Ballyhooly, Co. Cork, late 19th century

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Cork, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: 01 January 1880

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
This photo was taken in the late 19th century, probably by Robert French, chief photographer of William Lawrence Photographic Studios of Dublin.

You can compare this view of Ballyhooly with its companion photo taken approximately 100 years later as part of the Lawrence Photographic Project 1990/1991, where one thousand photographs from the Lawrence Collection in the National Library of Ireland were replicated a hundred years later by a team of volunteer photographers, thereby creating a record of the changing face of the selected locations all over Ireland.

For further information on the Lawrence Photographic Project, read all about it on our NLI Blog.

Date: Circa 1880

NLI Ref.: L_ROY_00034

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 38409
ballyhooly cork ireland munster robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative lawrencephotographicproject federationforulsterlocalstudies fuls federationoflocalhistorysocieties 1890s scaffolding dung school priestshouse church ashlin pugin countessmariaaugusta convamore mariaaugustawyndham mariawyndham georgewyndham nationallibraryofireland

Add Tags
  • profile

    mogey

    • 20/Jun/2012 08:15:22

    more trees and ivy! maps.google.com/maps?q=Ballyhooly,+Ireland&hl=en&...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jun/2012 08:29:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey But still not cluttered by cars on Street View! Thank you - adding to map now...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jun/2012 09:13:58

    Ballyhooly Parish Church was dedicated in 1870, Architects Ashlin and Pugin The Presbytery seen here under construction was finished by 1903 for the OS 25" map. The house on the right has a plaque reading 1871 on it.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jun/2012 09:40:24

    I'd go earlier than 1891: the church is finished but the presbytery is not, and the Mansion to the right looks brand new. 1880?

  • profile

    Nick Stewart2

    • 20/Jun/2012 10:25:19

    Remarkably unchanged.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 21/Jun/2012 10:55:34

    Yo, [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] ! I linked above to this Google Streetview zoomed in on that whatsit on the house. It says "1871", and has some other doodads on it, probably arms or something to do with Countess Maria Augusta of nearby Convamore, the original owner. Hmm, she was born Maria Augusta Windham (or perhaps Wyndham). I wonder if she was anything to another Windham we met recently. Edit: no, George Wyndham was her first husband, so it's not her birth name. It says here that she died in October 1871, which would have been right after this house was built.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Jan/2013 18:53:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Better late than never, Niall. Have amended date to circa 1880, based on all your construction evidence...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Jan/2013 18:55:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Thank you for your notes about the Ballyhooly village school and your grandfather, etc.

  • profile

    Kathy Peacock

    • 25/Jul/2016 21:19:18

    My great great grandfather was from Ballyhooly and emigrated to Canada (Peter Robinson settlers) in 1825 with his wife and 7 children. His name was James Handlon and his wife, Isabelle Cavanaugh Handlon. We will be traveling there in July, 2017. Just wondered if there are any Handlons or Cavanaughs left in the area. Many thanks for the information on this site. Kathy Peacock

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/Jul/2016 21:43:25

    Hi [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]]. Thanks very much for your note. None of us National Library volunteers are from the immediate area, but what we can say is that there was at least one Hanlon remaining in Ballyhooly town in the generations that followed your ancestor's departure. Whether any still remain may be something you'll discover in your planned visit next year. (I would note that while Hanlon is a somewhat common name in parts of Cork, it is most common in the northern border counties of Louth and Armagh. Cavanagh (or Kavanagh) is actually not a particularly common name in County Cork - though you can't move for Kavanaghs in Wexford and Wicklow and the South East in general :) ) All the best with your trip. If you make it to Dublin, please do stop-by Library Towers on Kildare Street :)

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Sep/2020 11:11:39

    Definitely before 1898 when this almost identical shot was published.