Trevor Hill, Newry

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Where: Northern Ireland, Down, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Lots of men chatting around the bridge here, but the boy in the foreground is fully occupied either delivering those parcels, or he has been sent to collect them. Think that's the River Clanrye flowing under the bridge...

Here's the current and relatively unchanged Street View, thanks to mogey.

The monument noted above by beachcomberaustralia is for Isaac Corry, 1753-1813, M.P. and Irish Chancellor of the Exchequer (who was born and died on the same day, 15th May). See comment below for a riot in Newry provoked by Corry's Window Tax...

Date: Circa 1900?

NLI Ref.: EAS_1432

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 70172
trevorhill newry down northernireland ireland ulster cityhall riverclanrye bridge cart horse gaslamp eason easonandson easoncollection 1900s boy parcels kildarestreet isaaccorry monument mp chancelloroftheexchequer lordhightreasurerofireland privycouncillor windowtax chancellorsroad courthouse newrycourthouse nationallibraryofireland

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    mogey

    • 19/May/2012 12:27:36

    lovely photo g.co/maps/wevxy. One thing that always strikes me about Streetview is how little the infrastructure of Irish town centres has changed. Shop signs, cars and fashions change but buildings are usually recognisable.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2012 13:15:59

    Here is something Quite Interesting - the monument (see note) is for Isaac Corry who as Ireland's Chancellor of the Exchequer at the time of Union, had introduced a Window Tax (see previous photo comments). " A local legend has it that the [Chancellor's] road was constructed after an incident in which Corry's stagecoach was stoned while passing through Newry by people angry at an unpopular window tax he had introduced." (ref. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Corry#Later_years)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/May/2012 13:51:54

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey Thanks for the Street View, Moira, and you're dead right about how often towns change over time, but essentially stay the same!

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    yousif abdelrazaq

    • 19/May/2012 14:15:39

    so amazing

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/May/2012 14:19:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Thanks for the Isaac Corrry info, and now two of our photos in a row tagged for Window Tax. What are the odds of that?

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 19/May/2012 22:06:25

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] It is one of life's serendipitous coincidences - the Great God of Library Towers is watching over us! The Window Tax had a big effect on the appearance of Georgian buildings as well as people's pockets, and according to this blog it led to the Irish "Half-Door". When is a door not a door? [http://www.flickr.com/photos/mogey] Thanks as always for the street view. It is great to snoop around these streets from the other side of the world. Ireland is fortunate to have escaped developers and big bombs. I was fascinated to see that the Town Hall is built right over the river behind the photographer, as well as to find the name on the monument. [http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Do you know about Historypin? Of course you do, silly question!

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    Renira1

    • 21/May/2012 20:18:13

    that pretty cupola on the left seems to have gone now

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/May/2012 06:42:23

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] The cupola is still there; you have to twiddle up the street a little way - g.co/maps/fwbtr - does anyone know what the building is?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 22/May/2012 08:42:32

    A digression: I tried to find a contemporary newspaper account of Isaac Corry's stagecoach being stoned, but drew a blank. However in the Caledonian Mercury (Edinburgh) Feb 27 1800, I did come across an intriguing statement about him settling an 'affair of honour' with pistols at dawn. Full account of Right Hon Isaac Corry v Henry Grattan Esq. from Caledonian Mercury (complete with 's' written 'f' - so 'paffing' = 'passing') Of course I then left no stone unturned in trying to find out what the 'affair of honour' involved, and the ODNB came up trumps: ...during a debate on the union on 18 February 1800, he accused Henry Grattan of ‘living in familiarity with rebels and being a conniver at this plan to overthrow the country’—an opinion which was not unique to Corry (Correspondence of … Cornwallis, 3.196). At the end of the debate Grattan challenged him. Although Corry was slightly wounded in the duel, the opposition accused him of trying to assassinate Grattan. Corry turned up to parliament the next day with his arm in a sling. I wonder if it might make things a little more interesting if parliamentary disputes were decided in the same way today.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/May/2012 12:31:07

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner John fpooner - fafcinating ftuff !

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2012 13:48:36

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Do indeed know about Historypin, and used it a little but then completely forgot password (consummate professional)! What I'd love to be doing is adding some of our photos from here to Street View...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2012 14:15:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Alwayf welcome a digreffion, and love yourf! So of its time - exchanging bullets and then exchanging compliments...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2012 14:17:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Could be wildly wrong, but think that's Newry Courthouse?

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    John Spooner

    • 23/May/2012 09:33:50

    I'm furprifed no-one has pointed out the obvious error in the ODNB* - it says the debate was on the 18th Feb, but the report in the Caledonian Mercury say the debate was on the evening of the 17th and the duel was at dawn on the 18th. But don't worry - I've emailed the ODNB. What surprises me is they've already replied wanting further details. * Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. One of the options on their homepage is to 'get a life'. Perhaps I should do just that.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/May/2012 17:39:38

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Impreffive fpeed on their part! And you're only allowed 'get a life' if that ftill involvef lotf of commenting on here...

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    John Spooner

    • 09/Oct/2012 20:17:37

    ... and the latest version of the online ONDB now shows the correct dates for the debate (17th Feb) and the duel (the following morning).

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 09/Oct/2012 21:32:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner fucceff! Well done!

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    John Spooner

    • 06/May/2013 18:28:23

    The duel is mentioned in Strumpet City . Yearling contemplates in Book Tree (1913-1914), Chapter Two, while waiting for Father O'Connor near Ball's Bridge: "Henry Grattan, he remembered, had fought a duel here when Ireland still had a parliament of her own."

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    mambo1935

    • 01/Dec/2013 01:50:30

    grace!

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    Liljaljosmyndar

    • 03/Mar/2014 12:38:19

    Love this.

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    Alessandro e Salvo

    • 06/Mar/2014 23:34:53

    bella foto del passato

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 31/May/2016 21:22:12

    I have just added this photo to our 50,000+ Views Album. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/sets/72157651136879037

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Jun/2016 13:13:41

    Definitely before 1923 - new Northern Bank building would be at right.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Jun/2016 13:43:27

    OK, behind the obelisk, I see these four semi-d's (streetview) on Windsor Hill, which are not on the 1903 OS map. They are on the next map I see, the 1919. So between 1903 and 1923.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Jun/2016 13:59:57

    The DIA says Samuel Wilson Reside, Architect, was living in one of these, Windarra, Windsor Hill in 1912 vs. #11, Windsor Hill in 1911. I suspect the house might have been new in 1912...