Walsh's Royal Mail and Day Car

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Where: Sligo, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1885

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Not even room for a little 'un on this packed day car in Sligo town. Destinations advertised outside Walsh's were Ballina, Bundoran, Enniskillen, Ballyshannon and Roscommon.

Thanks to John Spooner, we now know this photo was taken on Corcoran's Mall in Sligo and he found great info on Walsh's schedules from Slater's 1870 directory for Sligo:
"To BALLINA, from Corcoran's Mall, a Mail Car, every morning at fifty-five minutes past six, and a Van at halfpast two afternoon.
To BALLYSHANNON, from Corcoran's Mall, a Mail Car, every morning at six; also a Day Car at twenty minutes past two afternoon, during summer months only.
To ENNISKILLEN, Cars leave WALSH'S Office, Corcoran's Mall, every day (Sunday excepted) at seven in the morning.
" See comments below for how John worked out that the trip from Sligo to Ballyshannon worked out at an average of 6.75 mph!

Date: 1880s?

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_02021

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 108338
sligo ireland walshs royalmail daycar mail tourists tourism ballina bundoran enniskillen ballyshannon rugs veils hats 1880s robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative travel corcoransmall johnfkennedyparade toffsniteclub embassywinebarandgrill windowtax connacht connaught limerickbybeachcomber nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 18/May/2012 09:36:15

    Halle-flippin-lujah she's back. I've been like a junkie all week suffering withdrawal symptoms. Believe me "Cold Turkey" is not a nice state to be in. Welcome back Carol and I hope thats the end of the leave for this year?

  • profile

    Swordscookie

    • 18/May/2012 09:47:56

    There's an awful lot of weight at the rear of that car and that gentleman in particular. A lot of it is behind the back axle and it could make life interesting going up a steep hill. Imagine travelling on that in a downpour?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 09:48:04

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Lovely to be back! But afraid not on the leave front. Don't know how to break this to you gently, so you'll have to be a brave soldier - I'm going away again next week (feast or famine!)... But then I'll be around for ages, no flitting off on tourist cars for me! Though if this picture was taken today, the poor tourists would still be huddling in blankets. Brrrr and boooo to the arctic winds!

  • profile

    Michiel2005

    • 18/May/2012 09:51:43

    Crowded buses even then.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 09:59:44

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/govert1970 Wonder if it was the same back then - that you waited for ages and then two came along at once?

  • profile

    ClickKen04

    • 18/May/2012 10:47:18

    Which one was the Health and Safety officer ? ;) The movement of the gentlemen is well recorded on the right hand side in comparison to the people on the Coach!

  • profile

    eyelightfilms

    • 18/May/2012 11:03:50

    Does not seem like a very suitable vehicle for the Irish climate. Presumably there was some sort of tarp to go over the top in rain. Unusual hat on the large man at rear, Quite a high top hat behind him. One other top hat and then are those derbys, cokes or bowler hats? Or something else? They all have very undulating brims for bowlers or cokes.

  • profile

    dorameulman

    • 18/May/2012 12:17:02

    The men and women are wearing some fancy looking hats they must be going to church :)

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 18/May/2012 12:23:41

    hope you had a great break........ welcome back.

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    known order

    • 18/May/2012 12:26:55

    The distance from Sligo to Enniskillen is not much under 40 miles. I don't know how fast that car and horses would go (5 or 6 mph ?). But it's no wonder they needed the blankets.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 12:40:10

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/photoken04 Yes, the forward row of ladies and gentlemen were very definitely posing without moving a muscle.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 12:44:23

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/eyelightfilms Anything not covered and with underfloor heating doesn't seem suitable for an Irish climate! I wonder are you right about the tarp - must have been a bit grim under it in driving rain. And well spotted on the hat. Maybe he'd been "out foreign"? Perhaps the other "undulating brims" can help us date this one (if it was a short-lived fashion)?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/May/2012 12:44:45

    Here's the section 'Coach and Cars' from Slater's Directory Sligo 1870. To BALLINA, from Corcoran's Mall, a Mail Car, every morning at fifty-five minutes past six, and a Van at halfpast two afternoon. To BALLYSHANNON, from Corcoran's Mall, a Mail Car, every morning at six; also a Day Car at twenty minutes past two afternoon, during summer months only. To ENNISKILLEN, Cars leave WALSH'S Office, Corcoran's Mall, every day (Sunday excepted) at seven in the morning.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 12:45:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks very much. Fighting fit after the break.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 12:48:35

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/tj666] 36 miles from Sligo to Enniskillen according to distance calculator...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 12:55:45

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner That's brilliant, John! And apparently Corcoran's Mall is no more (as a name anyway). Renamed John F. Kennedy Parade after JFK was assassinated... OSI maps online are down because of an issue, but we might be able to get exact location when they're back up again. And also, was there any mention of Bundoran? Ballina, Ballyshannon and Enniskillen being in the 1870 directory, but not Bundoran might help us date this one...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 18/May/2012 12:57:54

    Welcome back ! Have a Streetview.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/May/2012 13:00:16

    Corcoran's Mall is now John F Kennedy parade Walsh's Office is now Toff's Nite Club The building on the right (with the distinctive windows - 'dummy' ones at the top and arched ones on the ground floor) is now The Embassy Wine Bar and Grill Google Streetview

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/May/2012 13:05:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Pipped at the post!

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    John Spooner

    • 18/May/2012 13:05:52

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland No mention of Bundoran

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 18/May/2012 14:02:38

    An advert in Freeman's in June 1869 for the Midland Great Western Railway, and their cheap tours of the Western Highlands and Connemara, includes this From Ballina, per Public Long Car, twice a day to Sligo, 37 miles, fare 5s. A similar advert in July 1871 has Walsh's Mail Car to Ballyshannon, via Dundruff, Grange, Cliffoney, Tullaghan and Bundoran, leaves at 6.0 a.m. and arrives at Ballyshannon at 10.0 a.m. Returns from Ballyshannon at 3.15, Bundoran at 3.45, and arrives at Sligo at 7.30 p.m. in time for Mail Train to Dublin. So the Ballyshannon service went via Bundoran. http://www.flickr.com/photos/tj666 Sligo -> Ballyshannon = 27 miles in 4 hours, so that's an average speed of 6.75mph, although moving average slightly more, as the 4 hrs includes stops, and the return journey slightly slower (tired horses?)

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 15:01:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley No, it's definitely Ballyshannon, not Ballyvaughan as on your note. But Roscommon is a good fit given the Sligo starting point. And thank you for the Street View!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/May/2012 15:06:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner http://www.flickr.com/photos/tj666 And presumably mph depended on the girth of passengers, weight of luggage and volume of mail?

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    Joefuz

    • 18/May/2012 17:28:32

    Corcoran's Mall on the old OSI maps - maps.osi.ie/publicviewer/#V1,569394,835965,7,9 John F Kennedy Parade today. - maps.google.ie/maps?q=54.271452,-8.469731&layer=c&amp... It's odd to compare old map and new. Where Rockwood Parade is now, in the old days we had "intercepting sewers". I wonder what they were intercepting?

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    martindevlin

    • 18/May/2012 19:23:46

    ('Though if this picture was taken today, the poor tourists would still be huddling in blankets. Brrrr and boooo to the arctic winds!' ) They still are on the Jaunting Cars in Killarney! and the looks on their faces when the jarvey tells them 'Sure it's a grand mild day'

  • profile

    mikescottnz

    • 18/May/2012 21:22:05

    Great picture.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/May/2012 22:03:34

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/joefuz] Thanks for the street views; I was completely lost in Sligo trying to find the buildings, and gave up. It is great to have a sticky-beak around these old photos' locations. Those 'blind' windows - did the Window Tax apply in 19th century Ireland too?

  • profile

    mikescottnz

    • 18/May/2012 22:12:41

    Scotland endured the English window tax not sure Ireland was subjected to that as well. www.irishabroad.com/yourroots/genealogy/names/anglonorman... Walsh/Welsh/Welch is the commonest modern Irish surname of Anglo-Norman origin, the fourth or fifth commonest surname in Ireland today. The South Welsh colony was the nearest part of the Angevin Kingdom to Ireland, and accordingly a disproportionately large element of the Irish settler population had geographic Welsh origins. Along with the Welsh based Normans and Flemings came many ethnic (Celtic) Welsh, usually, though not by any means exclusively, among the lower orders of the immigrants. Most of these men were known in French, the language of law and property, simply as ‘the Welshman’, le Walys. This has become Wallace in Scotland but Walsh et al in Ireland. In every part of Ireland settled by the newcomers we find people called le Walys, and the Walshs of today must descend from dozens, if not hundreds, of individual Welshmen. In County Cork alone a cursory glance at records of the fourteenth century indicate the existence of at least twenty distinct families of le Walys.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 18/May/2012 22:46:06

    There once was a fellow from Sligo Who thought he would daringly try go To Enniskillen by Day Car - 'Twas a little too way far By road, but not as the flies crow.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 19/May/2012 08:11:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia http://www.flickr.com/photos/celtico WIndow Tax - judging from the letters to the editor in Freeman's Journal, notices of public meetings in Dublin campaigning for its abolition in Ireland, and petitions to parliament for its abolition in Ireland, I'd guess Ireland was subject to window tax.

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 21/May/2012 15:59:11

    Is the fifth destination Rossnowlagh?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/May/2012 19:15:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Could be, Gerry. I favoured Roscommon because it's close to Sligo, but Rossnowlagh isn't too far away from Sligo either...

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/May/2012 19:46:49

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/celtico] Always heard that the window tax was one of the reasons why Irish cottages had so few and such tiny windows.

  • profile

    Gerry Ward

    • 21/May/2012 22:18:35

    ... it looks like Ross...!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/May/2012 07:10:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I am not sure of the intricate details of the Window Tax in Ireland, but in England merchant and upper classes paid most. It should not have affected cottages. "People who were exempt from paying church or poor rates, for reasons of poverty, were exempt from the window tax." (from Wiki article above). Or where there were less than 7 windows (hence half-doors). The small cottage windows were maybe more the result of building materials available, particularly the high cost of glass, and the necessity of retaining heat. Those weren't the days!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2012 19:35:36

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward Gerry, so sorry! I meant to check the original image today to see if you're right about Ross... - will try to do it tomorrow.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/May/2012 19:38:03

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Absolutely bowing to your superior knowledge of the Window Tax! :)

  • profile

    mikescottnz

    • 10/Jun/2012 07:38:22

    Aggrrhhh cyber advertising in a photo site !

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 10/Jun/2012 13:39:06

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/celtico That "user" now well and truly blocked!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Jun/2012 22:37:14

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I dobbed him/her in to Flickr as "spam-o-rama" - it seems to work. The Commons photos seem to attract a lot of spam-o-rama-erers, like the idjot writing dreadful limericks above. Block me!

  • profile

    victor98_2001

    • 21/Jul/2012 03:59:07

    best shot

  • profile

    Howard33

    • 30/Nov/2012 15:55:57

    People today complain about having to ride the bus.

  • profile

    excellentzebu1050

    • 10/Jul/2013 20:45:18

    Brilliant really Brilliant

  • profile

    TEXASJOHN

    • 20/Aug/2013 20:34:55

    Is it the day coach to Ballyshannon?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Aug/2013 12:43:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Don't know where this one was bound. Robert French dubbed it a "tourist car".

  • profile

    kristavanichinnsamy

    • 26/Aug/2013 00:28:15

    Now Louking /// Very interesting this image. great work.

  • profile

    deimadove

    • 12/Oct/2013 08:39:35

    whhy the hell do u put up old photo

  • profile

    mikescottnz

    • 13/Oct/2013 19:03:44

    DD , this is originally a real photography place , not just a photo collection or interest site. In addition because its documenting history and people like yourself, may 'favourite' them. Now owned by Yahoo this site precedes all the Yahoo changes that make it seem like more typical social media sites .Welcome ,take your own pictures, you don't have be an other anon' person here.

  • profile

    vinura_d

    • 18/Oct/2013 06:46:42

    Hmmm... Interesting.

  • profile

    mambo1935

    • 05/Nov/2013 02:27:32

    grace!

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    fascinated by everything

    • 29/Dec/2013 16:12:54

    most have had better weather back then

  • profile

    smgucijf27

    • 24/Sep/2019 03:28:28

    L'automobile non era ancora stata inventata?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Sep/2019 05:49:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] We think this was the 1880s, so no automobiles yet, but the word Car was used for a horse drawn vehicle before that, like a jaunting car, a side car or an outside car.

  • profile

    smgucijf27

    • 25/Sep/2019 21:31:16

    Thanks for the answer Niall.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Apr/2021 12:14:56

    L_CAB_02020 next door in the catalogue is also Sligo and likely 1872-76 per the comments on this one: A strange and somehow familiar building - is Sligo Townhall

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Apr/2021 12:20:06

    L_CAB_2019 is Sligo, from 1878 or later (it's the courthouse), so these are not taken at the same time.