To market, to market…

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Cork, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
A fine display of pig herding skills on Friar Street in Youghal, Co. Cork.

Date: Circa 1900??

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_07723

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 75810
pigs swine friarstreet youghal cork ireland munster children clocktower clock weathervane shamrockhotel hotels shawlies carsforhire robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland friarystreet limerickbybeachcomber animal animals woman women people herd pig hog gogs sus eventoedungulates ungulates domesticpigs house houses street chimneys fence female funny

Add Tags
  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:01:47

    OSI: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,610736,577505,7,7

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:02:39

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yep. All the tiles have fallen off the end wall of that house.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:03:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Wonder if the hotel was the Devonshire Arms back then? That's a very fine crest over the door.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:04:45

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Friary Street from OSI.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:06:20

    The "Cars for Hire" sign puts it an iggly wiggly bit later than 1900.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:12:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia It might mean Landaus or similar. They would have been occasionally referred to as cars before the advent of the motor car.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:18:58

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Yep, [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] is right - sidecars, etc. often referred to as cars. Sometimes "Post Cars for hire" as in this one, pre-1880...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:29:51

    Hmm - ok. How about that lady's coat and hat? 1910-ish? Or pigs might fly ...

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:37:13

    A couple of oinks later - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316350/Image?lookfor=http:...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Aug/2013 08:52:36

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] If it's Oinks you're looking for, have unilaterally declared today to be Pig Day at Library Towers...

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 01/Aug/2013 09:00:22

    How about some contemporary verse (not my own, and not contemporary with the picture, but it does mention piggies)? This little piggy's gone to market This little piggy took his cut. This little piggy got grassed on This little piggy's gone phut!

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 01/Aug/2013 09:06:37

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] lol - never heard that version before! Lovely historical piggy shot!

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 01/Aug/2013 10:21:44

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Slaters lists the "Devonshire Arms Hotel" in 1856 so maybe we can assume it was so called in 1900ish. Interesting, it is listed as also being a "posting house and excise office". This must be why we see the letterbox behind the hat lady....This box is still there!! The crest over the door is hard to make out but it has the shapes of the duke of Devonshire's coat of arms. A John Green was proprietor both in the 1901 and 1911census.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Aug/2013 11:03:51

    Posting house would not mean mail in 1846, it would mean that they'd have teams of horses available. A carriage would arrive with tired horses, change to the fresh ones and off you go, post haste. Wikipedia on postilions.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 01/Aug/2013 12:17:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Ah, but that was from 'Slaters 1856 which lists a Mr and Mrs Merry as owner ot the hotel and where it also says ... " "POST OFFICE Archibald Merry, Post Master.--.Letters form Dublin, Cork England arrive every morning at twenty minutes before eight ,and are despatched thereto at twenty-five minutes before five in the evening..A second mail from CORK arrives every evening at eight ,and are despatched thereto at eight every morning.—Letters from Tallow arrive at five minutes past ten every morning, and are despatched there to at ten minutes past two daily.—Letters from Dungarvan arrive at ten minutes past four every afternoon and are despatched there-to at ten minutes before eight every morning." All I'm suggesting is that there's probably a historical reason why the letter box is built into the wall of the Hotel.

  • profile

    Ken's Aviation

    • 01/Aug/2013 13:24:21

    Love it!

  • profile

    TEXASJOHN

    • 01/Aug/2013 14:10:33

    Piggy Pudding anyone?

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 01/Aug/2013 14:42:35

    The hotel was built by the Duke of Devonshire c 1780......one could assume he had help.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 01/Aug/2013 15:44:08

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] 'Ere Carol, go easy on the Polis will you? This is what those guys looked like a day or two later! You and whose army?

  • profile

    La Belle Province

    • 01/Aug/2013 16:07:21

    Regarding the hats, and then my work here is done, it is similar to the Grand Duchess Tatiana's, in 1912. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/e4/Tatianacropped5.jpg" /> Sorry the pretty girl has to come after the preceding image, as it should be pearls before swine...

  • profile

    david sankey

    • 01/Aug/2013 16:41:41

    A great many Irish pigs went to England - where they would be sent by train to (for instance) marsh and baxter's own rail sidings at Brierley Hill in the west midlands. There they would be led through M+Bs own tunnel beneath the churchyard to the slaughterhouse. So many pigs were slaughtered that it paid them to have a machine that separated brown from white bristles (for use in brushes). I don't kinow how true it was but I was told by people who worked there that they had killed a thousand pigs by breakfast!

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 01/Aug/2013 20:52:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/la_belle_province I agree with those sentiments entirely La Belle! That is a really beautiful shot of the tragic Grand Duchess though she did look a little pouty?

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Aug/2013 22:34:28

    The Youghal Piggy Limerick Friar Street in old Youghal, County Cork Is not the best place for a walk. The pigs trot to market, Eventually cark it - Chopped up for ham, bacon and pork.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 02/Aug/2013 07:54:58

    You go away for a few weeks and the poor Dogs are forgotten about altogether!!!!!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Aug/2013 08:02:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You snooze, you lose, Danny! We're all about the pigs here now... :D

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Aug/2013 08:03:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Bualadh bos mór!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 02/Aug/2013 09:00:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland You are way too kind (and bold). I see from wikipedia that Youghal is pronounced 'yawl', and not to rhyme with Dougal.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Aug/2013 09:30:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Indeed, Youghal is always a good pronunciation test. As is Naas...

  • profile

    blackpoolbeach

    • 02/Aug/2013 11:26:06

    Just in case it has not been posted already, here is Google Street View

  • profile

    en_la_bici

    • 02/Aug/2013 12:10:04

    awesome!

  • profile

    Udayan Kapur

    • 02/Aug/2013 20:59:28

    the invasion of pigs !!!

  • profile

    L. Neale Clifton

    • 04/Aug/2013 18:24:28

    The dubious rhyming? Poetic license.

  • profile

    Womenworldwideweb

    • 06/Aug/2013 20:14:11

    Love it !

  • profile

    sixpounder

    • 18/Aug/2013 03:51:58

    Draft animals made a nasty mess of public streets. Until these were replaced with gasoline powered vehicles, pigs rendered cities half-way livable. Pigs disposed of the droppings as well as much of the garbage thrown out by humans. .

  • profile

    Carrignafoy

    • 18/Mar/2015 11:45:32

    Should have named it Fryer Street, bacon and sausages anyone?

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 18/Mar/2015 12:05:23

    Lol!! What a great image!

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 18/Mar/2015 12:07:42

    Can I see "Cars Hire"? on the left. And even is that an armoured car away back in the distance? If those are there this is later than 1900.

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 18/Mar/2015 12:09:53

    Oh darn... hate the way Flickr hides the earlier comments!

  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 18/Mar/2015 12:12:09

    Not only that .. I hate the way Flickr delves up oldies!! Grrrr!! But a goodie to see again!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/Mar/2015 20:28:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 *oink!*

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 18/Mar/2015 21:55:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 You developed a sudden interest in piggy wiggies? It is a beauty of a shot and strangely enough it does look like an armoured car down there though it could have been something else!

  • profile

    ART NAHPRO

    • 21/Mar/2015 16:58:04

    Thanks for adding this to the Things They Won't Let Us Do Anymore group. Just perfect.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jan/2016 13:18:06

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037

  • profile

    guliolopez

    • 15/Sep/2016 15:14:04

    This scene captured in a video from 1936. Skip to the 5m50s or 6m00s mark. ifiplayer.ie/travelogues-the-irish-riviera/