Bridging the divide

Download this image


Love this? Please support us and...

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Munster, Co Kerry, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Normally Mr. O'Dea's domain but in this case it appears that Mr. French decided to get in on the act in advance. Cahirsiveen Railway Station is the caption but the image contains a whole lot more than that with two bridges, the hills behind and indeed a very bad job of Photoshopping!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_IMP_3053

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5110
glassnegative ireland lawrencecollection lawrencephotographcollection lawrencephotographicstudio munster nationallibraryofireland robertfrench thelawrencephotographcollection 20thcentury williamlawrence cahirsiveen railwaystation bridges bay countykerry

Add Tags
  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:09:39

    The castle-like building is the RIC Barracks. That’s the old train line from Cahirsiveen to Valentia Harbour which operated 1893 to 1960. The left bank is known as “over the water” to the people of Cahirsiveen.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:14:46

    Streetview, not a very close one, but the bridges and turrety building are still there. The railway is not. The turrety yoke is the RIC barracks of 1875.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:17:27

    Mr Valentine ❤ visited too; Spot The Differences ... From - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000046259

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:20:57

    The box girder bridge is from 1893.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:22:26

    Looks like all the principal features except the railway station have survived: both bridges and the barracks are extant

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:27:06

    The NIAH dates the railway viaduct at 1893. www.buildingsofireland.ie/buildings-search/building/21400...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:37:59

    I don't see a date for the current concrete bridge replacing the other bridge shown, which may be the wooden Barry's bridge footbridge from 1847.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:38:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/32162360@N00/] Valentine no later than 1905 www.historiccoventry.co.uk/main/pc-dating.php?pc=50833

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:41:31

    Per eiretrains, Caherciveen was 2nd last station on the line, but was the real terminus with engine shed, turntable, cattle pens etc. Only a limited number of trains ran on to Valentia.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:47:26

    The Valentine has a huge long train shed, not seen in today's photo. When did that happen? Best seen in a later Lawrence reverse view from the castle - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000318850

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:48:27

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/184711311@N04 Not sure how reliable that Coventry site is.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:50:09

    Ah, the dia has entries for the bridge, tenders in 1915 and 1927 for concrete bridge, no help.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:52:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/32162360@N00/ Probably not 100%, just indicative

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 08:55:09

    L_IMP_3054 next in the catalogue is a closer view of the railway viaduct, and it looks pretty new, the railway cutting is not yet overgrown, but the tidal area shows sea weed.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 05/Sep/2023 09:00:20

    L_IMP_3051, not a million miles away, includes a large church. I remember seeing it with some Kerry cows long ago. Yes, 11 years ago I said the church was completed in 1902: Fair Day, Cahirciveen, Kerry

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 09:01:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/32162360@N00/ The shed is shown on the 25”, but unable to determine survey date, as we once could. However, 25” surveys were c. turn of the century?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 05/Sep/2023 09:28:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I found this exchange in the account of a court case at Caherciveen Petty Sessions in The Kerryman; - Saturday 24 September 1910

    Jerh. Falvey deposed he met John Shea, Prendergast and Murphy at Carhan at three o'clock on the day in question and they were in his company until half-past five. he did not notice the sign of drink on them: he saw no police at Carhan: he was hunting rats during the time from 3 o'clock to 5:30 with those boys. To the Chairman - I know Constable Folan To the complainant - I was at home last Sunday, and I was over the water the previous Sunday. Compainant - Is that in Scotland, or England, or where? Witness - You know well. I mean on the other side of the Cahersiveen river
    The case centred around the admissibility of evidence obtained by the police by them witnessing goings-on through binoculars (although they were also referred to as opera glasses - not the latest apparatus from Mr Zeiss of Jena (1894)). It led to a debate in the newspaper's columns about the use of binoculars by the police. It occurred to me that with a good pair of binoculars a policeman high up in the turrets would ideally equipped to keep an eye on things in the town. Or was this an early 20th century example of the surveillance state? the policeman in the court case were not in the barracks but on a mountainside

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 05/Sep/2023 09:39:39

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Your L_IMP_3051 above does not show the 1910 Carnegie Library, seen on right here - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000318928 . Mr French / Lawrence visited multiple times, as usual. There is a magical similar view before the railway arrived in town - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000336597

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 05/Sep/2023 16:33:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/30369211@N00/ Yes, the Daniel O'Connell Memorial Catholic Church. Unique in being named for a secular person.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 05/Sep/2023 20:58:16

    There is a sign "GENTLEMEN" under a rock (see note). Thanks megazoom!