The Bomb Font

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Where: Northern Ireland, Londonderry, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1870

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
At least that's what it's called on our catalogue, and you can see why. This "font" was photographed at St. Columb's Cathedral in Derry City. The text reads:

ANO DO
1633

CAR REGIS
9

IN TEMPLO
VERVS DEVS
EST
VEREC
COLENDUS

If stones could speake
then Londons prayse
should sounde who
built this church and
cittie from the grounde
VAUGHAN AED

Who can tell us more about it?

Date: 1861-1883

NLI Ref.: STP_0952

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 31930
bombfont font stcolumbscathedral cathedral derry derrycity londonderry northernireland ireland ulster plaque stereopairs stereographicnegatives stereoscope jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnlawrence lawrencecollection arch balcony brass altarrail eaglelectern lectern stereoscopiccollection nationallibraryofireland 19thcentury

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  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 07:43:10

    Seen it many times it was hollowed out and fired into the city durning the Siege of Derry in 1688-89 containing surrender terms, the reply which was sent back was "No Surrender !". To my knowledge it is not actually a font but one of the Cathederals many relics from the Siege which also include the original locks and keys from the gates of the city. PA040056 Photo by [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Aug/2012 07:51:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen Excellent, thank you! So is the base really more just a plinth then? Oh and then you know exactly where the cathedral is then? Wouldn't a map reference be luverly? (Never learned the art of subtle hinting)

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 07:59:07

    The Church of Ireland St Columb's Cathderal stands within the walls of the old city of Derry, and was named after St Columcille, whose monastery was the original foundation on which Derry was built. St Columb's was constructed between 1628-33 in an archaic style known as Planter's Gothic, and was the first Protestant cathedral built in Britain or Ireland after the Reformation. The cathedral was used as a fortified defence during the Siege of Derry in 1688-89, The tower, which was used as a lookout post during the siege, has terrific views over the old city. The cathedral's spire has twice been replaced, and its interiors were extensively remodelled in the 19th century. The dark hand-carved oak pews create an austere effect, while the stained glass windows depict scenes from the siege. Also on display is the exquisite 18th century carved mahogany bishop's throne. In the chapter house museum are more relics from the siege, including the original locks and keys of the four main city gates.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:01:42

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Yes I would say a plinth would be a better describtion as for a map ref I'm not so sure how to take a map ref. maps.google.co.uk/maps?q=londonderry&hl=en&ll=54.... 17 London Street, Derry/Londonderry, County Derry/Londonderry BT48 6RQ 028 7126 7313

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:07:28

    Wikipedia gives the coordinates as 54°59′38″N 7°19′23″W.

  • profile

    Scadán Dearg

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:28:45

    The plaque is a copy of the inscription on the stone over head. Was the Cathederal built in 1633AD? Does CAr regis relate to the royal charter to the cathedral or city? "Vaughan AED" looks out of place.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:32:30

    If you'd access to the church records you could probably date this from receipts. There's various useful features: The central heating has been fitted, they've a brass eagle lectern, decoration under the balcony inside the door.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:38:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] It was in 1613 that James I formed, by Royal Charter, the new County of Londonderry and that The Honourable The Irish Society was established to build the City. Paramount in their plans was the erection of the Cathedral and they immediately sent over from London a silver-gilt chalice (the 'Promise Chalice') and paten for the Church they hoped to build. The Chalice is still used during special services for celebration of Holy Communion. St Columb's Cathedral is the City of Londonderry's oldest building, having been completed in 1633.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 30/Aug/2012 08:58:48

    "In 1861/2 the interior of the Cathedral was entirely remodelled, the old square pews were removed, and all the present oak work of the nave was provided, and the galleries in the aisles taken away. Many other improvements were made in the ornaments and furnishings of the building"

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 09:00:41

    In April 1861 excavations to a depth of three feet were carried out to provide ducts for a new heating system As http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] has pointed out the central heating in pipes in this photo we can say it's 1861 at the earliest.

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 30/Aug/2012 09:22:24

    The "CAR REGIS 9" refers to the ninth year of the reign of Charles I. "VAUGHAN AED" refers to Sir John Vaughan, Governor of the City of Londonderry, under whose direction the cathedral was built.

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 30/Aug/2012 09:22:53

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Snap!

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 30/Aug/2012 11:06:57

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Was this an anti-aircraft shell? When I saw this I thought that Carol was cracking up, this will hardly rouse any interest. Boy was I wrong!

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 11:39:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Fonts names are no longer numbered with the Frutiger system. Frutiger Black was renamed to Frutiger Next Heavy

  • profile

    corncrake68

    • 30/Aug/2012 11:55:19

    I wonder if there was an explosion in the population after the font was put in position....!!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 30/Aug/2012 12:03:41

    Nice birds-eye view of the Cathedral from Bing.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 12:26:38

    The Cathederal has just under gone a 4 year £3.6m restoration and according to the NI Tourist board it's the 2nd most visited attraction in the provence, next to the Giants Causeway. www.u.tv/News/Dean-thrilled-at-cathedral-restoration/d042...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 30/Aug/2012 15:46:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen Thanks for all the work and information on this one, and 1861 is a great starting date to have... (this series dates from 1860 to 1883). And Shane, can I just go back to the "bomb" for one second. I'm assuming it was a hollowed out cannon ball, is that right?

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 15:52:08

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ Thats correct.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 30/Aug/2012 16:04:44

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ not all canon balls were solid. Siege mortars fired a hollow ball filled with gunpowder and pieces of metal or "shrapnel" with a lit fuse. The "bomb" was most likely one of these.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 16:10:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie/ I was aware of that but I think that originally canonballs were solid and as I was unaware of when they started to use motars I stuck with hollowed out as this is the wording used in the Cathederal histories.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 30/Aug/2012 16:12:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland In particular, if it was fired in a siege, it's much more likely to have been a mortar bomb than a cannon ball. These were cast hollow rather than drilled out as without an externally powered lathe with a tungsten carbide (or iridium or diamond or whatever) bit, hollowing out cannon balls would be a pretty tedious business. Even more so than laying siege to Londonderry.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 30/Aug/2012 16:23:39

    "hollowed out" may simply refered to the fact that any gunpowder or "shrapnel" were removed to make way for the surender terms. Either way I wouldn't have liked to have been on the receiving end........................

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 31/Aug/2012 02:08:42

    Um, not to nitpick, but it appears to be from a stereo pair, per the catalogue link. You should have used the one on the right, this one has a smudge down on the left of the image. One of the pair on the right looks much nicer.

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 31/Aug/2012 07:52:39

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Just so there's no doubt about it I was throwing the detail of mortar shell in for information not to correct anybody. I sit in rapt wonder and total enjoyment reading your analyses and observations. Thank you for the great life you breathe into the fusty corridors of Library Towers. There are known instances, including at the siege of Derry where bystanders plucked the fuses out of those bombs and prevented death and destruction.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 31/Aug/2012 07:57:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Even if you were correcting somebody don't worry I'm sure all would agree that all "analyses and observations" are in the intrests of accuracy.

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 31/Aug/2012 08:05:55

    Looking at this photo PA040061 Photo by [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I think it shows that the "bomb" has been remounted since the library photo was taken as the library photo dosen't seem to have that lighter area. If we could find out when it may narrow down a date. Had a look at this today the bass plate is dated MDCCCXLIV which I think is 1844.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 31/Aug/2012 22:46:49

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen] I think that the pale area may be from cleaning the brass underneath. Two men stroking the ball lovingly (!) - youtu.be/OcRxXULxSlg?t=50s " The addition of the chancel in 1887 completed the Cathedral on the plan of its founders - the foundations had actually been laid in 1633 and were discovered during building operations. " From www.stcolumbscathedral.org/page5.html The 1887 latest date doesn't really help, since the series ended in 1883, but the exterior shots show the 'east' end stopping at the turretty towers (another technical term), eg catalogue.nli.ie/Record/STP_0950/Image?lookfor=http://www...

  • profile

    Colette again...

    • 01/Sep/2012 00:14:50

    I love your work, unfortunately I have nothing to offer by way of pictures or information, infact, I am am learning each time I look into your site. Thank you for your hard work, it is appreciated.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Sep/2012 14:23:08

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] No problem with the nitpicking. With some of these Stereo Pairs, I often dither about which "side" is the best. In this instance, I plumped for the side that had clearer text on the plaque...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Sep/2012 14:25:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/daisygreeneyes77 Plenty of people start out here thinking they don't know enough to contribute, and next thing you know, they're leaping into the conversation! But glad that you're enjoying all the photos anyway...

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 01/Sep/2012 14:33:51

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Ah ok, that makes perfect sense then. :)

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 03/Sep/2012 23:04:32

    Everything old is new again - www.nswlandscaping.com.au/images/150MoyalWaterFeature.jpg

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 29/Dec/2012 03:32:33

    Such an odd thing, instrument of war, now used in a house of God...

  • profile

    Mark Lusby

    • 20/Feb/2016 15:41:36

    The empty mortar shell landed in a graveyard within the Derry Walls during the 1688-89 Siege of Derry and contained terms of surrender offered to the besieged citizens by the Jacobite forces.

  • profile

    Mark Lusby

    • 20/Feb/2016 15:47:21

    St Columb's Cathedral was extended in 1887 to create a longer chancel. Looking up the nave, you can see that the chancel is not very deep in this photo.