Sibyl

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Where: Waterford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
As derangedlemur solved today's mystery image in about 30 seconds, presenting today's bonus photograph - the paddle steamer Sibyl (libations to all the maritime gods that for once the name is clear!) on the River Blackwater near Cappoquin in Co. Waterford.

Photographer: Probably Robert French of Lawrence Photographic Studios, Dublin

Date: Circa 1900??

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_05845

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 63816
cappoquin waterford ireland munster riverblackwater river blackwater paddlesteamer sibyl barque reflections trees reeds hills rigging masts lifeboats lifebelts funnels steam paddles passengers caps wheelhouse bicycle bikes tourists children veils hats crew ahpoole arthurhenripoole glassnegative nationallibraryofireland ubiestcanis supply poolephotographiccollection boat

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:07:44

    Streetview (I think): maps.google.ie/maps?q=Cappoquin,+Waterford&hl=en&...

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:08:20

    Probably this landing stage: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,609780,599367,7,9

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:13:49

    Our first non-clydebuilt steamer. This one seems to be from Liverpool (I'm waiting for the evidence to download).

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:17:46

    "A new steamer built at Liverpool P.S. Sybil (233 tons) replaced P.S. Meteor and became the youngest packet vessel at the Milford station in 1827. She was also the fastest steamer on the crossing with a record of 8 hours 13 minutes for a sailing between Milford and Dunmore East. " Hmm. I'm not sure that ship looks 70 years old.

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    O Mac

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:30:51

    NLI has a W.L. photograph of another steamer at the same place.. www.nli.ie/glassplates/L_ROY/L_ROY_03621.jpg

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:32:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well, I got the location right, at least.

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:36:00

    I spy two bicycles

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:49:48

    Kate Douglas Wiggin wrote in Penelope’s Irish Experiences in 1901:

    If you want to fall head over ears in love with Ireland at the very first sight of her charms, take, as we did, the steamer from Cappoquin to Youghal, and float down the vale of the Blackwater - ‘Swift Awniduff, which of the English man Is cal’ de Blacke water.’ The shores of this Irish Rhine are so lovely that the sail on a sunny day is one of unequalled charm. Behind us the mountains ranged themselves in a mysterious melancholy background; ahead the river wended its way southward in and out, in and out, through rocky cliffs and well-wooded shores.
    From - irishwaterwayshistory.com/abandoned-or-little-used-irish-...

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:49:54

    From a house sale description in Feeman's May30 1879,

    "There is also communication between Youghal and Cappoquin by means of the Blackwater River, on which during the summer months steamers ply daily"

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 08:58:53

    In recommending the steamer between Limerick and Kilrush, the correspondent of the Daily News writes (August 18, 1888)

    "The steamers that ply during the season are comfortable and tidy ... being in this respect totally unlike the casual wardlike diminutive tub which steams in the summer months on the "Irish Rhine" between Youghal and Cappoquin"
    I don't know what 'wardlike' means, but I don't think it's a compliment.

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:05:25

    The "Irish Rhine" was not immune from boycotting. The Belfast News-Letter , Monday, September 15, 1890

    "A steamship plying between Youghal and Cappoquin had to be taken off, the passengers actually being "ordered" one day to come on shore, the sole reason being that the steamer was owned by obnoxious persons."

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:19:59

    Looks like we can probably rule out 1897 for a date (unless the Sybil was on a different service) Freeman's, May 26, 1897

    BLACKWATER TOURIST TRAFFIC A STEAMER FOR THE RIVER Our Youghal Correspondent writes:- It is generally feared that the magnificent scenery of the "Irish Rhine" would be closed to tourists this year, as the promotors and guarantors who procured the steamers to keep the river open have been been at a considerable pecunary loss every year since 1884. However this has not deterred a few public spirited men from uniting and endeavouring to procure a suitable boat to run between Youghal and Cappoquin during the coming summer months. This morning, negociations were finally completed, with the result that the ss Queen Ness will commence plying ealy next month. This will be welcome news to tourists and travellers all the world over, as the "Irish Rhine" can hardly be excelled for its magnificent scenery, and the for the number of religious and historic interests that strew its banks.

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    John Spooner

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:25:12

    Trips on he Ness Queen were also being advertised in Freeman's (by the Atlantic Hotel, Youghal) in September 1899

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:36:41

    Here's a shot labelled Ness Queen at Bridge, Cappoquin

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:39:13

    Can we date this from the flooding, maybe?

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:40:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner You can also rule it out from the bike, which is a Datable Technological Artefact. The hub gears are 1898 at the earliest.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Aug/2013 09:42:37

    Devia Hibernia from 1893 lists the Sybil sailing from Cappoquin.

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    TEXASJOHN

    • 07/Aug/2013 12:43:12

    A less hurried way to commute!

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    Salty Windows

    • 07/Aug/2013 12:51:24

    My Dad tells me about "steamers" that came up the river Barrow as far as the "steamer hole" in St Mullins. The Barrow towpath ends at that exact spot so it would seem logical that barges would transport the goods up through Leinster on the river. Needless to say if you have anything from down there that would be fantastic.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 07/Aug/2013 16:13:42

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] also from Kate Douglas Wiggin's account of the trip in the steamer from Cappoquin to Youghal in her book Penelope’s Irish Experiences in 1901. Next came Dromana Castle, where the extraordinary old Countess of Desmond was born,—the wonderful old lady whose supposed one hundred and forty years so astonished posterity. She must have married Thomas, twelfth Earl of Desmond, after 1505, as his first wife is known to have been alive in that year. Raleigh saw her in 1589, and she died in 1604: so it would seem that she must have been at least one hundred and ten or one hundred and twelve when she met her untimely death,—a death brought about entirely by her own youthful impetuosity and her fondness for athletic sports. Robert Sydney, second Earl of Leicester, makes the following reference to her in his Table-Book, written when he was ambassador at Paris, about 1640:— 'The old Countess of Desmond was a marryed woman in Edward IV. time in England, and lived till towards the end of Queen Elizabeth, so she must needes be neare one hundred and forty yeares old. She had a new sett of teeth not long afore her death, and might have lived much longer had she not mett with a kinde of violent death; for she would needes climbe a nut-tree to gather nuts; so falling down she hurt her thigh, which brought a fever, and that fever brought death. This my cousin Walter Fitzwilliam told me.' It is true that the aforesaid cousin Walter may have been a better raconteur than historian; still, local tradition vigorously opposes any lessening of the number of the countess's years, pinning its faith rather on one Hayman, who says that she presented herself at the English court at the age of one hundred and forty years, to petition for her jointure, which she lost by the attainder of the last earl; and it also prefers to have her fall from the historic cherry-tree that Sir Walter planted, rather than from a casual nut-tree www.gutenberg.org/files/1391/1391-h/1391-h.htm

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    jim2302

    • 07/Aug/2013 22:06:32

    very nice.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2013 22:33:34

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Yes, 'Penelope's Irish Experiences' is a good gossipy read, but to be taken with a large pinch of salt, I think. It is interesting to find contemporary writings about these photos/places, if only to see how tastes and manners have changed. I can imagine 'Penelope' buying a postcard of the SIBYL to send to friends and family at home. Wondering about that working vessel (with great arty reflection) in the background - the Irish Waterways History site talks about the trade of coal from South Wales and timber for the pit props to Wales. The ship looks like the JONADAB, but I am reading JOSHUA (?? see note) - Librarian with pince-nez required! :8-)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2013 22:55:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] - Pssst! You have this as a Poole Collection photo above

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    O Mac

    • 07/Aug/2013 22:56:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The ship above is a topsail schooner while your "Jonadab" is a gaff ketch.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Aug/2013 23:09:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes, I realize that. I was looking at the shape of the hulls and thinking that rigging was sometimes changed. Can you read the writing? Betting on something Old Testament.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Aug/2013 07:49:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Pssst! Thank you - we must never speak of this again...

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    mogey

    • 08/Aug/2013 07:58:36

    would love to do that trip today.....tourist idea for a local entrepreneur?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 08/Aug/2013 09:20:15

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey It's already happening - see that Irish Waterways History site, further down the page. Bon Voyage!

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    Edoardo55

    • 24/Oct/2014 11:04:22

    Bellissima foto ottimo BW complimenti

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/May/2017 05:35:11

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/May/2017 05:50:48

    It is always good to revisit these photos - 4 years later. With the added bonus of Megazoom™ it is now possible to see the name of the ship in the background - SUPPLY.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 29/May/2017 07:39:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Well done, thank you for Supplying the name!!

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    Asha8989

    • 07/Oct/2018 01:23:36

    Perfect click showing how there were used to be coal engine boats.