Arcade, New Tipperary

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Where: Tipperary, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1890

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Following on from yesterday's photo of Dillon Street in New Tipperary, here's the Arcade built near the same location. Couldn't decide between the two images we have digitised, and as it gives us an end to end view of the Arcade, I decided to upload both - here's the view from the other end of the Arcade.

Read through the comments below for the rather remarkable story behind this lovely, but short-lived structure. The short version is that this Arcade was built during Plan of Campaign protests (1880s/early 1890s), when protesting tenants paid landlords only what tenants considered fair rent. Arthur Smith-Barry, main landlord of (Old) Tipperary Town, was not happy with this. His evicted tenants moved to New Tipperary – made up of just a few streets and this Arcade – all built from funds raised in Australia and America.

In the end, Smith-Barry defeated his former tenants, and
sadly, this Arcade was demolished at 4 a.m. on 11 August 1892.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photographic Collection

Date: Circa 1890 (definitely before 11 August 1892)

NLI Ref.: L_ROY_02571

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 50036
buttermarket arcade obriensarcade newtipperary tipperary ireland munster shops casks crates butter firkins posters perfume baskets bags bowlerhats cokehats clock chancellorson chancellors 0949 weighingscales ladder michaelcross material cloth linen blankets boots robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative williamobrienmart limerickbybeachcomber johndillon nationallibraryofireland 1890s planofcampaign arthursmithbarry 19thcentury

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:36:03

    I can't believe they demolished this after just a year. Bloody vandals!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:36:55

    I believe the arcade was where this massive shed is now: Streetview

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    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:43:47

    Mildly disappointingly, the barrels aren't the ones from Clare Island. Harbour on Clare Island, Co. Mayo

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:44:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley It's just not the same, is it?

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:44:22

    Demolished on 11th August 1892 at 4 a.m. Freeman's report the following day

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:46:19

    Yep, cranking down the Brightness and up the Contrast, I can see one of the houses on Emmet street through the open door.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:48:29

    Was the compromise that saw Dillon St. vacated again that everyone on it was deported to Australia? None of the named individuals are in the 1901 census.

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    Swordscookie

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:48:47

    Both excellent shots Carol and worthy of a posting in their own right. I take it those are barrels of butter? I would imagine that Niall is right about the location and Deranged Lemur you should not be too surprised, if the businesses went back to the Old Town the rates would have been punitive so not having an income would make this an expensive white elephant!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:50:25

    So, OS 25" GeoHive link to location.

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    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:55:26

    Here's the view out the door: Dillon St or Emmet St from arcade Looks like Emmet street alright.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 10:59:26

    I spent rather too long yesterday evening looking through accounts of court cases involving New Tipperary (up to about 1898), and by the end I was none the wiser, except I had the distinct impression they had taken place in The Cruiskeen Court of Voluntary Jurisdiction.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:17:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Thanks for that very accurate date of demolition, John!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:19:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Thanks Sean! Wondering if they were called firkins, or if that was just an actual weight?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:24:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I stuck a note on the same building visible in the Dillon Street photo (waaay at the far end of the street!).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:26:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner The Cruiskeen Court of Voluntary Jurisdiction? Straight out of Flann O'Brien...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:29:12

    As an antidote to evictions, demolitions and the like: A Day in New Tipperary - Amusing Incidents [Warning: Includes bad language] in which an MP deals with a blustering colonel.

    Mr P. O'Brien MP, who has his famous "Kodac" ever ready, raised the little photographic apparatus, click went the spring, and the colonel was "taken"

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    ccferrie

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:40:32

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner that's great! even the architect gets a mention! It could be the opening scene from Romeo & Juliet - "I do not bite my thumb at you, sir"

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:41:25

    Another resident: Mr Thomas McGrath, Main St, Tipperary died on Jan 1st 1898. A short piece in Freeman's on the 3rd stated:

    He was by business a baker and confectioner and was one of the first to leave his home in the old town and take up premises in New Tipperary. He always took a prominent part in the struggle and was exceedingly popular

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:49:08

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Fantastic! Use of the "Kodac" is fascinating, and I bet the "pretty silk handkerchief" presented to Mrs Byles came from the shop of Michael Cross... (What was the date for the Kodac / Sticking out of tongue incident, John?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 11:59:06

    The 'Day in New Tipperary' piece mentions Ballykisteen. Some of the defendants in the Father Humphreys case had Ballykisteen addresses. The complete list is:

    Patrick Ryan, Parnell Street Jas Mulcahy, Dillon Street Mary A Colter, Dillon Street Jas Shea, Ballykisteen Patrick O'Halloran, Ballykisteen Laurence Spillane, Ballykisteen Mary O'Donoghue, Parnell Street Michael Lyons, Parnell Street Michael Hogan, Parnell Street Richard Ronan, Dillon Street
    Both a James Shea and a Laurence (sic) Spillane are listed as farmers at Coolnaherin (a stone's throw from Tipperary) in the 1901census.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:02:15

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The edition of Freeman's is 28th August 1890, so the incident would have taken place on Wednesday 27th.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:09:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Eastman Kodak was only founded in 1888, so Patrick O'Brien must have been an 'early adopter'. I wonder when Kodaks first started coming across the Atlantic. I know John Dillon had been in the USA until May 1890, I wonder if he had one also?

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:14:57

    To answer my own question, an Kodak advert from The Graphic, December 1888

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    Swordscookie

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:22:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland They might be called "Firkins" because of their size and I have read of firkins of butter from time to time. The definition of "firkin" is a small barrel or a measure of beer/liquid usually equal to 1/4 of a barrel or 9 gallons"!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:25:59

    Ballykisteen on the GeoHive OS 25"

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:31:22

    The first few mentions of Kodaks in Freeman's are all in connection with Patrick O'Brien, and his use of one in proving allegations of 'shadowing' and various episodes of police brutality. Then on September 11th 1890

    The Eastman Photographic Company have presented Mr P O'Brien, MP, with a Kodak of the finest quality in recognition of his signal success in the use of the small Kodak with which he took the now famous instantaneous photograph of the shadowing in Tipperary. There can be no doubt that the publicity given to the merits of the apparatus by the debates in the House of Commons and the comments in the press must have been an immense gain to the purveyors of it in this country.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:33:15

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Not off topic as it also begins with a K, here's Dr. Krugener's Patent Book or Detective Camera from 1889...

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    O Mac

    • 15/Mar/2013 12:57:06

    The Times 12/8/1892 Also a good account of the buildings and the 'carry-ons' in New Tipperary here. pages 70-80 There's a mention of "2 story wooden houses" which explains the 'board and batten' finish to the houses on Dillon St.---- which is still evident on some of the original houses seen today Street View

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Mar/2013 14:49:09

    Patrick O'Brien couldn't leave his camera alone. In November 1890 he was sent to prison for 7 days for contempt of court for using his Kodak to photograph a witness during cross-examination. His protests that the witness hadn't objected didn't cut any ice with the Bench. Eastman Kodak must have been very pleased, because it was reported widely and the work 'Kodak' appeared an newspapers all over Britain.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 14:54:59

    Calling all Flickroonies! Come in Flickroonies! Can any of you remember/do you know the name of the tea rooms based in the Dublin Bread Company building at 6/7 Lower Sackville Street?

  • profile

    Inverarra

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:21:17

    Many thanks to the library and the contributors for a great bit of history. Had never heard of "New Tipperary " before. The newspaper article and O'Briens book make great reading. The idea that the tactical witholding of a liquor licence would scupper the whole project is priceless.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:26:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland That "Dublin Bread Company" link doesn't open??

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:34:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Remember? Even if I was only three when the tea rooms were demolished that'd make me a hundred now.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:35:57

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] these ones: Dublin Bread Company

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:36:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Ooops! Fixed now...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 15:36:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 16:14:23

    Just to be clear, the Tea Rooms were listed in Thoms: Thoms 1904 directory lists this as the Dublin Bread Company Ltd. with restaurants at 3-4 St. Stephen's Green North, 6-7 Sackville St Lower, 33 Dame St. and the National Library, Kildare St.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 15/Mar/2013 16:40:16

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] It says Luncheon Rooms on it. www.dublin.ie/forums/showthread.php?5372-Old-Photos-Of-Du...

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 15/Mar/2013 16:42:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Q.E.D

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Mar/2013 16:55:46

    Thank you all! And http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected], I did. Yet another email that got no response from me through this crazy week - sorry. There will be developments! (About the photos, not about my non-emailing :)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Mar/2013 21:22:31

    The WTF limerick The lads stand about confer-kin Dressed in their jackets and jerkin - They're wearing apparel To roll out the barrel And furtively ask "What's The Firkin ? "

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Mar/2013 21:55:26

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Firkin 'ell, this is a fammly photostream!

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 17/Mar/2013 02:52:03

    Carol, when you're back from the St. Patrick's festivities, can you see if you have any shots of trains for the Great Southern and Western Railway? We had a station from the railway a while ago, flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5769449628. Or shots of the engineer or trainmen? Thanks! Sláinte!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Mar/2013 07:43:15

    I am amazed to see how this sorry saga was covered in brief cabled articles in the Sydney Morning Herald only a couple of days after the events. What seems like a local skirmish was part of a much wider battle, and probably of great interest to Irish immigrants in Australia. (John Dillon was fund raising in Australia in 1889) Searched for 'Tipperary' and refined by newspaper and 1890s decade - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?q=tipperary&l-title...

  • profile

    Robinson_Luzo

    • 09/Aug/2013 14:31:27

    The Northern Echo on April 10th 1890 stated these photos of New Tipperary had just been shown for the first time in a slideshow. I imagine that narrows it down quite a bit, as Lawrence would have advertised the New Tipperary views in his slide catalogue which he first advertised in January 1890.

  • profile

    tonydonoghue

    • 24/Jul/2018 07:25:27

    Sir Leopold Cust was Smith-Barry's land agent in Tipperary from 1857-1878. He was also the local magistrate and lived in Cordangan Manor. Does anyone out there know if any prosecutions came out of the following incident, I would love to find any details available : The Dublin Evening Mail of 21 Jan 1870 reported a letter Cust received : "Cust the b*****d you wil be shot if you ever interfere with the Tennant League... The quicker you leave this place the better... Down with Rackrenting Agents and Exterminating Landlords, God Save Ireland." (Dublin Evening Mail 21 January 1870).

  • profile

    tonydonoghue

    • 24/Jul/2018 13:50:58

    However it now looks like the above was an edited version because the Cardiff Times of 29 Jan 1870 quotes a much fruitier version which appeared in The Clonmel Chronicle : THREATENING LETTER STILL AM INSTITU- TION OF IRELAND.â The Clrmmel Chronicle reports that Mr. Leopold Cust, J.P., agent on the Smith-Barry estate in Tipperary, received on Sunday last, through the post, a threatening letter, of which the following is a copy- Tipper,,try, January 15, 1870. -Cust the b d. you will be shot if ever you interfere with the Tenant League. We will let you see you can- not bullock Tipperary. The quicker you leave this place the better. Warn all theso b ds that signed the thing against Dr. O'Neill they will be shot. A six-ounce ball in a thing of this make." Here was a rude representation of a pistol. the article continues : The same journal states that a notice in the following terms was posted on Sunday on a wall or gate- way in Tipperary " Our clergy and tenant-right, and down with rack-renting agents and exterminating land- lords. God save Ireland." Has anyone out there heard of the appearance of this poster before or know if the perpetrators were caught and if so of any consequences ?