Afternoon Tea

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Where: Leitrim, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1900

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
A rather wooden group having scones, butter and jam at the Glencar Tea House, Co. Leitrim (despite the fact that it says Sligo on the glass negative!).

After some years of looking at this, and prompted by more recent inputs from conor65 and Niall McAuley (and a nearby/related image), our intrepid Photo Detectives propose that this is the Sibbery family. Niall proposes that it could be Margaret Jane Sibbery, her husband Robert, and two of their children....


Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1900

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_00123

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 32398
teahouse glencar ireland thatched cottage garden table china teapot sugar tea milk scones butter jame family 1900 1900s robertfrench billycock bombín bowler cokehat williamlawrence lawrencecollection connaught connacht leitrim nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    Michiel2005

    • 26/Dec/2011 14:20:43

    Probably were under instruction to keep still for a minute or so.

  • profile

    Jack Falstaff

    • 26/Dec/2011 14:43:05

    Now those two ladies look suspiciously like mother and daughter, so could this be the propietor's family posing for an all-important publicity post-card? Sunday clothes, mother to anwer to if they don't get it right..... it's no wonder the poor things look wooden. And, Oh I do hope father didn't step on his nice new billy-cock hat when he got up!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Dec/2011 15:15:35

    Well, I guess http://www.flickr.com/photos/govert1970 is right, posing for a while didn't exactly make for spontaneous snapshots, but maybe you're right too http://www.flickr.com/photos/jack_falstaff. Maybe they weren't resting tourists! And thanks for billycock! Didn't know that was what these hats were called. Apparently also bombín in Spanish speaking parts...

  • profile

    Jack Falstaff

    • 26/Dec/2011 16:27:02

    You're welcome, Carol. It was also known as a Derby in the USA, but more generally in the UK (when Jack was a lad, which is a long time ago) as a Bowler (after the name of the original makers) and,much more rarely if memory serves, as a Coke Hat (because it was created in the mid-nineteenth century for Edward Coke, brother of the Earl of Leicester).

  • profile

    Christine Rose..,

    • 26/Dec/2011 19:19:48

    Charming scene would be great foe a publicity shot.

  • profile

    australex

    • 27/Dec/2011 03:27:21

    Beautiful outside act of life with house, thanks for show it.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Dec/2011 13:25:04

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You are very welcome!

  • profile

    looking thru rose colored glasses

    • 27/Dec/2011 21:42:37

    Nice.

  • profile

    XPAT-Polska

    • 04/Jan/2012 13:42:56

    A lovely shot, even if it is wooden looking.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 04/Jan/2012 19:08:12

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] And lovely to hear from you again! You haven't been around for a while, I don't think?

  • profile

    conor65

    • 14/Sep/2017 20:17:22

    Is the the SIBERRY Tea House at Glencar?

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2017 22:29:19

    Indeed [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] - we had a discussion about this photo in Library Towers at the time, and we think it is connected to the existing/remaining teashop(or teashed?) which is still apparently in the area. And so that's where we mapped the image. Do you have any insights into who the proprietor may have been?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2018 10:12:30

    I think [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] is right. Prompted by todays image up the road: Rugged mountain and calm day at Glencar! I wondered if the census can shed any light. From the 25" location on GeoHive, I can flip to the 6" and see that the teahouse is in Largandoon. Guess how many families lived in Largandoon in 1901? Just one! They are still there in 1911. There is a good chance that this is Margaret Jane Sibbery, her husband Robert, and two of their children. As for a date, the youngest Sibbery, Richard, was six in 1901, we are not much later than that. There are only 4 years between the eldest boy Henry and his older sister Emily Jane, so it is not him. I think the earliest likely pair are David and Emily Jane with 12 years difference, meaning this is earliest 1890.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2018 10:20:05

    And the modern tea shed is run by one Helen Siberry! Helen's original home farm household also sits on the site where in the late 1800's to early 1900's a Tea House already existed, ran by Helen's great Aunts.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2018 10:28:25

    I just pinged her on twitter to take a look.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2018 10:30:14

    Another shot (Margaret Jane is in the same outfit...): Tea House, Glencar, Co. Leitrim, circa 1890

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jan/2018 17:43:11

    Excellent - Thanks https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley. I've updated the text to reflect!