Cable Station, Waterville, Kerry

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Where: Kerry, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1900

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These were, as it shows on the original glass negative, "Married Quarters.

Myrtle26 has very interesting historical and local background information on these buildings:
"Note how William Lawrence titled the picture 'Married Quarters.' The station was one of three in a small area that controlled all communication with Great Britain and America and in troubled times it fared well, as all sides respected its contribution to the economy. Nevertheless, it came under hostile control and wasn't always considered a safe 'married quarters.' The General Ward was dispatched to evacuate all women and children until peace was restored. [this unsafe time was during the Irish Civil War] 1922, after Erskine Childers had censored or authorised the dispatches passing through. The exterior of the building is the same today as it was then and all houses within it are occupied. They were offered to resident employees around the early sixties for £500.00 each and some thought they were too dear!! They have long gardens reaching to the road so far in front towards the sea that the entire garden lengths aren't shown in this picture. Lawrence possibly set up his camera on the road wall and note the man, almost lost in the garden, looking down towards the camera."

Date: Circa 1900

NLI Ref.: L_CAB_06549

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 18356
glassnegative waterville kerry ireland cablestation communications vintagegardens victorianallotments marriedquarters generalward evacuate irishcivilwar £500 gardens robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection munsterset nationallibraryofireland

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  • profile

    Myrtle26

    • 10/Mar/2012 22:20:41

    Note how William Lawrence titled the picture 'Married Quarters.' The station was one of three in a small area that controlled all communication with Great Britain and America and in troubled times it fared well, as all sides respected its contribution to the economy. Nevertheless, it came under hostile control and wasn't always considered a safe 'married quarters.' The General Ward was dispatched to evacuate all women and children until peace was restored.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Mar/2012 11:40:13

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree When was that, the danger time?

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    Myrtle26

    • 11/Mar/2012 18:51:43

    1922, after Erskine Childers had censored or authorised the dispatches passing through. The exterior of the building is the same today as it was then and all houses within it are occupied. They were offered to resident employees around the early sixties for £500.00 each and some thought they were too dear!! They have long gardens reaching to the road so far in front towards the sea that the entire garden lengths aren't shown in this picture. Lawrence possibly set up his camera on the road wall and note the man, almost lost in the garden, looking down towards the camera. On a lighter note, do you sleep at all, Carol? I put that comment on late on Saturday night over a glass of wine and here is an answer on Sunday. That's dedication. But you have made the series a joy!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Mar/2012 20:30:31

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mosskayree Not me, it's you lot who make Flickr a joy for me! So, wine-fuelled comments, eh? :) Lovely to know that the houses are still there, and still lived in...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jan/2013 17:16:07

    Streetview may actually help with dating this. There are two similar terraces there now, but only the more Southerly one appears in this shot. According to the local area plan (pdf) the whole works was completed in 1900. Neither one is in the 1896 25" map at GeoHive, so a date of 1896-1900, most probably in 1900 itself.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 27/Jan/2013 13:50:18

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Excellent, Niall! Tweaked the location, and happy with a date of circa 1900...

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    FTLD

    • 20/Mar/2013 22:40:25

    I have more information on the Waterville station on my page on the Irish cable stations, and there are postcards of Waterville on my page on the Commercial Cable Company, which operated the station as part of its transAtlantic network. And my contributor Cornelia Connolly wrote an interesting paper a few years ago on the effect of the cable industry on the Irish people.

  • profile

    FTLD

    • 20/Mar/2013 22:54:19

    I've added this photo to my Commercial Cable Company page, with a link back to here - hope that's OK!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Mar/2013 09:03:11

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] That's absolutely ok, thanks!