Who fears to speak of '98 (or Consumption)

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Where: Wexford, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1908

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Love this one for the way the boy in his lovely stripy geansaí has mimicked the stance of this 1798 commemorative statue in Wexford town.

The poster in the background may be useful for dating purposes. I can't read all of the poster, but the top bit says "Information for Consumptive People and for those who live with them". I think this may be to do with the nationwide campaign against TB in 1907/1908...

Date: Circa 1908?? (definitely after 6 August 1905 when this bronze Pikeman was unveiled)

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_09063

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 37526
1798 1798memorial wexford ireland leinster vinegarhill pike boy poster consumption tb tuberculosis health informationforconsumptivepeople consumptive robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative sculpture pikeman finials oliversheppardrha oliversheppard 1903 bronzestatue williamcrawford clerkofunion bullring mdccxcviii nationallibraryofireland 20thcentury

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 07:48:27

    Judging by the small boy pictured, congenital melted face syndrome seems to be more of a risk than consumption.

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 07:51:00

    There's a Thirtieth annual report of the Local Government Board for Ireland, for the year ending 31st March 1902 full of information for Consumptive People and for those who live with them: eppi.dippam.ac.uk/pdf1/13804-1.pdf

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 07:51:59

    There's also a booklet from 1913, published by "The Department" books.google.ie/books/about/Information_for_Consumptive_P...

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 08:00:15

    May as well have the streetview: maps.google.ie/?ll=52.339823,-6.462514&spn=0.004103,0...

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 08:02:55

    "this monument commemorates the gallant men of Wexford who fought for Ireland's freedom in 1798, one of the many uprisings against foreign domination during the centuries of subjection 1169-1921. It is the work of Oliver Sheppard, RHA, and was erected in 1904."

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 08:05:31

    Re. My opening comment: Looking at the full size image now, I'm wondering how much of that is motion blur and how much is genuinely some sort of ghastly injury or deformity.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Apr/2013 08:44:13

    The monument dates from 1903, says the DIA: Name: SHEPPARD, OLIVER * Building: CO. WEXFORD, WEXFORD, BULL RING, 1798 MEMORIAL Date: 1903 Nature: Bronze statue of pikeman. Refs: Paula Murphy, Nineteenth-Century Irish Sculpture: Native Genius Reaffirmed (Yale University Press: New Haven & London, 2010), 221-2(illus.).

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 08:58:15

    From Ulster Folk and Transport Museum A photo of the Poster, about half way down the page. NMNI

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:07:16

    The Statue stands in the Bull Ring The famous Wexford Bullring was recently given a total facelift to commemorate the Bi-centenary of the 1798 Rebellion. The area was originally a beach where boats were drawn up laden with produce bound for the town's markets. It got its present name from the medieval sport of Bull-baiting, introduced to the town by the Butchers' Guild. From 1621 until 1770, bulls were baited twice a year and their hides presented to the Mayor. According to tradition, Cromwell's soldiers massacred part of the civilian population here in October 1649.

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:07:50

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That one's from a poorhouse - it's signed William Crawford, clerk of union. The one above is posted on a market gate, so it may be part of a different campaign.

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:08:53

    Over the years the Bullring has been the venue of many political rallies and protests : Daniel O'Connell, Charles Stewart Parnell, John Redmond, James Larkin and Eamonn de Valera are among the many political figures who have addressed audiences in this historic square at the heart of Wexford

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:22:29

    Seems it was unveiled in 1905 and that a crowd of 30,000 attended. Now if one had access behind the pay walls of the national newspapers you could probably get a date and a report!!

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:23:30

    Don't need the papers... After the R.H.A. exhibition it was transported to Wexford and stored in the basement of the Town Hall in November 1904 In April 1905, the limestone plinth was assembled in position and the statue positioned, although veiled, by late June. It was not until 6 August 1905 that the bronze on its plinth was unveiled in the Bull Ring Square, Wexford irishartsreview.com/irisartsreviyear/pdf/1990/20492627.pd...

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    DannyM8

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:30:47

    From the same irish arts review (Letter from the Committee) Specifying that the monument was to be twenty feet high and that there was £550.00 available." To raise money the '98 Association held several bazaars. One such took place on 6 August 1900 with a garlanded flagpole erected on the site of the monument.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 09/Apr/2013 09:51:34

    The Wexford wikipedia article has a good "now" comparison photo, including the young lad's descendants still loitering there.

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    ccferrie

    • 09/Apr/2013 10:43:31

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/23/Wexford_Pikeman_Statue_by_Oliver_Sheppard_2010_09_29.jpg" />

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 09/Apr/2013 10:47:41

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That's the one! Thanks.

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    Swordscookie

    • 09/Apr/2013 11:16:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Apropos your first comment remember that the yellabellies are a strange mix of Norman, Dane, Breton, French, Spanish, English and Kilkenny (thats where the hurling comes from) so any physiognomy is possible:-) Personally I think its motion blur, a lad that age never stood still for any length of time!

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    Swordscookie

    • 09/Apr/2013 11:20:29

    I just went in to FrigateRN's stream and he has just posted this photo http://www.flickr.com/photos/alimarante/8634076790/in/contacts/. It makes a nice little bit of happenstance!

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    derangedlemur

    • 09/Apr/2013 11:34:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie You reckon that lump on his right cheek is his pre-motion nose as opposed to him having been run over with a harrow or caught up in the machinery of a steamship?

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    Swordscookie

    • 09/Apr/2013 11:36:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I remember looking like that after a friend of mine and I had a fight and beat seven kinds out of me:-)

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    corncrake68

    • 09/Apr/2013 15:34:30

    The Pikeman. Erected in 1904. Stood there unscathed for 106 years until in 2010 a local yob decided to disarm him. Lucky he was caught on CCTV and the Pikeman got his pike back. I think the yob got the usual slap on the wrist. flic.kr/p/8vAxUS

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Apr/2013 19:37:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks very much for the location!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Apr/2013 19:47:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Who are yellabellies?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Apr/2013 19:48:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Lovely to see the big version of "this" poster, thanks!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Apr/2013 20:04:24

    Taking on board [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]'s point about "William Crawford, Clerk of Union", the only matching person I can find is in Derry. Makes sense, I guess, as the poster was in the Ulster Folk & Transport Museum. I tried all sorts of combinations, e.g. Clerk of Poor Law Union...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Apr/2013 01:24:24

    "Consumption", yes the old term for TB, tuberculosis. Impressive looking statue, wouldn't want to meet that fellow in a dark alley... :)

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    FrigateRN

    • 10/Apr/2013 04:57:07

    As always NLI your genius for picking pictures that kick off lots of interesting comments has worked again.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Apr/2013 10:41:29

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Looks more as if it should be Yellachesties!

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    ccferrie

    • 10/Apr/2013 11:50:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Depends which jersey they're wearing http://www.wexfordgaa.ie/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/wexford-football-team-V-Dublin.jpg" />

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Apr/2013 11:53:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Ah, that's more like it! Yellabellies it is...

  • profile

    christopherlane_antiques

    • 11/Apr/2013 01:31:07

    From Ontario, Canada, and in that province, not far from its capital of Toronto, is a place called Vinegar Hill. '98 remembered across an ocean.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Apr/2013 07:44:28

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Fascinating. Did a really quick and dirty Google Maps search and it threw up Brooklyn, USA; New Zealand; U.K. Bet there's at least one in Australia too...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 11/Apr/2013 09:05:04

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] In Australia 1804, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_Hill_convict_rebellion

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Apr/2013 18:35:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Aha! Knew there'd be one in your neck of the woods...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 11/Apr/2013 22:44:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I was interested to find the characters involved in the Australian 1804 rebellion were the some of the original rebels in Wexford. Particularly Phillip Cunningham.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Apr/2013 09:25:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia ... who was hanged in the end. Surprised to read of the two who were executed at Castle Hill and then "hung in chains"! Wouldn't have thought that still went on at the start of the 19th century, that's just my ignorance me being knowledge challenged.

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    christopherlane_antiques

    • 13/Apr/2013 06:51:55

    The biggest wave of Irish settlement in Ontario, Canada was pre-Famine through to the Famine. Green, Orange, and indifferent came and literally cut lives out of the forest. Like all immigrants, they brought their dreams and desires, effort and muscles, bigotries and hatreds. Toronto, the province's capital, was once called the Belfast of Canada, both for its factories and for its distinct Orange streak. Toronto's July 12th parades, the biggest the world has ever scene, used to take an hour to pass any given point along the parade route. In Ontario, besides Vinegar Hill, we have places named Dublin, Belfast, Tralee, Limerick, Shamrock, Ulster, Monaghan, Grattan, etc. We even have a town called Arthur, which is not too far by Canadian standards from a village called Wellesley. Of course, the Irishman Arthur Wellesley is more commonly known as the Duke of Wellington, and Ontario has a Wellington County.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Apr/2013 11:37:05

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you for all of that background. I think "they brought their dreams and desires, effort and muscles, bigotries and hatreds" is very true.

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    photopol

    • 23/Apr/2013 10:19:57

    Some before, during and after shots of the temporarily decommissioned pikeman. He also had a brief career as a "No to Lisbon" protester in relatively recent times. A closer look will show there is no need for the ladies to look away. Oscar Wilde's mother "Speranza" was born in the far left corner of the Bull Ring (then the rectory) and there isn't even a plaque to this event.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Apr/2013 14:21:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photopol Never a dull moment for that pikeman!

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    Yellabelly*

    • 27/May/2013 08:21:12

    Great photo!