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Image from page 411 of
Description: Identifier: gri_33125008050011 Title: Military and religious life in the Middle Ages and at the period of the Renaissance Year: 1870 (1870s) Authors: Jacob, P. L., 1806-1884 Subjects: Middle Ages Civilization, Medieval Civilization, Renaissance Costume Military art and science Christian life Publisher: London : Bickers & Son Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 252.—Reliquary of the Holy Thorn, preserved in theConvent of the Augustine Sisters at Arras.—Carvedhrasswork of the Thirteenth Century. 3*b THE RELIGIOUS ORDERS. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 253.—Eefectory in the Priory of St. Martin des Champs, Paris (now part of the Conservatoiredes Arts et Metiers), the work of Pierre de Montereau, architect to St. Louis (Thirteeeth Cen-tury).—Archjeological Eestoration by M. Alfred Lenoir. which had no connection with the monastic orders, and which for a long timedevoted all its energies to defending the holy places by prayer and force ofarms—St. Norbert, the reformer of the regular canons of the St. Augustine THE RELIGIOUS ORDERS. 327 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectmiddleages booksubjectcostume booksubjectmilitaryartandscience bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 booksubjectchristianlife bookyear1870 bookpublisherlondonbickersson bookidgri33125008050011 booksubjectcivilizationrenaissance
1870

Image from page 366 of
Description: Identifier: hillsalbumofbiog00hill Title: Hill's album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors, lawyers, musicians, artists, poets, sovereigns, humorists, orators and statesmen, together with chapters relating to history, science, and important work in which prominent people have been engaged at various periods of time Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Hill, Thomas E. (Thomas Edie), 1832-1915 Subjects: Biography Encyclopedias and dictionaries Publisher: Chicago : Hill Standard Book Co. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: T MAERIAGE CERTIFICATE AS EXECUTED WITH A PE.N JiY D. 1. AMES. y-iy ?■ Text Appearing After Image: fieyJ<ay-aJ^r^ A^^icM^cd.. ^a^ti^yir/ .<2^^/i2_ r/^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: certificate marriage bookcentury1800 booksubjectbiography bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 bookauthorhillthomasethomasedie18321915 bookpublisherchicagohillstandardbookco bookidhillsalbumofbiog00hill booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionaries
1887

Image from page 243 of
Description: Identifier: westernfield101907olym Title: Western field Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protective Associations Subjects: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protectice Associations Sports Publisher: San Francisco Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: still Building California=Made ELEVATORS In Spite of the Fire and the Elevator Trust STYLES Full Automatic Electric Hydraulic Belt Automobile Builders Hoists NOW RUNNING Atlas Buildinc (10 stories) Mission Si., near Second Western Addition. Masonic Hall Fillmore Street ReeilluB Apartments Pacific Avenue, near Van Ness MerchantsIce and C. S. Co Sansome. near Lombard Volkman Building Jackson Street, near Sansome (One Hundred of our Elevators Burned.) Van Emon Elevator Co. 46=54 Natoma St. San Francisco Our eight elevators in Mr. H. E. Huntingtons Pacific Electric (Railway) BIdg.Los Angeles, Cal., we refer to as a Model Elevator Installation. CROCKER QUALITY DESKS Globe-WernickeFiling Cabinets andBook Cases H. S. CROCKER CO. S2S MARKET ST., SAN FRANCISCO Text Appearing After Image: PUBLISHED AT GREATER SAN fe^RANClSCO MAY, 1907 No. 4 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 booksubjectsports bookpublishersanfrancisco bookauthorolympicclubsanfranciscocalif bookauthorcaliforniagameandfishprotectiveassociations booksubjectolympicclubsanfranciscocalif booksubjectcaliforniagameandfishprotecticeassociations bookidwesternfield101907olym
1902

Image from page 637 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: must be very hard, remarked the gardener. Not a bit of it! snapped the King; theeasiest thing in the world. Why do not potatoesgrow in January? They do grow in January—in some places,explained the gardener, snipping away at therose-tree. The King nearly turned a back somersault in 1085 1086 THE KINGS VACATION [Oct., his astonishment, for this was the correct answer;and, seizing the gardeners rough hand in hisown, he explained all about the contest, and con-gratulated him upon his great good-fortune. But I dont want to be king! protested thegardener. I did nt guess your old riddle onpurpose. That does not make a particle of difference! All that day and the next, the sky remainedblue and the soft breezes gently whisperedthrough the rigging; but the third day, a terrifictempest came down upon them from the north,driving the ship before it, and, at last, castingher, a wreck, upon a rocky shore. Such of the passengers as escaped with theirlives were made slaves by the fierce old king of Text Appearing After Image: SO IT WENT ON, DAY AFTER DAY, UNTIL NEARLY ALL THE ANSWERS WERE IN. shouted the King, gleefully. You guessed it allright, and now you are going to take the job,whether you like it or not. But your crown is too big for me ! cried thegardener, catching at a straw. Put a cushion inside of it, then, laughed theKing. The lining is badly worn anyhow, and thatwill keep your forehead from getting scratched. Seeing there was no help for it, the gardenerslowly removed his apron and walked solemnlyoff toward his cottage, to break the news to hiswife; while the King hastened back to the palace,to.tell the Queen to pack the trunks at once, sothat they could start early the next morning. Long before sunrise, the King and Queen,dressed in ordinary citizens clothes, slippedquietly out of a side door of the palace, and weresoon safely on board a merchant ship bound forforeign lands, laughing and chatting merrily,all the cares of state forgotten and with nothingon their minds but to have a good time. t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial392dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 1118 of
Description: Identifier: saturdayeveningp1933unse Title: The Saturday evening post Year: 1839 (1830s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: Philadelphia : G. Graham Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: hdays have been in vogue since Adamdonned his first shirt, but even yet you oftenhear it said—Oh, anyone can do thewashing. And anyone could do the washing the oldway, when laundering consisted chiefly oftying the family bundle in the nearest brook,and leaving the cleansing to the ripplingwaters. And most anyone could do thingsthe rub-and-scrub way. But we know today that fabrics, like peo-ple, have their peculiarities — and for todayslaundries modern methods of meeting theserequirements of your clothes have been de-veloped. Take the peculiaritiesof woolensas an instance. Woolens—our blankets, flan-nels, underwear, and sweaters—are composedof the same elements as our fingernails andhair. They soften, shrink, and felt unlessthey are washed in the right way, in the rightwater, with the right soap. Here is the method that modern laundriesuse—it is this methodwhich The Laundry-owners National Asso-ciation prescribes forwoolens, and which isin use in modern laun-dries everywhere: Text Appearing After Image: Prepare bath by running into washer ten inchesof water in inside cylinder. Adjust temperatureto 110 degrees Fahrenheit. Add neutral soap andrun washer until suds are formed. Place woolensin washer and run 15 minutes. Remove woolensto spinning basket (to withdraw water) and spinfor one minute after full speed is obtained. Dis-charge suds from washer, and run in fresh waterof same temperature as used for suds (use ther-mometer) ; replace woolens in this bath, and rinsethree minutes. Place woolens in spinning basket,and run for two minutes after speed is obtained.Dry at ordinary room temperature. (Woolensshould not be dried at high temperature.) Your laundress can hardly be expected toknow these numerous details—it has requiredmany experiments,and long study by special-ists to work them out. It is this practice,based on knowledge, which distinguishesprofessional laundering from the domestic. There are other similarly exact methodsfor the laundering of colored goods; for cot-tons and li Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookidsaturdayeveningp1933unse bookpublisherphiladelphiaggraham bookyear1839 bookdecade1830 bookleafnumber1118 bookcontributoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign booksponsoruniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign bookcollectionuniversityofillinoisurbanachampaign bookcollectionamericana
1839

Image from page 274 of
Description: Identifier: ellington1918unse Title: Ellington 1918 Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Air bases--Texas--Houston Flight training--Texas--Houston Publisher: [Houston, Tex.] : [s.n.] Contributing Library: Rice University, Fondren Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: National Bank ofCommerce UNITED STATESDEPOSITOR > Illlll I i I ill run mill I Main Street and Rusk AvenueHouston, Texas % ft sfc- Officers: R. M. FARRAR.President J. W. REYNOLDS,Vice President SAM TAUB, Vice President J. S. PYEATT. Vice President fill* Officers: a w. FOSTER, Vice President andCashier A. F. FISHER, Assistant Cashier I. C. GRIFFITH, Assistant Cashier A. DEE SIMPSON,Assistant Cashier Hi WE CAPITAL ^ surplus \ $700,000.00 PROFITS i Total Resources over Six Million Dollars Directors M. D. ANDERSON R. E. BURT L. A. CARLTON J. A. ELKINS R. M. FARRAR II. S. FIjESON W. \V. FONDREN C. W. FOSTERM. E. FOSTERF. VV. FRALEYF. J. HEYNEJ. C. HILLA. M. HOLMESW. O. HUGGINS C. F. IRELAND W. W. JONES C. L. KERR V. LUCIA A. M. McFADDIN JNO. McMURRY N. E. MEADOR my.f. \v. iffRPiiY J. S. PYEATTJ. W. REYNOLDSCHAS. SCHREINERA. DEE SIMPSON-SAM TAUBC. J. VonROSENBERG Ellington Men always find a Welcome here ELLINGTON FIELD—1918] [Page 270 EXIDE DISTRIBUTORS 1901 Live OakStreet DALLAS TEXAS Text Appearing After Image: <mr 1203-5-7 MainStreet HOUSTON TEXAS Battery Equipment and Starter Corpn €«) BEATTY BUILDING Main Street and Walker Avenue HOUSTON TEXAS Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1918 bookidellington1918unse booksubjectairbasestexashouston booksubjectflighttrainingtexashouston bookpublisherhoustontexsn bookleafnumber274 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorriceuniversityfondrenlibrary
1918

Image from page 340 of
Description: Identifier: engineeringcontr33chicuoft Title: Engineering and Contracting Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: Chicago Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: er, Wyo. T. E. Calvert,Chicago, 111., is chief engineer. 200 ENGINEERING-CONTRACTING Vol. XXXIII. No. q. A New Jaw Crusher Designed Particu-larly for Contractors Use. .A. crusher for contractors use has to ful-fill different requirements than are intendedfor general quarry use. A contractorscrusher should be of large output, remarkablylight in weight, convenient to handle and aboveall very durable. Particular attention hasbeen paid to these qualities in designing thecrusher illustrated in the accompanying cut.A notable feature of this machine is its prac- Method of Making a Steam Shovel Cutof Two Lifts in One Lift. BY H. MORTON STEPHENS.* During September, 1909. the E. Purcell Con-struction Co., secured from the Winston-Salem South Bound Ry. Co., a contract forthe construction of part of tJie above railroad,embracing sections 22 to 30 inclusive. Section22 is located in the town of Lexington, N. C,on the Southern Ry. The balance of the workruns south through a rolling country, and with Text Appearing After Image: A New Jaw Crusher for Contractors. tically all-steel construction. The main frameor side plates are of rolled steel plates. Thelarge casting that forms the front of themachine, which part is termed the stationaryjaw, is of grey iron. The moving or swingingjaw is a steel casting. The tumbler or largelever casting is also of steel. The fly wheelsand pedestals are of grey iron. The maincam shaft and the anti-friction roller are steelforgings. The anti-friction roller revolvesin boxes made of special bronze material. Allshafts from which castings are suspended areof steel. The cheek plates are of special har-dened steel, while the toggle seats are alsomade of special steel. This steel construction makes the machineof tremendous strength in comparison withits size. The feeding mouth is lower, in fact,than in other crushers of equal size. Thismeans that a large saving is effected in deliv-ering stone into the crusher. The crusherwill turn out from 150 to 200 tons of crushedmaterial per day Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidengineeringcontr33chicuoft bookpublisherchicago bookyear1909 bookleafnumber340 bookcontributorgersteinuniversityoftoronto booksponsormsn bookcollectiongerstein bookcollectiontoronto
1909

Image from page 296 of
Description: Identifier: completeworksofp06shel Title: The complete works of Percy Bysshe Shelley ... Year: 1904 (1900s) Authors: Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822 Dole, Nathan Haskell, 1852-1935 Subjects: Publisher: London and Boston Virtue & company Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Death I. ^ , Text Appearing After Image: EATH is here and death is there,Death is busy everywhere,All around, within, beneath.Above is death—and we are death. II. Death has set his mark and sealOn all we are and all we feel.On all we know and all we fear. III. First our pleasures die — and thenOur hopes, and then our fears — and whenThese are dead, the debt is due.Dust claims dust — and we die too.259 Poems Written in 1820 IV. All things that we love and cherishLike ourselves must fade and perish. Such is our rude mortal lot Love itself would, did they not. ■^nc The Waning Moon ND like a dying lady, lean andpale,Who totters forth, wrapt in agauzy veil.Out of her chamber, led by the insaneAnd feeble wanderings of her fading brain.The moon arose up in the murky east,A white and shapeless mass. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1904 bookauthorshelleypercybysshe17921822 bookauthordolenathanhaskell18521935 bookpublisherlondonandbostonvirtuecompany bookidcompleteworksofp06shel bookleafnumber296 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto booksponsoruniversityoftoronto
1904

Image from page 308 of
Description: Identifier: engineeringcontr33chicuoft Title: Engineering and Contracting Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: Chicago Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ither through carelessness or in order tosave a few steps. Clean cut joints betweenthe slabs and expansion joints adjoining thecurbs at streets and alley returns, and atfrequent intervals in long stretches of walk,are absolutely necessary if broken curb stonesand broken slabs in the walks are to beavoided. Expansion joints at street and alleyreturns can be eliminated by constructing thecurbing with a recess into which the side-walk slab may be laid. Data on Street Work, Carlisle, Pa.—Dur-ing 1909 two blocks, 4.400 sq. yds, of asphalticmacadam were laid on East Louther St., atCarlisle, the work being done by day labor.The old bed was so worn that 6 in, of newstone was required. After this stone hadbeen thoroughly compacted by rolling, heatedasphalt, 90 per cent pure, was forced to pene-trate about 3 in. by a special sprinklingwagon: it was then covered with screeningsand rolled. The cost of the 4,400 sq. yds. ofasphaltic macadam was $1,0G9, or 25 cts. per /fai/ SOTeeA SC£ Sfa/x/arz/ Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 2—Experimental Track of the Syracuse Lakeside & Northern Ry. at Syracuse, N. Y. portion of the street laid wooden cross tics on(i ins. of concrete. The concrete was broughtup to the top of the cross ties and brick pave-ment on a sand cushion laid to grade. A 90-lb. tee rail (American Society of Civil Engi-neers standard) was spiked to the cross ties.The same type of special brick was used nextto the gage line. Hints on Constructing Cement Sidewalks —The following hints have been taken froma paper by Mr. N. R. Murray, superintendentbureau of sidewalks of Chicago, 111., presentedat the last annual convention of the IllinoisSociety of Engineers and Surveyors: Beforeconstructing cement walks on a foundationthat has been traveled over for several months,pick up the entire surface, flood and rctampit. The reason for this is obvious. On fill- square yard. This cost can be itemized asfollows: Per sq. yd. New stone $0.07 Labor and rolling 05 Asphalt and applying 13 Total $0.25 The Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookidengineeringcontr33chicuoft bookpublisherchicago bookyear1909 bookleafnumber308 bookcontributorgersteinuniversityoftoronto booksponsormsn bookcollectiongerstein bookcollectiontoronto
1909

Image from page 646 of
Description: Identifier: utahfarmerdevot1219utah_0 Title: The Utah Farmer : Devoted to Agriculture in the Rocky Mountain Region Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Utah State Agricultural College. Extension Service Subjects: Agriculture Farmers Farm management Farm produce Farmers' spouses Publisher: Lehi and Salt Lake City, Ut. Co Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: LLOYD KNITTING MILLS8aIt Lake City. Text Appearing After Image: FINE MATTRESSES. Salt Lake Mattress &Mfg.Co. SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH. it BUY THE Utopia and U Cross Brandsof Hams, Bacon and Lard,There is nothing better. Ask your Grocer and MeatMarket. If you have live stock tosell communicate with us UTAH PACKING and PROVISION CO. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectagriculture bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 booksubjectfarmproduce booksubjectfarmers booksubjectfarmmanagement bookidutahfarmerdevot1219utah0 bookauthorutahstateagriculturalcollegeextensionservice booksubjectfarmersspouses
1913

Image from page 298 of
Description: Identifier: iconographiedur1182944gu Title: Iconographie du règne animal de G. Cuvier, ou, Représentation d'après nature de l'une des espèces les plus et souvent non encore figurées de chaque genre d'animaux : avec un texte descriptif mis au courant de la science : ouvrage pouvant servir d'atlas a tous les traites de zoologie Year: 1829 (1820s) Authors: Guérin-Méneville, F.-E. (Félix-Edouard), 1799-1874 Cuvier, Georges, baron, 1769-1832. Règne animal Donckier, Henri, former owner. DSI Schaus, William, 1859- , former owner. DSI United States. Dept. of Agriculture Library, former owner. DSI Subjects: Zoology Publisher: Paris London : Chez J.B. Baillière Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: i. Erix benfltfr/rnsi.f, Jfej-r. (ia>. /i. A■ /. x.^. -r^ç . 2 . /VZ> ^u Sovtale cor)>nala,M,T.5.1. rpeton f^-ntitrii/ii/u^, /,n ■ . /. 2 /t.So /cofio^f\ tilt /ièt/ne Anima/-. Ref>(i7e.<^ r/ .sz. Text Appearing After Image: ^i^iit t-/^ ^ J>trl>/i^/f /ntfff t/t> Jtérntint^- (njtzut^ JCu//y- . Pvtbon Sc/int-tt/erii,Jlfr,ettt (iti> R. A . /.J.//. tio. î ■V>\\MiA& i^yi/t>ri tWu ,/iéllft>fi>f /<,;„iv. 2eon/?çr. tùt ^et/n^ ^Animal. Jie/?à7e^./^/. 22. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectzoology bookcentury1800 bookpublisherparis bookauthorschauswilliam1859formerownerdsi bookidiconographiedur1182944gu bookauthorgurinmnevillefeflixedouard17991874 bookauthorcuviergeorgesbaron17691832rgneanimal bookauthordonckierhenriformerownerdsi bookauthorunitedstatesdeptofagriculturelibraryformerownerdsi bookpublisherlondonchezjbbaillire
1829

Image from page 596 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Kingsfords costs D that tells all about making pies KINGSFORD & SON National Starch Co., Sucrs Oswego, N. Y. Are You Sure that Your Laundress Usesclean Starch? Of course the clothes arethoroughly washed—but it takes the purenatural lump Text Appearing After Image: to give results the careful woman wants—clear white, crisp clothes—the finish that de-lights the eye of every experienced housewife.Every care is taken to make Kingsfords per-fect beyond question. See that the laundressuses it and not one of the cheap starches con-taining impurities that spot or stain and spoilthe good of the washing so far as looks go. Sold in i lb., j lb. and 6 lb. boxes. T. KINGSFORD & SON National Starch Co., Sucrs Oswego, N. Y. 17 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial392dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookleafnumber596
1873

Image from page 171 of
Description: Identifier: westernfield101907olym Title: Western field Year: 1902 (1900s) Authors: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protective Associations Subjects: Olympic Club (San Francisco, Calif.) California Game and Fish Protectice Associations Sports Publisher: San Francisco Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ere I found great sociabiHty among huntersand a line spirit of true sportsmanship. Sup-ported by good game laws and aided bye.xcellent magazines, by game-protective asso-ciations, by exhibitions of trophies and by allsorts of dog shows, this spirit is encouraged and spread throughout the Empire. Protec-tion and preservation of the wild game isthe keynote of all these endeavors; it findsexpression in an old German adage: KcinHcgcr—Kcin Jager, which freely translatedmeans: ARBUTUS [VIETHINKS if Pan be still alive He makes his bed where mayftowers And fairy lovers often stroll Upon the warm arbutus knoll. Gay dryads of the woods appear To greet these first blooms of the year, And bees just waked from winters sleep Drink here on nectar long and deep. Half hidden by the withered leaves,While yet the north wind sighs and grieveFirst-born of spriug, first fruit of May,Dear flower of the common way,iviethinks no fairer wreath of greenCould grace the brow of elfin queen. —Charles Henrx Che Text Appearing After Image: OVV that the traps were set, andthe camp fixed to suit me, theeverlasting waiting and watch-ing began. I lay there in theshade and watched the hum-ming-birds sucking the flowersof the desert willows—whichare not willows, but look likethem and have flowers resembl-ing a morning-glory. Eachhumming-bird appeared to own a portion ofthe tree, and would not allow the other birdsto come near its flowers. peeped out many a time that day, but nosheep came in sight. The next day was thesame. I studied the birds, the ants and thelizards, and watched for sheep, but nonecame. The next morning I had just settleddown to business when I saw a buck sheepshe: J peep over the top of the hill. The hum-ming-birds might all have massacred oneanother, and the ants swallowed the lizards:I would not have turned my head then tohave seen the entire performance. The sheep stepped up on to a rock andlooked up and down the canon for a longtime. As he stood there silhouetted againstthi. sky, I thought he looked t Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookyear1902 booksubjectsports bookpublishersanfrancisco bookauthorolympicclubsanfranciscocalif bookauthorcaliforniagameandfishprotectiveassociations booksubjectolympicclubsanfranciscocalif booksubjectcaliforniagameandfishprotecticeassociations bookidwesternfield101907olym
1902

Image from page 260 of
Description: Identifier: handbookoftreeso00houg Title: Handbook of the trees of the northern states and Canada east of the Rocky mountains. Photo-descriptive Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Hough, Romeyn Beck, 1857-1924 Subjects: Trees -- North America Publisher: Lowville, N. Y., The author Contributing Library: NCSU Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: NCSU Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: DOTTED THORN. Cratcegus punctata Jacq. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookauthorhoughromeynbeck18571924 bookidhandbookoftreeso00houg booksubjecttreesnorthamerica bookpublisherlowvillenytheauthor bookyear1907 bookcontributorncsulibraries booksponsorncsulibraries bookcollectionamericana
1907

Image from page 323 of
Description: Identifier: greaterabbeysofe01gasq Title: The greater abbeys of England Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Gasquet, Francis Aidan, 1846-1929 Subjects: Abbeys Publisher: New York, Dodd, Mead and company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d defaced it. The church was 300 feet by 69feet, with transepts 150 feet across, and the vaulting was60 feet above the floor. The central tower rose far intothe air to serve as a landmark by day, whilst by night thelights of St. Hildas tower shone far out to sea fromhigh Whitbys cloisterd pile to cheer and guide thosewho sailed in ships, over that long stretch of water with-out a harbour. It is impossible, says a modern writer, to imagine anything more grand than this noble minsterwhen complete, rising majestically 250 feet above the sea,and approached across the deep valleys and mountainwastes of the Vale of Pickering. ... In the midst of thestorm or sea-fog the chime of its great bells cheered thesailors seeking refuge on that terrible coast, and in thedarkness of night the pale gleam of its lights was a beaconvisible leagues away—to that seamans eye it seemed thelustrous form of St. Hilda herself standing in one of thenorthern windows and guiding him with her lamp. [300] Text Appearing After Image: WHITBY The story of Whitby, or as it was then called Streanes-halch—^which St. Bede tells us meant Lighthouse bay —goes back on the earliest days of Saxon Christianity.In 655 Oswy, King of Northumbria, attacked by Pendaof Mercia and Cadwalla, vowed to found twelve monas-teries if successful in the fight that was being forced uponhim. He was victorious, and keeping his word sent hisdaughter to be brought up in the monastery of Hartle-pool, over which Hilda, the great-niece of Edwin, pre-sided. Two years later, in 657, Hilda and Oswysdaughter Helflad went from Hartlepool to establish, onone of the estates promised by the King, the monastery ofStreaneshalch. Here St. Hilda for a long time ruled adouble community of men and women, and as she waseminent for her knowledge and piety, people of all rankscame to seek her counsel and aid; many of the monks ofthis monastery became priests, and several were raised tothe episcopate. We have no detailed account of the building raised bySt. Hild Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublishernewyorkdoddmeadandcompany bookauthorgasquetfrancisaidan18461929 bookyear1908 bookidgreaterabbeysofe01gasq booksubjectabbeys bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress
1908

Image from page 504 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: reyes. Marjorie, tearful now, and the yachts cap-tain, were bending over her. Ah, at last! Our little Angele has come backto us! said the captain, and he murmured a rev-erent Thank God. Half an hour later, Carl was telling the story to Angeles father, who had just been rowed outfrom shore, and Angele was explaining how shehad intended to swim ashore to say good-by againto Marjorie, when a cramp had seized her, andhad made her powerless to swim. Her fathercould not say enough in praise of the boys, andin gratitude to the volunteer life-saving crew.And as for Marjorie, it made them all happyagain to see the way he hugged and patted her,in his enthusiastic manner, and called her, Monleetle Surfman Numbaire Seven ! Nor was this quite all. The following sum-mer, before the season had fairly opened, astanch little life-boat of the best design, self-righting, self-bailing, non-sinkable, and non-cap-sizable, arrived from a grateful father for theVolunteer Life-Saving Station at Brenton Beach. Text Appearing After Image: In the possession of Isaac C. Bates, Esq.SUMMER. FROM THE PAINTING BY FRANK W. BENSON. THE AGRICULTURAL LAIR Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial392dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 1361 of
Description: Identifier: programme2122bost Title: Programme Year: 1881 (1880s) Authors: Boston Symphony Orchestra Subjects: Boston Symphony Orchestra Concert programs Publisher: Boston, Mass. : Boston Symphony Orchestra Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Symphony Orchestra View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: GOWNS, SUITSandHATS 277 Dartmouth Street, Boston Summer Branch at Magnolia jACo: VIOLIN MAKERS AND REPAIRERS to the Boston Symphony Orchestra 47 WINTER STREET BOSTON. MASS. Text Appearing After Image: Importers Dealers in RAREOLD VIOLINS BOWS CASES STRINGSand Specialties EstabUshed 1881 New EnglandStill Keeps Faith THE first Indian-Pilgrim treaty was keptinviolably for over half a century. Thesame old New England ideals of integrity andhonor are the guiding principles of the modernbanking services rendered by this Company. This fact is of special significance to thosewho contemplate making wills. By designatingthe Old Colony Trust Company as yourexecutor you are assured that your wisheswill be carried out with disinterested fidelity. One of our Trust Officers will be glad tooutline our services in this capacity, withoutobligation on your part. Old Colony Trust Company 52 Temple Place I7 Court Street 222 BoylstonStreet BOSTOJ^ Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1881 bookauthorbostonsymphonyorchestra booksubjectbostonsymphonyorchestra booksubjectconcertprograms bookpublisherbostonmassbostonsymphonyorchestra bookidprogramme2122bost bookleafnumber1361 bookcollectionamericana
1881

Image from page 229 of
Description: Identifier: hillsalbumofbiog00hill Title: Hill's album of biography and art : containing portraits and pen-sketches of many persons who have been and are prominent as religionists, military heroes, inventors, financiers, scientists, explorers, writers, physicians, actors, lawyers, musicians, artists, poets, sovereigns, humorists, orators and statesmen, together with chapters relating to history, science, and important work in which prominent people have been engaged at various periods of time Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Hill, Thomas E. (Thomas Edie), 1832-1915 Subjects: Biography Encyclopedias and dictionaries Publisher: Chicago : Hill Standard Book Co. Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: or a good purpose, but may beperverted, and every faculty maybe cultivated and enlarged by exer-cise, or may be lessened byneglect.Most phrenologists and physiognomists claim also that character can be determined by many evidences existing outside the contour of the head. After showing the conformation of the head, they note the features of the face, the color of the hair and eyes, the complexion of the Briglit. Intelligent andEducated. •:c> :?l(^ THE temperam:ents. skin, the ?bflpe of mouth, nose and face, brilliancy of the eyes, archof the eyebrows and nose, fineness of the hair, length and size ofneck, breadth of chest, strength of lungs, size of body, shape of feetand hands. Even beyond and ontside all these physical characteristics, it isclaimed that the mental peculiarities of the individual can be seenand known in the tone of voice, the rapidity of speech, the spright-liness of motion, the firmness of step, the heartiness of a laugh, andthe Lrasp of the hand. Temperaments. Text Appearing After Image: Fie. 4---MiserIy It is a well-known fact that many men with largeheads do not accomplishas much as others whohave heads and bodies ofmuch less size. Thisfact is cited as one of theobjections to the claimthat mental ability can bedetermined by the size ofthe brain. The phrenologist an-swers by saying that thereare four temperaments,called the lymphatic, thesanguine, the bilious andthe nervous; that every person possesses more or less of these inhis physical constitution: that the lymphatic temperament is indi-cated by the predominance of stomach, which makes roundness ofform, softness of flesh, a weak pulse, and a languid conditionof the system. With such the hair is light, complexion pale, eyesblue and dull. The sanguine temperament largely depends upon a preponderanceof the arterial system. The person possessing it will have light hairand blue eyes, will be fairly rounded in muscle, will be ardent,active, enthusiastic, impressible, and will possess much greaterenergy than the personw Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectbiography bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 bookauthorhillthomasethomasedie18321915 bookpublisherchicagohillstandardbookco bookidhillsalbumofbiog00hill booksubjectencyclopediasanddictionaries bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber229
1887

Image from page 122 of
Description: Identifier: scienceofeugenic00hadd Title: The science of eugenics and sex life, the regeneration of the human race .. Year: 1914 (1910s) Authors: Hadden, Walter J Robinson, Charles H Melendy, Mary Ries, 1842- [from old catalog] Subjects: Eugenics Marriage Beauty, Personal Women Publisher: Philadelphia, Pa., National publishing co Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: LOVE IN ITS ANATOMICAL CONNECTIONS. m, the corpus caliosum, a great nerve center; o, the seat of love, in the female head. LIFE-CENTEES. 45 brain would render sleep impossible. Activity of the mind greatlyinfluences this matter of cerebral circulation. Hence it is easy tosee why prolonged worry or study, by retaining or increasing theblood supply, will cause insomnia; also why, if through sickness,monotonous work or other conditions, the supply of the blood to the Text Appearing After Image: PHRENOLOGICAL CHART of the Human Brain. brain is greatly lessened, the brain functions will not be carried onproperly in the waking state; memory, concentration, the voluntarymind, the will and the senses become feeble; the brain partially losescontrol of the nervous system, and nervousness is the result. Atsuch a time the mental impressions are likely to be misinterpreted or 46 LIFE-CENTERS. greatly exaggerated. The friends of a person thus afflicted shouldnot judge harshly, therefore, if they find themselves accused of manyabsurd if trifling offences; neither should they be surprised at thenervous ones facility for hearing burglars, seeing ghosts, and dis-covering fires or other calamities where none exist. A very simplecourse of treatment restoring the normal blood-supply to the brainwill usually banish all the horrors. HOW TO INCREASE MENTAL VIGOR. We see, then, that since the brain is the organ of the mind, thebetter the health of that organ, the more vigorous will be the working Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1914

Image from page 198 of
Description: Identifier: adolfostahllectu00astruoft Title: The Adolfo Stahl lectures in astronomy, delivered in San Francisco, California, in 1916-17 and 1917-18, under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Astronomical Society of the Pacific Aitken, Robert Grant, 1864-1951 Subjects: Astronomy Publisher: San Francisco Stanford University Press Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: of patient work. At thecenter of the figure is seen a small dotted area, which indicatesthe position of one of the largest and brightest of the spiralnebulae. Messier 33, which is bright enough to be made out inthe small telescope used for the survey. In Fig. 2 on thesame plate, is shown the same region, on the same scale, asphotographed with the Crocker Photographic telescope at Lick-Observatory. It will be noticed that the nebula is not muchmore in evidence than on the star chart, but it would be difficultto say by how many times we must multiply the number ofstars shown on the chart to obtain the total registered in thephotograph. Moreover, the photographic plate was secured ina few hours, as against many nights of work in the case of thestar map, and it is a permanent record, available for study andmeasurement as long as the photographic film shall endure. Inthe star chart, the human element has entered into every stepof the process from the observation of the individual stars to Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 1—B. D. Chart, M. 33 Central. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectastronomy bookdecade1910 bookyear1919 bookidadolfostahllectu00astruoft bookauthorastronomicalsocietyofthepacific bookauthoraitkenrobertgrant18641951 bookpublishersanfranciscostanforduniversitypress bookleafnumber198 bookcontributorgersteinuniversityoftoronto
1919

Image from page 20 of
Description: Identifier: opencourt_nov1900caru Title: The Open court Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Carus, Paul, 1852-1919 Open Court Publishing company, Chicago Subjects: Religion Religion and science Publisher: Chicago : The Open Court Pub. Co. Contributing Library: Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Digitizing Sponsor: CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Jason Securing the Golden Fleece.- Vase of Naples. (Reproduced from Heydemann, Hall. Winckelmanyisprogramyn, 1886, pi. 3.) 1 This picture, frequently copied in frescoes, has become famous through Goethes admirabledescription which appears in Vol. XXX., 425 f. of his collected works (edition Ootta). 2The hero is accompanied by Medea and two warriors. A satyrs head is visible in the treeand the bust of Nike appears in the sky. ON GREEK KKI.IGION AND MY 657 The festival of mourning with subsequent rejoicing that wascelebrated in Cyprus for Adon-Tammuz, was changed in Christiantimes into a kind of Christian mystery-play of the death and resur-rection of Lazarus. Thus the underlying ideas remain the samewith the change of time. Text Appearing After Image: Jason Rescued by Athena from the jaws of the Dragon.Attic vase from Caere. Roscher, Lex., II., p. 85. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectreligion bookcentury1800 bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 booksubjectreligionandscience bookauthorcaruspaul18521919 bookauthoropencourtpublishingcompanychicago bookpublisherchicagotheopencourtpubco bookidopencourtnov1900caru booksponsorcarliconsortiumofacademicandresearchlibrariesinillinois
1887

Image from page 25 of
Description: Identifier: 39002011210128.med.yale.edu Title: Practical electricity in medicine and surgery Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: Liebig, Gustav A Rohé, George H.(George Henry),1851-1899 Subjects: Electricity Electric Stimulation Therapy Publisher: Philadelphia and London, F. A. Davis Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: y be onsurrounding conductors, but, taken altogether, the total amountwill be the same. A few cases in which the lines of force around a chargedbody or bodies are known are given in jthe accompanyingfigures. The simplest case is that of a sphere suspended at a 12 PRACTICAL ELECTRICITY IN MEDICINE AND SURGERY. distance from other bodies in the air (Fig. 6). Owing to the per-fect symmetry of the figure the lines of force are radii from thesphere outward, and they extend away from the surface to anindefinite distance in straight lines. Another very simple caseis that of a sphere suspended within a spherical shell whichcompletely surrounds it (Fig. 7). Here the lines of force arealso radii between the surfaces, and if we suppose the outershell connected with the earth there will be no lines of forcearound it; that is, outside. Hence, all the force is in the inter-mediate space between the sphere and shell, and there is no forceoutside. If the interior body, instead of being a sphere, were Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 booksubjectelectricity bookid39002011210128medyaleedu bookauthorliebiggustava bookauthorrohegeorgehgeorgehenry18511899 booksubjectelectricstimulationtherapy bookpublisherphiladelphiaandlondonfadavis bookcollectionamericana
1890

Image from page 232 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: heir waters plash,And in the sunlight gleam and flash ;While roses tinge the unkempt stair,And fill the air with perfume rare. Once down these moss-encumbered waysProud ladies walked, in bygone days,And harkend to the tales of loveBreathed fervently to heavn above. Gay peacocks followed in their trainWith tails outspread in grand disdain,Mimicking evry haughty airThat ladies fine are wont to wear. Hundreds of years since then have passed,And Mystry her soft spell has cast, To bathe this garden full of dreams,MSsDSf In purest sunlights golden beams. A SCENE OF YESTERDAY BY ELIZABETH HENDEE (AGE 14) (Silver Badge)The sun was sinking in a cloudless sky; the day hadbeen hot and scorching, and the little band of men andwomen who were traveling across the prairie land wereweary and almost despairing. Such a long, long timeit seemed since they had left their eastern homes andstarted - for. that distant country known only as theWest. Now they-had reached it; and what had they found? Text Appearing After Image: A HEADING FOR JUNE. BY HAZEL S. HALSTEAD, AGE 17. (HONOR MEMBER.) A vast unbroken plain, whereon no tree grew to soothetheir forest-loving eyes, nor hill arose to remind themof their own beautiful mountains. 762 ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE [June, But with the morning they took fresh heart, hitchedtheir teams to the great covered wagons, and againpressed on. And at last they were rewarded by the sight of abroad stream of water, with a few cottonwood treesgrowing along its banks. Here they stayed through the nig+it, and in the morn-ing the men rose early, to begin work on a sod house.Day after day they worked, building more houses, andshelter for the horses, and in every way possible pre-paring for the winter. When it came, it was long and hard, and four oftheir number died ; one of sickness caused by exposure,two in a blizzard, and one shot by an Indian. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial392dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 1158 of
Description: Identifier: pdiaofaencyclo00loudrich Title: An encyclopædia of agriculture : comprising the theory and practice of the valuation, transfer, laying out, improvement, and management of landed property, and of the cultivation and economy of the animal and vegetable productions of agriculture Year: 1871 (1870s) Authors: Loudon, J. C. (John Claudius), 1783-1843 Subjects: Agriculture -- Dictionaries Publisher: London : Longmans, Green Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: organised for mas-tication in their perfect state, and the second are organised for suction alone. Each of these divisions,according to the system of Macleay, contains five separate orders, the principal characters of which we shallendeavour to make intelligible in common language. 7652, The Mandibulata, or masticating insects, are furnished with jaws of a horny or membranaceoussubstance, infinitely diversified in their form and structure. They are divided into the following orders: — 1. Tric/nfptera. The wings are four, soft, and generally a tube of its own construction. There are many species in this transparent ; the upper pair slightly hairy* and the lower countrv, wel known, in their perfect state, to all lovers of ahg- fblded when at rest. The inserts of this order are compar- line. Phryganea rhdmbica (Jig. 967. c) may serve as an ax- atively few. The caddy, or cadis worm, is the larva of the ample of this order.spring fly (Phryganea), and lives in the water, concealed within Text Appearing After Image: 2. HymemMcra. The wings are four, clear and transparent.The tarsus (or outer division of the foot) is composed of fivejoints, and the body is armed with a sting. The bee, the ant,and the wasp, are familiar examples. 5. Coltdptera. This well defined and most extensive ordercomprehends all insects known by the name of beetles. Theyhave two wings, concealed beneath a pair of hard wing-cases,which meet close together in a straight line down the back.There are many tribes of these insects, which, both in theirlarva and perfect state, are extensively injurious to man. 4. Ortfiiiplera. The irue wings are but two, very large whenexpanded, and folded lengthways when at rest. They are co-vered, either partially or wholly, by two wing-cases of a thin,tough, and rather opaque substance, somewhat resemblingparchment, and reticulated with small nerves. The leading roach ; the pest of tropical countries, and frequently trouble-some in our Kitchens and larders. 5. NeurtJptera. The wings, with very fe Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1871 bookpublisherlondonlongmansgreen bookauthorloudonjcjohnclaudius17831843 bookidpdiaofaencyclo00loudrich booksubjectagriculturedictionaries bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries booksponsormsn
1871

Image from page 124 of
Description: Identifier: gatewaytosaharao00furl Title: The gateway to the Sahara; observations and experiences in Tripoli Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Furlong, Charles Wellington, 1874- Subjects: Tripoli (Libya) -- Description and travel Publisher: New York : C. Scribner's sons Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: said: [69] THE GATEWAY TO THE SAHARA **Lah! [No.] I know your schemes/ You refuse to go? You, my slave, daresteal my money as a tick would bleed a camel!he cried threateningly, but I sprang from hisgrasp as he attempted to seize me. **Give me the clothes and the medjidies, hecommanded. ***Lah! I have use for them. I go to the Beyto pay for a protest against you. At this Ahmed was greatly scared, thoughmore angry, but I was safe enough there by thesea wall, as free as Hadji himself, who well knewthe Bey could punish him and confiscate hisgoods. ***Never mind, said he; *here are three moremedjidies. I took them. *Kafir! said I, *thou white-faced horse withweak eyes! And that was the last I ever sawof him, but I often went to visit the fat Heba toinquire after his health and to show him my newburnoose. But the medjidies, Salam.? I laughinglyqueried. The dark eyes met mine for a moment;the pupils seemed to contract fiercely. Then ablack hand disappeared under the folds of hisbaracan. [70] Text Appearing After Image: SALAM, A HAUSA SLAVE I bought this, said he, and drew from itssheath a beautifully worked dagger, the crookedblade of which flashed silver in the lamplight. Not long after Salam had related his narrativeto me a most unexpected event occurred. Onehot morning, from out the sounds of the Arabtown life, came the faint rhythmic cadence ofdistant-beating tom-toms. As their echoes vi-brated up the narrow Street of the Milk SellersMarket, I went out in time to meet a small com-pany of Blacks. They were parading the townby way of announcing to their race the event of areligious dance, to be held near the palm grovesof the oasis outside the town. Late that afternoon found me in company withSalam headed in the direction of their rendez-vous. Salam was dressed in his best fez andbaracan, with a little bouquet of blossoms tuckedbehind his ear. In one hand he carried—as washis custom on auspicious occasions—a piece ofdiscarded copper cable which he had picked upas a prize at the cable station. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublishernewyorkcscribnerssons bookauthorfurlongcharleswellington1874 bookyear1909 bookidgatewaytosaharao00furl booksubjecttripolilibyadescriptionandtravel bookleafnumber124 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1909

Image from page 129 of
Description: Identifier: karakoramwestern00defi Title: Karakoram and western Himalaya 1909, an account of the expedition of H. R. H. Prince Luigi Amadeo of Savoy, duke of the Abruzzi Year: 1912 (1910s) Authors: De Filippi, Filippo, 1869-1938 Savoia, Luigi Amedeo di, duca degli Abruzzi, 1873-1933 Subjects: Publisher: New York : Dutton Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: f strong external influence in the past, despite a geo-graphical position so secluded, in a country so wild and inhospitablethat whole groups of villages are cut off from all communion with therest of the world during ten months of the year. The Balti race deservea high degree of esteem and goodwill. They are scrupidously honest,mild of manners, gentle and good-tempered, naturally amenable todiscipline, capable of the hardest labour, incredibly temperate, happywith very Uttle and invariably good-humoured. CHAPTER VII. THE INDUS VALLEY. Character. — (liological Chaos. — Stone-falls, Landslips. Dei)Osits and Erosions. — AlluvialCones. — Signs of Climatic Change. — The Tenipoiary Damming of the Valleys. — GreatHistorical Floods. — Oases. — Irrigation Canal.s. — The Skardii Route. — The Formationot the Caravan.—The Order of thr Marches. — Saddle-ponies. — Coolies. — The Escort. —Climate. — The Cam)). — Kashmiri Servants. —Camp Work. ConU and Kunsniiiah. Text Appearing After Image: IHE striking peculiarities of theDras valley had made a stioiigim])iession upon us. But not untilwe reached the Indus valley did werealize to the full the nature of thisland of desolation and sterility. Thegigantic scale of all the features does not grow upon one until after daysand days of sojourn in this strange scenery, because the perfect propor-tions of the valleys and their enclosing hilLs keep the traveller under anillusion as to their actual dimensions. V\)v Indus \;illey. 03 111 the Alps one has the impression that everything has been mouldedill a remote past, and reached once and for all a settled state. Theancient gashes and scars are cloaked with a mantle of verdure whichhides the great wounds and mutilations left by prehistoric landshdes.The rocks have been polished by the hand of time ; they are overgrownwith moss and hchens ; no ledge, no crevice, is without its plant life.A rock-fall here, a landslip there, seems to matter as little as grains ofsand that slide down the Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1912

Image from page 861 of
Description: Identifier: dellectrisatio1861duch Title: De l'électrisation localisée et de son application a la pathologie et a la thérapeutique Year: 1861 (1860s) Authors: Duchenne, G.-B. (Guillaume-Benjamin), 1806-1875 Subjects: Electrotherapeutics Electrophysiology Electricity Electric Stimulation Therapy Electrodiagnosis Muscles Publisher: Paris : J.-B. Baillière et Fils Londres : Hippolyte Baillière New York : Baillière Brothers Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: igts au niveau de larticu-lation de la première à la seconde phalange. Cest sans doute après bien des tâtonnements que Delacroix étaitarrivé à construire cet ingénieux appareil. Il lemployait empirique-ment, sans pouvoir se rendre compte de son mécanisme physiolo-gique, que mes recherches électro-physiologiques expliquent parfai-tement aujourdhui. Bien que lappareil de Delacroix ait rendu des services réels (1),il présente cependant deux défauts : 1° il condamne tous les mou-vements du poignet; T il est tellement apparent, que les maladeséprouvent une grande répugnance à le porter. Jai eu loccasion delexpérimenter plusieurs fois ; je lai même modifié, en substituant à (1) Delacroix rapporte quun artiste qui avait perdu ses extenseurs des doigtspouvait jouer du piano avec son appareil. PROTHÈSE MUSCULAIRE PHYSIOLOGIQUE DES DOIGTS. 843 la manière de Mellet le caoutchouc ou des ressorts à boudin (1)aux tiges à ressort : les malades nont pas tardé à labandonner, Text Appearing After Image: FiG. 136. — A, lame métallique, fixée à la partie postérieure dune manchetteB, plaque métallique articulée en H avec la lame métallique A de manière àne permettre que les mouvements latéraux de la marn, à laquelle elle se fixe aumoyen dune courroie qui embrasse la paume de la main, lorsque les exten-seurs de la main sont paralysés : si ces muscles ont conservé leurs mouvements,une articulation fixée en B permet la flexion et lextension volontaires. Delextrémité inférieure de la plaque B partent des liges rigides qui sétendentjusquà lextrémité inférieure des premières phalanges en se relevant uq peu,A lextrémité de ces tiges sont de petites poulies D, sur lesquelles glissent descordes fixées, dune part à des anneaux E qui embrassent rextrémité|des pre-mières phalanges, et de lautre à des ressorts C attachés à des boutons de laplaque dorsale de la main. Aux anneaux G qui embrassent le pouce satta-chent des muscles artificiels destinés à remplacer les Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectmuscles bookyear1861 bookdecade1860 booksubjectelectricity bookpublisherparisjbbaillireetfils bookiddellectrisatio1861duch bookpublisherlondreshippolytebaillire bookpublishernewyorkbaillirebrothers booksubjectelectrotherapeutics
1861

Image from page 138 of
Description: Identifier: marinemammalsofn00scam Title: The marine mammals of the north-western coast of North America, described and illustrated; together with an account of the American whale-fishery Year: 1874 (1870s) Authors: Scammon, Charles Melville, 1825-1911 Subjects: Marine mammals Cetacea Sealing Whaling Whales Dolphins Publisher: San Francisco, J.H. Carmany New York, Putnam Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Smithsonian Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: rmous bulk of the tentaculumhere spoken of, we shall cease to wonder at thecommon saying of the fishermen, that the cut-tle-fish is the largest fish of the ocean. InTodds Cyclopcedia of Anatomy, p. 529, treatingof Cephalopoda, in an admirable paper by Mr.Owen, it states, that the natives of the Poly-nesian Islands, who dive for shell-fish, have awell-founded dread and abhorrence of theseformidable cephalopods, and one can not feelsurprised that their fears should have perhapsexaggerated their dimensions and destructive at-tributes. The same learned writer, after havingbeautifully described another animal of the sameorder, obsei*ves : Let the reader picture to him-self the projecting margin of the horny hook de-veloped into a long-curved, sharp-pointed claw,and these weapons clustered at the expandedterminations of the tentacles and arranged in adouble alternate series, along the whole internalsurface of the eight muscular feet, and he willhave some idea of the formidable nature of the Text Appearing After Image: Qo oPn o Wo g CO W w ft to 1to THE SPERM WHALE. 81 depths seeks and devours its animal food, is still tinged with mystery. In pastyears it was commonly believed that the Cachalots home was in the fathomlessdepths of the ocean, and that only a few stragglers were occasionally met withnear coast waters of moderate depth. But we find abundant proof, and from ourown observations, too, that they are met with and have been captured in waters carniverous Onychoteulhis. This species of ceph-alopod is thus armed with those kind of teethat the termination of the tentacles, in orderto secure the agile, slippery, and mucus-cladfishes on which it preys. And there is an in-stance recorded in Sir Grenville Temples Excur-sions in the Mediterranean, by which we perceivethat these terrible creatures sometimes prey ujjonmen! In those shallow waters, says Sir Gren-ville, are caught great quantities of fish, byforming curved lines or palisades some way outto sea with palm branches, by which the fishthat c Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: rotate90 booksubjectwhaling booksubjectdolphins bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1874 bookpublishernewyorkputnam booksubjectsealing booksubjectwhales booksubjectcetacea
1874

Image from page 517 of
Description: Identifier: illustratedcompa00rich Title: The illustrated companion to the Latin dictionary and Greek lexicon; forming a glossary of all the words representing visible objects connected with the arts, manufactures, and every-day life of the Greeks and Romans, with representations of nearly two thousand objects from the antique Year: 1849 (1840s) Authors: Rich, Anthony, 1803 or 1804-1891 Subjects: Classical dictionaries Publisher: London, Longmans Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: . pro C. Cornel. PILANI. The original name bywhich the soldiers composing thethird line or division of the old Ro-man legion were distinguished, be-cause they alone at that time werearmed with the heavy javelin orpilum, the other two using the spearor hasta. But when the pilum wasadopted for all the three divisions,the title of Triarii was substituted forthat of Pilani, with which it becomesthenceforth synonymous (Varro, L. L.v. 89. Paulus ex Fest. s. v. Ov. Fast.iii. 129.). Subsequently, however, tothis period, and towards the close ofthe republic, when the custom ob-tained of drawing up an army bylines in cohorts, the distinctivecharacter, as well as the name ofPilani or Triarii was abandoned, be-cause it no longer represented anyreal distinction. PILARIUS. One who exhibitsfeats of dexterity with a number ofballs, similar to the Indian juggler(Quint, x. 7. 11. Inscript. ap. Fabrett.p. 250. n. 2.), by throwing them upwith both hands, catching them on,and making them rebound from, the Text Appearing After Image: inner joint of the elbow, leg, forehead, PILEATUS. PILEOLUS. 503 and instep, so that they kept playingin a continuous circle round his per-son without falling to the ground, asminutely described by Manilius (As-tron. 169—171.), and as exhibited bythe annexed figure from a Diptych inthe Museum at Verona. The playeris exhibiting with seven balls, in ahandsome building (the scena pilario-rum of Quint. /. c), whilst a numberof boys and other persons stand round,and look on. Two figures in pre-cisely the same attitude, and with thesame number of balls each, are sculp-tured on a sepulchral marble in thecollection at Mantua. Lab us. Antich.di Mantova. torn. ii. PILEATUS (m\o6pos). Bon-netted; that is, wearing a felt-captermed pileus,ihe ordinary head- i^^^^^^M covering of sail- W il§\^ ors, fishermen, % and artisans, as xi-^^S^---^ well as of the ^^^^^^K twin brothers, ^-^^^^^^^P Castorand Pol- /f lux, who are * thence styled \\ fratres pileati (Catull. 37. 2.); amongst the Greek Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1840 booksubjectclassicaldictionaries bookpublisherlondonlongmans bookyear1849 bookidillustratedcompa00rich bookauthorrichanthony1803or18041891 bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress
1849

Image from page 11 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ng by Percival Rosseau, facing page 963 —The Amateur of Painting, from a painting byMeissonier, facing page 1059. DEPARTMENTS For Very Little Folk. (Illustrated) What Happened to Betty and Polly . Nora Bennett 652 Picking Flowers. Verse. (Jack and Jane and Betsy Anne) Katharine M. Daland 754 The Bossy Calf. Verse. The Drum-Maj or. Verse J Veils Hastings. Willies Air-Castle. Verse Edwin C. Beal . Making Friends. Verse 755 850 851 F. IV. M 851 Jacks Circus. Verse. (Jack and Jane and Betsy Anne) Katharine M. Daland 946 Beside the Sea. Verse. 947 In the Hayfield. Verse. 1042 Jerrys Joke. Verse. 1043 The Wolf and the Little Lamb Venie van Blarcom 1136 Books and Reading. (Illustrated) Hildcgardc Haiuthorne ... 649 764, 861, 956, 1052, 1148 Nature and Science. (Illustrated) 654, 747, 842, 938, 1035, 1129 St. Nicholas League. (Illustrated) ! 662, 756, 852, 948, 1044, 1140 The Letter-Box. (Illustrated) 766, 1150 The Riddle-Box. (Illustrated) 671, 767, 863, 959, 1055, 1151 Editorial Notes 958 Text Appearing After Image: [The entire contents of this Magazine are covered by the general copyright, and articles must not be reprinted without special permission] CONTENTS OF ST. NICHOLAS FOR MAY, 1912. Frontispiece. Springtime. From a painting by Sydney Kendrick. Page Deborahs Change of Heart. Story Helen Ward Banks 579 Illustrated by William F. Stecher.An Old Time May-Day Song. Verse. Adapted by Arthur Guiterman 585 Illustrated by Otto Rebele. The Military Band. (Ballads of the Be-Ba-Boes.) Verse D.K.Stevens 586 Illustrated by Katharine M. Daland. Crofton Chums. Serial Story Ralph Henry Barbour 590 Illustrated by C. M. Relyea.A Thoughtful Little Friend. Picture. Drawn by A. Z. Baker 595 -The Lucky Sixpence Serial Story { SSSSSS ^ } 596 Illustrated by Arthur Becher. V Sadie Swung, Sally Sung. Verse James Rowe 604 How I Became a Big-League Pitcher Christy Mathewson 605 Illustrated by Frank Tenney Johnson, and with photographs and diagram. . A Spring Freshet. Picture. Drawn by Gertrude Kay 616 The Magic Bottlstnicholasserial392dodg Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookidstnicholasserial392dodg bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 154 of
Description: Identifier: dancinghelenmoll00moll Title: Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates; Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Moller, Helen Dunham, Curtis Subjects: Dance Dance Publisher: New York : John Lane company London, John Lane Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ry ex-ceptional capacity for perceiving and knowing beauty.The majority of human kind are comparatively unde-veloped in this regard, and their capacity for happiness iscorrespondingly restricted. This is mainly because theydo not habitually do and live the things that are beauti-ful. A fully developed aesthetic sense is not to be gainedby the mere spectator; he must have a consciousness ofparticipation, and in some way he must express that con-sciousness. We cannot all be creative geniuses—poets,sculptors, painters, composers of music; but all of us whoare normal beings can learn to actively respond to theinfluences which they exert, especially the influence ofmusic. Young children usually are considered to be sim-ply little animals. But watch them in the presence ofsome powerful manifestation of beauty. What child One Hundred Three An expression of pleasurable relaxation pervading the entire body—a com-plete reeiction to influences that are pervasive in their sweetness and charm. Text Appearing After Image: Dancing Back to Arcady does not almost instantly respond, both physically andpsychically, to that masterpiece of Nature, a perfectmorning in June? The small boy tears off the hatedshoes and stockings and races with joyous whoops overthe cool greensward. The little girl shows her longingto follow him; she is only restrained by the conventionswith which so many mothers oppress the souls andbodies of their feminine offspring. But her breastheaves, her eyes sparkle: she lets herself go to the limitof the sense of freedom left in her, and now and thenthere is one whose actions declare her to be in open re-volt. She doesnt care! Let them call her a tomboyif they like! Off come hei shoes and stockings, her hat,her apron—every article of clothing she can modestlydispense with—and away she goes! She is expressingher sense of beauty and developing her capacity for hap-piness. And from that cause will spring a contented anduseful woman.* And music. What normal child ever is seen to as-sume a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: dancing bookcentury1900 booksubjectdance bookdecade1910 bookpublisherlondonjohnlane bookauthormollerhelen bookiddancinghelenmoll00moll bookauthordunhamcurtis bookyear1918 bookpublishernewyorkjohnlanecompany
1918

Image from page 122 of
Description: Identifier: dancinghelenmoll00moll Title: Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates; Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Moller, Helen Dunham, Curtis Subjects: Dance Dance Publisher: New York : John Lane company London, John Lane Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: truct the classic Greekdance, and to convince ourselves that it, as well, hasnever been excelled. In this task—which is literally alabor of love—we see more and more clearly that we arepursuing the highest hygienic ideal. The spirit ofHealth breathes in every inspiration and movement ofthe Greek Dance. But for the anachronism of associat-ing one of the later deities with one of the original Greekpantheon we should be justified in the impression thatTerpsichore, Goddess of the Dance, enjoyed the full con-fidence and counsel of Hygeia, Goddess of Health. Happily, here we are in direct accord with themost advanced modern science. It is an axiom of physi-ology that rational—that is enjoyable, pleasurable—ex-ercise of mind and body is the only single thing that canbe depended upon to promote and maintain the condition Eighty-five The ocean beach, upon which the surf rolls rhythmically, or is broken uponhalf submerged rocks, incites to the most open free and vital dancingexpression. Text Appearing After Image: Our Contribution to Health of health. In the face of such a direct and simplemethod, what an extraordinary waste of time and energyis comprehended in the complicated structure of rulesand regulations prescribed by Science for hygienic liv-ing! The chemistry of food, the balanced ration—somuch protein in such ratio with carbohydrate, and so on,and so on; the intricacies of digestion and metabolism;in short, the elaborately worked out assumption that ourpoor finite minds are capable both of understanding anddirecting the operations of the most marvellous of labora-tories. Natures own—what a monument to squanderedintelligence! All we have to do is to keep our minds andbodies normal by a natural way of living; Nature can betrusted to carry on her own processes. Regular and suf-ficient exercise in the open air maintains the efficiency ofthose processes. Normal appetite is the instinct whichselects needful food and limits the amount consumed.Overeating is the result, as well as a cause, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectdance bookdecade1910 bookpublisherlondonjohnlane bookauthormollerhelen bookiddancinghelenmoll00moll bookauthordunhamcurtis bookyear1918 bookpublishernewyorkjohnlanecompany bookcollectionamericana
1918

Image from page 143 of
Description: Identifier: lacunarbasilicae00geddrich Title: Lacunar basilicae Sancti Macarii, aberdonensis: the heraldic ceiling of the cathedral church of St. Machar, old Aberdeen Year: 1888 (1880s) Authors: Geddes, W. D., Sir (William Duguid), 1828-1900 Duguid, Peter Subjects: Old Machar Church (Aberdeen, Scotland) Heraldry -- Scotland Heraldry, Ornamental Publisher: Aberdeen : Printed for the New Spalding Club Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ^urr^ ^iTziF. XVI [16] Text Appearing After Image: l}F!p2(f MiFzhmiF. • asm •■•• * CO. La«n« REGAL SERIES. lOI XV. The Duke of Gueldres. [No. 15. Azure, a lion rampant or, Gueldres, impaling Or, a lion rampant sable, Flanders, the lions respecting each other. The lions are langued gules, and are the only ones on the ceiling that are langued of a different tincture from their bodies.• • • . Boutell (pp. 163, 164) says that M. Bouton (Noiiveau Traite deBlason, p. 322) blazons the lion of Gueldres crowned, and that in anilluminated MS. of the fifteenth centur}-, in the College of Arms(Collectanea Curiosa, 1. xiv.), both the lions are crowned, and the lionof Gueldres is also queue fourchee . The lions respect each other, after the usage of ContinentalHeraldr}^. Sir David Lindsay shows the lion of Gueldres crownedin the impalement of Mary of Gueldres, Queen of James II. (29),and Laing (vol. i., p. 12, No. 48, PI. II., fig. 2) gives an engravingof her beautiful seal, showing Scotland, with the tressure complete,impaling th Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1888 booksubjectheraldryscotland bookpublisheraberdeenprintedforthenewspaldingclub bookidlacunarbasilicae00geddrich bookauthorgeddeswdsirwilliamduguid18281900 bookauthorduguidpeter booksubjectoldmacharchurchaberdeenscotland booksubjectheraldryornamental
1888

Image from page 181 of
Description: Identifier: catalogueno16spr00macy Title: Catalogue no. 16, spring/summer / R. H. Macy & Co. Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Macy's (Firm) Subjects: Department stores--Catalogs Trade catalogs--Department stores. Publisher: R.H. Macy, New York Contributing Library: Winterthur Museum Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Genuine Russia Calf Blucher Oxford—A liandsnme model and a line wearing shoe. The high niililaiTlieel and soli. Text Appearing After Image: Patent Colt Button Oxford withleather: has Ktiiiiine oak solesmilitary Iieel; eouiiler and insolesliittli tne; plain tip: sizes anil li VlHIKllI 28 ..HT..,.s 46BI8009 Iri r ir 46B18009 upper of mat finish and solid leather are solid leather; alf sizes (J to 11; Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectdepartmentstorescatalogs bookidcatalogueno16spr00macy bookauthormacysfirm booksubjecttradecatalogsdepartmentstores bookpublisherrhmacynewyork bookyear1911 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber181
1911

Image from page 18 of
Description: Identifier: historyoftownpar00hall Title: A history of the town and parish of Nantwich, or Wich-Malbank, in the county palatine of Chester Year: 1883 (1880s) Authors: Hall, James, of Nantwich Subjects: Publisher: Nantwich : Printed for the author Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: osite Page53 opposite 91 no opposite 167 194 265 opposite 275 NANTWICH. 10. II. 13- 14-15-i6. 17-i8.19.20.21.22. 23- 24. 25- 26.27.28. 29. Stone Pulpit in the ChurchShields of Arms {Plate) (Fac-simile of original drawing temp. Eliz The Church Interior {Plate) Plan of the Church {Plate) ... Bosses in Chancel groining {Plate) ... Sweet-briar Hall, Hospital Street Gateway to Wrights Almshouses {Plate) (Re-produced from a plate byOld Grammar SchoolGrotesque Carving...Miserere Carving ...Old Houses in High StreetArms and Crest of iVIaistersonWilbrahams Widows AlmshouseArms and Crest of WilbrahamChurchs Mansion ...Arms and Crest of MainwaringArms and Crest of WettenhallArms and Crest of MinshullPortrait of John Gerard (Fac-simile slightly reduced from the engrav Arms and Crest of Wicksted •enes J. P. Earwaker, Esq.) J. Richardson). ing in Gerards Herbal opposite 284 opposite 308 opposite 330 opposite 332 353 opposite 370 377 395 403 415 420 430 436 441 457 463 470 481496 PREFACE. PREFACE. Text Appearing After Image: NE has well observed that the past is in itself a treasure; and the same feeling which leads us back to the recolleftion of infancy carries us still further along the mighty waste of time. In these pages an attempt is made to trace the history of Nantwich, an ancient market town in Cheshire, from the time of the taking of the Domesday Survey to the present year; bridging over that interval of more than eight centuries with a series of local events in chronological sequence, and linking the present with the past by re-peopling the town with inhabitants of by-gone days. This self-imposed task has entailed no small labour; for, as Sterne has said, when a man sits down to write a history, though it be but the history of Jack Hickathrift or Tom Thumb, he knows no more than his heels what lets and hindrances he is to meet with in his way, or what a dance he may be led by one excursion or another, before all is over He will, moreover, have various accounts to reconcile; anecdotes to pick up; Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: o initial initialo bookcentury1800 bookyear1883 bookdecade1880 bookidhistoryoftownpar00hall bookauthorhalljamesofnantwich bookpublishernantwichprintedfortheauthor bookleafnumber18
1883

Image from page 67 of
Description: Identifier: poems00ross_0 Title: Poems Year: 1901 (1900s) Authors: Rossetti, Christina Georgina, 1830-1894 Subjects: Publisher: London : New York : Macmillan Contributing Library: University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: frozen fountain would have leaped, The buds gone on to blow,The warm south wind would have awaked To melt the snow. Is she fair now as she lies ? Once she was fair;Meet queen for any kingly king, With gold-dust on her hair. 4.0 THE PRINCES PROGRESS. Now these are poppies in her locks,White poppies she must wear : Must wear a veil to shroud her faceAnd the want graven there: Or is the hunger fed at length,Cast off the care ? We never saw her with a smile Or with a frown ;Her bed seemed never soft to her, Though tossed of down ;She little heeded what she wore, Kirtle, or wreath, or gown ;We think her white brows often ached Beneath her crown,Till silvery hairs showed in her locks That used to be so brown. We never heard her speak in haste - Her tones were sweet,And modulated just so much As it was meet:Her heart sat silent through the noise And concourse of the street.There was no hurry in her hands, No hurry in her feet;There was no bliss drew nigh to her, That she might run to greet. Text Appearing After Image: l/dui should have wept heryesterday MAIDEN-SONG. 4* You should have wept her yesterday, Wasting upon her bed :But wherefore should you weep to-day That she is dead ?Lo, we who love weep not to-day, But crown her royal head.Let be these poppies that we strew, Your roses are too red :Let be these poppies, not for you Cut down and spread. MAIDEN-SONG. T ONG ago and long ago, ■*— And long ago still, There dwelt three merry maidens Upon a distant hill.One was tall Meggan, And one was dainty May,But one was fair Margaret. More fair than I can say,Long ago and long ago. When Meggan plucked the thorny rose,And when May pulled the brier, Half the birds would swoop to see,Half the beasts draw nigher ; 42 MAIDEN-SONG. Half the fishes of the streamsWould dart up to admire : But when Margaret plucked a flag-flower,Or poppy hot aflame, All the beasts and all the birdsAnd all the fishes came To her hand more soft than snow. Strawberry leaves and May-dew In brisk morning air,Strawberry leaves and Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: preraphaelite dantegabrielrossetti bookcentury1900 bookyear1901 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherlondonnewyorkmacmillan bookauthorrossettichristinageorgina18301894 bookidpoems00ross0 bookcollectionunclibraries bookleafnumber67
1901

Image from page 178 of
Description: Identifier: threeyoungcruso00murr Title: Three young Crusoes, their life and adventures on an island in the West Indies Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Murrill, William A. Subjects: Natural history--West Indies. Publisher: New York city,: W. A. Murrill Contributing Library: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ecies, abamboo cage constructed on the principle of a fly-trap proved very effective. For ground-feeders,like doves and pigeons, a coop-trap fitted with afigure four was used; while butterfly nets came inhandy for hummingbirds and for all kinds of youngbirds just beginning to fly. Wild turkeys were caught in a covered pen witha trench approach in which corn was scattered.They would keep their heads down while followingthe trail of corn and raise them up so high whenthey got in the pen that they could not see how toget out. The birds that first attracted the attention of ouryoung naturalists were the kinds they had seen athome. Some of these, like the kingfisher and thehawks, remained during the entire year, but mostof them came down to spend the winter and wentback early in the spring. Among these migratorybirds were the following: 158 Birds 159 Ruby-throat hummingbird, olive-backed thrush,wood thrush, catbird, cedar waxwing, bobolink,mourning-dove, meadow-lark, bittern, killdeer, av- Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 56. Sandhill cranes and their nest among the cat-tails. ocet, godwit, Wilsons snipe, plover, great blue heron,mallard duck, green-winged teal, wood duck, andhooded merganser. 160 Three Young Crusoes When the season arrived for these birds to returnto their northern homes, those that were in cageswere set free and allowed to go with the rest. The 4; ,1 ; ., £ Fig. 57. Caged birds for sale in Mexico City. The Indians buy themeagerly, children were themselves prisoners and would glad-ly have flown home with the birds. Why not let them carry a message to our friends? Birds 161 said Edna, excitedly, as she opened one of the cagesand let a wood thrush out. Why not? replied William. It might not doany good, and still it might. There is no harm intrying. So they fastened a tiny message to a number ofthe birds in such a way that they would not be in-jured or impeded in their flight, and turned themloose with the hope that somebody would get achance to read it. There was a catbird that ha Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1918 bookidthreeyoungcruso00murr bookauthormurrillwilliama booksubjectnaturalhistorywestindies bookpublishernewyorkcitywamurrill bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber178 bookcontributoruniversityoffloridageorgeasmatherslibraries
1918

Image from page 970 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 1904. NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG FOLKS. 84: Text Appearing After Image: A PHOTOGRAPH BY DR. HERBERT C. WILSON, PHOTOGRAPHER OFGOODSELL OBSERVATORY. HOW TO PHOTOGRAPHLIGHTNING. Any boy or girl who has acamera and a good stock of pa-tience may secure a photographof lightning. The patience isneeded in waiting for the light-ning. When a thunder-showercomes at night, keep a sharplookout for an opportunity tosecure your picture. You can-not get a picture of lightningduring every thunder-shower.Clouds or a heavy downpour ofrain often conceals the flashfrom view, and we have sheet-lightning. It is useless to pho-tograph this, but you may by itslight get an interesting pictureof the landscape. When thesharp chain-lightning comes,select a window from which youcan see it well, or, if it is notraining, go out of doors and set the camera on the tripod focusedas for a distant view and pointedtoward that quarter of the hea-vens in which the lightning ismost frequent. The diaphragmshould be set to the largestopening that is ever used, theslide drawn, and the lens un-cove Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial31dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 126 of
Description: Identifier: youngfolkshistor01ober Title: Young folks' history of Mexico Year: 1883 (1880s) Authors: Ober, Frederick A. (Frederick Albion), 1849-1913 Subjects: Publisher: Boston : Estes and Lauriat Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d, the total destruc-tion of mankind if the fire bv divine interference shouldnot be permitted to kindle. The faces of the childrenwere covered, and they were not allowed to sleep, to pre-vent their being tra7isfo7med i7ito 7nice. All those who didnot go out with the jDriests mounted upon roofs and terracesto observe from thence the event of the ceremony. Upon the breast of the human victim selected for thisevent were placed two pieces of wood, and as one of thepriests gave him the fatal stab with the knife of flintanother kindled the wooden shield by friction, and theflame flew upwards. Then the victim and the blazing The Tying-up of Years. 123 wood were cast into a pile of combustibles, and as the flamesleaped up they were received by the assembled multitudeswith shouts of gladness. The signal fire in the mountaintop was seen all over the valley. Myriads of upturnedfaces greeted it from hills, mountains, terraces, temples,teocallis, house-tops and city-walls ; and the prostrate mul- Text Appearing After Image: MEXICAN CENTURY. titudes hailed the emblem of light, life, and fruition as ablessed omen of the restored favor of their gods and thepreservation of the race for another cycle. The priestscarried the new fire to the temple, and in every temple anddwelling it was rekindled from the sacred source; andwhen the sun rose again on the following morning, thesolemn procession of priests, princes and subjects, which T24 Mexico. had taken up its march from the capital on the precedingnight, with solemn steps, returned once more to the city,and, restoring the gods to their altars, abandoned them-selves to joy and festivity, in token of gratitude and relieffrom impending doom. This was the last celebration of the festival of the sacredfire in Aztlan. Nearly eight cycles have rolled their roundsof vears since then, but at the termination of none of themhas been performed the ceremony of the tying up ofyears. At that last rejoicing, in 1506, they felt them-selves safe for another century; but, as a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1883 bookdecade1880 bookauthoroberfrederickafrederickalbion18491913 bookpublisherbostonestesandlauriat bookidyoungfolkshistor01ober bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana booksponsorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionlibraryofcongress
1883

Image from page 694 of
Description: Identifier: 20thcenturycatal00purd Title: 20th century catalogue of supplies for watchmakers, jewelers and kindred trades Year: 1899 (1890s) Authors: Purdy, J. H. & co., Chicago Subjects: Purdy, J. H. & co., Chicago Jeweler's supplies Publisher: Chicago, J.H. Purdy & co. Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Champion Jewelry Wash. :-pint bottles, $2.75 doz.; i4-pint bottle, $1.7.) do Silver Cream. In o-pint bottles.Per doz $1.50 Magic Rouge. The New Polish.Per doz $2.00 For Watchmakers, Jewelers and Kindred Trades. 689 JEWELERS SUNDRIES. Compounds and Polishing Materials. Text Appearing After Image: JEWELERS ENAMEL. ■ For 14K Gold. pg, „^ 3. II. Purple 14K $3.00 5A. DarkBluel4K 2.00 12. Maroon UK 2.00 16. Orange 14K ■ 2.00 7. Ivory 14K 2.00 6. Turquois 14K 2.00 150. Terra Cotta Eed 2.00 10. DarkKubyHK 5.0O 14. Cream 14K 1..50 Green 14K 1.50 4. EoyalBluel4K 1.00 1. Whitel4K 1.00 3. Peacock Blue 14K 1.00 2. BlackuK 1.00 For lOK Gold. 3. 8. Kuby lOK $5.00 9. PinklOK 3.00 15. CanarvlOK 2.00 lA. White lOK 2 00 Other colors it desired.Flux for flowingenamel, per oz., $1,00. 14K enamel11 flow on lOK gold and silver with this flux.Copper Alloy, per lb., 40c.Sealing Wax, per lb., 40c. SYLVANITE CLOTH A SUPERIORPOLISHER iSe No. 8 size, 12xl3/4 Inches ...$1.00per doz, VIENNA LINIE. iGallon:.■..■.;:■.25c targe Bottle. 25c; Small, 15c. The Twentieth Century Catalogue of Supplies JEWELERS SUNDRIES. COMPOUNDS AND POLISHING MATERIAL. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1899 bookid20thcenturycatal00purd bookauthorpurdyjhcochicago booksubjectpurdyjhcochicago booksubjectjewelerssupplies bookpublisherchicagojhpurdyco bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress booksponsorsloanfoundation
1899

Image from page 877 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: yarns. He also hadbrought home with him his sailor hammock, and forMarjories and my benefit he took it from the attic andhung it several yards from the side of the house. With it came stories of the delights of sleeping outof doors, and, as Marjorie and I loved anything novel,we put our heads together and planned how we couldaccomplish this. Various plans were suggested, but we gave them allup and decided to ask our mothers for permission tocamp out in the yard that night. Our mothers readilyconsented—and smiled.We were overjoyed,and, as soon as it wasbedtime kissed the twomothers, and with blan-kets and pillows jumpedin the hammock. As long as the lightswere bright in the housewe thought it great fun,but when they were putout (earlier than usualit seemed) we began tothink and talk about thegipsies that had beenaround that day. Abig boy had told us thatthey would come intopeoples yards and takelittle girls and hurtthem. We then began toby hary tufts, age 14. count sheep, but before Text Appearing After Image: 9°4-] ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE. 953 we had counted ten the most blood-curdling groans andmoans came from the darkened house. Marjoric hung on to me and I to her, both of us tooscared to move. Finally Marjorie said in a weak little voice: Dontyou think our mothers are lonesome? I answered Yes; and with that two little formsjumped out of the hammock and ran to the house, wherethey were soon clasped in their mothers arms and borneupstairs to bed. Through the open door, when Marjorie was droppingto sleep, I heard her say, I think this is the best placeto camp. BESSIES DREAM. BY ALICE CONE (AGE II). Bessie was a little girl; Her age was nine or ten;She d been to school for six long years, And did not know all then. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial31dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 293 of
Description: Identifier: handbookoforname1900meye Title: Handbook of ornament; a grammar of art, industrial and architectural designing in all its branches, for practical as well as theoretical use Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Meyer, Franz Sales, 1849- Subjects: Decoration and ornament Art objects Publisher: New York, B. Hessling Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Wellesley College Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: strictly: Mosaic means pictures andpatterns composed of pieces of stone, pottery, pearl, and glass, thelast being coloured or underlaid with metal-foil. There are two principal classes of such Mosaic. The opus tesse-latum is composed of small pieces, mostly cubes, held together bybeing inlaid in a kind of cement. The opus sedile is composed oflittle slabs, varying in shape according to the object to be repre-sented. Mosaic work is very ancient; and is mentioned as early asthe Book of Esther. A large number of Roman mosaic pavements, inopus tesselatum, have been preserved to us. Early Christian art alsodecorated walls and piers with geometrical mosaic (opus Grecanicum),numerous examples of which are to be found in Ravenna, Palermo,Venice, and elsewhere. All kinds of mosaic have been practised inItaly down to the present day, less, it is true, for the decoration ofwalls and pavements than for Ornaments, Pictures, Table-tops, &c. KEPEATING OKNAMENT. 279 % >sN Text Appearing After Image: 1 ^ f p = U/ a c , 7 7 C = ca z n utz 1 ILi= \ \y^ u .1 l!= = / R-^ ni 70-5 J il -1 t^c 1 =!l m n II 1 31 ^ r zc,_ = : ^1 nil Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectdecorationandornament booksubjectartobjects bookyear1900 bookidhandbookoforname1900meye bookauthormeyerfranzsales1849 bookpublishernewyorkbhessling bookleafnumber293 bookcollectionamericana
1900

Image from page 4 of
Description: Identifier: frithjofvikingof001835 Title: Frithjof, the viking of Norway : and Roland, the paladin of France Year: 1899 (1890s) Authors: 1835-1924 1782-1846 Subjects: Publisher: New York London : G. P. Putnam's sons Contributing Library: New York Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: .... . Faf-ner. Framnas . Fram-nase. Frey . . Fr&y (the y sounded as in doj/) Freya .... . Fre-ya. Frithjof . Frit-iof. Ganelon . Ga-ne-lon(g). Gautier . Go-tya. Halfdan . Half-dan. Halwar . Har-var. Ham .... . Ham. Heid .... . Herd. Helge .... . Her-ge. Hilding . Hild-ing. Ingeborg . . In^-ge-borg. Jumala . Yu-ma-la. Marsilius . Mar-si-lius. Naimes . Name. Odin .... . O-din. Oehlenschlager . . U-len-shla.ger. Oriflamme . . O-ri-flam. Pinabel . Pi-na-ber. Ring .... . Ring. Roncevaux . . Ron(g)-se-v6. Saragossa . Sa-ra-gos-sa. Sigurd .... . Sf-gurd. Sote .... . So-te. Surtur .... . Sur-tur. Tegner . Ten-yer. Pronunciation of Names 295 Thierri. Thorsten Valhalla Valkyrie Veillantif Vikingson Tyer-ree. Thor-sten. Val-hal-la. Val-ki-rre. Ve-lyan(g).tif Vl-king-son. ^ Text Appearing After Image: FRITHJOFS FIRST BEAR. Uales of tbe Iheroic H^es^ FRITHJOF The Viking of Norway AND ROLAND The Paladin of France BY zenaide a. ragozin Member of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland ; of the American Oriental Society, etc. Author of Chaldea, Vedic India, Siegfried and Beowulf, etc. G. P. PUTNAMS SONSNEW YORK & LONDONZbc fcnicfterbocliec Dceee THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY ASTOR, LEMOX ANDTICDEN F0U#J0aTI0N8. Copyright, 1899 BY ZENAIDE A. RAGOZIN Entered at Stationers Hall, London tbe Itnfclterbocltec pre0«, new ]Qor^ IT Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookpublishernewyork bookpublisherlondongpputnamssons bookidfrithjofvikingof001835 bookauthor18351924 bookauthor17821846 bookyear1899 bookcollectionamericana bookcontributornewyorkpubliclibrary
1899

Image from page 53 of
Description: Identifier: diagnosistreatmecros Title: The diagnosis and treatment of diseases of women Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Crossen, Harry Sturgeon, 1869- Subjects: Genital Diseases, Female Gynecology Gynecology Women Generative organs, Female Publisher: St. Louis : Mosby Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 50. Appearance of pus about the oiaening of the left vulvo-vaginal gland. Watery discharge. A portion of the discharge appears like water. This may beassociated with the normal muco-epithelial discharge or with a muco-purulentor purulent discharge. The most common cause of a watery discharge is the de-composition of a malignant tumor-mass in the vagina or uterus, giving the character-istic watery, foul-smelling discharge of advanced cancer or sloughing fibroid. ULCERS, SWELLINGS, NEW GROWTHS 37 INFLAMMATION ABOUT EXTERNAL GENITALS. GONORRHOEAL OR OTHERWISE. Inflammation is indicated by redness and tenderness, either diffused or in spots.It is usually accompanied by smarting or burning on urination. The smarting onurination and the increased frequency of urination, are most marked when theurethra is involved. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 51. Palpating the left vulvo-vaginal gland, to determineif there is thickening or tendeiness, or if pus can be pressed from it. ULCER ABOUT EXTERNAL GENITALS. SIMPLE, CHANCROIDAL, SYPHILITIC, TUBERCULAR, MALIGNANT. If an ulcer is found, determine its position, size, shape, consistency (edge andunderlying tissues), tenderness and mobility (whether fixed to underlying deepstructures or freely movable). Determine also the character of the discharge from it,and whether it bleeds readily on touching. Notice whether the base is made ofregular granulation tissue or has yellow dots scattered in it, or is filled with a slough.Examine also the edges—do they slope from within outward, as in an ordinary ulcerwhen healing, or are they sharp-cut and perpendicular, or undermined as in a rapidly 38 THE PHYSICAL ^EXAMINATION spreading chancroid? Is there a red acute-inflammatory zone about the uicer oris there a wide area of chronic infiltration (chronic inflammation, mahgnant)? Isthere only a Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectgynecology booksubjectwomen booksubjectgenitaldiseasesfemale bookpublisherstlouismosby booksubjectgenerativeorgansfemale bookiddiagnosistreatmecros bookauthorcrossenharrysturgeon1869 bookyear1907
1907

Image from page 38 of
Description: Identifier: CUbiodiversity1127488 Title: The papilios of Great Britain, systematically arranged, accurately engraved, and painted from nature, with the natural history of each species, from a close application to the subject, and observations made in different countries of this kingdom; as well as from breeding numbers from the egg, or caterpillar, during the last thirty years Year: 1795 (1790s) Authors: Lewin, William, -1795 Subjects: Butterflies Publisher: London, Printed for J. Johnson Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: Mann Library, Cornell View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: bitation. The caterpillars vary much incolour ; fome are dark brown, others paler, and fome are of a yellowilb colour :fig. i. They are full fed the beginning of July ; and change to chryfa-lides moftly under the cover of their webs : but fometimes, when ready fortransformation, they travel farther to a convenient place, where they fufpendthemfelves by the tail, with a very ftrong web. They remain in chryfalis,fee fig. 2, till the firfc week in Auguft; when the butterfly appears in allits fplendour. We are not certain in what ftate this infect lives through thewinter, to produce the fummer flies : but I ftiould conjecture, that the cater-pillar lives and feeds till the middle of May, and is then ready for transfor-mation ; and this may account for thefe butterflies being in fome fummers veryplentiful, and in others, rarely to be feen ; juft as the mildnefs or feverity of thewinter has protected or injured the caterpillars. The male flying, is reprelentedin fig. j, and at reft, fig. 4. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1825

Image from page 14 of
Description: Identifier: handbookoforname1900meye Title: Handbook of ornament; a grammar of art, industrial and architectural designing in all its branches, for practical as well as theoretical use Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Meyer, Franz Sales, 1849- Subjects: Decoration and ornament Art objects Publisher: New York, B. Hessling Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Wellesley College Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ck-Case, and ToiletCabinet. 259-260. The Bedstead, and Cradle. D. Frames, &c. 261-262. The Architectural Frame.263-264. The Mirror-Frame, &c.265-266. The Strap-work Frame.267-268. The Typographical Frame. 269. The Strap-work Tablet. 270. The Strap-work Border, andMargin. E. Jewelry. 271. The Pin. 272. The Button. 273. The Ring. 274. The Chain. 275. The Necklace. 276. The Bracelet. XIV TABLE. 277. The Girdle, Buckle, andClasp. 278. The Pendant. 279. The Ear-ring. 280. Miscellaneous Jewelry. F. Heraldry. 281. Tinctures, and Divisions, ofthe Shield. 282. Shapes of the Shield. 283. Ordinaries.284-285. Charges. 286. Forms of the Helmet.287-288. Helmet Trappings. 289. Crowns, Coronets, &c.290 Heraldic Accessories. G. Writing, Printing, &c. 291. Romanesque Letters.292-293. Gothic Uncial Letters. 294. Old English Letters, &c. 295. Old German Letters. 296. Modem Texts. 297. Renaissance Letters. 298. Roman Initials. 299. Roman Letters. 300. Constructions, Numerals,Monograms. Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1900

Image from page 462 of
Description: Identifier: gri_prodigiorvma00lyko Title: Prodigiorvm ac ostentorvm chronicon : quae praeter naturae ordinem, motum, et operationem, et in svperioribus & his inferioribus mundi regionibus, ab exordio mundi usque ad haec nostra tempora, acciderunt ... Year: 1557 (1550s) Authors: Lykosthenes, Konrad, 1518-1561 Kandel, David, d. 1587 Manuel, Hans Rudolf, 1525-1571 Subjects: Monsters Animals, Mythical Curiosities and wonders Publisher: Basileae : Per Henricvm Petri Contributing Library: Getty Research Institute Digitizing Sponsor: Getty Research Institute View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: fuseft, utrefertauthorFafciculitempom, ac Chronicoru etiamNorinbergentTum.EoannoFIoraiaabAlbertoimperatoreob*fcffa.RobcrtusBritanntocxScotorum fylueftriu locafubegit, 8C fames maxima per to*tum triennium Lituaniam& adiacentes regiones grauiterafflixit. COmcta horribili fpe ^lcie>trescotinuosme#*fcs flagrauit,poftHerici fcptimi mortem, is bellu de«fignauit ciuile, q Ludeui*cus Bauarus, etFridericusAuftriacus diffentietibuseleiftorum fuffragrjs fimulelec*ti,deimperio 8 • annbfcQcj 2 deccrs Text Appearing After Image: Anno Do-mirci. 4-si Dc prodigiis dcccrtarunt, donec tandcm Friderico in praelio capto, folus Lu*douicus impctium retinuit. Eo rcgnantc mox alrj effulferuntdno,akcranno ij37.altcrbieniopoft. Sccutahos eftpreteratroccmpeftcm,pcrniciofadiffen{ioEicvflorum,quiaCiem€tcPon^tifice incitati,depofito Ludouico Carolum quartum crearunt»mox cVeodem amoto,GuntherumcomitemSchuuartzburoertfem accerfiucrunt,qua:rcs nouos pcpcrit tumultus, d>C iterum adarmaconcurfumcft,breuipofttamen ueneno fublatus Guntherus imperiumCarolo concefsit, TResLunae apparucrunt in coelo,Eodcm annorcxFranciaePhilippusobrjt,Dc imperatorc ddigendo contentio fadacft poftHenriciobitum, inquaquidamLudouicum Bauarum*alrjFridericum AuftriacumdelegeVe.QuaTnobremintereos bcllum fuit, durauitq? annos o&o,quo tandcm Ludouicus obti*nuit,&regnauitfolusannos 24. I ^ Pag° uallis fupcrioris-*Arni nominc Tcrtaniomonftrum cft natum ha*bens duos pucros uno um*bilico ad inuicem inutftos,cuiab unolatere cVgenita*lia erant membra, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1825

Image from page 462 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: red for cooking, and underneath the treeswere built two small fires. Jehees wife, on alittle step-ladder, was busy stirring first onekettle, then another. When the calif saw thishe was very angry with Jehee for playing himsuch a trick, and said : Of course the food cannever so much as be warmed up there in thetrees, much less ever cook. Then Jehee hum-bly begged the califs pardon, but said hethought that the food surely could cook overthat fire if he himself could keep warm by a lighttwo miles away. Then the calif saw how fool-ish he had been in refusing Jehee the wager,and he promised him, before all the nobles whowere there, to pay him the two thousand piasters.Jehee then led the hungry people into the house,where, to their great surprise and joy, they founda sumptuous repast prepared for them. After that Jehee became a great favorite ofthe califs, and lived at court with his wife for therest of his life, where many other tales are toldof his bright doings and sayings. F. M. Jessup. Text Appearing After Image: THE WEIGHING. By Julia Darrow Cowles. Now, Midnight and Spot, do be quiet,Or we 11 never know how much we weigh; Miss Bessie is losing her patience,And we really ought not to play. Vol. XXXI.—57. There, Spot, hold your tail still a minute; Hush, Midnight, dont purr quite so loud;Four pounds and a little bit over ? My goodness, wont mother be proud! HOW PROBY SAVED THE WOODS. By Helen Grey. Proby woke up with the feeling that some-thing good was going to happen that day. Atfirst he could not think what, and then he re-membered. He was going up into the woodson the long train of flat-cars with the presidentof the railroad and of the lumber company, andhis father, who was superintendent of the bigwoods. Proby had always lived in the woods;he was nine, but had never been to schoolbecause there was no school near enough forhim to attend. When the trees were cut downaround his home, his father moved to wherethe trees grew that were to be cut. so his fam- Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial31dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookleafnumber462
1873

Image from page 125 of
Description: Identifier: orthopaedicsurge00tayl Title: Orthopaedic surgery for students and general practitioners : preliminary considerations and diseases of the spine : 114 original illustrations Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Taylor, Robert Tunstall, 1867- Subjects: Orthopedics Spine Children Orthopedics Spine Pediatrics Publisher: Baltimore : Williams & Wilkins Co. Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: FiG. 52. Same Boy as ShownIN Fig. 50 as he is Today.Cured Without Deform-ity. 122 ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. tarily, until the head sling is adjusted and the superincum-bent weight removed. -The question of which of these machines we shall use toprevent, correct or improve the deformity of Potts Diseasedepends on the pathological condition we find in the spine,as shown by its flexibility, the size of the knuckle not neces-sarily being a determining factor of the latter; in other words,prior to ankylosis, the spine can he made much straighter, byhyperextension at the point of the kyphosis. (1) Earliest Stages. At this period there is little or nodeformity to correct, but the child will indicate by its pos- Text Appearing After Image: FiG. 53. Large Recumbent Kyphotone in Action. ture, carriage or gait, grunting respiration, pain, night cries,muscular spasm or some of the characteristic symptoms,that spinal trouble is present. The region can be locatedand prevention of deformity obtained by plaster jacketsapplied in slight hyperextension on the small recumbentkyphotone. At this stage caseation and conglomeration of the tuber-cles is beginning and traumatic contact from pressure ofthe healthy adjacent vertebrae is ripe to help break downthe diseased vertebral body. (2) Beginning Deforinity. In such a case the vertebralbody has partially broken down and abscessformation has TUBERCULAR LESIONS OF THE SPINE. 123 begun. Correction may be obtained by gravity withlthesmall or large recumbent kyphotone or upright kyphotoneand maintained by a plaster jacket. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectchildren booksubjectspine bookpublisherbaltimorewilliamswilkinsco bookidorthopaedicsurge00tayl bookauthortaylorroberttunstall1867 booksubjectpediatrics booksubjectorthopedics bookyear1907
1907

Image from page 12 of
Description: Identifier: oldshippingdaysi018stat Title: Old shipping days in Boston Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: State Street Trust Company (Boston, Mass.) Walton Advertising and Printing Company Subjects: Shipping Clipper ships Publisher: Boston, Mass., Printed for the State Street Trust Company Contributing Library: Boston College Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: Old Shipping Daysin Boston THE MERCHANTMEN Beyond all outer chartingWe sailed where none have sailed,And saw the land-lights burningOn islands none have hailed;Our hair stood up for wonder,But when the night was done,There dawned the deep to windwardBlue—empty neath the sun. Rudyard Kipling. SHIPPING IN THE EARLY DAYS ^^2^HE earliest settlers of New England built their hutsnear the ocean, first of all, so as to be able to usethe sea as a source of food, and secondly to pro-vide for themselves a convenient place of refuge incase of attacks from the savages. In fact all thingsto do with the sea dominated their thoughts. Itis not strange therefore that our colonists becameboth ship builders and sailors, and although Yankeeprivateers, Yankee packets, and Yankee clippers no longer plough theseas of the world, nevertheless their fame and the romance that wentwith them will endure forever. We also owe to these early sailorsthe development of a seafaring race,—men who during our warsbecam Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookornament bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookidoldshippingdaysi018stat bookauthorstatestreettrustcompanybostonmass bookyear1918 booksubjectshipping booksubjectclipperships bookauthorwaltonadvertisingandprintingcompany bookpublisherbostonmassprintedforthestatestreettrustcompany
1918

Image from page 54 of
Description: Identifier: indianmythlegend00inmack Title: Indian myth and legend Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Mackenzie, Donald Alexander, 1873-1936 Subjects: Hindu mythology Publisher: London, Gresham Contributing Library: Indiana University Digitizing Sponsor: Indiana University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: r to the revival of Brahmanism. Inthe sixth century before the Christian era Buddhism hadorigin, partly as a revolt of the Kshatriya (aristocratic)class against priestly ascendancy, and the new faith spreadeastward where Brahmanic influence was least pronounced.When the influence of Buddhism declined, the Pantheonis found to have been revolutionized and renderedthoroughly Mediterranean in character. .The Vedic godshad in the interval suffered eclipse; they were subject tothe greater personal gods Brahma, with Vishnu and Shiva,each of whom had a goddess for wife. Brahma, as wehave said, had associated with him the river deity Saras-wati of the Bharatas; the earth goddess, Lakshmi, was thewife of Vishnu; she rose, however, from the Ocean ofMilk. But the most distinctive and even most primitivegoddesses were linked with Shiva, the Destroyer. Thegoddess Durga rivalled Indra as a deity of war. Kali,another form of Durga, was as vengeful and bloodthirsty * Vedic Index of Names and Subjects. Text Appearing After Image: KALI From a bronae in the Calcutta Art Gallery INTRODUCTION xli as the Scottish Cailleach, or the Egyptian Hathor, who, asthe earlier Sekhet, rejoiced in accomplishing the slaughterof the enemies of Ra.^ Kali, as we shall see (Chapter VIII)replaced the Vedic king of the gods as a successful demonslayer. As the Egyptian Ra went forth to restrain Hathor,so did Shiva hasten to the battlefield, flooded by gore, toprevail upon his spouse Kali to spare the remnant of herenemies. The rise of the goddesses may have been due in partto the influence of Dravidian folk-religion. This doesnot, however, vitiate the theory that moon, water, andearth worship was not unconnected with the ascendancyof the Brown race in India. The Dravidian brunet longheads were, as we have said, probably represented in thepre-Aryan, as well as the post-Vedic folk-waves, whichmingled with pre-Dravidian stocks. Mr. Crooke inclinesto the view that the Aryan^conquest was more moral and,intellectual than racial.^ The declin Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookidindianmythlegend00inmack bookyear1913 bookdecade1910 bookcentury1900 bookauthormackenziedonaldalexander18731936 booksubjecthindumythology bookpublisherlondongresham bookcontributorindianauniversity booksponsorindianauniversity bookleafnumber54
1913

Marjorie Kay & Otho W. Budd (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Marjorie Kay & Otho W. Budd [between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.22884 Call Number: LC-B2- 3999-1
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 9172
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1915

SS DOUGLAS MAWSON, 1914-1923
Description: Built and launched Bawley Point, New South Wales on 11 April 1914, SS DOUGLAS MAWSON was a wooden ketch rigged twin screw steamer. It was owned by the Australian Government and operated along the nothern Queensland coast between Cairns and the Gulf of Carpentaria. On 29 March 1923, the vessel was lost along with all 21 crew and passengers en route from Burketown to Thursday Island after a cyclone hit near Groote Eylandt, Gulf of Carpentaria. This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museum’s collection. If reproduced or distributed, this image should be clearly attributed to the collection of the Australian National Maritime Museum; and not be used for any commercial or for-profit purposes without the permission of the museum. For more information see our Flickr Commons Rights Statement. The Australian National Maritime Museum undertakes research and accepts public comments that enhance the information we hold about images in our collection. If you can identify a person, vessel or landmark, write the details in the Comments box below. Thank you for helping caption this important historical image. Object number 00017577
Owner: Australian National Maritime Museum on The Commons
Views: 9675
Tags: steamer ketch gulfofcarpentaria bawleypoint maritimedisasters douglasmawson tssdouglasmawson
1918

Syrian colony restaurant (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Syrian colony restaurant [1916] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from data provided by the Bain News Service on the negative. Date from print of negative in: PR 06 CN 133, Container 4, Folder 9. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.22817 Call Number: LC-B2- 3980-7
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 7842
Tags: libraryofcongress xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 littlesyriamanhattan dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain22817 syriandiaspora
1916

Tim Healy speaking to crowd (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Tim Healy speaking to crowd [between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.22812 Call Number: LC-B2- 3980-3
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 8195
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1915

Gen. Von Hindenburg (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Gen. Von Hindenburg [between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.22795 Call Number: LC-B2- 3978-6
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 15150
Tags: libraryofcongress xmlns:dc=httppurlorgdcelements11 paulvonhindenburg dc:identifier=httphdllocgovlocpnpggbain22795
1915

Dolly Sisters (LOC)
Description: Bain News Service,, publisher. Dolly Sisters [between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920] 1 negative : glass ; 5 x 7 in. or smaller. Notes: Title from unverified data provided by the Bain News Service on the negatives or caption cards. Forms part of: George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress). Format: Glass negatives. Rights Info: No known restrictions on publication. Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print General information about the Bain Collection is available at hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.ggbain Higher resolution image is available (Persistent URL): hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ggbain.22783 Call Number: LC-B2- 3977-4
Owner: The Library of Congress
Views: 10277
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1915

Image from page 377 of
Description: Identifier: newenglandhumani00joh Title: New England; a human interest geographical reader Year: 1917 (1910s) Authors: Johnson, Clifton, 1865-1940 Subjects: Publisher: New York, The Macmillan Company London, Macmillan and Co., limited Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: d the scenes of his 358 New England youth, and many of his best poems were written in it.He was born in 1807 in a three-story frame house inthe easterly part of the town near the harbor. Longfellow graduated at Bowdoin College, in themanufacturing city of Brunswick, and was for some years a Bowdoin pro-fessor. Hawthornewas another famousBowdoin collegian. Harriet BeecherStowe was living atBrunswick when shewrote Uncle TomsCabin. Her husbandwas at that time aninstructor in the col-lege. She did thewriting amid heavydomestic responsibili-ties, with untrainedservants to oversee, ababy to take care of, and several pupils in the familyto whom she gave daily lessons with her own children.The sale of the book was enormous from the very first,and it has been translated into at least nineteen foreignlanguages. The story was dramatized, and probablyno other play has been produced so many times. Bath is the ship-building city of Maine. It has adeep, safe harbor, and can conveniently receive coal Text Appearing After Image: Henry W. Longfellow Maine Places, Industries, and People 359 and iron by sea, and lumber from the Androscogginand Kennebec rivers. The vessels that are launchedfrom the Bath shipyards vary greatly in size and kind.They are both wooden and steel, and include barges,schooners, steamers, and even warships, Bangor on the Penobscot is the most notable lumbercentre in New England. It gets water power fromfalls, logs can be floated to it direct from the forests,and the river below is navigable for ocean-going ves-sels, so that the lumber can be sent away to advantage. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1917

Image from page 790 of
Description: Identifier: canadiantransport1913 Title: Canadian transportation & distribution management Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Freight and freightage Shipment of goods Transportation Publisher: Don Mills, Ont. : Southam Business Publications Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: LITERATURE ON REQUEST Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 19118
Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookyear1913 bookpublisherdonmillsontsouthambusinesspublications booksubjectshipmentofgoods booksubjecttransportation booksubjectfreightandfreightage bookidcanadiantransport1913 bookleafnumber790 bookcontributorfisheruniversityoftoronto
1913

Image from page 1147 of
Description: Identifier: Highland_Echo_1915-1925 Title: Highland Echo 1915-1925 Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Maryville College student body Subjects: Maryville College Publisher: Maryville, TN : Maryville College Contributing Library: Maryville College Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: MADE FOR YOU WHATEVER your choice of style may be, what-ever you need a shoe for—you cnnnor findgreater satisf.Ction than you will get from the EdwinClapp shoe. It isconifortrble,it retains its shape throughhard usage and repeated soling. Its appearance is ingood taste, and it will give you service beyond yourexperience with Lsser shoes. Edwin Clapp shoes are approved and worn by men ofdiscrimination. For seventy years they have challengedcomparison in appearance, comfort and wear. Headquarters for the Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1915

Image from page 447 of
Description: Identifier: postoperativetr00mors Title: Postoperative treatment; an epitome of the general management of postoperative care and treatment of surgical cases as practised by prominent American and European surgeons Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Morse, Nathan Clark. [from old catalog] Subjects: Operations, Surgical. [from old catalog] Publisher: Philadelphia, P. Blakiston's son & co. Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 142.—Anterior [Leg [Splint, for Resection of the Knee-joint, Fitting Either Side. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 143.—Posterior Leg and Thigh Splint, for Resection of the Knee-joint,Fitting Either Side. If sepsis occurs, the after-treatment is tedious and uncertain, andfrequently demands considerable mechanical skill in the application ofsplints, and at the same time permits surgical dressing to be appliedwhen the wound is suppurating. The open-wound method of treat-ment is always preferable, and the after-treatment does not vary frommethods already described under the head of Treatment of SepticWounds. In these prolonged cases the ambulatory splint (Fig. 141)not only assists in the radical cure, but renders the patient more com-fortable and permits him to be up and around. EXCISIONS OK RESECTIONS 01 JOINTS. 423 Excision or Resection of the Knee-joint.—The after-treatment is of the utmost importance, is tedious, and often surrounded withdifficulties. There is a tendency to displacement, and notably to adisplacement of the tibia backward. If sound healing does not takeplace, the limb is Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1907

Image from page 256 of
Description: Identifier: briarpatch1920swee Title: The Briar patch Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Sweet Briar College Subjects: Sweet Briar College Publisher: Sweet Briar, Va. : Sweet Briar College Contributing Library: Sweet Briar College Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: 1J1)•^•♦<{*♦<•^•♦<^~^•M~I~I~M•^~;~;~;~H••^♦♦♦*^•I~I~^ I Winfree-Strother Furniture CompanyFINE FURNITURE 717 Main Street Phone 841 LYNCHBURG, VA. The LYNCHBURG NATIONAL BANK Lynchburg, Va. OFFICERS;WM. V. WII.LSON - - - . PresidentALLEN CUCULLU- - - -Vice-PresidentGILES H. MILLER. Vice-President 4 CashierB. F. COUSINS - - - . Assistant Cashier ASSETS : Over Seven Million Dollars Progressive, Conservative AND Secure The Oldest Bank in Lynchburg Shoreham Hotel H Street Northwest at FifteenthWashington, D. C. Noted for its atmosphere of Comfort and Refinement WE cater especially TO LADIES traveling alone. ROBERT C. DOVE. Manaeinir Director C. M. COLLINS. Resident Mananer O. S. CUNNINGHAM. Assistant Manater See Here Girls! Miss Hollodays Insist on that Agriculturist Husbandof yours (when you get him) grow-ing peanuts and buying a BenthallPicker, the Machine of ProvenWorth-. Famous Home-made Candies ...Made in...PARIS. KENTUCKY Benthall Machine Co. Se Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 7156
Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 bookauthorsweetbriarcollege booksubjectsweetbriarcollege bookpublishersweetbriarvasweetbriarcollege bookidbriarpatch1920swee bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber256 bookcontributorsweetbriarcollege
1920

Image from page 150 of
Description: Identifier: ellington1918unse Title: Ellington 1918 Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Air bases--Texas--Houston Flight training--Texas--Houston Publisher: [Houston, Tex.] : [s.n.] Contributing Library: Rice University, Fondren Library Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Can She Climb? Text Appearing After Image: Do You Get That Bull Dog Look? Page 147 ] [ELLINGTON FIELD—1918 r r . - J St mTMmm\\!\ ! ■ j; ^;t S ^^a ■■^^Hl jf m Hh i^^**Mt-v i m\ ~^~ Mm Mtk P^iSfllPlf* ^T JaE&at- VuH V vJ^Bp^st^Kbu^SI 1^9 ■ \ J \\ ^v*N?iito\^ 5m 1^aH^ ^T^3 Ifek^ *\ * WPc.3 ^ Ellingtons First Officers and Instructors Top Row—Walter Lees, L. L. Harvey, T. H. Webb, B. S. Robertson, C. F. Smythe, L. L. Snow, Albert Johnson Bottom Row—Roger Jannus, Charles Baetjer, Porter Mackall, L. J. McMenemy Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1918

Image from page 526 of
Description: Identifier: coastreview501896sanf Title: Coast review Year: 1871 (1870s) Authors: Subjects: Insurance Insurance Mines and mineral resources Mines and mineral resources Publisher: San Francisco : J.G. Riley Contributing Library: San Francisco Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: San Francisco Public Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Ij^SURANCE C5MR§g|f I Text Appearing After Image: For Fire Insurance. Assets in United States *2,8:{«!,:«; -m Net Sui-pius » .-.(;8,:jt>o 4: Writing Large Lines On Desirable Business. Ajjplications for Agencies or Information should be addressed For Eastern ami Middle States: WILLIAM BI-:LL. t i. , x. „- WILLIAM WOOD. , Joint Managers. WILLIAM M. HALLAIJD, Branch Secv. 31 Nassau St., (Equitable mdjj.i, New York. For Western States: GEORGE M. FISHEK, Manager. 305 La .Salle Street. Chieas. HI- For Southern States: FINLEY & JANVIER. Managers. 308 Camp Street, New Orleans, I>a. For Pacific Coast: CHARLES A. LATON, Manager. 4.39 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. J. S. Winchester, Makes a»« \ ATTORNEYAND ^ COUNSELOR AT LAW, Correspondence Solicited.References on Application. 4 Sherlock Building, PORTLAND, OREGON. Specialty ofInsurance •Law • • • t ^4 Ths Coast T^eview. Our San Francisco Insurance Directory Directory of San Francisco Fire and MarineInsurance Agencies. Tele- Qeneral, Agents and Companies,phone 5 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Views: 2905
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1871

Image from page 99 of
Description: Identifier: triptoorientstor00jacorich Title: A trip to the Orient; the story of a Mediterranean cruise Year: 1907 (1900s) Authors: Jacob, Robert Urie Subjects: Middle East -- Description and travel Publisher: Philadelphia, The J. C. Winston co Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: agnificent andinteresting view of the harbor was obtained. Not faraway, but hundreds of feet below us, the Moltke lay,encircled by the white awning-covered boats. Eightlarge battleships and a dozen cruisers and gunboats,all painted black, were lying peacefully at anchor.Steamships and sailing vessels at the docks were dis-charging cargoes, or were lying in the bay awaitingtheir turn to unload. Steam launches were busilyflying from one point to another, and little ferry boatswere constantly crossing and re-crossing the bay. Theharbor was surrounded by high cliffs and old gray forti- 88 A TRIP TO THE ORIENT. fications. At the entrance to the bay stood a talllighthouse.and a frowning fortress, the one for guidance,the other for protection. Through the entrance a shipwith spread sails was entering, and beyond, the sun-light shone on the beautiful blue waters af the Mediter-ranean. The streets of Valetta were full of life that day. Inrepl\^ to inquiries we were informed that on the follow- Text Appearing After Image: ATTRACTIVE STORES LINE THE STRADA REALE. ing day, the Sunday preceding Lent, a festa, or carnival,lasting three days, would begin. During the festa,business would be suspended, and the people, disguisedin masks and fanciful costumes, would engage in mostludicrous and extraordinary antics and play all mannerof practical jokes on one another, showering the passers- THE ISLAND OF MALTA. 89 by gently witn confetti and flowers, or pelting themstingingly with dried peas and beans. Many children,impatient for the morrow to come, were already paradingthe streets arrayed in their costumes. Attractive stores line the Strada Reale, the mainshopping street. In these stores laces, gold and silverfilagree work, jewelry, and embroidered muslins werethe principal wares sought by the tourists. The ladiesof our party were particularly anxious to secure piecesof Maltese lace, a special hand-made product noted forthe excellence of its quality, the making of which givesemployment to thousands of the inhab Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherphiladelphiathejcwinstonco bookidtriptoorientstor00jacorich bookauthorjacobroberturie booksubjectmiddleeastdescriptionandtravel bookyear1907 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber99 bookcontributoruniversityofcalifornialibraries
1907

Image from page 24 of
Description: Identifier: beckertsgardenfl1908wmcb Title: Beckert's garden, flower and lawn seeds Year: 1908 (1900s) Authors: Wm. C. Beckert (Firm) Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection Subjects: Commercial catalogs Seeds Vegetables Seeds Catalogs Bulbs (Plants) Seeds Catalogs Fruit Seeds Catalogs Flowers Seeds Catalogs Garden tools Catalogs Publisher: Pittsburg, Pa. : Wm. C. Beckert Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: WHITE AND RED TOP GLOBE TURNIP Wm. C. Beckerts Choice List of Vegetable Seeds, Pittsburg, Pa. 21 NORTHERN-GROWN SEED POTATOES (Kartoffeln) Prices subject to change i stock, grown especially from seed. We sei id out no Potatoes in spring before danger of Text Appearing After Image: EARLY OHIO POTATOES Our Potatoes are all choice northern-growrfrost is past. All varieties sent free by mail at 20 cts. per pound, except where otherwise noted. Prices here quoted are based on present value, and are subject to variation without notice The Bovee. Early as any Potato yet introduced. In competi-tive trials with other early sorts it has out-yielded them all. Vinedwarf and stocky; tubers grow very close together in the hills, Pk. 45 cts., bus. $1.60. ^^^^Hfl X Early Ohio. Leading early variety; tubers rough in the skin; MRf li- nearly round, and quite distinct in appearance; cooks dry and flK * v i mealy. Pk. 45 cts., bus. $1.60. L \rly Puritan. Skin and flesh white; cooks dry and floury;very productive. Pk. 45 cts., bus. $1.60. Eureka. Extra-early variety, tubers round, skin smooth andwhite; good quality. Pk. 45 cts., bus. $1.75. Irish Cobbler. Good all around extra-early variety; uniform,productive, and fine quality. Pk. 45 cts., bus. $1.75. Country Gentleman. Resembles Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookauthorhenryggilbertnurseryandseedtradecatalogcollection booksubjectflowersseedscatalogs booksubjectvegetablesseedscatalogs bookauthorwmcbeckertfirm booksubjectfruitseedscatalogs booksubjectgardentoolscatalogs bookyear1908 booksubjectcommercialcatalogsseeds
1908

Image from page 294 of
Description: Identifier: charactersketche00inbrew Title: Character sketches of romance, fiction and the drama Year: 1892 (1890s) Authors: Brewer, Ebenezer Cobham Subjects: Literature Allusions Fiction. Publisher: New York,: E. Hess Contributing Library: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries with support from LYRASIS and the Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ich, into the loilderness. ivithorders to put both mother and child to death. Moved by her prayers, the two men, oneofwijom is with dijficulty persuaded to compassion by his more merciful companion,consent to Spare her life, but on condition that she bide herself in the wood, ivhile theyreturn to report her death to Siegfried. Seven years pass, and one day, while the Countis hunting, the hart be is pursuing brings him to the cave where Genevieve is living zvithher child. The Count, astonished at the sight, brealis forth: SiegfriedWho art thou, then ? And what may be tly name.? GenevieveSurely, good Sir, I have known better days.I lived in Brabant. To these woods I fledFrom men who would have killed me, innocent.Nor me alone, but my poor, lovely child. What was your name ? and what your husbands ? say ! ^ Genevieve My husband ? Ah, my God I His name was Siegfried.And I, unlucky one, am Genevieve.And this is his poor child, God pity him ! Ludwig Tiecks Life and Death of Saint Genevieve. Text Appearing After Image: GENEVIEVE DE BRABANT. BRAHMIN CASTE 159 BRANDAMOND aristocracy: Our scholars come chieflyfrom a privileged order just as our bestfruits come from well-known grafts.—Msie Venner (1863). Brainworm, the servant of Knowell, aman of infinite shifts, and a regular Pro-teus in his metamorphoses. He appearsfiist as Brainworm; after as Fitz-Sword;then as a reformed soldier whom Knowelltakes into his service; then as justiceClements man; and lastly as valet to thecourts of law, by which devices he playsupon the same clique of some haH-dozenmen of average intelligence.—Ben Jonson,Every Man in His Humour (1598). Brakel (Adrian), the gipsy mountebank,formerly master of Fenella, the deaf anddumb girl.—Sir W. Scott, Peveril of thePeak (time, Charles II.). Bramble (Matthew), an odd kind ofhumorist, always on the fret, dyspeptic,and afiiicted with gout, but benevolent,generous, and kind-hearted. Miss Tabitha Bramble, an old maidensister of Matthew Bramble, of some forty-five years of age, noted Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectfiction bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 booksubjectliterature bookyear1892 bookidcharactersketche00inbrew bookauthorbrewerebenezercobham booksubjectallusions bookpublishernewyorkehess bookcollectionamericana
1892

Image from page 102 of
Description: Identifier: cu31924023266970 Title: The unmannerly tiger, and other Korean tales Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Griffis, William Elliot, 1843-1928 Subjects: Folklore Tales, Korean Publisher: New York, Thomas Y. Crowell company Contributing Library: Cornell University Library Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: g off thewater from his hair, and thus get the creditfor first finding where the stone had been. It was a long, hard swim and the dogsstrength was nearly used up when only two-thirds across the river, but the cat was happy,for she had only to hold on and keep her feetdry. All went well until when near the shore. Now it happened just then that a party ofchildren, out of school and ready for fun, caughtsight of the odd pair. They had never seenanything so funny in all their lives, and at oncethey laughed uproariously. Snap was too seriousto pay any attention to their glee, but Mee Yow,already tickled with vanity, became positivelyfrivolous. She too joined with the childrenand laughed so hard that Snaps body was badlyshaken, so that he nearly got his nose underwater and drowned them both. This made thelight-headed and conceited cat laugh all themore. Finally bursting in a guflfaw, Mee Yowdropped the gem out of her mouth, so that itwas hopelessly lost in the river and fell to thebottom, f Text Appearing After Image: A party of children caught sight of the odd pair. TOKGABIS MENAGERIE 77 That was too much for the dog, to have hislabor thus wasted. Thinking only of his mas-ter the faithful and serious Snap dived to thebottom of the river, tumbling Mee Yow off,though much scratching and clawing took placebefore Puss let go and swam ashore. Alas I the dog could not find the preciousgem, and when once on land he first shook him-self to dry his hair and then rushed at the catto give her a good shaking. But Mee Yowclimbed up a tree, and though nearly frozento death after her icy bath, kept up growlingas long as the dog barked. After that, in Korea, the cats and dogs ceasedto be friends. Indeed, they never spoke to eachother. Wild, unloved and unpetted, the cat be-longs to the bad animals in Tokgabis museum,while the puppy dog, with a good reputation,is the pet of the family and his big father anduncles are the faithful friends of man. THE GREAT STONE FIRE EATER AGES ago, there lived a great Fire Spiriti Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 bookpublishernewyorkthomasycrowellcompany bookauthorgriffiswilliamelliot18431928 booksubjectfolklore bookyear1911 bookidcu31924023266970 booksubjecttaleskorean bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber102
1911

Image from page 238 of
Description: Identifier: biblepanoramaorh00fost Title: The Bible panorama, or The Holy Scriptures in picture and story Year: 1891 (1890s) Authors: Foster, William A. [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: JESUS DRIVES PROM THE TEMPLE THE MONEY CHANGERS AND SELLERS OF DOVES. oqo St- John II. 15. Text Appearing After Image: JESUS TEACHES THE PEOPLE. Z-jo st. John vii. 11 Jesus and His Disciples Go into Galilee. JESUS and his disciples went into a part of the land called Galilee. On theway there, they came to a city named Sychar. Just outside of the citywas a well, called Jacobs well, where the people came to get water. It was in the hot part of the day, and Jesus being wearied with his journey,sat down by the well. His disciples had gone into the city to buy food, andhad left him alone. And a woman came out of the city, carrying her pitcher to draw water.ISTow this woman was a sinner. She did not love God in her heart, and haddone many things to displease him. Jesus knew this, for he sees all our heartsand knows of everything that we have done. And he talked with the woman,and told her of some of the things she had done, long ago, to displease God. Then she was surprised, and said, Sir, I see thou art a prophet. She meantthat he was a person whom God told of things which other people did notknow. And she Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookauthorfosterwilliamafromoldcatalog bookyear1891 bookidbiblepanoramaorh00fost bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber238 booksponsorthelibraryofcongress bookcollectionlibraryofcongress
1891

Image from page 470 of
Description: Identifier: diseasesofdogthe00ml Title: Diseases of the dog and their treatment Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Müller, Georg Alfred, 1851-1923 Glass, Alexander Subjects: Horses Dogs -- Diseases Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Alexander Eger Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Fig. 151.—Hematoma oi the ear. Therapeutic Treatment.—The methods of treatment which thewaiter considers advisable are as follows: We perforate the swelling with a large-sized hypodermic syringeor aspirator. The secretion is then removed and a solution of iodine 1, Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 152.—Ear-cap. iodide of potassium G and alcohol IG is injected into the cavity. Wethen apply a compressing dressing in the following manner: The ear is covered with antiseptic wadding on both surfaces. It is SEROUS CYST 431 then held in position bj- means of an ear-cap (Figs. 152, 153). This dress-ing must not be clisphiced, but allowed to remain for days. This methodhas been an element of uncertainty; in some cases it acts perfectly andin others, beyond setting up considerable irritation, it does not destroythe secreting surface and the abnormal condition returns. McQueens method is very simple and produces good results. Hecarefully removes the hair from the ear and renders it antiseptic, andeither paints the ear with cocaine or administers chloroform, empties thesac by means of an aspirator syringe, and makes sure that it is com-pletely emptied. Sutures are then inserted radiating from the centreof the sac, about one-third of an inch apart, directly through the ear and KALEVI Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjecthorses booksubjectdogsdiseases bookyear1911 bookiddiseasesofdogthe00ml bookauthormllergeorgalfred18511923 bookauthorglassalexander bookpublisherchicagoillalexandereger bookcollectionamericana
1911

Image from page 155 of
Description: Identifier: epitomeofhistory00unse Title: Epitome of the history of medicine : based upon a course of lectures delivered in the University of Buffalo Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Park, Roswell,1852-1914 Subjects: Medicine History of Medicine Publisher: Philadelphia : F.A. Davis Co. Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: into the wells from which the French drew theirwater. These wild views simply indicate the spirit of theage. Oviedo published in 1545 a history of the WestIndies, in which he states that syphilis originated in Amer-ica. He held that when Columbus returned from hissecond expedition to the New Worlds in 1496, his menenlisted under Gonsalvo de Cordova to go and fight theFrench, who had invaded the Kingdom ol Naples, andthat they communicated to the French and Neapolitansthe disease which they had brought from San Domingo.Unhappily for his veracity, it is certain that syphilis brokeout in Naples at least two years before the arrival of theSpanish fleet. It is equally certain that at none of thepoints at which Columbus touched on his return from hisfirst expedition was there any manifestation of syphilisfor years. At this time the venereal disease, so-called, includedthose conditions which we now differentiate under thenames of syphilis, chancroid, and gonorrhoea,—a confusion t7^1na> Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 20.—Different Forms of Trephines and Pliers. (From the Works on Chirurgerie, by Jacques Guillemeau, chirurgeon ordinaryto the King of France, 16-19.) 138 THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE. of diseases which persisted even up to the time of JohnHunter. It is worth while to publish this fact, sincewriters of two or three hundred years ago may not havemeant by the term syphilis just what we would meanto-day. Without going into this question here, it isenough to say that one who reads intelligently may see inthe Sacred Scriptures unmistakable allusions to this dis-ease. If the statements of David, as contained in thePsalms, are reliable, he was himself a serious sufferer fromit. The ancient Greek and Arabian physicians make men-tion of lesions which could only be attributed to this dis-ease ; and the Latin satirists, like Horace and Juvenal,describe symptoms of a certain kind as being the fruit onlyof shameful practices. It is most likely that the sudden appearance of syphilisin nearly all p Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectmedicine bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1898 bookpublisherphiladelphiafadavisco booksubjecthistoryofmedicine bookauthorparkroswell18521914 bookidepitomeofhistory00unse bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionmedicalheritagelibrary
1898

Image from page 346 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial392dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: in the twilight as that one incidentshone in the old musicians memory. MY HAPPIEST MEMORY(As told by a kitten) BY BETTY HUMPHREYS (AGE II) (Gold Badge) Little kitten,1 his was written For you to obey :Stay at homeUntil you ve grown, That s a kittens way.If you dont obey this rule,You will be a kitten fool. That was the rule my mothertaught me. I had always obeyedit, until one day I could nt bearthe poky old basket any longer.My mother had gone to catchmice in the cellar, so it was agood chance to jump out andexplore the house, which I did. I stole some fish, broke a vase full of flowers, almost caught the canary (I scared him, anyhow), and had a fine time. Then I came back and pretended to be asleep in the basket. Mother never knew how I enjoyed myself that day. My happiest memory was being a kitten fool. N.B. I have grown up now, ana tell that story to mykittens, who are never tired of hearing it. I am glad tosay, however, that they obey the kittens golden rule. HEADING FOR JULY 1112 Text Appearing After Image: A HEADING FUR JULY. BY DOROTHY CALKINS, AGE 15. 854 i ST. NICHOLAS LEAGUE [July, Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1873

Image from page 1252 of
Description: Identifier: reportsofmission1904pres Title: Reports of the missionary and benevolent boards and committees to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Year: 1891 (1890s) Authors: Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Home Missions. Annual report of the Board of Home Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Foreign Missions. Annual report of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Education. Annual report of the Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work. Annual report of the Board of Publication and Sabbath-School Work of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of the Church Erection Fund. Annual report of the Board of the Church Erection Fund of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Presbyterian Board of Relief for Disabled Ministers and the Widows and Orphans of Deceased Ministers. Annual report to the General Assembly Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Missions for Freedmen. Annual report of the Board of Missions for Freedmen of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies. Annual report of the Board of Aid for Colleges and Academies of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Special Committee on Systematic Beneficence. Report of the General Assembly's Special Committee of the Presbyterian Church on Systematic Beneficence Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Permanent Committee on Temperance. Annual report of the General Assembly's Permanent Committee on Temperence for the year ending .. Subjects: Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A Publisher: Philadelphia : Presbyterian Board of Publication Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: at the head of page 59, is not in-cluded in the sum charged to the Presbyteries, although guests at the Houseare recommended by their Presbyteries, the same as those receiving an appro-priation in money. Annual Report of the Board of Relief. 59 TABULAR STATEMENT* /.—Of the amounts paid into the Treasury from each Presbytery, with the amounts they havedrawn from the Treasury, not including the turn appropriated to the Homes. (See page *i.) t.— The number of Contributing and Non-Contributing Churches. For a list of the Churchescontributing, with the amounts, see pages 23-5^ of the Report of the Board. Synod of Atlan-tic. Presbyteries. Atlantic East Florida, . . Fairfield Hodge, Knox, McClelland, . . .South Florida, . . Synod of Balti-more.Presbyteries. Baltimore, 1,287 36 Newcastle, . . . . i 693 02Washington City,, 90-5 28 Synod of Call FORNIA.Presbyteries.Benicia, . . .Los Angeles, .Oakland, . . .Riverside, . ,Sacramento, .San Francisco,San Josii, . . .Santa Barbara,Stockton,. . . Text Appearing After Image: 330 12530 02273 93184 76|113 701189 00202 45201 4161 40 Synod of Ca- T.4WBA. Presbyteries. ■Cape Fear Catawba Southern Virginia,Yadkin, 2,086 79 18 0016 5018 0025 92 78 42 Synod of Colo- I RADO. Presbyteries, Boulder, i 152 93 Denver 176 51 Gunnison | 61 3.i Pueblo I 475 62 Wyoming 50 00 916 41 450 00 5,837 50 1,800 00 150 00 650 00 1,150 00125 00750 00 SvNOD OF Indiana Presbyteries.Crawfordsville,Fort Wayne, .Indianapolis, .Logansport, .Muncie, . . .New Albany, .Vincennes, . .8 I White Water, .13 10,912 50, 138 475 00500 00445 00260 00 24 1,680 00 700 00 850 00 300 00 1,100 00 106 Synod of IndianTf.rritory.Presbyteries.Canadian. 28 I Choctaw, .22 Cimarron. 29 iKiamichi,Oklahoma, 59 103 |Sequoyab, 2,950 00 64 Synod op Iowa.Presbyteries.Cedar Rapids, . .35 Corning, . . . . ,13 Council Bluffs, . ,— Des Moines, . . , 276 76 1,850 00 184 57 400 00 278 90 800 00 227 43 1,650 00 135 03 625 OO; 160 70 1,625 00 166 83 300 00, 235 91 1,000 00! 1,666 13 8,250 00 151 U 00 19 60 83 52 8 00 13 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookpublisherphiladelphiapresbyterianboardofpublication bookidreportsofmission1904pres bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusa bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusaboardofhomemissionsannualreportoftheboardofhomemissionsofthepresbyterianchurchintheunitedstatesofamerica bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusaboardofforeignmissionsannualreportoftheboardofforeignmissionsofthepresbyterianchurchintheunitedstatesofamerica bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusaboardofeducationannualreportoftheboardofeducationofthepresbyterianchurchintheunitedstatesofamerica bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusaboardofpublicationandsabbathschoolworkannualreportoftheboardofpublicationandsabbathschoolworkofthepresbyterianchurchintheunitedstatesofamerica bookauthorpresbyterianchurchintheusaboardofthechurcherectionfundannualreportoftheboardofthechurcherectionfundofthegeneralassemblyofthepresbyterianchurchintheunitedstatesofamerica
1891

Image from page 1059 of
Description: Identifier: pharmaceuticaler19newyuoft Title: The Pharmaceutical era Year: 1887 (1880s) Authors: Subjects: Drug Industry Drugs Drugs Pharmaceutical industry Pharmacy Pharmacy Publisher: New York [etc.] D. O. Haynes & Co Contributing Library: Gerstein - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: Ontario Council of University Libraries and Member Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: GOODYEAR CROWN WATER BOTTLESGOODYEAR CROWN ATOMIZERSRUBBER BULBS AND TUBINGGOODYEAR HARD RUBBER SYRINGESROYAL HARD RUBBER SYRINGESEXCELSIOR HARD RUBBER SYRINGES IMPERIAL HAIR BRUSHESIMPERIAL NAIL BRUSHESIMPERIAL TOOTH BRUSHES IMPERIAL LATHER BRUSHESIMPERIAL MIRRORS f^^\fijl DO Imperial, Royal, I. R. Comb Co.s Unbreakable Goodyear, 1851, HerculesV/V/IVIDO. (warranted unbreakable), Maltese, Mottled, I. R. Comb Co.s, Butler HardRubber Co.s, U. S. Comb, American Rubber Co. Oil IVI r^ D I ^ Q Hard Rubber Pessaries, Pile Pipes, Iodoform Sprinklers, Suppositors,O w IN L/rvi CO. Scoops, Funnels, Teething Rings, Specula, Caustic Holders, Stetho-scopes, Ear Trumpets, Pocket Flasks, Plain and Telescopic Tumblers, Beer Stands, Scrapers,Cocktail or Lemonade Shakers, Match Boxes, Penholders, Rulers and Inkstands ; also Goodyear Crown Dental Gum and Corrugated Soft Rubber Points. The NeYi^er Remedies By Virgil Coblentz, A. M. Phil. D. PROFESSOR OP CHEMISTRY. . . . . . . NEW YORK COLLEGE OP PHABMAOY. Text Appearing After Image: SECOND REVISED AND ENLARGED EDITION. NEARLY 1,000 OF THE NEWER REMEDIES. rNCLUDING ALL THE SYNTHETIC COMPOUNDS, RARE CHEMICALS, PROPRIETARY PREPARATIONS, ETC. FULLY DESCRIBED AS TO THEIRORIGIN, CHEMICAL FORMULAS,SYNONYMS,THERAPEUTIC USES,DOSES, ETC. Subjects alphabetically arranged for quick reference.Gives both pharmacist and physician information not to befound in any standard text book. It is the most complete workof its kind and sold at a popular price. PRICE 50 CENTS PER COPY POSTPAID. D. O, HAYNES & CO., Publishers, NEW YORK. p. O. BOX H83. il June 30, 1898.] THE PHARMACEUTICAL ERA. Rottler! in Rnnd ^*^ ■«*• P^oot. when bottled, size UULLICU III UUIIU. of bottles, number of gallons to thecase, all guaranteed by the Best Qovernment on Earth. Per CflSAOLD HERMITAGE BOURBON, made In Spring 83, bottled In bond 1897, 15 years old, B to the gallon J13.B0 JOCKET CLUB, made by M. V. Monarch, O wensboro, Ky., Spring 92, B to the gallon T.OO JOCKET CLUB, Spring 92, full pints, 2 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 booksubjectdrugs booksubjectpharmacy bookyear1887 bookdecade1880 booksubjectdrugindustry booksubjectpharmaceuticalindustry bookpublishernewyorketcdohaynesco bookidpharmaceuticaler19newyuoft bookcollectionmedicalheritagelibrary
1887

Image from page 205 of
Description: Identifier: catalogueno16spr00macy Title: Catalogue no. 16, spring/summer / R. H. Macy & Co. Year: 1911 (1910s) Authors: Macy's (Firm) Subjects: Department stores--Catalogs Trade catalogs--Department stores. Publisher: R.H. Macy, New York Contributing Library: Winterthur Museum Library Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Womens elbow length r,:, uci siik gloves with double finger tips, two cUi^v^, ma^.y cinbroideredbacks. Suitable for evening and general drt;sa wear, Asplendid quality glove for a very small price. Black orwhite only; sizes, ^Vz to 8; State color and aize. •I7B204I3 Price, per pair 69c Womens extra fine quality Imported glace lambskinmousouetaire gloves. Sixteen button length, oversewn seams, modish embroidery at backs, fastened with threesmall pearl buttons, in wliite only. Especially suitablet(.r e\ening and dress wear. Sizes, 5M: to ^I 7B204 I 2 Prir-M per pair $1.79 Text Appearing After Image: Our Marigold eight button mousquetaire glace gloves, oversewn seams, embroidered backs, finished with twopearl buttons at wrist, perfn-l ia lit and tliiisb Amideal glove for general dress wear, in black, wlilte, stateand tan. An luiusual opportunity to buy a liiijli niudeglove at Ji very moderate price; sizes, 5/^ to 7.I 7B204 I 4 Il-Jue. per pair $1.79 Our Marigold, imported elbow length French suedekid mousquetaire gloves, high grade quality, silk filetcmbrotdfiry on the back; finished at wrist with three stnallpearl buttons, <*olors, grav, tan pink. rtUy and clianiiiacne,al--^n in iilack and white, t^tate color and size. ^0 JA I7B204I5 Elbow Length. Price, per pair..3^.1^I7B204I6 20 button Length, black or white.$3.44 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectdepartmentstorescatalogs bookidcatalogueno16spr00macy bookauthormacysfirm booksubjecttradecatalogsdepartmentstores bookpublisherrhmacynewyork bookyear1911 bookcollectionamericana bookleafnumber205
1911

Image from page 315 of
Description: Identifier: americanhomesga101913newy Title: American homes and gardens Year: 1905 (1900s) Authors: Subjects: Architecture, Domestic Landscape gardening Publisher: New York : Munn and Co Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: y the north-eastern states islabeled New Eng-land, though this, to be sure, maybe because owing to the small size ofthese states it was impossible to pre-sent each one. New York occupiesonly the tiniest fragment upon themap and New Jersey and Delawareare quantities almost negligible.Pennsylvania is expanded to a sizemuch greater than it ever possessed,and Virginia and the Carolinas arerepresented by long horizontal stripswhich extend from the seaboard tothe Mississippi River. Mexico, andthe greater part of Central Americaappear in what is much their presentposition, but a puzzling section justnorth of Mexico is labeled NewNavarre, and by far the greater partof the continent is inscribed un-known land. Another English collection includes attainments far above the ordinary. Among the treasures in a noted col- 0val maP samplers are very rare. This fine example a sampler map~of Africa, and it too is lection of samplers in England, there 1S from the Drake Collectlon (Continued on page 192) Text Appearing After Image: A remarkable map sampler, Eastern and Western hemispheres, worked by A. Mather, 1 802. From the collection of Mr. E. B. Power May, 1913 AMERICAN HOMES AND GARDENS 179 Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 booksubjectarchitecturedomestic booksubjectlandscapegardening bookpublishernewyorkmunnandco bookidamericanhomesga101913newy bookyear1905 bookcollectionbiodiversity bookcontributorsmithsonianlibraries booksponsorbiodiversityheritagelibrary
1905

Image from page 140 of
Description: Identifier: generalcatalogue00jaco Title: The general catalogue of Jacobson & co Year: 1915 (1910s) Authors: Jacobson & Company Subjects: Plaster Decoration and ornament, Architectural Publisher: New York Contributing Library: Boston Public Library Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: 2531 Adam each S12.00 2536 Adam each S4.00 2541 Adam each 2532 Adam each 12.00 2537 Adam each 2.00 2542 Adam per foot. . . 2533 Adam each 6.00 2538 Adam per foot 60 2543 Adam per foot. . . . 2534 Adam each S.OO 2539 Adam per foot 80 2544 Adam per foot.. 2533 Adam each 6.00 2340 Adam per foot 80 2545 Adam each .$2.00. .80. .60. .40..8.00 Panels PLATE 125 JACOBSOX & Co. Text Appearing After Image: 2546-2548 Louis XVI each S16.00 2549A, B Louis XVI each. . 12.00 2550 Louis XVI each 2.00 2551 Louis XVI each $2.00 2552 Louis XVI each 4.00 2553 Louis XVI each 3.00 2554 Louis XVI each $3.00 2555C. D Louis XVI each 4.09 2555A. B Louis XVI each 4.00 Note: 2549B same size as 2549A. JACOBSON & Co. PLATE 126 Insert Panels Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectdecorationandornamentarchitectural bookpublishernewyork bookyear1915 bookidgeneralcatalogue00jaco bookauthorjacobsoncompany booksubjectplaster bookcollectionamericana booksponsorinternetarchive
1915

Image from page 28 of
Description: Identifier: dancinghelenmoll00moll Title: Dancing with Helen Moller; her own statement of her philosophy and practice and teaching formed upon the classic Greek model, and adapted to meet the aesthetic and hygienic needs of to-day, with forty-three full page art plates; Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Moller, Helen Dunham, Curtis Subjects: Dance Dance Publisher: New York : John Lane company London, John Lane Contributing Library: University of California Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: s attention to detail—and very little of valueabout Dancing, in the true sense of the word. You maylearn from those volumes that dancing is the mostancient of the arts; that its birth was coincident with thebirth of religion; that the primitive tribes of every landdanced; that all savages still dance, and that every stageof civilization has been marked by its own particularvariation upon the ancient dance theme, with the peopleof every nation exploiting national dances of their owninvention, while the stage has added all its traditionalresources of exaggeration and spectacularization. Thusyou may learn virtually all there is to be learned aboutdances—and miss pretty nearly the whole idea ofDancing. Such knowledge is not to be despised. A faithfulhistory of the dance is the virtual equivalent of a social Twenty-thret Atalanta. Depicting the classical moment of the most intense physical andmental concentration upon two opposing motives—to win the race, yet pauseto seize the prize. Text Appearing After Image: The Classic Ideal—and Ours history of the world, reflecting ethics, the graphic andplastic arts, the customs, manners and costumes in allcountries and in each successive stage of civilization.All this material is of special and legitimate value to thestage, which, in these times, exercises a function of por-trayal that is universal in its scope. Probably never be-fore was the daily life of the people more closely asso-ciated with the atmosphere of the theatre. Thus, morethan ever, every manifestation of decadence or of prog-ress in human affairs must, sooner or later, find itselfrecorded in stage productions. More and more fully thestage is recording our progress in restoring the Arcadiannatural grace and beauty of the dance. It invites us whodance as dancing ought to be, for our own joy and bene-fit, to make a public diversion of what is our pleasure andour duty to ourselves. And this is as it should be. Itwill contribute new-old beauties to the Art of the Dance,and it will help to Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectdance bookdecade1910 bookpublisherlondonjohnlane bookauthormollerhelen bookiddancinghelenmoll00moll bookauthordunhamcurtis bookyear1918 bookpublishernewyorkjohnlanecompany bookcollectionamericana
1918

Image from page 161 of
Description: Identifier: howtoknowhumanna00atki Title: How to know human nature: its inner states and outer forms Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Atkinson, William Walker, 1862-1932 Subjects: Character Personality Publisher: Holyoke, Mass., The Elizabeth Towne co. [etc., etc.] Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: cen-tral source of motive and mental power;every action has its root or seat of impulsein the brain and its connections, and as themind forms purposes, the will is sent outto the extremities, and the external motionsexpress the inward thought and feeling.Habitual states of mind tend to produce hab-itual forms and expressions of face and body;a person who suffers pain for years, will havein the face an expression of the internal state;one who has been nurtured in gladness,though the face may not be beautiful, willwear the sunshine of joy; one who has hadcare and responsibility, will come to show itin the face, in the walk, and in the voice, asone who has been subjugated and kept subor-dinate will have the word humiliation written 160 Human Nature in his features not only, but in all his move*ments and attitudes. SHAPES OF FACES The authorities in Physiognomy divide thefaces of persons into three general classes,viz: (1) The Bound Face; (2) The OblongFace; and (3) The Pear-shaped Face. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 12 BOUND FACE In Fig. 12, we see the Round Face. Thisface is indicative of the Vital Temperament.It is usually associated with broad shoulders,short neck, full chest, and plumpness, withenlarged abdomen in middle life. These peo- Faces 161 pie love ease and physical comforts, good eat-ing and drinking, &nd not too much hard men-tal or physical work. They are solicitous ofthe comfort of their bodies, and generallylook out for No. 1 in this respect. Theyare generally good-natured and sociable, andoften jolly. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1910 booksubjectpersonality bookpublisheretcetc bookyear1919 booksubjectcharacter bookidhowtoknowhumanna00atki bookauthoratkinsonwilliamwalker18621932 bookpublisherholyokemasstheelizabethtowneco bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress
1919

Image from page 198 of
Description: Identifier: reviewofreviewsw33newy Title: Review of reviews and world's work Year: 1890 (1890s) Authors: Subjects: Publisher: New York Review of Reviews Corp Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: an acre of coal land will yieldanywhere from 5,000 to 15,000 tons of freight.Compare the minimum of 5,000 tons in contrastwith the freight created onagricultural land, where theaverage would be less thanone-half a ton per acre, andit will be seen that an acrein cotton, corn, or wheat willneed 10,000 years to producethe same amount of freightproduced by one acre of coal.In this fact is found thepotent reas(m for the strug-gle of the giants of industryand finance to become own-ers of vast tracts of coallands as investments, as wellas to secure a dominatingposititui in every coal regiontor the traffic to be created.In West Nirginia the con-test Ieminds one of the strug-gle of great armies for stra-tegic positions. Every moveis watched with jealous eye,and every available railroadroute that has not been pre-empted is being taken up.The strusijjle in West Vir-ginia involvts the Fennsyl-vania. the Goulds, tlie \an-dtubilt interests, the Chesa- , (!A. ities.) THE SOUTHS AMAZING PROGRESS. 185 Text Appearing After Image: ONE OF THE NEW SOUTHS MOST PKOGKESSIVE CITIES.—A VIEW OE ATLANTA, GA., FROM THE GRAND OPERA-HOUSE. peake & Ohio, the Norfolk & Western, the Balti-more & Ohio, and many others, while the most sen-sational move of all is the building of a.new line,now under construction from the lakes to Norfolk,at a cost of about |50,000,000, designed purely asa freight-carrier, and which is being built withoutregard to reaching any particular towns or com-munities between its termini. No such, railroadscheme has ever been undertaken before in thiscountry. The contractors know that the billsare being paid, but the public is not permittedto know where the money comes from nor whois financing this vast undertaking, though it isgenerally understood that Mr. H. H. Rogers andhis Standard Oil associates are the owners. In Kentucky, Tennessee, and Southwest Vir-ginia movements of almost equal magnitude areunder way, while Alabama is another strategicpoint rivaling in interest even the West Vir-g Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookyear1890 bookpublishernewyorkreviewofreviewscorp bookidreviewofreviewsw33newy bookleafnumber198 bookcontributorrobartsuniversityoftoronto booksponsoruniversityoftoronto bookcollectionrobarts bookcollectiontoronto
1890

Image from page 49 of
Description: Identifier: wedgwoodsbeingli00jewiuoft Title: The Wedgwoods: being a life of Josiah Wedgwood; with notices of his works and their productions, memoirs of the Wedgwood and other families, and a history of the early potteries of Staffordshire Year: 1865 (1860s) Authors: Jewitt, Llewellynn Frederick William, 1816-1886 Subjects: Wedgwood, Josiah, 1730-1795 Wedgwood family Wedgwood ware Staffordshire pottery Publisher: London, Virtue Brothers Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: parting-cups, and those with three or four handles loving-cups, being so arranged that three or four personsdrinking out of one, and each using a different handle,brought their lips to different parts of the rim. Examplesof some of the forms of these tygs are here shown. The 26 THE WEDGWOODS. two first which are engraved were found in a long disusedlead mine at Great Hucklow, where they must haveremained for about a couple ot centuries. The third hasthree handles and a spout, and is ornamented with bossesof a lighter colour, bearing a swan, a flower, and a spreadeagle. The fourth, a two-handled cup, is of the same Text Appearing After Image: Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1860 bookyear1865 bookidwedgwoodsbeingli00jewiuoft bookauthorjewittllewellynnfrederickwilliam18161886 booksubjectwedgwoodjosiah17301795 booksubjectwedgwoodfamily bookpublisherlondonvirtuebrothers booksubjectwedgwoodware booksubjectstaffordshirepottery
1865

Image from page 316 of
Description: Identifier: leonardodavincia01mn Title: Leonardo da Vinci, artist, thinker and man of science Year: 1898 (1890s) Authors: Müntz, Eugène, 1845-1902 Subjects: Leonardo, da Vinci, 1452-1519 Publisher: London : W. Heinemann New York : C. Scribner's Sons Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: in its most sensitive moods, that he took as the basis and inspiration of his art. But it was the human body as a softly moulded mass, rather than as a bony, anatomical structure. In spite of his interest in anatomy, or rather my-ology, he had a horror of all things connected with death. No art was ever more radiant than his. Hence his distaste for architectural backgrounds against rigid statical laws. I may add, to complete the antithesis between Leonardo and Michelangelo, that Leonardo was a respectful disciple of Nature, approaching her without foregone conclusions, whereas the great Florentine sculptor made his researches under the influence of a preconceived idea, adominant ideal, andinterpreted anatomy byartistic canons. Is it possible to fixthe dates of Leonardosdrawings ? The Germanwriter, M tiller - Walde,has attempted it. Formy own part, I thinkwe may place a rung in STUDY FOR THE EQUESTRIAN STATUE OF FR. SFORZA. Ill ,..,. ^ ... , the chronological adder (Windsor Library.) O Text Appearing After Image: Head of an Old Man. (BRITISH MUSEUM.) Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1890 bookpublishernewyorkcscribnerssons bookyear1898 bookpublisherlondonwheinemann bookauthormntzeugne18451902 booksubjectleonardodavinci14521519 bookidleonardodavincia01mn bookcontributorharoldbleelibrary booksponsorbrighamyounguniversity
1898

Image from page 43 of
Description: Identifier: westvirginiatree00broo Title: West Virginia trees Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: Brooks, A. B. (Alonzo Beecher), 1873-1944 Subjects: Trees Shrubs Publisher: Morgantown Contributing Library: West Virginia University Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: C^ TAMARACK September, 1920] WEST VIRGINIA TREES TAMARACKLarix laricina, (DuPoi) Koch. Form.—A tree usually 30-60 feet high, 1-2 feet in diameter; trunkstraight, tapering, and having numerous slender, upward-curvingbranches; crown narrowly pyramidal. Leaves.—Scattered singly or clustered in dense fascicles on shortlateral spurs; linear, triangular in cross-section, y^-\y^ inches long,light green, falling each year in autumn. Flowers.—May, with the leaves ; monoecious ; staminate sessile,sub-globose, yellow ; pistillate oblong with light-colored bracts andnearly orbicular rose-colored scales. Fruit.—Cones mature autumn of first season ; ovoid, obtuse, 5^-^inch long with few light brown rounded scales. Bark.—Thin, roughened with small rounded red-brown scales. Wood.—Heavy, hard, slightly resinous, very strong, durable insoil, light brown. Range.—Newfoundland south to Maryland and West Virginia,west to Minnesota and the Rocky Mountains, through British Colum-bia to Alaska. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1920 booksubjectshrubs bookauthorbrooksabalonzobeecher18731944 booksubjecttrees bookidwestvirginiatree00broo bookpublishermorgantown bookcollectionamericana bookcontributorwestvirginiauniversitylibraries
1920

Image from page 972 of
Description: Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg Title: St. Nicholas [serial] Year: 1873 (1870s) Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905 Subjects: Children's literature Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.] Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ile away. It wasabout as thick as a man, and rosestraight up ten or fifteen feet or thereabouts, and went out of sight. We did not see orhear anything more, and, after waiting a little, I wentdown to the place. The place is a rather swampy mow-ing which we do not plow. It is quite rough, and hassmall trees and bushes scattered about in it. There arewoods beyond, with a brook, which is about four feet mate aerolites and smoke-trails as being near athand, when they are really many miles away.—Professor Cleveland Abbe, Weather Bureau,Washington. variations in leaves. Oakland, Cal.Dear St. Nicholas : I was making some picturesof leaves, and I noticed that my pansy leaves were alldifferent. I have made four different kinds on a pieceof paper and am going to send them to you. Deborah Dunning. Wilkes Barre, Pa.Dear St. Nicholas : I wish to know why threedifferent kinds of leaves grow on the same stem ; willyou please tell me? I inclose you a sample. Good-by.Your friend, T. Allen Mills, Jr. Text Appearing After Image: VARIOUS FORMS OF LEAVES ON ONE BRANCH OF SASSAFRAS. Note that the three forms are distinct in the small as well as in the large leaves. Some plants and trees have each leaves of thesame general type. Yet even among these aclose examination will reveal the fact that notwo are exactly alike. Other plants and trees have leaves of two wide and averages about nine inches deep, running or more distinctly different types. Perhaps through it. The smoke rose on the north side of aclump of elm-trees which were about ten feet tall. Idid not see anything unusual at the place. Can youexplain this? Your interested reader, Augustus W. Aldrich (age 16). the most common and marked example is inthe leaves of the sassafras. On one branchmay be found three distinctly different designs—the solid form with unbroken outline, the mitten form, and the three-pronged form. Note the variations in size in relation toApparently a small explosion of gunpowder the best lighted parts of the tree or plant. Notewould Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1870 bookcentury1800 bookyear1873 bookauthordodgemarymapes18301905 booksubjectchildrensliterature bookidstnicholasserial31dodg bookpublishernewyorkscribnerco bookcollectionjuvenilehistoricalcollection bookcollectionunclibraries bookcollectionamericana
1873

Image from page 653 of
Description: Identifier: canmachinerjanjun1919toro Title: Canadian machinery and metalworking (January-June 1919) Year: 1919 (1910s) Authors: Subjects: Machinery Machinery Machinery Publisher: Toronto MacLean-Hunter Contributing Library: Fisher - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: Algoma University, Trent University, Lakehead University, Laurentian University, Nipissing University, Ryerson University and University of Toronto Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: High Speed Steel Double WacoQuality—forQuick Production Work Turtle Brand— High-classTool Steels, Files, Drills, etc. MANUFACTURED BY WM. ATKINS & COMPANY, LIMITED RELIANCE STEEL WORKS E»tab!i»hed 1870 SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND GEO. A. MARSHALL & CO. 1118 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario Sole Representativesfor Canada Phone Park. 250 CoalCokeIron Ore Pig Iron VictoriaF0UNDRY & malleable Text Appearing After Image: Made by The Canadian Furnace Co.Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada M.A.Hanna&Co. Sales Agents, CLEVELAND Canadian Office : 904 C.P.R. Bldg., Toronto Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectmachinery bookdecade1910 bookyear1919 bookidcanmachinerjanjun1919toro bookpublishertorontomacleanhunter bookleafnumber653 bookcontributorfisheruniversityoftoronto booksponsoralgomauniversitytrentuniversitylakeheaduniversitylaurentianuniversitynipissinguniversityryersonuniversityanduniversityoftorontolibraries bookcollectioncanadiantradejournals
1919

Image from page 285 of
Description: Identifier: fieldwoodlandpla00furn Title: Field and woodland plants Year: 1909 (1900s) Authors: Furneaux, William S Subjects: Wild flowers Shrubs Publisher: London New York : Longmans, Green, and Co. Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: THE Marsh Sedge. 256 FIELD AND WOODLAND PLANTS spikelets below ; or they are arranged in a compound spike orpanicle. The flowers are all imj)erfect, without perianth ; and themale and female flowers are either in sejiarate spikelets or in differentparts of the same one. The glumes overlap all round the axis ofthe spikelet; there are generally three stamens ; and the ovaryis enclosed in a little vase-shaped covering with a little hole at thetop through which the two or three stigmas protrude. We give illustrations of two of the commonest species ; theCommon Sedge {Carex vulgaris), which flowers from June to August;and the Marsh Sedge (C. jxtludosa), that flowers in May and June.The former grows to a height varying from six inches to two feet;and the latter to from two to three feet. Text Appearing After Image: Plate VI. FLOWERS OF DOWN, HEATH AND MOOR. 1. Musk Thistle. 2. Clustered Bell-flower. 3. Spring Rest Harrow. 7. Heath Rush. 4. Hairy Hawkbit. 5. Sheeps-bit. 6. Spotted Orchis. XVI ON HEATH, DOWN AND MOOR On the exposed and more or less bleak heath, down and moor wedo not meet with many species of spring flowers, and for this reasonwe have included both spring and summer blossoms in the samechapter. It must not be supposed, however, from the above statement,that we regard these exposed situations as devoid of interest, oreven lacking in flowers, for the small number of species floweringearly in the season is often compensated for by the profusion inwhich their blossoms are produced. The golden blaze of the Furze or Gorse, aided more or less l)y thesimilar flowers of its little relative—the Petty Whin, is alonesufficient to add a charm to the scene, while the large yellow blos-soms of the Broom often take the place of, or add to, the gloriousdisplay, which is frequently varied by the Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 bookdecade1900 bookpublisherlondon bookidfieldwoodlandpla00furn booksubjectshrubs bookauthorfurneauxwilliams bookyear1909 bookpublishernewyorklongmansgreenandco booksubjectwildflowers bookcollectionamericana
1909

Image from page 400 of
Description: Identifier: wanderingsinbibl00mill Title: Wanderings in Bible lands: notes of travel in Italy, Greece, Asia-Minor, Egypt, Nubia, Ethiopia, Cush, and Palestine Year: 1894 (1890s) Authors: Miller, D[aniel] L[ong], 1841- [from old catalog] Subjects: Publisher: Mount Morris, Ill., The Brethren's publishing company Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: ndrendered Zoan in the Hebrew. We are informed in theBible that Hebron was built seven years before Zoan inEgypt,t and that the Lord did marvelous things in thesight of the fathers of Israel in the land of Egypt, in thefield of Zoan.I The identification of Tanis with Zoanbrought to light another buried city of the Bible. We maybe able to enter somewhat into the feelings of the excava-tor by reading what Mr. Petrie says about some of his dis-coveries: -But the burnt houses were the real prize of the sea-son, as the owners had fled and left most of their goods;and the reddened patches of earth attracted us usually to aprofitable site. In one house there was a beautiful marbleterm, of Italian work; and the fragments of a very curiouszodiac, painted on a sheet of clear glass over a foot square,each sign or month having an emblematic head to repre-sent it; unhappily, it was broken in a hundred and fifty * Pharaohs, Fellahs and Explorers, pages 65, 67.f Lev. 13: 22. iPs. 78:12. i-Urt?* tffl Text Appearing After Image: WANDERINGS IN BIBLE LANDS. 381 pieces, and as I uncovered them it was cruel to see thegold-foil work which was on them peel off on to the earth,leaving the glass bare in many parts. A yet more heart-rending sight were the piles of papyrus rolls so rotted thatthey fell to pieces with a touch, showing here and there aletter of the finest Greek writing. The next house, alsoburnt, was the best of all. Here we found the limestonestatuette of the owner, Bakakhuiu, inscribed in demotic onthe base; a sensible, sturdy-looking, active man, who seemsto have been a lawyer or notary, to judge by his docu-ments. Many household objects of pottery and stone werefound, jars, mortars, etc., and a beautiful blue glazed jar,perhaps the largest such known and quite perfect. Therich result however was in his waste; for in a recess underthe cellar stairs had been five baskets of old papyri.Though many had utterly perished by being burnt to whiteash, yet one basketful was only carbonized; and tenderly un-der Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1894

Image from page 306 of
Description: Identifier: handbookoforname1900meye Title: Handbook of ornament; a grammar of art, industrial and architectural designing in all its branches, for practical as well as theoretical use Year: 1900 (1900s) Authors: Meyer, Franz Sales, 1849- Subjects: Decoration and ornament Art objects Publisher: New York, B. Hessling Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library Digitizing Sponsor: Wellesley College Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: i t^m^^£.i!£-^^>j:Mr Various Diapers. Plate 178.19* 292 REPEATING ORNAMENT. Text Appearing After Image: Plate 179. Various Diapers. REPEATING ORNAMENT. Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1900

Image from page 479 of
Description: Identifier: historyofhamilto01ford Title: History of Hamilton County, Ohio, with illustrations and biographical sketches Year: 1881 (1880s) Authors: Ford, Henry A., comp Ford, Kate B., joint comp Williams, L.A. & co., Cleveland, O., pub Subjects: Publisher: Cleveland, Ohio, L. A. Williams Contributing Library: The Library of Congress Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: wo years beforeher husbands death. The surviving members of thefarnily are Nancy Roll, Damaris Moore, Cynthia Stone,Thomas, and Benjamin, the fourth son and subject of thefollowing sketch. Benjamin Whallon was born in Sycamore township in1807. He made his home with his parents until hismarriage, in 1830, to Miss Eliza Moore, daughter of anearly pioneer. Two years later his wife died, leaving aninfant daughter, Eliza. In 1835 he married Sarah Stone,who became the mother of three children—Nancy, Eliz-abeth, and James. In 1843 his second wife died. In1847 he was wedded to Margaret S. Griffin. The homein which he now lives with his family joins the old home-stead where his father settled in 1811. The Presbyterianchurch has for a long time received his liberal support,his wife as well as himself being among its best members.It may be added as a matter of interest that Mr. Whal-lon has attended one church regularly fifty-eight years;never received a whipping at home or at school (suggest- Text Appearing After Image: o-c^4-€^^>^CZ:, HISTORY OF HAMILTON COUNTY, OHIO. 369 ive to the opposite as the name may be), and has nevertaken a chew of tobacco or smoked a cigar. William Pierson was born in the State of New Jerseyin the year 1788. He came with his parents to Cincin-nati in the year 1800. His trade was that of a brick-maker. He was married to Miss Huldah Pierson, whowas born in 1791, and was the daughter of an early set-tler. To Mr. and Mrs. Pierson were born seven children—four sons and three daughters: Sinias, Mary Ann, Har-riet, Emily, James, William, and John. John, Sinias,Mary Ann, and Harriet are now dead. Our subject diedin the year 1866, surviving his companion thirty-fouryears. The only member of the family now residingwithin the county of Hamilton is William, the third son,who was born in the year 1832. His attention has prin-cipally been given to farming. He married, in the year1852, Miss May E. Cooper. There have been born tothem four sons and three daughters: George W., LauraH Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookdecade1880 bookyear1881 bookidhistoryofhamilto01ford bookauthorfordhenryacomp bookauthorfordkatebjointcomp bookauthorwilliamslacoclevelandopub bookpublisherclevelandohiolawilliams bookcontributorthelibraryofcongress bookleafnumber479
1881

Image from page 37 of
Description: Identifier: rollofserviceing1921univ Title: Roll of service in the Great War, 1914-1919 Year: 1921 (1920s) Authors: University of Aberdeen. [Lists and Class Records] Allardyce, Mabel Desborough Subjects: Publisher: Aberdeen Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Text Appearing After Image: ANDERSON, JAMES: Private, 4th Bat-talion Gordon Highlanders; son of John-Anderson, fisherman;born Portnockie, 29April 1892 ; educated,at Portnockie PublicSchool and Fordyce \Academy; student inArts, 1911-14. During his 3rd yearat the University heenlisted in the formerU Company, i/4thGordon Highlanders,and at the Front was amember of the SnipersSection. In June 1915 his CO. reported thathe had distinguished himself in the Field. Hewas among the missing after the action at Hooge,25 September 1915. Subsequently it was re-ported that he had died on 26 September1915 as a prisoner of war at Giessen, Ger-many, from wounds received the previous day.Those who knew him in the Snipers Sectionfound him a sterling comrade, full of humour,cool and daring in the face of danger. TAWSE, BERTRAM WILKIE: Sergeant,4th Battalion Cameron Highlanders ; son of Peter Tawse,contractor; born Aber-deen, 14 September1884; educatedGordons College ; en-tered the University,1901 ; graduated M.A.(II Math.), 1905;B.S Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1921 bookidrollofserviceing1921univ bookauthoruniversityofaberdeenlistsandclassrecords bookauthorallardycemabeldesborough bookpublisheraberdeen bookcontributornationallibraryofscotland booksponsornationallibraryofscotland bookcollectionnationallibraryofscotland
1921

Image from page 156 of
Description: Identifier: whiteindianboyst00wils Title: The white Indian boy : the story of Uncle Nick among the Shoshones Year: 1922 (1920s) Authors: Wilson, Elijah Nicholas, 1842-1915 Driggs, Howard R. (Howard Roscoe), 1873-1963 Subjects: Wilson, Elijah Nicholas, 1842-1915 Shoshoni Indians Frontier and pioneer life Publisher: Yonkers-on-Hudson, NY : World Book Co. Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: upon us. About four oclock that afternoon, seven Indians rodeup to the station and asked for something to eat. Neece,the station keeper, picked up a sack holding about twentypounds of flour and offered it to them. They demandeda sack of flour apiece. He threw it back into the houseand told them to clear out, that he would not give themanything. This made them angry, and as they passed a shed aboutfive rods from the house they each shot an arrow into apoor old lame cow, that happened to be standing under ashed. When Neece saw that, he jerked out his pistoland commenced shooting at them. He kiUed two of theIndians and the rest ran. Now, boys, he said, we are in for a hot time tonight.Theres a bunch of about thirty of the red rascals up thecanyon, and they will be on us as soon as it gets dark.Well have to fight. A man by the name of Lynch was with us at the time.He had boasted a good deal about what he would do ifthe Indians attacked him. We thought he was a kind of The Pony Express 143 Text Appearing After Image: desperado.- I felt prettysafe until he weakenedand began to cry, thenI wanted all of us to geton our horses and skipfor the next station; butPete said: No; we willload up all of our oldguns and get ready forthem when they come.There are only four ofus; but we can standoff the whole bunch ofthem. Just a httle beforedark we could see a bigdust over towards themouth of the canyonabout six miles from thestation. We knew theywere coming. Neece thought it would be a good thing to go out from the stationa hundred yards or so and surprise them as they came up.When we got there he had us lie down a httle way apart, Now, he said, when you fire, jump to one side, soif they shoot at the blaze of your gun, you will not bethere. You bet I lay close to the ground. Pretty soon weheard the thumping of their horses hoofs. It seemedto me there were hundreds of them. And such yellsas they let out, I never heard before. They were comingstraight for us, and I thought they were going to run rightover us. It Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 bookyear1922 booksubjectfrontierandpioneerlife bookidwhiteindianboyst00wils bookauthorwilsonelijahnicholas18421915 bookauthordriggshowardrhowardroscoe18731963 booksubjectwilsonelijahnicholas18421915 booksubjectshoshoniindians bookpublisheryonkersonhudsonnyworldbookco
1922

Image from page 611 of
Description: Identifier: 39002086411023.med.yale.edu Title: The diseases of infancy and childhood : designed for the use of students and practitioners of medicine Year: 1918 (1910s) Authors: Koplik, Henry,1858-1927 Subjects: Children Pediatrics Publisher: Philadelphia : Lea & Febiger Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: so expedi-tiouslv that the child has not time to struggle or get frightened(G. A. G. Simpson) (Fig. 133). Indications for Operation.—Xewly born or nursing infants who can-not nurse or in whom sleep is palpably disturbed should be operatedupon without delay; in these patients the operation is simple and isfollowed by immediate relief. The indications for removal of thegrowths, even if only small amounts of adenoid tissue are present, arein older children a persistent rhinitis or repeated attacks of acute 564 DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM rhinitis, intermittent attacks of deafness with pale retracted ear-drums,or exudative catarrh of the middle ear, chronic aural discharge whichwill not impro\e, mouth-breathing, snoring at night, and backwardnessin phonation; in young children a persistent dry cough or bronchitisor an irritable cough. Of great importance is the recognition of thefact that some obstinate ear discharges will not yield to treatmentuntil existing adenoids be removed. Text Appearing After Image: Fig. 1.33.—Examination for adenoid growths. Position of patient and examiner. Prognosis.—The operation for the removal of adenoids is exceed-ingly simple and unaccompanied by danger to life. It should beborne in mind that any operation of this nature may be followedby infections, especially of the ears. In this respect no operator isexempt from the chagrin of seeing occasionally a complicating otitisfollow the operation. Adenoids are apt to return or grow after beingremoved; a secondary operation then becomes necessary. Treatment.—When the diagnosis of adenoids has once been made,It IS well not to temporize with douches and sprays, as this mode oftreatment acts only in a cleansing manner and merely delays the DISEASES OF THE NOSE AND NASOPHARYNX 565 ultimate necessity of removing the growths. This is in the domainof speciaHstic procedures; it is well for the practitioner not to relyentirely on descriptive methods but to see, if he can, the operationperformed once or twice by an Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1900 booksubjectchildren bookdecade1910 bookpublisherphiladelphialeafebiger bookyear1918 booksubjectpediatrics bookid39002086411023medyaleedu bookauthorkoplikhenry18581927 bookcollectionamericana bookcollectionmedicalheritagelibrary
1918

Image from page 235 of
Description: Identifier: recordofpartners1920will Title: Record of partners, staff and operatives who participated in the Great War, 1914-1919 Year: 1920 (1920s) Authors: William Graham & Co Subjects: William Graham & Co World War, 1914-1918 Publisher: Glasgow : W. Graham & Co. Contributing Library: National Library of Scotland Digitizing Sponsor: National Library of Scotland View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Pte. JOHN PURDIE.3/4th Seaforth Highlanders. L/Cpl. W. J. RAE.2nd R.S.F. Text Appearing After Image: Pte. JAMES RUSSELL.3rd Cameronians (S.R.). Sergt. James MKinnon. 1st Batt. Machine Gun Corps. Sergt. MKinnon joined the Colours in June, 1916.Served in France. Pte. John Purdie. 3/4th Seaforth Highlanders. Pte. Purdie joined the Colours in February, 1919, andserved in France. L/Cpl. W. J. Rae. 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers. L/Cpl. Rae enlisted in September, 1914. Transferredto 5th H.L.I. Transport and was drafted for service inFrance. Pte. James Russell. 3rd Cameronians (Scottish Rifles). Pte. Russell enlisted in March, 1917. Served in U.K.,and was discharged in August, 1919. Pte. J. Smith. Highland Light Infantry. Pte. Smith enlisted in April, 1918, and served in theArmy of Occupation. Gunner A. Simpson. Royal Field Artillery. Gunner Simpson joined up on 27th July, 1915. Servedin France. Pte. W. Sutherland. Machine Gun Corps. Pte. W. Sutherland joined up on 26th June, 1917, anddrafted to Egypt 4th November, 1917. Discharged27th February, 1920. L/Cpl. J. Telfer. 5th Cameronians (Scottish Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookdecade1920 bookcentury1900 booksubjectworldwar19141918 bookyear1920 bookidrecordofpartners1920will bookauthorwilliamgrahamco booksubjectwilliamgrahamco bookpublisherglasgowwgrahamco bookcontributornationallibraryofscotland booksponsornationallibraryofscotland
1920

Image from page 27 of
Description: Identifier: histoiredutissua00lebr Title: Histoire du tissu ancien à l'exposition de l'Union centrale des arts décoratifs Year: 1883 (1880s) Authors: Le Breton, Gaston, 1845-1920 Tiffany, Louis Comfort, 1848-1933 Union centrale des arts décoratifs (Paris, France). Exposition (1882) Union centrale des arts décoratifs (Paris, France). Arts du bois, des tissus et du papier Subjects: Textile fabrics Publisher: [Paris, A. Quantin] Contributing Library: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library Digitizing Sponsor: Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: le jeu des soies de couleur. La garniture du lit de Marie-Antoinette, qui lui fut offerteà loccasion de son mariage par la ville de Lyon, est, à notre avis, la pièce capitale parmiles étoffes anciennes exposées à lUnion centrale. Cest un lampas fond blanc crème; ledessin broché de soie et de chenille est formé de roseaux, de branches de laurier, de guir-landes de fleurs, dinstruments de musique et de perdrix. On voit également dans le fonddu lit un paysage avec ruines dont la mise en carte, aussi soignée quune gouache, setrouve au musée industriel de Lyon. Il serait aujourdhui très difficile, même avec le métier Jacquard, dexécuter une étoffesemblable ; cette opération nécessiterait peut-être près de deux cent mille cartons. Létoffe du lit de Louis XVI, appartenant également au Garde-Meuble, est un satin fondblanc à dessins formés de branches de laurier et de chêne; elle provient également desmétiers de Philippe de la Salle. HISTOIRE DU TISSU ANCIEN, 157 ; Text Appearing After Image: TENTURE DITE A LA CORBEILLE DE FLEURSExécutée à Lyon, daprès les cartons do Philippe de la Salle, xvin» siècle. (Musée dart et dindustrie do Lyon.) 158 HISTOIRE DU TISSU ANCIEN. Cet illustre compositeur de cartons pour soieries naquit à Lyon en 1723. Élève deFrançois Boucher, il fut dessinateur et peintre autant quhabile fabricant et que mécani-cien. Il modifia le métier à la tire, qui lui servit à exécuter les remarquables compositions Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: bookcentury1800 bookyear1883 bookdecade1880 booksubjecttextilefabrics bookidhistoiredutissua00lebr bookauthorlebretongaston18451920 bookauthortiffanylouiscomfort18481933 bookauthorunioncentraledesartsdcoratifsparisfranceexposition1882 bookauthorunioncentraledesartsdcoratifsparisfranceartsduboisdestissusetdupapier bookpublisherparisaquantin
1883

Image from page 68 of
Description: Identifier: lakesuperiortose00garn Title: Lake Superior to the Sea Year: 1913 (1910s) Authors: Garnault Agassiz Subjects: Publisher: [Montreal] : Canada Steamship Lines Contributing Library: Brock University Digitizing Sponsor: Brock University - University of Toronto Libraries View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Lake Superior to the Sea 03 soldiers and churchmen, friend and foe; the spot where fell the braveMontgomery; the Chateau Frontenac, constructed on the site of oldFort St. Louis; the house of Madame LaPeau, paramour of theIntendant Bigot; the little house on St. Louis Street, said to be theoldest building in Quebec, where Montcalm had his last headquarters,and where were drawn up the articles of capitulation; the DufferinTerrace, where Champlain laid the foundations of the city and ofNew France—and a thousand and one other points of interest thattake us back to the dim, distant past. Text Appearing After Image: Montmorency Falls, Higher than Niagara Quebec for the tourist is indeed excelled by no other city on thecontinent. Any tourist can well afford to spend three or four days in Quebec,and those who can afford to linger there longer will be well repaid. Just twenty-one miles from Quebec, on the St. Lawrence River,is the world-famous shrine of Ste. Anne de Beaupre, which attractsan annual pilgrimage of nearly a quarter million of the faithful. The original chapel at Ste. Anne de Beaupre was built a fewyears after the founding of Quebec as a votive offering to their patronsaint by a party of fishermen, who, overtaken on the river by aviolent storm, made a solemn vow that if Ste. Anne would hear theirprayers for succor they would erect a sanctuary on the spot theylanded. Their prayers were answered, and they made shore safely ata point then known as Petit Cap. Here they erected a primitivewooden chapel that although frequently reconstructed still stands.Until March, 1658, the missionary Jesu Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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1913

Image from page 68 of
Description: Identifier: 2encyclopaediaof00gwiluoft Title: An encyclopaedia of architecture, historical, theoretical, & practical. New ed., rev., portions rewritten, and with additions by Wyatt Papworth Year: 1888 (1880s) Authors: Gwilt, Joseph, 1784-1863 Papworth, Wyatt Angelicus Van Sandau, 1822-1894 Subjects: Architecture Architects Publisher: London Longmans, Green Contributing Library: Architecture Landscape Design - University of Toronto Digitizing Sponsor: MSN View Book Page: Book Viewer About This Book: Catalog Entry View All Images: All Images From Book Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book. Text Appearing Before Image: Europe. Their great 2caU is a remarkal)le monument. In most paits it consists of aneiirthen mound retained on each side I)y walls of brick and masonry, with a terraced plat-foim and a jiinpct of l)iicks Its licij,ht is 20 ft iiuluding a parapet of 5 ft. The thickness at the base is 25 ft.,ind it diminishes to 15 ft. at tiicplatforin. Towers, at intervals ofabout 200 paces, are 40 ft. squareit the base, and 30 ft. at tlie top;their height is about 37 ft.; someot them, however, are 48 ft. high,•tud consist of two stores. (Seef\g. 76.) In other i)artsthe wall13 little better than an earthenparapet with a ditch; in some[daces only rude stones heapedu]). It extends a length of 1500miles, and is conducted over mountains, valleys, and rivers. Mr. W. SiiTi|)son, in the Papersof the lust, (if Brit. Architect^, I87:)-74. carefully describes the important series of theI\Img tombs, dating 1495-162S. Many works have been published of late on Chineseand Japanese architecture and ornainent. Y V-S Text Appearing After Image: GUI Al ^^ MI OF CHINA Sect. IX. SIKXICAN AlUllirKCrCKE. 109. Ihe architecture of the peojjle who had jjossession of America before its discoveryt)v Columbus has a considerable claim upon our attention. When a people appears to havehad no means of modelling their ideas through study of the existing monuments of oldernations, nor of preserving any traces of the style of building practised by the race fromwhich they originated, tiieir works may be expected to possess some novelty in tlie mode o\combination or in the nature of the objects combined ; and, in this point of view, Americanarchitecture is not without interest. It is, moreover, instructive in pointing out the bentof the human mind when unbiassed by example in the art. 110. North America was found by the Spaniards advanced in agriculture and civilisation,and more e.5pecially so in the valleys of jMexico and Oaxaca. These provinces seem to havebeen traversed by different migratory tribes, who left behind them traces of cultivatio Note About Images Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.
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Tags: booksubjectarchitecture bookcentury1800 booksubjectarchitects bookdecade1880 bookyear1888 bookpublisherlondonlongmansgreen bookid2encyclopaediaof00gwiluoft bookauthorgwiltjoseph17841863 bookauthorpapworthwyattangelicusvansandau18221894 booksponsormsn
1888