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Where: Northern Ireland, Antrim, United Kingdom

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1907

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
And it certainly looks as if most of the population of Portrush, Co. Antrim are all aboard this crowded steamer.

Date: On or after Friday, 14 June 1907? (definitely between 1907 and 1914)

NLI Ref.: L_NS_01481

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 35879
portrush antrim ireland northernireland ulster srhenry portstewart cart horse crowd tourists daytrippers carriage swissbazaar shops hotels northerncountieshotel lifeboats decks steamer crew sailors funnels portholes masts quay docks robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative ship northpier coastguardwatchhouse imperialhotel victoriahotel portrushbar jhelkes josephharriselkes draper sshazel fairfieldgovan nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:17:32

    looks dangerous; leaning/listing to one side!

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    Badger 23 / jezevec

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:36:59

    Conga line on the port side!

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    Vab2009

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:42:09

    Yikes - Board Trade Regulations had not come in then..Lol!!

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:42:49

    Taken from the North Pier. This is as close as streetview gets. The actual vantage point is a little further out the pier.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:54:41

    The Imperial Hotel noted above is called the Victoria Hotel on the 1904 OS Map and the Portrush Bar on the 1896 OS Map

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    Gerry Ward

    • 19/Nov/2012 12:55:55

    According to the 1910 Portrush Street Directory, the Swiss Bazaar was at Quay Head, Portrush. It was owned by JH Elkes. The only Elkes in Ireland in either the 1901 or 1911 Census was Russian Jewish draper, Joseph Harris Elkes, living in North Street, Belfast.

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:13:56

    The Northern Counties Committee was only formed in 1903, so presumably the Northern Counties Hotel post-dates this.

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:19:22

    This looks like the same boat, though it's a different photo: 7seasvessels.com/?p=22053

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:19:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Northern Counties Hotel is on the 1896 Map - may not be connected to the railway or perhaps the name was in usage before the committee was set up.

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:24:45

    "SS Hazel, and was operated by the Laird Line from 1907 to 1919" She doesn't appear to have been part of a class, so I think this is definitely the Hazel, so there's your start and end date.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:26:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Looks like the same boat alright, although some of the vents on deck are facing different directions. I suppose these could have been adjusted over time.

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:27:58

    www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=808

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:29:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It was serving in the war from 1914 so that tightens up the timescale further (this doesn't look like a wartime photo)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:32:55

    S.R. Henry's cart seems to have been a fixture on that pier...

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:34:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] (this doesn't look like a wartime photo) - Not if it was being used as a boarding vessel, no. They'd not be filling it up with passengers.So 1907-1914. Outside chance of 1919.

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:36:25

    I have seen this photo before somewhere now if I could just remember where.

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    Gerry Ward

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:39:39

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The Belfast & Northern Counties Railway (BNCR) acquired the hotel in 1881.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:41:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] seems likely it went straight to Isle of Man in 1919. Doesn't look like it has been through a war (and somehow, neither do the people). So April 1907 to September 1914? (shadows are too short to be later than September I think)

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:50:27

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Shadows say middle of June at lunchtime.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:52:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Could be the maiden voyage! June 1907 - that would explain the multitudes.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:56:57

    Just to note that the always useless backwards writing on the negative says: The Quay Portrush

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:58:02

    Dunno. You'd expect a bit more bunting.

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    derangedlemur

    • 19/Nov/2012 13:59:28

    The carriage has a couple of lads in peaked caps on it and a fellow with a helmet beside it. Is it a black maria?

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 14:04:50

    The unusual buildings to the right of the Northern Counties Hotel don't appear on the 1904 OS Map and are no longer in existence. Those big bay windows look they could have been ballrooms.

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    DannyM8

    • 19/Nov/2012 14:22:40

    Could it be people arriving for this tournamenr in 1895 ? - Royal Portrush was the first links outside of England to house the British Ladies' Championship, which was won by Lady Margaret Scott and has been played here another seven times since.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 14:38:38

    Those buildings are not on this image dated 1908 ihpc.ie/ihpc/Main/Enquiry.asp?iPictureID=13539&iTownI... but they are in this, unfortunately undated, photo ihpc.ie/ihpc/Main/Enquiry.asp?iPictureID=13604&iTownI...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2012 15:13:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks very much for the location!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 15:21:36

    Those buildings ARE the Northern Counties Hotel according to the 1931 map (OS 10 25" County Edition 2), and I don't think you'd see them on the 1908 photo from that angle. The DIA says the hotel had alterations in 1892, 1894 and 1905. So I'd say those buildings are the 1905 alterations, and this shot is post 1905.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2012 15:48:32

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley That'd make it 1905-1914 - it cannot be any later than that...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 15:49:46

    One page over from [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward]'s Portrush directory of 1910, we find the Portstewart directory featuring: Emigration Agent—S. R. Henry Grain and General Merchant—S. R. Henry Grocers—S. R. Henry Hotels—... Carric- na-cule, S. R. Henry; Posting Establishments—... S. R. Henry and Stationery and Fancy Warehouses—... S. R. Henry,

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:02:58

    Have had a look at another photo of the S.S. Hazel at Portrush, and I'm 99% happy that http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] is right. This is the S.S. Hazel, so this must have been taken after Saturday, 13 April 1907 when the Hazel was launched...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:04:17

    Samuel R. Henry appears in the census of 1901 and 1911 in Portstewart.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:15:37

    From the Irish Times of Friday, 14 June 1907

    SAD DROWNING ACCIDENT AT PORTRUSH Harry Young, aged 18, a native of Londonderry, was accidentally drowned while bathing off the South Pier, Portrush, yesterday. He was a member of an excursion party from Londonderry Methodist City Mission, and in the absence of the attendant at dinner hour he went, with others, to bathe at the outer side of the pier, when a strong current was running. The pier was deserted, as the majority of people had assembled at the opposite side of the harbour to witness the arrival of the Laird Line steamer Hazel on her maiden voyage. As the steamer was being moored the cry was raised that a boy had gone down. A boat was quickly launched, and was only in time to pick up a young man named Thomas Davis, of Derry, who had accompanied Young into the water, and who, in attempting to save his life, almost lost his own. Young's body was recovered half an hour later, and efforts made to restore animation by Doctors Martin and Porter, with the assistance of the coastguards, were of no avail.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:25:02

    Hmm, the original image for [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]'s postcard is in the nli archive, and the backwards writing on it says "Glasgow Steamer The harbour Portrush". Is it the same ship? This steamer has a row of square and a row of round portholes in the white stripe above deck level. The Glasgow steamer appears to have no cabins/portholes above deck level. On the other hand, we are looking at the port side here, and the starboard side in the Glasgow steamer image. maybe the cabins are all on the port side? The Glasgow Steamer image is not high-definition enough for me to make out if the ship's name is legible.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:32:09

    After a quick google, I'm confident that this is the Hazel, later Mona. I'm not sure the Glasgow Steamer image is, though. Here are lots of Hazel/Mona pictures showing the portholes I mention on both sides.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:45:53

    In 1902/03, there was a steamer named the Azalea on this route, but I can't find a picture... June 19 1903 The daylight service between Ardrossan an Portrush opens on June 23 with the SS Azalea. Return fares: cabin, 14/-; steerage, 6/6d. Ardrossan - Belfast sail are: cabin, 9/6d.; steerage, 4/-.

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:47:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] I'm beginning to doubt the date of that "1908" image. I think you would see the hotel extension because it directly abuts the terrace of houses on Mark St whereas we can see the gable of that terrace in the "1908" photo. BTW here's a nice poster of the ballroom of the Northern Counties c.1932. The ballroom depicted could be behind one of those great bay windows.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:53:40

    More Hazel info here

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    ccferrie

    • 19/Nov/2012 16:59:45

    Another shot of the Hazel in the 1910s www.philsamusements.co.uk/sites/default/files/styles/page... part of a great selection of old Portrush photos www.philsamusements.co.uk/old-portrush

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    FrigateRN

    • 19/Nov/2012 20:11:17

    I love your old pictures NLI and you have done it again! You seem to just have the knack of finding and posting great pictures that just grab the attention, great job if I may say so. Thank you for sharing.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 19/Nov/2012 22:34:21

    There is a length of stud-link chain cable, as used for anchoring. en.wikisource.org/wiki/1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica/...

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    dorameulman

    • 20/Nov/2012 01:54:13

    Brilliant old photo.

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    billh35

    • 20/Nov/2012 09:45:39

    At the time this photo is taken the S.S. Hazel is in the process of "tying up" as she arrives on her berth at Portrush. You can clearly see a docker securing her bow line while on the deck officers await at each of the vessel's three disembarkation points. This explains why there are no gangways in situ and why people appear to be watching and not actually doing anything. In 1908 Laird Line were offering tours to Ireland ( theglasgowstory.com/image.php?inum=TGSA02066&t=2&... ) so it would be quite feasible for the S.R. Henry wagon, who was probably Laird's port agent, to be waiting to collect luggage from the Hazel while the carriage awaited passengers for the hotel.

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    Scadán Dearg

    • 20/Nov/2012 10:38:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lizinitaly could have been the steam boat equivalent of the kneeling city bus;)

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    billh35

    • 20/Nov/2012 10:49:13

    More likely that people were in a rush to disembark so the weight had shifted to the port side which alarmingly was affecting the ship's stability!

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    Dru Marland

    • 27/Nov/2012 06:41:21

    I used to work on the Isle of Wight ferry, and was comfortably drinking my tea in the engine control room one afternoon when the Tannoy came on and the voice said "This is the captain speaking: if you look to starboard, you will see the QE2". A moment later we had heeled over to starboard, as the passengers upstairs dashed across...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Nov/2012 08:47:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/belvedere Oooh-er! That's like that old ad on the plane: "The McVitie's are at the back".