Fast Excursion to the International Exhibition

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Where: Limerick, Ireland

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When: 01 July 1907

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It looks as if some quite stylish ladies have just alighted from a train at Limerick Railway Station, though they're of no interest to local children who are completely focused on the photographer.

Delighted to see a poster in this one that gives us great dating evidence as it advertises the International Exhibition, with a Fast Excursion to Dublin on Tuesday 23rd, though unfortunately can't make out the month. The International Exhibition ran in Dublin from May to November 1907.

Date: July 1907

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_09143

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 48938
trainstation railwaystation limerick ireland munster carriages royalgeorgehotel awnings sidecars horses blankets umbrella children gaslighting porter barrel poster internationalexhibition fastexcursion 1907 1900s trains railways robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative jarveys railwayhotel colbertstation july nationallibraryofireland limerickbybeachcomber 1907internationalexhibition dublininternationalexhibition irishinternationalexhibition

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  • profile

    Vab2009

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:01:34

    I love those carriages for the gentry!! It is an excellent image with oodles to look at ..but I have to go to the dentist :-(

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    Swordscookie

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:02:16

    Firstly, welcome back Carol - our lives were so much duller without your presence and posts! Secondly when I was growing up in Limerick this was more or less the centre of activity because (a) I lived not too far away and (b) my father worked on the railway. This scene had not changed much when I was growing up and I can remember some jarveys parked along that fence line though there was a line of taxis nearby as well. Those gates were still there right up to the 1960's if I remember right and the station building was and remains more or less the same. In our time the bus terminal for the country linking the trains with the outlying areas and towns not served by the railway were up there to the right of the shot and I remember the green single deckers with the luggage on the rack on the roof leaving there down through the years. Ah, them was the days!!! This was probably taken from the Railway Hotel which was directly across the street from the station?

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    Swordscookie

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:05:44

    I should mention that this is right in the heart of "Cookie" country, just up to the right was Careys Road and the Young Munster rugby club was centred in that area. The club which is 120+ years old was drawn from local workers and craftsmen and the name was cocking a snoop at those elitist clubs like the Old Belvederes, Old Wesleys etc.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:13:09

    What a contrast between the extravagant hats of the ladies and the caps of the urchins standing right next to them.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:30:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 Ouch! Best of luck at the dentist...

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    Michiel2005

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:30:14

    In 1907 there was a Tuesday 23 in April and in July. As the exhibition only opened in May, this must be July 23.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:38:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/govert1970 And I imagine the ladies would perhaps have been wearing rather more substantial garments in early April.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:39:51

    The handsome stone building is still there, although the car-parking around it is less scenic than these horse-drawn carriages! See here from Bing

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Oct/2012 09:54:36

    The stations's page at the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage (aka buildingsofireland.ie).

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    KölnMike

    • 15/Oct/2012 10:01:30

    Nice details. There must have been keen competition between the Cruises Royal Hotel and the Royal George Hotel as seen by their large shuttle coaches. I can’t make out the signage on the smaller coaches.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Oct/2012 10:13:32

    Wonderful selection of carriages and carts, just before motor vehicles came along. Challenge: name the type of carriages ...

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 10:33:21

    "Omnibus meets all trains and steamers" Obviously a selling point. Freeman's Feb 18th 1885 Photobucket

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    eyelightfilms

    • 15/Oct/2012 10:46:44

    What nice stripey awnings for the windows.

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    Vab2009

    • 15/Oct/2012 10:47:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Dentist was fine :-) http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie This to me is what history is about - someone who can say how things were when they were a child and how it has changed from the image being shown. Funny, I find walking around Belfast I can't remember where buildings once were - until I recall memories of trips to town as kid with my parents.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Oct/2012 12:12:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/govert1970 Thanks a million! So this must have been just before (maybe up to a week before) Tuesday 23 July 1907.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Oct/2012 12:16:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Thanks for location, Niall.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 15/Oct/2012 12:16:50

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Hello, and missed you guys too! Yes, what http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 said - nothing like stories from someone on the ground.

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    ClickKen04

    • 15/Oct/2012 15:50:52

    Wecome back Carol, the usual detectives have been at work, the Gardai would not come up with the details the above crew deciphere from god knows how many sources! Well done to Sean, Niall, Vab2009,John, Beachcomber, Michiel,KölnMike & Eyelight, always an education and revelation.

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    anthony1928 (Have A Great Day)

    • 15/Oct/2012 16:37:13

    Wonderful image and apture.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 16:58:04

    Limerick Railway Station in the news 1 Daily News, Sept 30. 1890 (also reported elsewhere)

    To-night at the Limerick Railway Station, as some Cork excursionists, about 3,000, were returning home by train afer witnessing the Gaelic athletic sports, several free fights occurred. The windows of the carriages were wrecked, and the railway officials were assaulted. One man was arrested by a railway porter for flinging stones through a window, but he was resued, and a number of people were injured. The fight lasted nearly two hours, the railway officials being unable to cope with the rioters. There were no police present.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 17:09:49

    Limerick Railway Station in the news 2 London Times June 25th 1910

    A mail-bag containing all the latters and parcels posted at a pillar-box in front of Limerick railway Station was stolen from a postman who was engaged in looking adtter the mails arriving from Clare County and district last night.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 17:24:04

    Limerick Railway Station in the news 3 London Times Feb 13th 1894

    A scene of wild disorder took place at the Limerick Railway Station last night on the arrival of the special train from Clonmel conveying a small contingent and two bands to the Anti-Parnellite meeting here. Before leaving Clonmel the members of the bands and others were attacked by a mob of Parenllites, sticks and stones being used. One man was badly injured. The train was partilally wrecked, the windows of ten carriages being smashed. On the arrival of the train at Limerick, however, matters would have been more serious but for the intervention of the police. A mob, estimated at 3,000 persons, besieged the railway station and, despite the efforts of the officials, succeeded in getting on the platform in large numbers, cheering and hooting, and threatening the Anti-Parnellites coming to the city. At the platform about half a mile from the station, whwere the passengers' tickets are taken, word was given of what was impending, and the members of the bands accordingly left the train and proceeded to their destination by another route. The mob, when the train arrived without them, made a rush to intercept them on their way homewards, but the police cleverly got in front of the Parnellite gathering and enabled the bandsmen to get home uninjured. The police made one arrest, but the prisoner was subsequently discharged

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 17:45:15

    Limerick Railway Station in the news 4 London Times Jul 3rd 1883

    On Thursday a large basket, which excited the suspicion of the police, arrived at the Limerick Terminus. It was addressed merely "Limerick Railway Station, to be left until called for," and was booked at Birmingham. Being opened, it was found to contain revolvers of the newest pattern. The police have secured the basket, and permitted it to be at the office in the hope that someone would call for it. In the meantime the strictest caution and secrecy were adopted. Nobody, however, came to claim the basket, and the police have formally seized it.

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    Swordscookie

    • 15/Oct/2012 18:06:57

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner/ That must be an advance purchase for the Gangs of today.

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    John Spooner

    • 15/Oct/2012 18:15:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie but they might also have been useful in controlling runaway cattle a couple of years later. But on reflection their use might have made matters worse. Limerick Railway Station in the news 5 Daily News May 23rd 1885

    An extraordinary scene was witnessed at the Limerick Railway terminus last evening. As several trains were about taking their departure for Dublin, Ennis, and other destinations, and the platform was crowded with passengers and their friends, a farmer was driving a number of cows past the station, when one of the animals, broke away, and got into the terminus. Startled by the hissing of the engines, and the ringing of bells, the cow became furious, and ran around the station, scattering the affrighted passengers, knocking dowwn several, and more or less injuring not a few. For nearly an hour the maddened animal could not be dislodged from the platform, and the utmost confusion prevailed. Ultimately a side gate was opened, and and the cow rushed wildly out, overturning two vehicles in her career, and making a desperate drive with her horns at a carter, who had a very narrow escape. Rushing up Carey's road, a short distance from the railway station the animal came against the door of a house and smashed the woodwork. A number of men arrived on the scene, and secured the animal, now well-nigh exhauseted, before she could do further mischief.

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    KölnMike

    • 15/Oct/2012 21:10:30

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Thanks for that newspaper clip from the London Times Feb 13th 1894. My Great-Grandfather raised his family across the street from the Railway Station, in a lane off Queen Street (1890-1905). They must have lived dangerously enough there because he was a member of the Victuallers Marching Band who were aligned to the anti-Parnellites. The streets around the Railway Station were a Parnellite stronghold and were represented by the Boherbuoy Marching Band. I have no doubt in my mind that my Great-Grandfather was in the thick of things on that particular day! Incidentally the Railway Station is on Nelson Street and was aptly renamed Parnell Street.

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    KölnMike

    • 15/Oct/2012 21:21:53

    Limerick Constitutional Nationalism, 1898-1918 By Tadhg Moloney (Excerpt from Pages 21-23) The most violent manifestation of the divisions between Parnellites and anti-Parnellites were at popular level. For example, a meeting of the Irish National Federation in the Town Hall in June 1892 in favour of the city’s sitting anti-Parnellite MP, Francis O’Keeffe, was broken up by the Parnellites wielding sticks. It had been previously alleged that O’Keeffe had pledged his allegiance to Parnell ‘to the death’, but for some unapparent reason he ‘found it necessary to change his opinion’. As was the case in other cities, specific areas in the city, and particular leisure associations were known to be in favour of one side or the other. Cronin has argued that that in Cork this very bitter enmity had ‘filtered down to working-class level not only through press and clerical pronouncements but also through …highly politicised musical bands’. Limerick was no different. A strong inter-locality political rivalry was enforced by the location and traditional rivalry of the city’s various musical bands that often crossed into each other’s areas thereby causing disturbances which the Constabulary had to control. The Boherbuoy Brass Band and the Sarsfield Fife and Drum Band, located respectively at Boherbuoy and Mungret Street, were allied to the Parnellite cause, while St. Mary’s Fife and Drum Band, situated in St. Mary Street and the Victuallers’ Band, Cornwallis Street (later Gerald Griffin Street), located opposite the City Dispensary, took anti-Parnellite side. Two examples illustrate the intensity of this enmity. In 1892 St. Mary’s Fife and Drum Band deliberately marched through the rival Boherbuoy district, accompanied by a crowd – a sure recipe for the conflict that ensued until the police calmed the situation and the band returned to its rooms with some of its instruments damaged and others lost to the attackers. As if to give expression to the Old Testament creed of ‘an eye for an eye’, the Sarsfield Fife and Drum Band paid a visit to the Boherbuoy Band room where it was decided to seek retribution for the encroachment into Parnellite territory by making a return visit to the area of St. Mary’s Band. Despite the intervention of the police in diverting the Sarsfield Band away from the immediate area, skirmishing between both sides ensued, resulting in injuries and this band also losing some of its instruments and having others damaged. Two years later in 1894, when the Nelson Street Parnellite Band was passing through Cornwallis Street, it was attacked by some members of the Victuallers’ Band, which in turn led to the bandroom of the Victuallers’ being broken into and damage estimated to be about sixty pounds caused, with practically all the instruments broken or vandalized. It had been thought that both sides were on ‘the most friendly terms’ and that ‘they had buried the hatchet’ but obviously old enmities died hard and the proverbial hatchet was buried in the heads of opponents. If a person or family happened to be living in the enclave of either side in the political divide, especially during election time when emotions ran high, then they were in for a very hard time. John McGrath in a recent study on late nineteenth century Limerick, has pointed out that communities on both sides of the political divide guarded their territory very aggressively. During the 1892 election, anti-Parnellite houses in the strongly Parnellite Queen Street later Thomas Davis Street and Boherbuoy district were attacked; the shutters and windows were torn and smashed, while in the St. Mary Street area, which was largely Anti-Parnellite, people who harboured Parnellite tendencies had their windows broken. Popular memory recalls that one such Parnellite family living directly opposite the Anti-Parnellite St. Mary’s Fife and Drum Band room was compelled to leave the locality in fear of their lives. Although this is anecdotal information, it echoes that which was reported in the Munster News of 13 July 1895 when the house of a man by the name of Thomas Kiely, a Parnellite, was attacked and wrecked after the election of that year. Such popular animosities sometimes went beyond popular level to affect the city’s political elite directly. Prior to the election of 1892, residence of Francis O’Keeffe, MP in the elite area of the Crescent, and those of Councillor David Begly, in the middle-rank retailing William Street and Councillor Patrick O’Malley, in the slightly more plebian High Street had their windows broken by Parnellite supporters. The latter two greeted the anti-Parnellite William O’Brien, MP, a short time previously when he had arrived al Limerick Railway Station in support of O’Keeffe’s parliamentary candidature. On that occasion, O’Brien and his entourage, which was led by the Victuallers’ Band, were attacked by Parnellites after he had addressed a convention of Federationists in the city. This attack had occurred as he walked up the major thoroughfare of Patrick Street, bricks were thrown from the tops of some of the houses and, in retaliation, the windows of the Parnellites’ election rooms were broken.

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Oct/2012 04:14:21

    This is the fair in question: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_International_Exhibition_%281...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Oct/2012 04:19:02

    Carol, where is your poster with the date? The same one I tagged? Do you have any photos of the Exhibition itself to share?

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 16/Oct/2012 04:24:03

    Why is there a long railing with spikes on it (behind the poster), it appears to rotate... For cleaning horse excrement off things? Or is it just to keep the rowdies out of the station?

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    John Spooner

    • 16/Oct/2012 07:20:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I've briefly tried to find a Freeman's Journal account of the 'incident' in 1892, but haven't found anything yet, but later in the year when O'Brien arrived for the Limerick Convention, the attack on him was described as 'a puny effort' in comparison by 'a group of rowdies, who, after throwing a few stones, fled in wild confusion at the approach of the cheering multitude'. I'll resume my search later, but I'm off to the dentist now.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Oct/2012 07:28:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The excursion poster is up at the front door, I just added a note. All the gates have spikes on them, I wonder why only one has super rotating spikes?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 16/Oct/2012 07:31:34

    It must be 2.30 ! (2.30 - tooth hurty - Dentist Time)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 16/Oct/2012 07:37:30

    Ouch! (The pun, I mean, not the tooth!)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 16/Oct/2012 08:20:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Pun Bin! You know the way. Off you go...

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Oct/2012 09:22:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well done Mike, that's great information and as you know the only surviving band is the Boherbuoy Band though they have suffered in recent times as well. Just looking at the transport outside the station I note the "Charabancs" as my mother used to call them for the hotels, with the enclosed carriages or cabs for those who could afford them and in there in the middle of the throng on the right in close to the steps is a "pony and trap". A family who lived out near Mungret had one of those and could be seen each Sunday going to church in it. I always considered it to be the height of elegance, the beautifully polished trap, the finely groomed pony and the family in their Sunday best, magical!

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    Swordscookie

    • 16/Oct/2012 09:35:42

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] When I was there the goods depot was on the far side away from the centre of the shot and the buses and PARCEL depot were on the right hand side of the shot. The rotating spikes were in common enough usage around that time and there are still fine examples of them in Kilmainham Gaol. I suspect that they were placed on that gate as that was where the parcel depot was and it could be vulnerable enough. That design came back a few years ago using expanded metal rotating on bars and was not nearly as aesthetically pleasing as the spikes.

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    John Spooner

    • 16/Oct/2012 11:16:25

    William O'Brien's visit to Limerick in early July 1892: Disgraceful conduct of a factionist mob I think the Freeman's correspondent may have been a little one-sided in his report.

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    KölnMike

    • 16/Oct/2012 18:59:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Thanks again John, I'll add this clip to my genealogy research too. http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Indeed Sean, but the Boherbuoy Band are still a cut above the rest. The Victuallers Band are in fact still around. They changed their name a few times, St John's Working Men's Band, St. John's Temperance Band and today to St. John's Brass & Reed Band.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 16/Oct/2012 22:40:56

    Some ladies in nineteen-o-seven Arrive late at ten-past-eleven. The trip on the train Was hell they complain - But Limerick was relative heaven.

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    Swordscookie

    • 17/Oct/2012 07:56:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I didn't realise that about St. John's! I knew a lot of the people who played in St. Johns and saw them many a time. I also danced in their bandroom, Toddsies, and enjoyed the wonderful sprung floor and the sense of danger that a good row might provide!!! http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Well done the Beachcomber, you've gone right up in my estimation!!!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 17/Oct/2012 09:50:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Thank you! A limerick about Limerick is like sending coals to Newcastle.