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Where: Wicklow, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1886

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More maritime misadventure for you today - this time in the harbour at Arklow, Co. Wicklow.

Date: Circa October 1886

NLI Ref.: L_ROY_00416

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 42284
arklow wicklow ireland leinster arklowharbour harbour boats fishingboats sailors fishermen quay chains sails masts rigging 344d anne irishmanarklow irishman crane robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative october 1886 1880s limerickbybeachcomber nationallibraryofireland dateestablished 19thcentury

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  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:28:08

    1886 - lots of ships sunk at moorings

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:29:53

    14 Ships in total see www.irishwrecksonline.net/Lists/WicklowListA.htm

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:32:02

    On 15-16th October 1886 a hurricane, at least equal in intensity to the Great Wind of 1839, devastated the island for two days before leaving a further trail of shipwreck, death and destruction in the Irish Sea, Wales, southern England, and northern Europe and may be the same that swept across Texas and Louisiana on the 12th. Its passage across Ireland was described in daily and regional newspapers; though many have little or no local information. Locally the Wicklow Newsletter had reports, 23rd October to the end of November, from Bray, Greystones, Wicklow and Arklow, but none from the mountains. The damage in Arklow where the flooding and storm damage were worst, was widely reported around Ireland. www.iancantwell.com/pdf/Floods.pdf

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:35:33

    The worst damage happened in Arklow when floodwaters, of a height and volume not seen in living memory, floated one of the many dilapidated old hulks lying derelict in the upper part of the river. It collided with the Ida, a schooner owned by James Tyrell, which was hove down on her side and attached to a heavy barge by pulleys for repairs. The three were then swept into the fleet of fishing smacks, anchored lower down, carrying twentythree out of the harbour, while the Ida passed the new pier and was thrown broadside onto the pier slope on the southern side of the breakwater with the hulk’s keel lodged inside, where it rapidly broke up. Most of the smacks were holed below their water lines and sank at the river’s mouth, while the rest were swept out to sea www.iancantwell.com/pdf/Floods.pdf

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:45:31

    Some Reports in the Irish times on 17th October 1886

  • profile

    B-59

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:47:20

    This photo must have been taken here Street View

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:50:53

    The Next photo in the Archives catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000042372/Image?lookfor=http:... I think confirms that it is around this date.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Apr/2013 08:58:26

    The GeoHive OS 25" is from 1907, but I'm pretty sure that notch in the North shore is on it.

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:02:59

    The Board of Works, who was usually criticized after any such disaster, was cleared in this instance, as it was the Wicklow Copper Mining Company who placed the wooden mooring post to which the Ida was attached. Representatives of the Board of Works and Irish Fisheries Board (and on behalf of the Lord Lieutenant) visited the scene, while the Deputy Receiver of Wrecks, on behalf of the Board of Trade, held a preliminary and private investigation. What the Harbour Master thought of the disaster was not recorded, which is a pity as some years previously he had prosecuted the hulk’s owners but lost the case (and costs) because it was argued that they were doing no harm and would be repaired when the fishing improved www.iancantwell.com/pdf/Floods.pdf

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:12:26

    Other losses were ...... Annie (James Murphy) ........ Carol I see you have a tag Anne could it be Annie?

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    John Spooner

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:14:11

    Freeman's account of the aftermath of the storm at Arklow October 18 1886

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:31:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Danny, you're fantastic. Thank you! Given the next Lawrence photo in the series, we're surely safe with a date of October 1886! I'd love to go wild and maybe say circa 25 October, but it's impossible to tell how long the wreckage remained or how long it was before Robert French (if it was he) got to Arklow to record the aftermath of the storm... P.S. Anne is the name on one of the little boats - I added a note.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:34:50

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you very much!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:35:59

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Niall, it's very blurry, but I think that Something Something Arklow is Irish Man Arklow...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:41:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Could that fallen over "bollard" type thingy be one of the "insecure moorings" spoken of in your article??

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:51:01

    The Graphic, November 6 1886 arklow2

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 09:52:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner The Graphic was a weekly, wasn't it?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 19/Apr/2013 10:23:03

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Yes, every Saturday. I think there was often a long lead time between the event and the appearance of illustrations in the Graphic. Credits are often 'drawn by X from a photograph by Y'

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Apr/2013 10:29:41

    L_ROY_00418 shows the same small building you see at the right of this shot from upriver, but now you can see the enormous Chemical Works behind it, as seen on the OSI 25" linked above.

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 11:16:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Niall re the Chemical works from DIA - Does not help our dating!!! Name: MORRISON, JOHN 2 Building: CO. WICKLOW, ARKLOW, CHEMICAL MANURE WORKS Date: 1868-69 Nature: Plans prepared and building supervised by JM. Engineer: B.T. Patterson. Refs: IAA, PKS B05/06, A03 (1868-1870, p.114v); P.J. Power, The Arklow Calendar (1981), 106 (B. of I.)

  • profile

    Inverarra

    • 19/Apr/2013 12:11:23

    Great bit of detective work and a great history lesson. Thanks to all.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 12:36:18

    www.ukweatherworld.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/74862-the... The gale and floods of 15th/16th October 1886 Belfast: A great deal of damage was done to the grain Dublin: All the rivers were in high flood and low-lying lands were submerged. Arklow (Wicklow): River rose to an unprecedented flood height

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 12:49:08

    Tuesday 30 November 1886 The South Australian Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1858 - 1889) The Arklow lifeboat helped to save some fishing boats which had been driven from their anchors by a derelict hulk which had broken from her moorings, and which boats must have been lost in the absence of the lifeboat.

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 13:24:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland You were lucky to have moved this ship from Arklow to Dublin - it could have been caught up in the carnage..... http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8204773855/in/photostream/ Date: Between 15 October 1886 and 3 April 1887 NLI Ref.: L_ROY_00426 The start date is interesting, but probably a little early and the end date a lot late.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Apr/2013 16:08:07

    As requested by http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected], a round up of most recent stats... Views for March 2013 = 200,495 Comments in March 2013 = 1,054 Overall views since June 2011 = 3,189,918 Overall comments since June 2011 = 18,000

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 19/Apr/2013 18:13:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Impressive

  • profile

    KenjiB_48

    • 19/Apr/2013 21:07:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Up the NLI! Not least due to your own diligence and good humor.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/Apr/2013 22:16:15

    The Stats Limerick Well done with the [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/] stats - In honour we doff virtual hats. There's lies and damn lies But statistically-wise Who really is giving a rat's .... ?
    limerick by beachcomber no.34

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 20/Apr/2013 07:56:28

    From - Arklow RNLI rnli.org/findmynearest/station/Pages/Arklow-Lifeboat-Stat... 1877 Silver Medal awarded to Second Coxswain William Manifold on 3 May 1877, who during the past 11 years, has been out on service 22 times and has assisted to save 44 lives. MEDAL RECORD Five Silver medals have been awarded, the last being voted in 1877. __________________________________________________________________ Surprisingly there is no mention of the events of 1886 on the Arklow RNLI History William Manifold is mentioned along with others in Ian Cantwell's paper. News of the catastrophe was quickly spread through the town and in a very short time “all the inhabitants were on the pier and regardless of rain and sea they gazed on the scene of destruction”. It was impossible to launch the lifeboat due to the flood so volunteer men; women and children carried it half a mile to the beach. Five launch attempts failed when it was thrown broadside back up to the beach but the sixth was successful and carrying a crew of John Reilly, Charles Tyrell, Laurence McDonagh, William Manifold , Michael Manifold, Matthew Flood, John Waddock, Richard Hayes, John Mahon, Peter Murphy, James Russell, Samuel Kinsella, James Timmins and Richard Waddock (coxswain) plus around thirty volunteers set off on rescue. They first reached the Glance, a first class mackerel boat (Thomas Kavanagh) about five miles offshore. It was boarded and brought back to port with difficulty as it had been holed and would not have survived much longer. Next found was the Green Flag (Neill & Hannigan), about half a mile from the bank and eight miles from the harbour. It was boarded by Daniel, Patrick and Andrew Neill, sons of the owner, and Peter Waddock and brought back safely, as was the Jackdaw (J. Reynolds) by a crew of three. The Safe Return (W. Canterbury) caused problems as she drifted dismasted between Glassgonnan Bank and Arklow Rock about six and a half miles from shore. The first attempt to rescue her failed when the first man to attempt boarding her (Kendall) fell into the sea and was rescued with difficulty. However, nearby was the undamaged Mary Francis (Mrs. Kearon), and she was used to tow the former back to harbour. The lifeboat was unable to save one that went down on the banks and another was seen drifting on the far side www.iancantwell.com/pdf/Floods.pdf

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    FrigateRN

    • 23/Apr/2013 21:20:25

    What a great thread NLI, of interest all the way, once again kudos to you.