A Rival for Trinity?

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Where: Leinster, Leix, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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The Patrician College in Ballyfin may not have been a rival in the academic field for Trinity College Dublin but the quality of that portico, and the grandeur of the building could bear some comparison! A very fine looking edifice with lots of attachments and outbuildings, and that conservatory looks very grand indeed. Yet another postcard from the Library's Ephemera Collection to whet the appetite!

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: NLI Ephemera Collection

Date: Unknown

NLI Ref.: EPH A301

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4369
20thcentury ireland leinster locationidentified nationallibraryofireland ephemeracollection ephemera nationallibraryofirelandephemeracollection nationallibrarysephemeracollection ballyfin house

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 12/Oct/2023 07:32:28

    ... The present building is a neo-classical mansion built by Sir Charles Coote, 9th Baronet (1794–1864) in the 1820s to designs by the leading Irish architects, Richard (1767–1849) and William Vitruvius Morrison (1794–1838). For much of the twentieth century, it served as a school, having been sold in 1928 by Sir Ralph Coote to the Patrician Brothers, a Roman Catholic teaching order. From 2002, it was the subject of a restoration project, and in May 2011, it opened its doors as a country house hotel. ... From - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballyfin So photo is likely after 1928 ?

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 12/Oct/2023 08:11:41

    Earlier (c. 1903?) via Mr Eason - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000558360 Later ? (1942) via Irish Tourist Association - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000577069

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2023 08:46:13

    Vary barebones entry at the NIAH. More detail at the DIA.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2023 08:56:36

    The house was owned and occupied for the 1911 census by the excellently named Sir Algernon Charles Plumptre Coote, a baronet, and his large household. Himself, wife Ellen Melesina, daughter Mary Melesina, 2 visitors, a housekeeper, 10 assorted maids, a Hallman (?) and two Footmen. A butler, land steward, 3 coachmen, 2 gamekeepers, 2 grooms, a dairy maid, and 4 gardeners live in other houses on the demesne.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 12/Oct/2023 08:58:07

    There is an original Roman mosaic in the hallway. This Googleball gives a sort of idea - maps.app.goo.gl/kPrWgFHpfSwi9JQ29 "The Entrance Hall incorporates a Roman mosaic pavement: one of the art treasures brought over by Sir Charles Coote from his Grand Tour of 1822. The hall also displays a far more ancient antiquity: the antlers of Megaloceros Giganteus – the Irish Elk, recovered from an Irish bog and some 10,000 years old!" (from Roaring water journal above) - maps.app.goo.gl/P5pzV6iFE8XXsAMf9

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2023 08:59:40

    Per thepeerage, he was the 12th Baronet Coote, of Castle Cuffe, Queen's Co. His successor the 13th baronet would have been the one to sell to the Patricians in 1928. There is apparently still a lad calling himself the baronet, the current one being the 16th inheriting the title in 2016.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Oct/2023 09:27:25

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/30369211@N00/ A Hallman, no less. Have we ever had one of those before?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2023 09:40:37

    Have not seen Hall man before, a HAGS suggests Hall and Hotel Porters; Doorkeepers and Carriage Attendants There are only two in the 1911 census, and a different two (in different houses) in 1901. William Rawlins, the hall man here, is 20, while the footmen are 22 and 25 - perhaps it is a junior position? The other hall man in 1911, Horace Churches (!), is 21, and the single footman in that house is 24.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Oct/2023 11:33:35

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] You rang a bell with me (pun shamelessly intended) about a character employed as a hall boy in Downton Abbey. Apparently, in real life, "The hall boy or hallboy was a position held by a young male domestic worker on the staff of a great house, usually a young teenager. The name derives from the fact that the hall boy usually slept in the servants' hall." See more here...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2023 11:45:19

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Ah, that may explain the lack of hall men - they are usually boys. 47 hits for "hall boy" in 1911, nearly all teenagers, 33 hits in 1901. There are a few more under "hallboy" Per your wikipedia link it is indeed the lowest grade for male servants, often an entry level position for boys who work up to footman and perhaps valet or butler later in life.

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    John Spooner

    • 12/Oct/2023 15:45:34

    Small ad in The Scotsman - Wednesday 05 February 1908 confirms the relative youth of an ideal hallmanThe Scotsman - Wednesday 05 February 1908

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    vincenthogan1

    • 14/Oct/2023 13:33:29

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons