Home & Foreign Fruits (at no. 48)

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Where: Cork, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
A lovely high view of King Street (now MacCurtain Street) in Cork. Where was the high point from which this photo was taken?

I hope that the unusually situated dog in this photo will satisfy those of you who requested a canine component in our Flickr offering - this means you, DannyM8!

Date: Circa 1900?

NLI Ref.: L_NS_00115

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 76107
kingstreet maccurtainstreet cork ireland munster missflanagan flanagan dress mantle awnings homeforeignfruits dog theatre bicycles housefurnishing windowboxes strawboaters donkey cart milkchurns trams bakerwright brushes lamps tramno16 tram16 whitehavencoals palacetheatre hotelmetropole dennehy winespiritstore newsposters mademoiselle alma ryansfurnishings baptistchurch hiberniabuildings dobbinogilvie confectioners factory thompsons bakery squaresection telegraphpoles corkarms dennehys everymanpalace dobbin ogilvie wilkie awwilkie limerickbybeachcomber alexanderwilliamwilkie nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Dec/2012 09:45:16

    Never mind the dog, what about the unusually situated human (see note)?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 09:53:20

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Crikey, cannot believe I didn't spot him! :)

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:01:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia He was up there looking for a real Dog

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:03:09

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I spotted him thanks to your note and what I wonder is how did he manage it? I remember when linesmen of various persuasions put on special steel shoes with a large spiked hook at the toe that went around the pole. They then put a large leather belt around their waists and around the pole and they climbed up one step at a time shifting the belt up with each step as this prevented them from falling backwards. The thing is that the pole in this case look like it is make of concrete and there is no ladder in evidence. Similarly there is no belt in sight to hold him onto the darned thing! Health and safety how are ye?

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:04:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Niice one Danny, I was just thinking that after all our labours of last week solving puzzles and generally entertaining the denizens of Library Towers and all she gives you is an imitation dog for our troubles. Tsktsk!

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:07:11

    Wilkie A W & Son, The Black Dog, 41 King st

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:09:08

    Cork. Wayhay. (And my side of town too!) Don't have much to add just now - other than the obligatory street view.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:10:13

    I n d i a R u b b e r S t a m p M a n u f a c t u r e r s. "WTLKIE & SON, T h e Black Dog, King street. Any shape, style or size of stamp can be made. Monograms, Crests, Address Dies, Note Headings, etc. Our stamps are not supplied to any city dealers.

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:12:59

    Baker & Wright for Brushes, Lamps ... Cork Exhibition, 1883. Freeman's reported: "Stand 59 - Baker and Wright, Patrick Street, Cork. This company exhibits well-prepared liquid paints in tins, for which they deserve honorable mention."

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:15:50

    Carol you were wondering where was the high point offering that view? In streetview (which I cannot add) you can see that this street runs from the base of Patricks Hill which gave us so much fun during the year and the buildings at the bottom of the hill are looking right down MacCurtain Street, Having said that they seem very far back for this particular view, unless there was a zoom lens?

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:16:02

    The Metropole opened in 1897

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:21:30

    Was this shot on the same day or around the same time as the photo of Patrick Hill? It is a direct continuation of coverage of that area and there are lots of similarlities in dress etc. though the weather looks much better in this? http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6627415775/

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:25:16

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] I think you are right. The building in the left foreground is this one here so the viewpoint is right at the end of the street, probably from the building at the bottom of Patrick's Hill

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:27:54

    In 1897 Dan Lowrey opened the building as a luxurious new theatre called The Cork Palace of Varieties. Its origins as beautiful Victorian theatre is reflected in the interior of the building with its impressive ornate proscenium arch and boxes and a balcony and ceiling composed of decorative plasterwork which has been restored to its former glory.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:51:42

    48a Building: CO. CORK, CORK, MACCURTAIN STREET, NO. 048A? (WILKIE & SONS) Date: 1895 Nature: New premises. Tender of D. Duggan for £1,752 accepted. Refs: IB 37, 15 Jun 1895, 146

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:53:37

    The Coliseum is just out of sight at the far end of the road, on the right hand side: Coliseum Theatre

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:55:50

    Here's the 1901 census entry for the Wilkies. Alex William Wilkie is listed as a Stationer, Newsagent, Indian Rubber Stamp Manufacturer and Photographer They were still there in 1911 www.census.nationalarchives.ie/reels/nai001854776/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2012 10:59:20

    Obligatory 25" OSI link at GeoHive.

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    eyelightfilms

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:06:11

    Straw boaters were very much in style that year. Mitchell & Kenyon did a great sequence shot from the top of a moving tram along this street in 1902 I think. Can't seem to find a clip on YouTube, but it's on my Mitchell & Kenyon in Ireland DVD.

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:09:37

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Account of the opening of the Palace of Varieties in The Era (a theatrical newspaper) at Easter 1897 including a detailed description of the theatre and a review of the opening night. Acts included: - Professor Jelly Jolly, with the Cinématographe - Little Daisy Palmer - Tiller's Eight Champions, lady vocalists and dancers - Mdlle. Alma, on the electric globe - Miss Minnie Cunningham - Mr F.W Mills, ventriloquist - the Musical Palmers [does this include Little Daisy?] - Jake Graham - the Five Behazins Dan Lowrey made a speech during the interval and made a remark which "elicited an interjection from the celestials". I'd love to know what an electric globe was, and what Mdlle Alma did with it.

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:21:17

    No mention of Miss Flanagan as a dressmaker in the 1907 trade directory but the Wilkies get a mention www.corkpastandpresent.ie/places/streetandtradedirectorie...

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:22:45

    There seems to be an archive of Photos by Wilkie in Cork. I also saw a reference that some of the photos may be early copies from the NLI Lawrence Collection... Cork City & County Archives Descriptive List Identity Statement Reference Code: IE CCCA/U399 Title: Wilkie Photographers Dates: c.1890 – c.1910

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:30:56

    Here is an example from the Wilkie collection Grand Parade 1902 - 1903

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:32:46

    Apologies for the digression The round-up of acts at the Empire Cardiff in 1898 says:

    Mdlle Alma, in her gyrations on the electric globe, surrounded as she is by myriads of lights, is as pretty an exhibition as we have witnessed here for some time.
    Gyrations indeed! In December 1898 in DUblin
    Mdlle Alma, in her evolutions on the electric globe, meets with due appreciation
    Evolutions? Belfast Christmas Eve 1898
    a novel and exciting turn has been submitted by Mdlle Alma on the electric globe

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:38:23

    From Jane Mulcahy's myspace (!) page: In June 2005 I played the part of Mademoiselle Alma, who had an amazing electric globe in Playgroup's innovative production "Dark Week" at the Everyman Palace From Lynda Radley (playwright) home page: Dark Week (2005): (Dramaturgy) Playgroup in co-production with Cork Midsummer Festival and Everyman Palace Theatre. Nominated for the Judges’ Special Award at the Irish Times Irish Theatre Awards 2006.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:41:53

    Cork City Library Same Day? Different Image?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:42:56

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Amazeglobes!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Dec/2012 11:50:17

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I looks as if there are 5 shots of King Street in the nli collection, but only 2 are digitized so far, and that City Library one is not one of them. Here is the other.

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:03:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia NIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICE one!

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:08:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley That's interesting Niall, the no 16 tram is going in the opposite direction in the second shot!. There also seems to be a ladder up at the pole down near Dan Lowery's place!

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:09:18

    So, anyone got any ideas on the date and time? Where are our shadow measurers? Surely that telegraph worker is casting a distinctly measurable shadow :) Using almanacs and census I can't really improve on Carol's "c.1900" estimate. Everything points to >1898, and maybe as late as 1903 or 1904.

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:14:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Interesting play on language depending on where you were! Gyrations in Cardiff, evolutions in Dublin, a turn in Belfast what would the papers in Aberdeen have said???

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:37:37

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie] I don't know about Aberdeen, but in Dundee her 'evolutions' were judged 'extremely attractive', and her feats of juggling 'highly interesting'. Some slightly more detailed descriptions of her act in The Belfast Newsletter and The Dundee Courier & Argus. And The Leeds Mercury

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:51:39

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Digress away! Between the "gyrations" and the "evolutions", the mind boggles... Wonder if Mdlle Alma used gas or candles in the early days of her career?

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:56:36

    Professor Jolly I'd guess this was the first time moving pictures had been seen in Cork. It wasn't that long since the first moving pictures had been seen anywhere.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 12:59:19

    Dan Lowrey was a huge impresario in Dublin as well! Have a look at this or this, or this...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:02:03

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Yes, very early! This poster for the Coliseum on King Street, advertising Edison's Speaking Pictures dates from around 1914 or 1915, we think...

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:19:22

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland No mention of any lighting in her earlier performances. In 1894 at the London Pavillion, Mdlle Almas' exploits on a moving globe, pushed by the feet on a swaying plank, astonished the audience and (as described in The Illustrated Police News (!)) ... met with their usual success, as did Mdlle Alma with her golden ball. At Christmas 1896 at Bristol in a sparsely attended Babes in the Wood In this scene Mdlle Alma introduces electricity in a very striking way. She flits about with electric lights on her costume, and then manipulates with her feet a ball in which the electric light changes colour. She also walks a plank on this prismatic globe I can't find any mention of her after January 1899.

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:20:54

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The cinematograph was first displayed in England on February 20th, 1896...soon after, the cinematograph found its way onto the vaudeville theater circuit

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:29:17

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] In Tramore, Co. Waterford by 1901...

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:33:10

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] If they had "talkies" in 1914/15, they still felt the need for "accompaniment" as late as 1919. (On the same page [page 230] as the Ryan's Furniture advert, which I linked in a tag above, there is an advert for the Coliseum - which mentions accompaniment by "orchestral band".)

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:34:26

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland the use of the term Cinématographe suggests the Lumiere brothers invention which preceded Edison's Kinetoscope

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:39:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Presumably it made the whole experience even more exciting! And what beautiful lettering on COLISEUM?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:39:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You are right, of course.

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:40:53

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Isn't it? Certainly compared to the pedestrian type-faces in the rest of the publication. FYI - This journey back to Bridge Street, King Street, and Ship Street reminds me. I came across a smashing photo of Barriscales shop and clock on Bridge Street recently. I nearly fainted with the excitement.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:45:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That is absolutely gorgeous! If you get a moment, would you comment it under the other photo please? There are Barriscale family members who I'm sure would love to see it... With regard to the "nearly fainted with excitement" - I'm issuing a blanket disclaimer that if any of you experience blood pressure issues, chest pains, spots before the eyes, etc. from the excitement of finding out things about these photos, Library Towers accepts no responsibility whatsoever! :)

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    John Spooner

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:53:45

    The description of the Cork Palace of Varieties includes the sentence Erected here, and all over the house, are "panic doors", to cope with emergencies in case of fire or panic I wonder if these measures were insisted on by Dan Lowrey (described as 'Music Hall Proprietor') as a result of his witnessing the scenes at the Colosseum, Liverpool, in October 1878, when someone shouted 'Fire!' and 37 people were killed in the crush when the audience panicked. Inquest report from Lancaster Gazette Added later: From another report Dan Lowrey's experience during the panic seems to have been truly horrific, as he vainly tried to calm people (even though he had no connection with the Colosseum). Not long after that he left Liverpool to start up in Dublin.

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:54:09

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Dan Lowry (sic) gets a mention in James Joyce's Ulysses! They passed Dan Lowry's musichall where Marie Kendall, charming soubrette, smiled on them from a poster a dauby smile www.james-joyce-music.com/extras/lowreys_theatre.html (it's now the Olympia Theatre!)

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 13:57:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Sure is. I would have added it to the other thread already - but I'm trying to find out who owns the photo and who is pictured. I think it's a "family photo", so it's likely that very few people have seen it before. I've asked the guy who posted it to Facebook for some info. I don't want to be splashing "private family photos" around too readily. Even 100 year-old ones.

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    dorameulman

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:05:25

    Thanks for another brilliant image.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:13:23

    From the British Library - "The Black Dog" must have been the LOGO of Wilkie & Sons? Advert from The Irish Exhibition Olympia 1888 Pressmark Evan.6023 Heading or Venue Wilkie & Son Place Ireland, Cork Title Section G. Stand B99. The Irish Exhibition. Olympia, London. Wilkie & Son, Cork, india rubber stamp makers, name stamps 1s. 6d. Monograms 2 letters 1s. Fancy names 1s. Use only our special inks for the stamps. India rubber stamp inks all colors 3d. 6d. & 1s. per. Bottle. Subscriptions & advertisements received for all Irish newspapers by Wilkie & Son, "The Black Dog," King Street, Cork. And at Irish Exhibition, Olympia, Stand B99

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:14:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Good thinking, Batman!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:14:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/dorameulman You're very welcome, Dora!

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    guliolopez

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:37:41

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was stuck in my own stuff and didn't keep up with the thread. You'll see it in the almanacs. "The Black Dog" was the operating name of (one of two?) of the Wilkie's premises on MacCurtain Street. (They had one at #41 and another at #48.) Hence "The Black Dog" shows in addresses and listings.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:47:50

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Looks like they used the image similar to the way Public Houses do. Ps - I notice that "She who Hates all Dogs or http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland for short" referred to you as Batman - obviously you are a different Super hero alltogether.

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    DannyM8

    • 17/Dec/2012 14:48:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bip/434198013/

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    ccferrie

    • 17/Dec/2012 15:02:45

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] has queried the cupola above - it looks like it was on the corner of the Hibernia Buildings nearest to us in this picture. The buildings were originally built in 1879 and rebuilt in 1883 after a fire and housed Dobbin & Ogilvie Confectioners. Entry in DIA Report on fire (Incidentally, Henry Hill, architect of the reconstruction of Hibernia Buildings was Myrtle Allen's Great Grandfather)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Dec/2012 22:07:27

    There once was a Mademoiselle Alma - Alas! No-one was able to calm her - With electrical probes And extraordinary globes - She re-wrote the Sutra of Kama.

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    victor98_2001

    • 19/Dec/2012 14:35:27

    excellent shot

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    excellentzebu1050

    • 27/Dec/2012 22:26:06

    in one word Brilliant

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 03/Jan/2013 15:29:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Forgot to thank you for your Limericked Ode to Mademoiselle Alma! Hope you'll keep them coming in 2013 (though probably shouldn't encourage you... :)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Jan/2013 21:23:09

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Please don't encourage me - writing limericks about Irish photographs is like sending coals to Newcastle.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Jan/2013 11:45:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Ha! Bet you won't be able to resist the urge... :D

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 04/Jan/2013 12:08:05

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] ...but they do send coals to Newcastle upon Tyne. All the deep coal mines closed long ago. A new quay was built to import coal. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selling_coal_to_Newcastle On the other hand, Newcastle NSW is "the largest exporter of coal in the modern world."

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    iantheteacher

    • 02/Mar/2013 12:22:28

    If anyone is interested in Alexander William Wilkie, his ancestry.com entry is at trees.ancestry.com/tree/18853130/person/723167360 (unfortunately think you need to be paid up or on free-trial to see this). They also had a photography studio at the other end of the street (now the Spar). He is also the same Wilkie that compiled Wilkie's Cork Directory for 1872.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Mar/2013 18:06:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Shame about the subscription only access as you say, but some people may have institutional or library access, so thank you very much...

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    achesonblog

    • 17/Feb/2014 20:52:52

    I'd be willing to bet this was taken the same summer's morning as this shot of Bridge St around the corner: www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6627415775/in/faves-aches... I believe the shot was taken (with a longer lens) from the upper rooms of K. Toomey's pub on the corner of Coburg St. Perhaps the photographer was lodging there. That view would put them on the same level as the cross bars on the tram power poles, as in the photograph. Lots of straw boaters in view. (Also a linesman high on a telegraph pole in the right middle distance.)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Aug/2016 23:25:20

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037