Ballyhooly, Co. Cork, 1991

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Where: Cork, Ireland

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When: 15 May 1991

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This one is for those of you who've been complaining over the past few weeks about the modern photos being crowded or cluttered by cars - you know who you are, not looking at anyone in particular - well, maybe just a little! :)

Taken by photographer, Patrick Connolly...

You can compare this view of Ballyhooly with its companion photo taken approximately 100 years earlier as part of the Lawrence Photographic Project 1990/1991, where one thousand photographs from the Lawrence Collection in the National Library of Ireland were replicated a hundred years later by a team of volunteer photographers, thereby creating a record of the changing face of the selected locations all over Ireland.

For further information on the Lawrence Photographic Project, read all about it on our NLI Blog.

Date: Wednesday, 15 May 1991 at 13:15 (weather conditions - dull / cloudy)

NLI Ref.: LPP_40A/13A

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 48096
ballyhooly cork ireland munster lawrencephotographicproject lawrencecollection patrickconnolly federationforulsterlocalstudies fuls federationoflocalhistorysocieties wednesday 15th may 1991 1990s nineties dull cloudy mainstreet nationallibraryofireland honda super cub c50 c70 c50zz c70zz red

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  • profile

    ClickKen04

    • 20/Jun/2012 08:02:49

    A bike in this one, of the Motorised Variety, lol. The interesting perspectives between the two shots are Carol, the Church spire & wall are upright in both photos, yet the House on the right hand side in this leans back, where as in the earlier shot Leans more forward. This I presume is due to the characteristics in the lenses of the Cameras used?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jun/2012 08:16:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoken04 Tell me about it, Ken! I tried to overlay half of one photo over the other in Photoshop, and while they were a very snug fit, the "leaning" you're talking about nearly brought on a bout of vertigo...

  • profile

    martindevlin

    • 20/Jun/2012 09:13:06

    Carol have you tried applying vertical alignment to both the images after they have been merged ? Click Ken Uprights in photographs are dictated by the back of the camera being at right angles to the ground otherwise convergence or leaning outwards will occur. This is not a characteristic of the lens but a common fault created at the time of taking by the photographer. In darkroom days it was corrected by tilting the baseboard on which the photographic paper was held to correct the verticals, so this flaw would be present in many old negatives as correction took place in the darkroom and not the camera. Later plate cameras incorporated a rising front and dropping back which allowed correction to take place in camera. SLR cameras had special lenses called tilt and shift which allowed correction at time of taking and are still used by some in this digital age. but most photographers use the vertical alignment feature which is present in many post processing programs, photoshop being just one of them.

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    Swordscookie

    • 20/Jun/2012 09:56:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoken04 Ken as the shooter chose a slightly different position to take the shot the angles are slightly different which may have caused the change in leaning. On the other had in the intervening years we had a great deal of political change and the house may have changed sides;-)))

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    DannyM8

    • 20/Jun/2012 12:34:12

    The best of the newer Photos so far, in my opinion. http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/7407524830/in/photostream

  • profile

    blackpoolbeach

    • 20/Jun/2012 13:33:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Would professional tripod cameras have a grid marked on the focusing screen, just to avoid convergence of verticals?

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 20/Jun/2012 23:48:04

    I wasn't complaining, I was making an OBSERVATION. photoshop out the car and the scooter, you could have a colour photo of the scene...

  • profile

    martindevlin

    • 21/Jun/2012 00:23:50

    blackpoolbeach Modern cameras have a function where grid lines (based on the rule of thirds) can be shown on the live view screen but the screen is often hard to view clearly in bright lighting conditions. Some camera types can have a fresnel screen (which is inside the viewfinder) with guide lines. But given the ease of correcting verticals in post processing most photographers now use this method

  • profile

    ClickKen04

    • 21/Jun/2012 00:27:49

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Now that's funny, lolol, it made me chuckle Carol. Sorry for your 'Artistic Pain' Whatever you are doing, keep it up, your choices are FAB!

  • profile

    ClickKen04

    • 21/Jun/2012 00:28:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Brilliant!

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    ClickKen04

    • 21/Jun/2012 00:29:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie I just love this page, lolol, nice one Swords C. I am with you on that theory, lol

  • profile

    ClickKen04

    • 21/Jun/2012 00:33:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Fair play to you for that explanation Martin, it's detailed and probably right. I hadn't given a huge amount of thought in the way you did, but yep, I get what you are saying in the printing process! Well done!

  • profile

    blackpoolbeach

    • 21/Jun/2012 15:46:46

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I was thinking about the original photo taken by Robert French in the 1890s. www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/7406536002/in/photostream/ He would have travelled around with a pony and trap to carry the heavy wooden camera and tripod. Details of the glass negative are on the NLI Catalogue "Physical description: 1 photographic negative glass 16.5 x 21.5 cm" or about 6.5 x 8.5 inches. At least he was not using 10 x 8 inches glass negatives. Here are some early wooden cameras So he would have focused and levelled the image on the focusing screen before whipping that out and slamming in a dark slide holder. Pull out the slide, squeeze the bulb, then replace the slide. I think the finished product would have been contact prints, so no enlarger involved. We don't know we are born with digital cameras.

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    soilse

    • 08/May/2019 11:19:33

    The Honda 50 served rural Ireland very well when people couldn't afford cars or there was no proper public transport.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/May/2019 15:20:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/an_solas There is no doubt about that.