Curves in Cork

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Where: Cork, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1893

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Chose this curvy photo of the railway station in Cork for the bewildering multiplicity of signage. Most scenes in our early photos are blissfully uncluttered, but not this one!

Also chose it because it has a clock clearly displaying the time (like a moth to a flame), and the advertising posters are fab (technical term). However, think the adverts contain a first on our Flickr stream, unless of course you know different - Earth Closets!

Also wonder what happened ladies who got confused or were short-sighted and wandered into the Ladies First Class Room rather than Ladies Third Class Room?

Date: After 2 February 1893

NLI Ref.: L_NS_00149

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 85768
cork ireland munster railwaystation trainstation greatsouthernwesternrailway gswr trains railways station platforms tracks porters platformno5 platformno6 wayout rosssons trolley posters advertising outfitters 47greatgeorgesstreet refreshmentrooms clock 1329 corkeveningecho dailyhalfpennypaper subway staff ladder uniforms uptrains thirdclasswaitingroom waitingrooms ladiesthirdclassroom ladiesfirstclassroom hndrapers dichroicink bestblackinkknown slogans seatrips yeast wilfredhaughton cityquay weeklytelegraph hudsonssoap earthclosets sunlightsoap victoriahotel kentstation stáisiúnkent glanmireroadstation robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative 1890s ruaboncompressedbrick limerickbybeachcomber nationallibraryofireland guardrail 19thcentury

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  • profile

    TJ.Photography

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:23:49

    wow....... such an architecture style was prevalent already in/around 1893??? amazing ... i have to say that i thought first it's from 50s or 60s!

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    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:32:36

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/tj_q8 1850s

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    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:34:56

    maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,568445,572243,7,9 The curve is plainly visible. Looking from the north.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:35:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] To answer your question Carol, ladies who tried to rise above their station and enter the first class waiting room were given a dose of cold shoulder by those ladies entitled to be there and hot tongue by the waiting room attendant!

  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:39:31

    That is a fabulous image at any time!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:49:12

    First advert in Freeman's for Draper's Dichroic Ink was on December 23rd. 1868

    THE ONLY GOOD BLACK INK DRAPER'S DICHROIC INK
    Writes almost instantly FULL BLACK Does not corrode steel pen Dries rapidly on the paper Is cleanly to use and does not blot Flows easily from the pen Is quite free from Greasiness Combines tenaciously with the paper Blotting paper may be applied at the moment of writing Resists the action of water and dilute acids
    In jars 6d, 1s, and 2s each, may be obtained from all Respectable Stationers, Chemists, and Druggists, and General Dealers throughout the Kingdom And wholesale only of the Sole Wholesale Agents BEWLEY AND DRAPER, 25 MARY STREET, DUBLIN
    Interesting use of a pseudo-scientific name. Other inks may perform satisfactorily, but are they dichroic?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 04/Feb/2013 09:58:07

    The OED defines 'dichroic' as

    Having or showing two colours; spec. applied to doubly-refracting crystals that exhibit different colours when viewed in different directions; or to solutions that show essentially different colours in different degrees of concentration.
    First citation is 1864

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:00:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Bayer started making paint like that about 10 or 15 years ago. It's primarily used in nail polish but Opel also painted cars using it for a while.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:03:42

    the outfitters at 47 Great George's street would appear to have been Cleburne Brothers. www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/streetandtradedirectorie... www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/streetandtradedirectorie...

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:09:42

    I must have a look at the roof again next time I'm in Cork - it doesn't have the same feeling of lightness now. Here's the archiseek entry for the building

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:12:22

    There were only three Cleburnes in Cork in 1911, compared to about a dozen in 1901, mostly in Bishopstown. William Henry and Robert are the two merchant tailors. In 1911 W.H. is gone and Robert derives his income from rent.

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:20:09

    Eustace & Co's Timber Yard on Leitrim Street appears on the 1899 OS Map and they had a full page ad on Page 8 of the 1919 publication Cork: It's Trade & Commerce. No clues as to what the item [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] has tagged above is though!

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:23:56

    All about Earth Closets www.jldr.com/henrymoule.htm and the modern equivalent: www.toiletrevolution.ie/products/composting-toilets/excel...

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    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:33:03

    In 1879 William Adolphus Ross founded the ‘W.A. Ross & Co. Royal Belfast Ginger Ale and Aerated Water Manufacturing Works’ [http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/8201073320/] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/boston_public_library/8201073238/]

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:43:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well it appears to say "cockring".

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    Peter Denton

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:47:47

    Everyone in the image appears to be looking at the camera, so this must have been a rare or special photo session. And why are the platforms so empty? Well, it's obvious of course - as the clock tells us it's nearly 1.30pm, clearly the passengers are all enjoying their table d'hote cuisine, served daily (except Sundays) from noon to 3pm. How eminently civilised!

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:51:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well, I'm not going to google that at work - are you! :-)

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 10:55:09

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] We might leave that one for the time being.

  • profile

    Inverarra

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:00:29

    Class was very important on Irish trains. When the West Clare train broke down the announcement went as follows. "First class passengers stay where you are, second class passengers get out and walk, third class passengers get out and push"

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:05:02

    Thanks http://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsnail/ - I can't imagine the smoke deflectors working particularly well in that space. It's a long distance to expect the smoke to travel to the outside.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:07:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I'm at home so I googled it and the only definitions I got would bring a blush to the cheeks of any well brought up young lady, so in deference to the tender Ms. Maddock I won't cut and paste:-)

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:13:15

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ the only related word that I can think of is caulking - perhaps it's an alternative spelling or misspelling of that?

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:18:17

    Well, whatever it is, they're the largest importers of it in the south of Ireland, they claim.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:20:10

    The Evening Echo started in 1892.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:20:36

    What's the Cigarette poster? Cameo?

  • profile

    Rienk Mebius

    • 04/Feb/2013 11:54:35

    Glanmire Road Station.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Feb/2013 12:10:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Could you check your Flickr Mail, please! :)

  • profile

    blackpoolbeach

    • 04/Feb/2013 12:26:34

    I counted more than 30 lamps, with 2 types. Gas or electric?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 04/Feb/2013 12:36:16

    The Rails and sleepers do not look newly installed - so I would say quite a few years after the station opened.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 13:16:52

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland No problem.

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    derangedlemur

    • 04/Feb/2013 13:17:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] They get into that state in about twenty minutes.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 04/Feb/2013 15:41:29

    Those were the days before the "Trolley Dollys" when porters were employed to move passengers bags around and there are three porters handcarts parked to the right of the photo near the subway to the other platforms!

  • profile

    ccferrie

    • 04/Feb/2013 17:42:46

    BBC's Great British Railway Journeys goes to Ireland this evening including a trip to Cobh so we may see this fine edifice on the screen

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 04/Feb/2013 21:23:50

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] With a familiar photograph at 5:23

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 04/Feb/2013 21:47:37

    The Rail-station Cork limerick When admiring the station at Cork Platform Six is a good place to walk. The sensuous curves Are a feast for the nerves - But a poster is 'Not Safe For Work' !

  • profile

    Joefuz

    • 05/Feb/2013 02:09:34

    Somebody liked their signs! I count 29 (correct me if I'm wrong) official signs. If you didn't know where in the station you were, it wasn't the sign writer's fault!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 05/Feb/2013 08:17:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I saw the show, very interesting. This photo was also in there.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Feb/2013 08:44:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/79549245[email protected] Missed the programme! Was this one really there? And our picnic at Gearhameen http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 05/Feb/2013 08:55:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland yes it was and when they covered Cobh I think some of the photos from here featured. I believe the show is on all week at 6.30 with the focus on Munster railways. I presumed you had posted this photo to tie in with the broadcast.....

  • profile

    abandoned railways

    • 05/Feb/2013 11:37:55

    Unseen in this picture is the storage celler under the restaurant and platform 5.It has an access door in the subway under the line, there was no footbridge anywhere, so goods/parcels could be delivered to any platform. There is also a lift next to the signal cabin.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Feb/2013 14:27:28

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Not at all, pure serendipity! I dream of one day being that organised...

  • profile

    MSGS4

    • 05/Feb/2013 14:46:12

    I think the subway arrangement is different now. There seems to be two sets of ramps either side leading down to the subway, but nowadays there is only one ramp either side of the platform, I think. Great clarity in the photo. Also I seem to remember reading somewhere that its one of the few mainline stations in Europe that has its main platform on a bend. I suppose there wasn't much choice in that seeing as though when you exit the tunnel a turn has to be made, or else its into the river you go.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Feb/2013 18:19:31

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think York is on a bend, but from memory it isn't as tight as Cork's. Meanwhile, roll credits. credits

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Feb/2013 19:05:07

    Huzzah, John, thank you! I got home in time to watch this evening's edition, and I'm a little over-excited! What a wealth of William Lawrence's photos, and some that we've all argued over - the creamery one, and Bianconi's car among them! Have the magic box all set to record tomorrow evening's offering. (Though still laughing at Michael Portillo's pronunciation of Camogie!) Made me want to search for railway and station and Waterford photos, so be warned!

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 05/Feb/2013 19:25:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I told ya that they were using your photos. How about a gamoogee photograph!!!!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Feb/2013 19:37:08

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Have you forgotten our lovely Miss Hookey and her Camogie Team? :)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 05/Feb/2013 20:00:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland how could I forget......

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Feb/2013 20:54:17

    A description of the "commodious new terminus" which appeared in Freeman's on Friday 13th January 1893 [http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoolbeach] Both - in the article it says "It will be lit both by electric light and gas".

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 05/Feb/2013 21:13:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner "Commodius", but no movable boudoir - very shortsighted of them...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Feb/2013 21:33:59

    The brick works at Ruabon in North Wales where the bricks used in the construction of the station were manufactured.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 06/Feb/2013 02:38:42

    I couldn't figure out how we knew it was after Feb. 2, 1893. Duh, that's when it opened... Per Wikipedia anyway :)

  • profile

    Carmen Cordero Olivares.

    • 06/Feb/2013 10:45:39

    Buena toma.

  • profile

    blackpoolbeach

    • 06/Feb/2013 16:57:29

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Newcastle upon Tyne Central Station had a nasty S-bend for northbound steam locos. I used to watch the big Pacific wheels spinning in the 1950s, trying to start heavy trains for Edinburgh. www.british-history.ac.uk/mapsheet.aspx?compid=55210&... Cork Station looks an even tighter curve. maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,568403,572269,7,9

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 06/Feb/2013 21:08:30

    GoogleMapsStreetView is Quite Interesting (apologies if someone has posted this before). The station looks like a rotting red-brick Victorian monstrosity on streetview, not the feast for the eyes as in this photograph - well done Mr French!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 07/Feb/2013 08:02:44

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland On tonight's episode Señor Portillo visits the big Parsonstown telescope.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Feb/2013 11:26:54

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner What's the betting one of our photos turns up there?!

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 07/Feb/2013 20:10:18

    One of my contacts had this one to show. http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/8453045392/in/contacts/ The intervening 100+ years have seen many changes but plenty of curved lines?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 07/Feb/2013 21:13:41

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Didn't Birr Castle, and the remains of our Leviathan look great? Plus our lovely Lawrence photo? Bet any Flickroonie who ever sees that episode will smugly say "that's the fourth earl atop the telescope, don't you know!"

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 08/Feb/2013 08:44:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I have watched the Portillo show all week. He makes an excellent presenter and has a very nice way about him. The tourist board must be delighted with the show, it is like an advertisement to visit Ireland.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Feb/2013 09:20:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was thinking the same about the tourism aspect. Definitely want to try that Lismore steam section...

  • profile

    Lorenzoclick

    • 08/Feb/2013 10:16:55

    Beautiful ! ! !

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 10/Feb/2013 22:44:35

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I'm "on the road" at the moment, so I missed the telescope. I'll just have to hope they are still available on iPlayer when I get home, otherwise wait for the repeats (which shouldn't be long).

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Feb/2013 11:22:26

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner No problem at all.

  • profile

    Carrignafoy

    • 05/Jun/2013 17:07:17

    Kent station could do with some pigeon deflectors these days. The birds congregate over the heads of passengers waiting on Platform 4 to board trains to Dublin. Wear a hat!

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    werner.deceur

    • 25/Aug/2015 02:19:50

    Noticed de "guard rail" on the tracks. (technical term for an extra rail along the tracks to avoid derailing) which was patent by Gorham B. Ames of Lagonia (New Hampshire) which he filed on the 20th of July 1893. So who is the copycat???

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Aug/2015 07:03:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Werner, let's see what the technical experts have to say. Later in the day.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Feb/2016 14:09:49

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 16/May/2016 12:56:09

    Streetview is inside now!