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Where: Ulster, Donegal, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Ending the week with another drawing but in this case one to save lives rather than the dreadful murder of Mrs. O'Neill in Crook. Today we have a drawing of the proposed lighthouse for Inishtrahull off the coast of Donegal. It looks so simple in that form though the actual building must be strong and durable as well as serviceable!

Photographer: Ball, Robert S. (Robert Stawell), 1840-1913

Collection: Commissioners of Irish Lights Photographic Collection

Date: Circa 1890 - 1909

NLI Ref: NPA CIL106

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4649
ireland locationidentified nationallibraryofireland ulster thecommissionersofirishlightsphotographiccollection commissionersofirishlightsphotographiccollection robertball robertstawell drawing planofproposedlighthouse inishtrahull donegal atlantic wildatlanticway

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2023 07:34:41

    Looking fantastic in 2019 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/criodesign/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/criodesign/48522107971/

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2023 07:49:05

    I think this design is from the 1950s. See details - www.irishlights.ie/tourism/our-lighthouses/inishtrahull.aspx

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2023 08:09:57

    ' ... This tall and slender lighthouse is an important element of the twentieth-century built heritage of County Donegal. Constructed of robust modern materials, it retains its originally form and character. It was built to designs by the engineer A. D. H. Martin (1915 – 2004), Engineer-in-Chief at the Commissioners of Irish Lights from 1956. ... From - www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/40900...

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2023 08:21:37

    [Aside] Via Trove from 1953 -

    Heavy Smoker Dies At 104 LONDON, Mon (AAP): Ireland's oldest woman, Mrs. Bridget McGonagle died yesterday. She was 104. _ Known as "Queen of Inishtrahull"— a tiny island nine miles north of Ireland— Mrs. McGonagle smoked 30 cigarettes daily. She had never been on a train or a bus.
    trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/266064675?searchTerm=I...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2023 08:24:19

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/32162360@N00/ Asides are very welcome!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2023 08:42:30

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Fishy business in 1950 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/104340591?searchTerm=I...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2023 09:57:47

    The island is uninhabited now. In the 1901 census there were 65 residents, including 2 light keepers (of the original lighthouse, not this one) and a signalman/telegraphist. The original lighthouse was 1km East of this one, but the 6" Cassini marks a Lloyd's Signal Station and flagstaff at the spot this lighthouse now occupies. 80 residents of the mistranscribed Irishtrahull island in 1911, including 3 lighthouse keepers and 3 Lloyds men. The locals are all fishermen/farmers. There are ~18 "scholars", and there is a school on the Cassini map, but no teacher in the census.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2023 10:24:57

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Bridget McGonagle/McGonigle is recorded as 40 in 1901, and 52 in 1911, so would be 93ish at her death if either is close. Her death record puts her at a round 100 years. She had moved 9 km to Malin Head.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2023 11:27:08

    Engineer ADH Martin was Engineer-in-Chief of Irish Lights when they installed their first (and so far, only) nuclear powered light in the 1970s: Irish Lights first step into the atomic era was in 1964 when the UK Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell, Buckinghamshire, asked for their views on isotope powered thermo-electric generators in the marine lighting and navigational field. Meetings were arranged between Trinity House, AERE, and the Research and Development Section of the Lighthouse Authorities, and in October 1968 Blackrock Mayo was chosen as the lighthouse which, for experimental purposes, was to have one of these isotope generators. In a report dated July 1970 the Engineer-in-Chief, Mr A. D. H. Martin, stated that AGA Signals Ltd were designing an optic but pointed out that it would be difficult to maintain the present candle power in the horizontal beam if they were to divert some of the light downwards due to the focal plane of Blackrock being 282 feet above sea level. This problem was solved by Inspector of Lights and Marine Superintendent, Capt. C. L'Estrange, who suggested Rathlin O'Birne as being an easier station from the access point of view and only 116 feet above sea level. The Board approved this recommendation. The isotope generator known as RIPPLE X (Radio Isotope Powered Prolonged Life Equipment-Mark Ten) was transported by road to Holyhead from Harwell, lifted aboard ILT Isolda, cleared customs at Dun Laoghaire and landed directly on Rathlin O'Birne on 7 June 1974. The whole journey from Harwell to Rathlin O'Birne took four days. Two electric temporary lights were positioned on the lantern balcony railing and came into operation on 20 June flashing white and red every 20 seconds. The old optic pedestal and incandescent gear was removed and a new PRB24 optic was installed. Irish Lights's only, and probably the world's most powerful, nuclear powered light came into operation on Thursday 15 August 1974.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2023 11:30:42

    Another aside, this from 'Nature Notes' in the Derry Journal of Monday 29 November 1954:

    FOUND IN INISHTRAHULL THERE is only one published record for the Ortolan Bunting in Ireland. It is for Inlshtrahull Island. Donegal, and is dated September 1953. That this widespread continental species had not previously been reported here is surprising for its nesting area extends from Scandinavia in the north to Spain in the south, and then eastwards through Turkey and Greece, but leaving out the toe of Italy.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2023 11:41:28

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Ortolan bunting

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2023 11:47:13

    Not an aside Some snippets from the Derry Journal - Friday 1 May 1987, to mark the last residents (the 2 lighthouse keepers Ciaran O'Briain and Eugene Sullivan, and Ciaran's dog) leaving the island when the light was automated: - the original 1813 lighthouse was at the east end of the island. When the 1956 lighthouse started operation the old lighthouse cast "a nasty shadow" so was demolished to 1st floor level. - In 1905 a fog signal was installed, and there were 4 keepers, two each at the east and west ends of the island. - After automation, the lighthouse was to be visited once a fortnight for checks to be carried out, to be extended to monthly intervals

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2023 12:02:56

    We welcome asides and not asides equally! :)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2023 12:29:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner That explains why there are more keepers in the 1911 census!

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 06/Oct/2023 14:07:59

    Excellent, I have been thinking of building a lighthouse -for my bathtub, to avoid hitting the head.

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    silverio10

    • 07/Oct/2023 19:58:43

    Buena serie de fotos antiguas .