DRIVE Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 287
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublishernewyorkmcgrawhillpubco bookidelectricrailway451915newy bookyear1908 booksubjectelectricrailroads booksponsorsmithsonianlibraries bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries bookleafnumber1108 bookcollectionsmithsonian
1908

Image from page 223 of
Description: Identifier: pacifictouristad1881shea Title: The Pacific tourist : Adams & Bishop's illustrated trans-continental guide of travel, from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean : containing full descriptions of railroad routes across the continent, all pleasure resorts and places of most noted scenery in the Far West, also of all cities, towns, villages, U.S. forts, springs, lakes, mountains, routes of summer travel, best localities for hunting, fishing, sporting, and enjoyment, with all needful information for the pleasure traveler, miner, settler, or business man : a complete traveler's guide of the Union and Central Pacific Railroads, and all points of business or pleasure travel to California, Colorado, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, Montana, the mines and mining of the Territories, the lands of the Pacific Coast, the wonders of the Rocky Mountains, the scenery of the Sierra Nevadas, the Colorado Mountains, the big trees, the geysers, the Yosemite, and the Yellowstone Year: 1881 (1880s) Authors: Shearer, Frederick E Williams, Henry T Subjects: Union Pacific Railroad Company Central Pacific Railroad Company Publisher: New York : Adams & Bishop Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: the NevadaState Journal, daily and weekly, and theWeekly Pliiindeale?âand several factories, asteam fire deijartment and a public library. The benevolent orders are well represented,the Masons and Odd Fellows meeting in halls oftheir own. There are two hotels, the RailroadHouse, which is well kejit, and the Lake House,on the bank of the Truckee River, a most desirable place for a few days stay. One dailystage leaves for Susanville, via Long Valley,in the California portion of the Sierra Nevadas,and another for Fort Bidwell and Surprise Val-ley, vid Pyramid Lake. The Pea Vine District is nine mUes north-west, and about 1,500 feet above Reno, in whichare valuable mines of dark sulphuret oreâthebasest work on the coast, and worked success-fully only of late by the OHara process. The Nevada and Oregon Railroad Companyhave organized to build a narrow gauge (3 feet)road from a point at or near Aurora, EsmeraldaCounty, Nev., to a point at or near Goose Lake 220 wmm pmâ¬iwi⬠wQwmiBw. Text Appearing After Image: WINTER FOREST SCENE IN THE SIERRA NEVADAS. BY THOMAS MORAN. WMM ^^mFi⬠wQwmi&w, 221 in Oregon, and have commenced building fromEeno in the direction of Oregon. This roadwill rnn through a i^art of Long Valley, andtake the freight that is now carried on wagonsto Northeastern California and Southern Oregon.George L. Woods is President; (reorge A.King, Vice-President, and S. C. Scoville, Sec-retary. The general offices are all at Eeno. riRGIXIA AM} TRICKEE B. li. D. O. Mllls, President - - San Francisco.H. M. Yeekington, V.-Pr. &G. Supt. Carson.W. M. Thoenton, Secretary - - Carson.D. A. Bender, Gen. Pr. <fe Pas. Agt. - Carson. Leaving Reno, the Red Mountain District isseen on the east, and the Washoe Range withMount Rose, 8,200 feet high, on the west, andsoon the cars pass a flume, 15 miles long, ownedby Flood & OBrien, running through a longcanon to Evans Creek to convey lumber tothe railroad. Huffakers is six and one halfmiles from Reno, the terminus of the PacificWood Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 2294
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1881 bookauthorshearerfredericke booksubjectcentralpacificrailroadcompany bookidpacifictouristad1881shea bookpublishernewyorkadamsbishop bookauthorwilliamshenryt booksubjectunionpacificrailroadcompany bookcontributorharoldbleelibrary
1881

Image from page 152 of
Description: Identifier: railwaysurgeryha00herr Title: Railway surgery : a handbook on the management of injuries Year: 1899 (1890s) Authors: Herrick, Clinton B. (Clinton Bradford), b. 1859 Subjects: Railroad accidents Surgery Emergencies Railroads Wounds and Injuries Publisher: New York : W. Wood and company Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 48.—Typical Appearance of the Arm in Elbow-joint Fracture. as the ligamentous structures hold the fragments in closerelation. For the same reason deformity is not so com-mon. At times a separation of the fragments can be dis- FRACTURE AT THE ELBOW-JOINT. 131 tinctly made out, leaving no doubt whatever as to the con-dition. In all cases, however, in which there is a suspicionthat a fracture is present, it should be treated as such, soas to err, if at all, on the safe side. Treatment. As regards the manner in which the treatment shouldbe carried out, there is a diversity of opinion as to whetherthe elbow should be flexed or extended in the applicationof the dressing. The author has had better results fromthe following plan which he recommends. Flex the elbow Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 49.—Dressing for Fracture at the Elbow-joint—semi-flexion. to nearly a right angle, and retain it there by means ofan angular splint, well padded, and supported by firmbandages and crinoline (see Fig. 49). If there is much displacement, this dressing with proper I32 RAILWAY SURGERY. readjustments may be employed for four weeks, with oc-casional passive motion. In ordinary cases, however,when but little or no displacement of the fragments hasoccurred, the splint should be left on only a day or two,or until the primary swelling has subsided, and then theparts should be supported by a well-laid crinoline dress-ing. Passive motion should be given daily, and after aweek the dressing changed to an ordinary muslin bandage,giving some freedom of motion to the parts. By so do-ing there is but little chance for the new bone to fill upthe fossae in the humerus, and thus limit motion. Thismethod of treatment obtains motion at the expense of alarger amount of callus, but the latter is imm Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3674
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectsurgery bookdecade1890 booksubjectwoundsandinjuries booksubjectrailroads bookyear1899 bookidrailwaysurgeryha00herr bookauthorherrickclintonbclintonbradfordb1859 booksubjectrailroadaccidents booksubjectemergencies
1899

Image from page 325 of
Description: Identifier: birdlore161914nati Title: Bird lore Year: 1899 (1890s) Authors: National Committee of the Audubon Societies of America National Association of Audubon Societies for the Protection of Wild Birds and Animals National Audubon Society Subjects: Birds Birds Ornithology Publisher: New York City : Macmillan Co. Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: riositywas found to contain the breasts of Penguins,—many hundreds of them. My attention was next directed to the ceiling. We were in a great, long,,barn-like room, the ceiling of which was supported by strong rafters thatran, close together, the length of the room. On nails and hooks driven into-both sides of these rafters, hung immense bunches of entire skins of the Black-^necked Swan. There were many, many thousands of them, and, as we lookedin speechless amazement, our host explained that at certain seasons of theyear these birds congregated on the rivers of Lower Argentine in great numbers,and that a good gunner could usually kill several at one shot. I ventured to (259) 26o Bird - Lore inquire for what purpose these skins were used; and was told, though not inthese same words, that the only excuse or reason for this wholesale slaughterof the beautiful and graceful creatures was to supply the women of the civi-lized world with powder-puffs. I wonder how many women have realized Text Appearing After Image: RHEAS IN THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDEN AT BUENOS AIRESPhotographed by L. E. Miller this gruesome fact, when insisting on genuine swans down when purchas-ing the fluffy daubers! But the greatest surprise of all was still awaiting us.I was called into the office and given the opportunity to listen to somerather heated arguments against the laws that had recently been enacted inmy coimtry, prohibiting the importation of wild birds plumage. And bydegrees it dawned upon me that the concern had a large sum of money investedin a stock of these goods, upon which it suddenly found it impossible to realize.As proof, I was shown into a lower storeroom almost completely filled withenormous burlap-covered bales that were stacked from floor to ceiling. Thesewere filled with Rhea feathers, and I was repeatedly assured that they had allbeen taken from wild killed birds; and that practically the only market thatexisted for these feathers was the United States of America, where they weremanufactured into duste Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3752
Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectbirds bookdecade1890 booksubjectornithology bookauthornationalcommitteeoftheaudubonsocietiesofamerica bookauthornationalassociationofaudubonsocietiesfortheprotectionofwildbirdsandanimals bookpublishernewyorkcitymacmillanco bookauthornationalaudubonsociety bookyear1899 bookidbirdlore161914nati
1899

Image from page 106 of
Description: Identifier: princessmargaret00barr Title: The Princess Margarethe Year: 1893 (1890s) Authors: Barry, John D. (John Daniel), 1866-1942 Subjects: Publisher: New York, Geo. M. Allan Co Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: was a certain room inthe palace where the kingand queen used to retire latein the afternoon when mostof the duties of the daywere over. Here for a timethey would forget their cares and try to behappy in each others society. The kinghad never lost the first love he had feltfor the beautiful girl he had raised to thethrone, and to that love was added an ad-miration for her strength of mind and for hertalents that daily increased. She not onlywas his adviser but his supporter as well, forthere were times when he seemed suddenlyto lose courage and faith in himself and inhis work. At these times the dauntless spiritof Oueen Louisa would lift him from his fw depression and inspire him with new energy.He used to think that but for her all theplans he had made would fail and that he 96 Text Appearing After Image: A STATELY OLD MAN ENTERED DRESSED IN THE RED COPEOF A CARDINAL. ///c Princess Margarethe. never would have strength enough to con-ceive and carry out new ones. One afternoon, after a long and tryingday, during which he had received news offresh atrocities of Prince Fritz, he came tothis room and threw himself on the couch infront of the great wood fire that blazed andcrackled on the hearth. The room wassmaller than most of the rooms in the pal-ace ; it was at the top of one of the circulartowers and was perfectly round. Its broadwindows looked out on the city spread be-fore it like a panorama. The walls were covered with tapestriespicturing valiant deeds of some of the kingsof Schlafenland. One represented the nobleGuthrun, founder of the royal line, leadinghis victorious troops against the Huns;another, Otto the Dauntless, fighting handto hand with the pitiless Thorold, whose loveof war was so great that nearly the whole ofhis life was spent amid scenes of slaughter, andwhose knotted Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 1263
Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookidprincessmargaret00barr bookauthorbarryjohndjohndaniel18661942 bookpublishernewyorkgeomallanco bookyear1893 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary bookcollectionnewyorkpubliclibrary bookleafnumber106
1893

Image from page 321 of
Description: Identifier: battlingforatlan00dunn Title: Battling for Atlanta Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Dunn, Byron A. (Byron Archibald), 1842-1926 Subjects: United States -- History Civil War, 1861-1865 Fiction Publisher: Chicago, A.C. McClurg & Co. Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: shrill screams of a woman smote hisears. A moment more and Fred was horrified tosee a horse coming down the path at a terrific rateof speed. The rider, a young woman, seemed tohave lost control of her mount. The reins hungloose in her nerveless hands, and she swayed to andfro as if about to lose her seat. Straight as an arrow from the bow the horsemade for the river. The bank of the stream washere high, and the current swept against it withtremendous force, boiling and foaming, as thoughin rage at being turned aside. A plunge over thatbank, and nothing could save horse or rider. Fred saw it all at a glance, yet to attempt a res-cue might mean capture and death. But the dangerof the lady appealed to everything chivalric in hisnature. He would save her, even if it meant deathto him. She had ceased to scream, and as thehorse neared the brink and the dark waters of theriver could be seen leaping and foaming below, Fredthought he saw her glance upward and her lipsmove as though in prayer. Text Appearing After Image: THERE CAME THE -SHARP CRACK OF A REVOLVER. LUCILLE DE COURTNET. 295 One bound more and the horse would be over.There came the sharp crack of a revolver, and thehorse fell dead with a bullet through his brain, hishead hanging over the very brink. The fall of thehorse threw his rider on the very edge of the bank,and Fred had just time to rush forward and dragthe unconscious form of the lady back, when thecrumbling bank gave way, and the body of thehorse rolled into the water below. Fred bore the unconscious rider back to alittle spring which bubbled forth from under theroots of a stalwart pine, and laying her gentlyon the ground, commenced to bathe her face.He now saw that she was young, not more thaneighteen or nineteen, and wondrously fair. Solong did she remain in a swoon that Fred beganto fear that she was dead; but at length her eyelidsbegan to tremble, she gave a little sigh, and theeyes slowly opened. A look of wonderment came over her face as shesaw Fred bending over her. She at Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3175
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookauthordunnbyronabyronarchibald18421926 booksubjectunitedstateshistorycivilwar18611865fiction bookidbattlingforatlan00dunn bookyear1917 bookpublisherchicagoacmcclurgco bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary bookcollectionnewyorkpubliclibrary
1917

Image from page 122 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924022536647 Title: Game birds. Life histories of one hundred and seventy birds of prey, game birds and water-fowls Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Blanchan, Neltje, 1865-1918 Subjects: Game and game-birds Publisher: Garden City, N.Y. Doubleday, Page Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: :: 2^ o o Text Appearing After Image: GREEN WINGED TEALOrder—Anseres Family—Axatid« Genus—Nettion Species—Carolinense National Association of Audubon Softieties River etnd Pond Ducks Black Duck (Anas obscurd) Called also: DUSKY DUCK; DUSKY MALLARD Length—22 to 23 inches; same size as the mallard. Male and Female—Resembling the female mallard, but darker andwithout white anywhere except on the wing linings; violetblue patch or speculum on wings bordered by black—a finewhite line on that of male only. General plumage duskybrown, not black, lighter underneath than on upper parts, thefeathers edged with rusty brown. Top of head rich, darkashy brown, slightly streaked with buff; sides of head andthroat pale buff, thickly streaked with black. Female paleryellow. Bill greenish. Feet red. Range— Eastern North America, west to the Mississippi Valley,north to Labrador, breeding southward to the northern partsof the United States.—A. O. U. Season—Resident in the United States, where it nests; also winterresident Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 222
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 booksubjectgameandgamebirds bookpublishergardencitynydoubledaypage bookauthorblanchanneltje18651918 bookidcu31924022536647 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcollectionamericana bhlconsortium
1922

Image from page 53 of
Description: Identifier: civlivscaesarsiv03golt Title: C. Ivlivs Caesar : sive Historiae imperatorvm Caesarvmqve romanorvm ex antiqvis nvmismatibvs restitvtae liber primvs; accessit C. Ivlii Caesaris vita et res gestae Year: 1563 (1560s) Authors: Goltzius, Hubert, 1526-1583 Duke University. Library. Kempner-Gundolf Collection of Julius Caesar Subjects: Caesar, Julius Numismatics, Roman Publisher: Brvgis Flandrorvm : apud Hubertum Goltzium ... Contributing Library: Duke University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Duke University Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: C. Iulij Caefaris Diuinitas, Templa, Arae,&Statuaefacrae. XVIII C IVLIVS CAESAR. _ij *iL Text Appearing After Image: C.IVLIVS CAESAR. XIX Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
Owner: Internet Archive Book Images
Views: 3468
Tags: bookcentury1500 bookdecade1560 bookyear1563 bookauthorgoltziushubert15261583 bookauthordukeuniversitylibrarykempnergundolfcollectionofjuliuscaesar booksubjectcaesarjulius bookpublisherbrvgisflandrorvmapudhubertumgoltzium booksubjectnumismaticsroman bookidcivlivscaesarsiv03golt bookcontributordukeuniversitylibraries
1825

Capt. W.J. Roberts  (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Capt. W.J. Roberts [between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.16340 Call Number: LC-B2- 3106-13
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 1950
Tags: libraryofcongress xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain16340
1910

Norwood, Ohio, Auto Emission Inspection Station, Part of a Hamilton County System in Which All Light Duty, Spark Ignition Powered Motor Vehicles Must Be Certified Annually...08/1975
Description: Original Caption: Norwood, Ohio, Auto Emission Inspection Station, Part of a Hamilton County System in Which All Light Duty, Spark Ignition Powered Motor Vehicles Must Be Certified Annually. Vehicles Are Attached to an Exhaust Analyzer That Gives Readings for Carbon Monoxide and Hydrocarbon Emissions. If a Vehicle Fails the Test, the Owner Is Given a 30-Day Temporary Sticker to Allow Time for Repairs and Retesting. Officials Report 250,000 Vehicles Registered in Norwood and Cincinnati 08/1975 U.S. National Archives’ Local Identifier: 412-DA-15386 Photographer: Eiler, Lyntha Scott, 1946- Subjects: Norwood (Hamilton county, Ohio, United States) inhabited place Environmental Protection Agency Project DOCUMERICA Persistent URL: arcweb.archives.gov/arc/action/ExternalIdSearch?id=557836 Repository: Still Picture Records Section, Special Media Archives Services Division (NWCS-S), National Archives at College Park, 8601 Adelphi Road, College Park, MD, 20740-6001. For information about ordering reproductions of photographs held by the Still Picture Unit, visit: www.archives.gov/research/order/still-pictures.html Reproductions may be ordered via an independent vendor. NARA maintains a list of vendors at www.archives.gov/research/order/vendors-photos-maps-dc.html Access Restrictions: Unrestricted Use Restrictions: Unrestricted
Owner: The U.S. National Archives
Views: 7063
Tags: test car station inspection norwood mechanic emission environmentalprotectionagency documerica usnationalarchives
1973

Candidates for Columbia crew  (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Candidates for Columbia crew [between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Subjects: Rowing Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.10291 Call Number: LC-B2- 2383-15a
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 5334
Tags: columbia crew libraryofcongress 1910s rowers georgegranthambaincollection xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain10291 bainnewsservice 238315
1910

N.Y. - Lawrence strike meeting  (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. N.Y. - Lawrence strike meeting [1912?] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative. Photo shows group of men gathered outdoors, probably in New York City, to hear about the textile mill strike in Lawrence, MA. (Source: Flickr Commons project, 2008) Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.10186 Call Number: LC-B2- 2372-7
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 7467
Tags: rain lawrence strike libraryofcongress 1910s laborhistory strikers bowlerhats xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 unionhistory
1912