High Street, Belfast

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Where: Northern Ireland, Belfast, United Kingdom

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When: 01 January 1906

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Date: Circa 1906

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_02415

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 45851
robertfrench street cart donkey horse carriage trolley tracks belfast williamlawrence lawrencecollection glassnegative fish flesh fowl sawers fishmongers icemerchants poulterers butchers albionclothcompany reckittsblue 1525 mardle hairdresser forstergreenco lipton albertclocktower crowndiningrooms robertboag albionchambers mackenziemcmullen forstergreen nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    tasteful pets

    • 02/Jun/2011 10:30:43

    stupenda

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    Peter Denton

    • 06/Jun/2011 14:56:51

    A wonderful capture of times past. And look - more horses (and a donkey, bottom left) than motor vehicles!

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    Swordscookie

    • 02/Aug/2011 10:34:21

    What's interesting in this excellent shot is the police or security presence? There are four outriders around that carriage, two more are going out of focus at the bottom and there are two an RIC?Policemen standing and walking between the tramrails. Some dignitary on his way someplace?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Aug/2011 14:17:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/swordscookie Must have been! Well spotted...

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    Swordscookie

    • 03/Sep/2011 18:37:04

    Look at the variety of modes of transport on display? Hansom cabs on the right with the hoods, soldiers/policemen on horseback, dignitary in landau, motor car in the distance, tram on the left, donkey and cart further left foreground, horse and drey left foreground, jaunting car on the left parked, and shanks mare all over the place!!!

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    Foxglove

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:12:57

    also to note that the Albert Clock tower is still perpendicular to the ground. Now its belfast "leaning tower" www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove/263370435/in/set-721575941... and the clock face only has 8 time settings

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 10:40:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove That's absolutely mad, thanks! Have replaced this with higher res image too - enjoy... :)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:36:47

    15:25 (x 2)

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:43:17

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Rarely been happier! Not one, but two clock faces clearly visible - both telling exactly the same time... :)

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 27/Aug/2012 11:56:41

    IMHO The photo was taken between 1903 -1908, provided the citizens of Belfast were up to date with their Aussie flag but 1901 at the earliest 1908 at the latest. Australia only used this flag after becoming a Commonwealth in 1901 being used for the first time in Melbourne on what is now Nation Flag Day September 3rd of that year. Orginally the Comonwealth Star (the big one) had 6 points, the Southern Cross had five stars of nine, eight, seven, six and five points respectively. In 1903 this was changed so that only one of the Southern Cross stars, the smallest, had 5 points the rest 7, I belive this is the flag in use here as the two visible stars of the Southern Cross appear to have 7 points. In 1908 this was changed to the modern flag with the Comonwealth Star now also having 7 instead of 6 points. Clearly the Comonwealth Star has 6 points here so it should be before 1908 if the people of Belfast were not using an old flag and you know what Belfast people are like about flags..........

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2012 12:33:59

    Belfast's trams were not electrified until 1905 per wikipedia.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2012 12:53:18

    Sawer's Ltd, 1-4 High street are in the 1910 Lennon Wylie directory and 1913 phonebook, but not in the 1918 directory, so it's before 1918. Edit: not correct, I later found a pic of Sawers still there in 1940!

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    robinparkes

    • 27/Aug/2012 12:57:08

    My home town.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2012 13:04:48

    Albion Cloth Company (#14 on the left) is in the 1907 directory, 14 is vacant in 1910, and occupied by McDowell Jewellers in 1918. The windows are open here, so I think the shop is open, putting it before 1910.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 27/Aug/2012 13:52:40

    Further digging in Lennon Wylie shows Robert Boag listed in 1907 as Proprietor of Albion Cloth Co., but in 1908, no occupation shown and no entry for 14 High Street. So, I think this is 1906 or 1907, with an outside chance of late 1905 (trams) or early 1908 (Mr. Boag). Mr Boag's son (also Robert) was an architect, and the DIA has just one entry for him, saying he completed "Albion Chambers" High Street, Belfast, in December 1908. My guess is the Mr. Boag senior retired, and Mr. Boag Junior remodelled the shop before it was let. Check out this 1940 image of High Street, #14 has shot up to be the same height as #12 (the arrows point to buildings destroyed by the Luftwaffe).

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 27/Aug/2012 14:30:22

    Anyone got a theory as to why there are so many Aussie flags on display? As my wife and I are both Aussies it has piqued our interest.

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 27/Aug/2012 14:46:24

    The same street after a vist from German bombers !! photosales.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/media/BIVkR19JhemfeFJ2E...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 17:43:39

    Going with 1906 for this one then. Delighted to have it so well narrowed down! As usual, thank you all for the hard work...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Aug/2012 17:57:39

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen That's a very sobering photo, and makes it all the more important that we look after the surviving photos we have. Hope someone can weigh in on the Aussie flag issue, to help you and your Missus!

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    robinparkes

    • 27/Aug/2012 18:48:59

    I cannot see Bridge Street. It should have been on the left. Could it have been created after the blitz. There was what we called a 'bomb site' (Second World War) in Bridge Street. I can see the end of Skipper Street for I see an awning to a shop on the corner. The perspective appears compressed as if the photographer has used a long lens even for a plate camera.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 27/Aug/2012 22:25:47

    A suggestion: Empire Day, May 24? First celebrated in 1902 across the British Empire - www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/Empire-Day/ .

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 28/Aug/2012 04:44:28

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think Bridge Street is immediately to the left of where this photo was taken, the is a slight bend in High Street and you can just see from the curve of the tram lines that the photographers position is just on the bend possiblely from what is now the British Home Stores.

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 28/Aug/2012 04:47:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Possible but 6 Aussie flags, 1 NSW State flag, Union flags, White Ensign why no Indian, New Zealand Canada e.t.c. ?

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 28/Aug/2012 04:52:55

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Canadian flag not used until 1965, Indian not until independace in 1947. New Zealand in 1902 it is possible that some of the 6 I have counted as Aussie flags could be Kiwi but for Gods sake don't tell anyone I'd never live it down !! So Empire Day 1906.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Aug/2012 07:14:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen I shan't tell a soul! I think there is an old Dominion of Canada flag to the left of the Australian one (see note and old flags at the Empire Day link above).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Aug/2012 08:07:37

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen] [http://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Is this any help to you flag crazies?

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    Vab2009

    • 28/Aug/2012 09:01:06

    This does not help with dating this but I was fascinated by the Forster Green & Co carriages as I know of the hospital named after him so I dug this out. Forster Green (Grocer & Philantropist) died 21st Oct 1903. Buried at Balmoral Friends Burial Ground, Belfast, he had been Life Governor of the Royal Victoria Hospital & Founder of Forster Green Hospital. Educated at Friends School, Lisburn, he went to Liverpool for 3 years and then established the firm of Forster Green & Co. tea & coffee merchants, with premises all over Belfast. He lived at Derryvolgie House, Malone, Belfast. He married twice - Mary Boadle of Whitehaven and later Jane Houlding of Preston.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Aug/2012 09:42:52

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/vab2009 Lovely nugget of information, thank you! And any and all information is always welcome...

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    robinparkes

    • 28/Aug/2012 12:22:02

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/shanekillen Unfortunately that would be Lombard Street on the immediate left of the photo and that runs up to Rosemary Street. You can see the start of Cornmarket on the right and that is right across the street from the end of Lombard Street. Bridge Street is on my old 'Geographia' map of Belfast but I cannot date it for there are no covers and there's no date on the actual map. The map predates the building of the Sydenham Bypass.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Aug/2012 14:06:13

    Bridge St. was there in 1906, but not as wide. Indeed, it's on this 1833 6" map.

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    robinparkes

    • 28/Aug/2012 14:16:40

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Niall, for some reason I cannot open that on my iMac. I've been trying to figure out where Bridge Street is in the photo. High Street is so much changed since that photo was taken, and not for the better.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 28/Aug/2012 16:17:14

    Nobody has uploaded Google Street View, so here you are.

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    Gerry Ward

    • 28/Aug/2012 16:23:30

    This photo appears in "No Mean City - Belfast 1880-1910" by Dr Brian Walker & Hugh Dixon (1983) and they date it as "about 1910". They speculate that the carriage may have been carrying the Lord Lieutenant and associate the display of the flags with that! Bridge Street was half of its present width at the time of this photo and is hard to see on the left. This photo is taken at High Street's junctions wth Cornmarket, to the right, and Lombard Street, to the left. Forster Green's buildng on the right was designed by Thomas Jackson (1865) and was replaced by the present building in 1929 (by William Priddle for FW Woolworth). The middle flag is Australia. New Zealand's flag dates from 1869 and has red stars edged in white and has never had the large "Commonwealth Star" that has appeared on Australia's flag, which was adopted in 1901.

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    Cuddly Nutter

    • 28/Aug/2012 16:48:12

    The Australian Flag shown here is the 1903-1908 version it certainly could not have been in use before 1903 and as http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley/ Niall McAuley pointed out Belfast's trams were not electrified until 1905. So it must be 1905 at the earliest but we can not as yet say it is before 1908 simply on the basis of the Australian flag as it may have been an old flag being reused.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Aug/2012 18:01:21

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/gerryward] Wednesday 28th March 1906, Irish Times, Page 5: LORD LIEUTENANT IN BELFAST. The Lord Lieutenant had Canadian associations, but there's no reason to fly the Aussie flag or the White Ensign for him, so I think an Empire Day parade is more likely.

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    robinparkes

    • 28/Aug/2012 20:53:48

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoolbeach I don't know how to do it but you need to go back a bit to the start of High Street to complement the original photo.

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    robinparkes

    • 28/Aug/2012 21:51:28

    Bridge Street is said to intersect after Mackenzie & McMullen, 22,24 High Street according to the 1907 Belfast Street directory of Lennon Wylie.

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    blackpoolbeach

    • 28/Aug/2012 22:32:47

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] Open up Street View and use the big white arrows to move along High Street. When you find the correct place click the LINK symbol. The full URL is highlighted ready to copy (CTRL+C) and paste (CTRL+V) into this page.

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    robinparkes

    • 29/Aug/2012 06:53:45

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoolbeach] Thank you. Here it is: maps.google.com/maps?q=Castle+Place,+Belfast,+United+King... It is so changed. High Street starts at Lombard Street. Castle Place is between Castle Junction and High Street.