Glendalough before Round Tower was restored

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Where: Wicklow, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1860

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Side cars, or perhaps more correctly, Jaunting Cars at Glendalough, Co. Wicklow. We knew this was taken between 1860 and 1883, and the "bare headed" Round Tower has helped us to date it more accurately, as derangedlemur tells us "The conical roof was rebuilt in 1876 using the original stones"...

Date: 1860-1876

NLI Ref.: STP_0023

P.S. Gorgeous Belfast image from a year ago replaced with higher res for your viewing pleasure!

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 50478
glendalough gleanndálocha wicklow ireland leinster roundtower monastic hotel sidecars horses drivers hats pipes smoking stereopairs stereographicnegatives stereoscope jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnlawrence lawrencecollection hostel jarvey jarvie jauntingcars stereoscopiccollection nationallibraryofireland 19thcentury

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:07:42

    maps.google.ie/maps?q=Glendalough&hl=en&ll=53.015...

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:07:53

    Looks a bit different now.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:12:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks very much for the map link!

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    public songs

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:14:58

    superb

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:36:51

    Right. I'll stop going mad with the notes now.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:41:26

    "The conical roof was rebuilt in 1876 using the original stones", btw.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:42:38

    If any of the jarveys are particularly notorious you might be able to date them from the census.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:44:56

    (do we use the term "three-post ment" on this site?)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 09:57:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Not at all! You feel free to go nuts with the notes any time (or go notes). Thanks for the roof rebuilding information. That means this was definitely taken before 1876 then! And we might, if I knew what "three-post ment" meant... :)

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:00:09

    A TPM is someone whose emotional stability may be called into question as a result of their posting large numbers of observations on an internet comment forum without any intervening remarks from other people. The minimum threshold number of comments is generally considered to be three.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:02:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Ah, well apologies then for the lack of intervening comments, although are you not calling your own emotional stability into question by dubbing yourself deranged?

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:03:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Well, it doesn't do to set unrealistic expectations.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:14:11

    @Scadan (sorry, no fadas): I thought it might be a wall but in the original 2000x1957 resolution I think it looks a lot more like a road. If it's a wall it's about five or six feet high (by comparison with the house on the hill).

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    Swordscookie

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:22:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Yes, the Lemur is making us all feel guilty and deranged now that we have not contributed sooner. Dubbing oneself deranged is just acceptance of reality, I've been deranged for so long that it is no longer worthy of comment. I didn't know that IK Brunel used to jarvey in Ireland? Is there no end to that mans talents:-)

  • profile

    Cuddly Nutter

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:34:11

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] The date on your www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/5785358121/ ,ie Gorgeous Belfast Image, is incorrect.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:44:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen It was just circa, after all! When do you suggest?

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 27/Aug/2012 12:04:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I know but I know you like to get as near as possible with your dates and didn't know if you were still visiting that page. My sugested date is 1903-1908 my reasoning is explained on that page.

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 12:57:35

    I can't identify anything in the picture as a lead mine but maybe somebody else can. www.glendaloughmines.com/history.html

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    derangedlemur

    • 27/Aug/2012 13:00:54

    And here's the historic OSI VIew: maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,712534,696926,7,9. I suspect the standing stone may be the remains of a stone cross. Also, it looks like the surveyors couldn't be bothered schlepping up a mountain. None of the background features are marked.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 27/Aug/2012 14:19:02

    Geograph has a lot of photos of Glendalough www.geograph.ie/search.php?i=35550695&page=1

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    Myrtle26

    • 27/Aug/2012 15:13:12

    The cars here are pretty similar to those in Killarney today and I think they could be called Jaunting Cars rather than side cars. Johann Georg Kohl in Travels in Ireland had this to say after he was shown around by Irwin who had guided The Queen of England, whilst still a Princess, and Sir Walter Scott. 'We seated ourselves on our car, and drove off silently, thanking the Irish for their "Jaunting Cars" whose formation allowed us to sit, that, instead of the horses before us, we could see the vanishing landscape of Glendalough behind us, on which our eyes remained eagerly fastened as long as possible.'

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 15:29:54

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree Will be guided by you. Have added jaunting cars into description above, and into tags - thank you! P.S. nice to hear from you again...

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    Myrtle26

    • 27/Aug/2012 15:37:13

    Thanks for compliment, Carol. I still add many Flickr pictures from the National Library and elsewhere to my Favorites for education and entertainment in equal measure.

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    Yellabelly*

    • 27/Aug/2012 16:21:53

    Never knew that the round tower roof was restored. Very interesting.

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    maorlando - God keeps me as I lean on Him!!

    • 27/Aug/2012 18:54:27

    Loved riding a jaunting car in Killarney... marvelous experience!!!

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    John Mac Giolla Phádraig Leisen

    • 28/Aug/2012 01:35:45

    Magnificent,.Respect,.,!!!

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    Scadán Dearg

    • 28/Aug/2012 08:20:33

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] 5/6 foot high boundary walls would be common enough. There are plenty examples in Mayo where I am from, also down through the mountains in Galway, Clare and Kerry. I have not been through Wicklow that much but it looks very consistent with what I am used to seeing. if the feature we are looking at is the retaining wall of a road and 5 or 6 feet high it would have indeed been a major feat of engineering. Why would such a major road be required at that elevation? My money is on a boundary wall.

  • profile

    Scadán Dearg

    • 28/Aug/2012 08:27:57

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] No problem, hold down the "Alt Gr" button to add an accent. My money still on it being a wall;)

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    MKSeery

    • 29/Aug/2012 09:42:23

    Interesting re wall/road - the 25" map which I think is late 19th C doesn't show any sign of a road. But it certainly was a big wall!

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    ClickKen04

    • 31/Aug/2012 00:03:58

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Is there a comparable photo Carol?

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    ClickKen04

    • 31/Aug/2012 00:09:39

    Carol, there are 'notes' on the top of the hills surrounding the Valley of the Lough suggesting a 'road' but what I think it might have been is, if you look now (the present day), there are a very organised line of trees, So, would it be or could it be the original planting/plantation of trees for the top of the hill rather than a 'road' or trek of any description? I have been there recently, I will dig through my collection and see if I can demonstrate what I am referring to.

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    acrid home

    • 04/Jan/2013 23:30:46

    Can't believe how bare the hills are...not a tree in sight - unlike today where the majestic larch and scots pine cover the slopes

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    randell c

    • 02/May/2014 16:35:22

    looks like a western movie