The Burning of Cork

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Where: Cork, , Ireland

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When: 01 December 1920

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This is the devastation in the aftermath of what's known as the Burning of Cork during the Irish War of Independence. We don't have an exact location, but another Hogan-Wilson photo in this series shows this remaining facade front on, and carving says Pharmaceutical & Dispensing Chemist.

Photographer: W.D. Hogan

Date: Circa Tuesday, 14 December 1920

NLI Ref.: HOGW 153

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 73407
cork ireland munster burningofcork irishwarofindependence rubble newspaperboy newspapers workmen shovels chemist december 1920 1920s nationallibraryofireland rsunner pharmaceuticalchemist familychemist medicalhall 31patrickstreet patrickstreet pana sunners arthurhill hoganwilsoncollection williamdavidhogan wdhogan 20thcentury

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    derangedlemur

    • 10/Sep/2013 07:53:45

    I thought we had this one already, or did we just reference it while digging through some other B&Ts photo?

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    derangedlemur

    • 10/Sep/2013 07:56:24

    It looks like Patrick's Street, at a guess: maps.google.ie/?ll=51.89984,-8.470695&spn=0.009149,0....

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    derangedlemur

    • 10/Sep/2013 07:58:57

    Actually, maybe not. HE on the background suggests that the row of houses in the background are quite a bit lower than the street in the foreground (though the image is pretty murky).

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:05:05

    The ruins of Sunner's Chemists perhaps.

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:07:02

    During the War of Independence Cork was one of the main centres of resistance to British Rule. In one of the worst atrocities committed during the War of Independence. British forces deliberately set fire to several blocks of buildings along the east and south sides of St. Patrick's Street during Saturday night 11 December 1920 and the following Sunday morning. The City Hall and the nearby Carnegie Library were also completely destroyed by fire. From www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/historyofcorkcity/early...

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:08:43

    The Auxiliaries and the Black and Tans were allegedly taking revenge for an earlier attack on British troops. Among the buildings completely destroyed on St. Patrick's Street were Roche's Stores, Cash & Co., The Munster Arcade, Egan's, The American Shoe Company, Forrests, Sunners chemist and Saxone Shoes. www.corkpastandpresent.ie/history/historyofcorkcity/early...

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:11:17

    Sunners was at 31 Patricks Street - see www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/environment-geography... EDIT See the advertisment at the above link - they describe themselves as Pharmaceutical & Dispensing Chemist. And they sell Invalid water beds!!!

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:11:35

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Snap

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    derangedlemur

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:11:46

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] So here-ish, then? maps.google.ie/?ll=51.898846,-8.471382&spn=0.004144,0...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:13:25

    This Hogan shot shows the same detail [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] notes above, and is titled The ruins of Patrick Street, Cork, after it had been destroyed by fire and the Black and Tans.

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    Robinson_Luzo

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:20:43

    A few months before the burning of cork, in August 1920, violence broke out in Lisburn following the shooting of a District Inspector. Catholic houses and businesses were attacked and burned to the ground, causing most of the Catholic population to flee. I mention this as my grandfather had several photos of the burnings in Cork, given to him years after the event by a frequent patron of his bar. The person, who had also witnessed the violence in Lisburn, said he considered the sheer amount of damage in Cork worse but that the violence in Lisburn gained more of his sympathy as there would (in his words, as best I can recall them being told to me 10 years ago) "nowt comfort given to 'em, unless it benefited one side or the other".

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:23:16

    See also www.askaboutireland.ie/learning-zone/primary-students/5th...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:29:27

    Between Cook Street and Robert street, I think. You can make out the gable-ended building on the right in this nli shot. Better, here, and here, at left.

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    DannyM8

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:30:04

    Charles Schulze of K Company more than likely started the fire!! See www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/instigator-of-a-citys-torch... So the only possible writer of the letters was Charles Schulze, and this was confirmed because he mentions his sister’s name in some of the correspondence. The letters to his mother and girlfriend were written on December 16, 1920, and subsequently intercepted by the IRA. “The ADRIC service record of Charles Frederick Lees Schulze states that he was born in Selkirk, Scotland, on May 30, 1878, and joined the ADRIC on November 29, 1920. He was a former army officer and held the rank of captain with the Dorsetshire Regiment.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:36:18

    The Munster Arcade was immediately left of this facade. In this Hogan shot, you can see that the Munster Arcade set up a hut by these streetlights later, with a sign saying Munster Arcade Inquiry Office

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    Niall McAuley

    • 10/Sep/2013 08:41:45

    The burnt building was designed by one Arthur Hill, apparently.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Sep/2013 11:08:11

    Thanks very much all! Now added to our map, and I'm just about to change the information on both Hogan photos of Sunner's facade in our catalogue. Think I might have been a tad optimistic about this being taken circa Sunday 12th. All of the newspapers speak of a contingent of firemen from Dublin hurrying to Cork on Sunday evening, with a fire engine on a train organised by the G.S.&W.R., and that the fires were still burning. By the way, great description of Sunner's and its wares in the PDF of Commercial Cork...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 10/Sep/2013 12:08:28

    RTE Documentary explaining the background to The Burning of Cork - 1920 - youtu.be/MIv5YPtghgg . Similar image to this at 46:10

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    TEXASJOHN

    • 10/Sep/2013 13:27:55

    I had never seen this picture before. Thank you!

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    Bariom43

    • 10/Sep/2013 13:45:55

    This really brings history alive. Thank you.

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    guliolopez

    • 10/Sep/2013 14:02:50

    Hi. I am late to the party (again). By the sounds of things you guys have it in hand. But here's input (mainly confirmation) from a "local" anyway: The most obvious frontage (which is still standing with "dispensing chemist" lettering still visible) was #31 Patrick Street. This was Sunner's chemist (as Danny correctly noted) Immediately to it's left (behind the arched lamps) was where #29/30 Patrick Street stood. This was the Munster Arcade (as Niall correctly notes). Further into the background, the "stripey" arch is a gable remnant of the buildings between Robert Street and Winthrop Street. (Possibly Regan's or their next door neighbours on Robert Street) (I won't get into the events themselves. They are well documented. And I will only get riled-up)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Sep/2013 16:12:57

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] And you must watch your blood pressure! I should really let you know when a Cork photo is coming up (I always try to have about 5 photos in the bank and a vague idea of the order in which they'll appear). And then I can title them Cork or Not Cork... :)

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    ClickKen04

    • 10/Sep/2013 16:28:25

    Superb "shot"and great choice Carol. (Trust you Sean), flippin iPhone spelling, lol.

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    jamica1

    • 10/Sep/2013 17:00:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoken04 superb shot even

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    Swordscookie

    • 10/Sep/2013 21:25:04

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoken04 Were you right the first time???? http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was in a church in Lisburn once and saw a memorial to an RIC District Inspector shot by the IRA. When I researched it I found that he was responsible for creating a police cordon that covered the Tans and Auxies when they went in to kill the two Mayors! The destruction wrought on the Catholic homes did not just happen at that time but many times thereafter!

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    Robinson_Luzo

    • 11/Sep/2013 08:25:18

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie An interesting lesson on how history can be subjective. I've never heard the bit about the Mayors, but it goes to show us that proverb "one man's freedom fighter" etc.

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    Spanrz

    • 15/Sep/2013 11:57:55

    Did the "burning" end up on the south side of the river? In particular around Dunbar Street?

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    guliolopez

    • 16/Sep/2013 15:31:22

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/spanrz] There were buildings set alight on both the north and south-sides. But not around Dunbar Street/Georges Quay/Douglas street that I am aware of. Beyond Patrick Street (where the devastation was widespread), and Albert Quay/Angelsea street (where the city hall, library and other surrounding buildings were completely destroyed), the other arson events were often "targeted". (Such as the Transport and General Workers Union building and surrounds on Camden Quay, the houses surrounding the Dillon's Cross ambush out of town, etc). There's a fairly rough map here. While the looting went beyond the burned buildings, the associated attacks were most common in and around the fires themselves, as well as on Washington Street and on the Grand Parade. I've never read anything about attacks or looting on Dunbar Street or George's Quay. (Although it has to be said that those responsible wrought some pretty indiscriminate terror about town, so I imagine anyone living close to town would've been impacted one way or the other).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Jan/2017 10:42:51

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037

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    PCEReunion

    • 27/Jan/2017 15:07:43

    The back and white striped arch is the fromer Lee Cinema at the top of Winthrop Street (It is still there) www.google.ie/maps/@51.8988139,-8.4714516,3a,31y,119.16h,...

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    madmancain

    • 07/Mar/2022 15:36:47

    Not sure why but it looks familiar I'm thinking I may of seen it before