Bridge over untroubled water

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Where: Meath, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1865

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Spooky quality about this one, between the ruins and the bridge and the water… Also rather an odd mix in the group atop the bridge - rich, or at least well-to-do young women, alongside barefoot children...

We asked if anyone knew where this was. Answer came back about 10 minutes later - see comments below...

Date: 1860-1888

NLI Ref: STP_0516

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 44016
ruins keep castle tower bridge weir river reeds parasol umbrella rick children barefoot hats stereopairs stereographicnegatives stereoscope jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnlawrence lawrencecollection stereoscopiccollection trimcastle yellowtower yellowsteeple trim meath ireland leinster boyne nationallibraryofireland 19thcentury

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    Gregory PC

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:18:57

    Wow! That looks to me like Trim, Meath. Trim Castle and the Yellow Steeple in the background. I know that bridge and now it's away from the river on the public foothpath.

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:24:12

    That's Trim alright.

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    Gregory PC

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:25:05

    Here's where the bridge is now. maps.google.com/maps?q=Trim,+Ireland&hl=en&ll=53....

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:25:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey Trying to be delighted you got it so quickly! :D Does all of the structure of the bridge still survive? And tell us about the Yellow Steeple? That's a great name.

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:26:12

    From the angle it's taken from, it must be at the ruined church on the east side of the town.

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:29:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey] I thought it was here: maps.google.com/maps?q=Trim,+Ireland&hl=en&ll=53....

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:36:13

    The yellow tower is the tower of St Mary's Abbey. Like most "yellow" places (e.g. yellow walls in Malahide), I think it's just named after the limestone used to build it. Maybe wikipedia will know.

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:37:23

    "the ruin of the abbey bell tower named for the yellow color reflected by the stonework in the setting sun"

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    derangedlemur

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:37:49

    I climbed to the top of it once when I was about 9 or 10. It's quite high.

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    Gregory PC

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:38:33

    This is the only pic I could find on the web of where I think the bridge is located. i.ytimg.com/vi/J6KnmcoMykM/0.jpg (top left) I'll try to get a photo of the bridge as it is now over the weekend.

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    ccferrie

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:46:13

    Here's a Google Streetview of the bridge now taken from the ring road maps.google.com/maps?q=Trim,+Ireland&hl=en&ll=53.... There used to be a channel of the river running through here which shows up on the old OS Maps but must have been filled in in the last century maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,680521,756536,7,9

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    mogey

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:48:59

    The 180 degree streetview really shows the view on the origial photo maps.google.com/maps?q=Trim,+Ireland&hl=en&ll=53....

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    FrigateRN

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:57:40

    The bridge to nowhere, another interesting picture NLI, I love it!

  • profile

    Gregory PC

    • 25/Oct/2012 08:59:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] yes, you're right! that's the bridge.

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    Joefuz

    • 25/Oct/2012 09:15:07

    I've often walked past that piece of bridge. I never realised the river used to run under it!

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    probable ice

    • 25/Oct/2012 10:15:15

    is it possible that the kids are orphans?? and that the well dressed ladies have taken them out for a day.... perhaps the guy in the uniform is there to make sure they don't run away??? just a thought.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Oct/2012 10:19:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey Thanks for the location! Really weird to see a bridge just sitting in the middle of a field...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Oct/2012 10:23:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/franmoll Anything is possible, but I think it was probably far less sinister.

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    ccferrie

    • 25/Oct/2012 12:58:49

    It looks like this could have been a mill race rather than a branch of the river. The old 6" map shows that in 1836 there was a Tuck Mill further downstream. Tuck Mills were associated with the woolen industry. 1836 Map maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,680784,756550,7,7

  • profile

    Gregory PC

    • 25/Oct/2012 15:59:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Very interesting. But do you see the weir/inlet and the start of it there's a small bridge. I think this is the same bridge they're sitting on here. But today that inlet is not there any more.

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    John Mac Giolla Phádraig Leisen

    • 25/Oct/2012 16:22:34

    Respect,.!!

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    ccferrie

    • 25/Oct/2012 21:01:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey that's right - if you use the overlay tool in OS Maps you can see it corresponds to the bridge as it is today (more or less)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 25/Oct/2012 21:25:12

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey] A mill-race for sure, though possibly for an earlier mill near or on this bridge, if you look at the water flow on the old maps. When the weir shown downstream was taken away this section of the river Boyne would have silted and dried up. Thinking haymaking (see haystacks note). There is a Trim Haymaking Festival - Scurlogstown Olympiad at this very site nowadays. They would be fascinated to see this photo.

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    DannyM8

    • 25/Oct/2012 22:35:09

    Great job - 10 minutes! Is that a Record? I thought they were supposed to be hard this week.

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    derangedlemur

    • 26/Oct/2012 06:14:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] No. I still have it with St Doulagh's. I think records should only count for fastest research though. If either Greg or I had seen this sooner we'd have broken the record, so it's really just about how fast you can spot that there's a new picture. Things like dating the Oscar Traynor pic were (to my mind) far more impressive.

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    derangedlemur

    • 26/Oct/2012 06:18:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia It's very big for a mill race, but I can't see what else it could be. It's not navigable with that weir across it.

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    Gregory PC

    • 27/Oct/2012 12:08:55

    Here's how it looks today: www.flickr.com/photos/gregcarey/8127420168/in/photostream

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    ccferrie

    • 27/Oct/2012 23:09:55

    In the older OS Map it looks like the channel is much narrower and the bridge spans across it. In the later map it is wider and looks more like what we're seeing in this photo. The area is prone to flooding which may have caused the widening of the mill race but the weir must then have been added to help waterflow for the mill.

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    ccferrie

    • 27/Oct/2012 23:13:40

    Perhaps flooding caused the damage to the bridge

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    fingle

    • 25/Jul/2013 17:10:07

    Anyone who has ever taken kids down near the water would tell you that the first thing you have to tell them, after "Stay out of the water!" is "Then at least take off your shoes!"