No heifers, no cows, only a solitary Bullock

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Where: Leinster, Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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It is always interesting to see how a small fishing village where the original inhabitants once struggled to make a living and where conditions were brutally harsh can become a place for the wealthy and famous! Dalkey is on such and the spread of the socially mobile denizens of the city of Dublin along the coast has swallowed it up like a fungus. It brings out the cynic in this Mary!

Not quite the seafront in Bray but out there on the Southside as a reminder of the interment yesterday of the late singer, Sinead O'Connor.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_ROY_08920

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5012
nationallibraryofireland thelawrencephotographcollection williamlawrence robertfrench leinster lawrencephotographicstudio lawrencecollection ireland glassnegative dublin nationalphotographicarchive bullockharbour dalkey southdublin martellotower

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  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:08:41

    Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/ztWvMQ #googleearth And in 3D Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/t7M5Q5 #googleearth

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:11:21

    The row of cottages seems to be no more, but the leftmost building with the arched window above the door and a rectangular thing on its pediment above the door has survived and is now coloured pink with blue windows and door. Streetview

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:22:22

    https://flic.kr/p/dd3uuF via Jimmy Pierce

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:33:34

    The Pilot Cottages on the left were built in 1807 to house the ‘hobblers’ who were private family operators who rowed out to pilot approaching ships in Dublin Bay.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:43:31

    That’s St. Patrick’s Church, 1843, in the distance.

  • profile

    CHG PRO PHOTOGRAPHY incorporating the APL archives

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:44:33

    My late and humble parents once resided near Bullock Harbour. Back in the 1960’s when the area was more affordable than it is today! If I recall correctly there is nowadays a senior citizens retirement residence right by the harbour…..

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 09/Aug/2023 08:54:58

    The tall building beyond was the Shangri-la hotel demolished in the '70's

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 09/Aug/2023 09:20:26

    Of interest - 'Monkey' swung by on Tuesday 27 April 1954 - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000731231

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 09:25:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/32162360@N00/ The cottages were still there then, and the apartment blocks weren’t built yet

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 09/Aug/2023 09:36:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/184711311@N04 From memory I think Malcolm Macarthur was arrested at the very same apartments?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2023 09:41:15

    GUBU!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 09/Aug/2023 10:29:05

    Via Trove from 1863 (a lot of Old Bullocks!) - "Longevity:- Patrick Mooney, a superannuated pilot, and one of the oldest men in Ireland, breathed his last at his residence, in Bullock, on Monday last, at the extraordinary age of 107. He passed his entire lifetime, except when he was at sea, in the above locality, where also lived his father, grandfather, and other ancestors for the last three or four hundred years, and whose bones rest in the old churchyard of Dalkey. The several members of this family were remarkable for longevity. About two years ago the sister of the deceased died at the age of 84. His grandfather was nearly 100, and a relative named Mrs. Fitzsimmons attained the age of 103. Patrick Mooney never married, and was an active, temperate man." See - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/41460160?searchTerm=bu...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2023 10:54:04

    L_ROY_08921 next door includes Knox Memorial Hall, Monkstown, opened 1904 per the DIA.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 09/Aug/2023 11:07:05

    Some Dalkey pics like L_ROY_08911 previously have dates in the 1905-10 range, if I recall correctly.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 09/Aug/2023 11:21:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Not just Patrick Mooney. The Irish Times wrote up his death on Wednesday 18 February 1863 ("He was a genuine old salt, and many a strange tale of peril and adventure he narrated to the young") with the following tacked on the end

    A few months since, a woman died at Dalkey the advanced age of 112 years, She, too, enjoyed full faculties up to her last. She used to tell how she assisted in cooking dinner for a party of the famous Irish Volunteers in 1782. A short time previously John Bryan died aged 103 year of age, and had taken part in the famous battle of Vinegar Hill when 42 years of age. Another superannuated pilot, known as "Red Bill” died a short time since in his 101st year; and a Mr Farrell a well-known blacksmith ol Killiney, lived to the good old age of 106 years. We question whether any locality in the British dominions cou'd produce such list of centeynarians who died within few months of each other.

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 09/Aug/2023 11:36:21

    a Dalkey Archives ...photo then

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 09/Aug/2023 12:13:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/47290943@N03/ GUBU! “It was a bizarre happening, an unprecedented situation, a grotesque situation, an almost unbelievable mischance.” - Charles J. Charvet MacArthur was released from Shelton Abbey prison on 17 September 2012. MacArthur's story inspired John Banville's 1989 novel, The Book of Evidence.

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 10/Aug/2023 09:48:26

    Granite from nearby Perrins Quarry (entrance visible at bottom of hill on right, this side of St Patricks Church) was shipped from here by barge to Dublin Port for onwards transmission to London, for construction of Thames Embankment and Houses of Parliament - 1830s - 1860s

  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 10/Aug/2023 10:00:16

    By the way, its more often BullocH (than a would-be male bovine).

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Aug/2023 06:08:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/91590691@N05 Thanks Micheal.