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Where: Kansas, Lincoln, United States

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When: Unknown

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Something a bit different from the Sean T. O'Ceallaigh Collection to start this week. A headstone in the name of Dillon which looks dark and dreary but thanks to the benefits of "Supermegazoomability" we can read things a bit better than the late Uachtaráin. The title says "If you look thro' a magnifying glass you can see plainly the inscription "Gondeunad [?] Dia trócaireona" but you can make your own mind up on that! Where is it and why would the Dillon family be of interest to the late President?

Sounding the Location Identified Klaxon. This photograph brings us to Kansas in the USA.

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Sean T O'Kelly Photographic Collection

Date: 1932 Jul. 21

NLI Ref.: NPA OKE/37

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4960
nationallibraryofireland nationalphotographicarchive nli seantoceallaighphotographiccollection uachtarainnaheireann headstone tombstone dillonfamily lincolncounty kansas unitedstatesofamerica unitedirishmen stpatrickscemetery lincoln locationidentified

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 08:14:04

    In Memory of the Daughters of James W and Agnes M Dillon Mary Mar 12 1861, Aug 8 1879 Agnes Sept 8 1868, Mar 15 1880 Ellen Aug 4 1870, Apr 29 1880 Sarah Apr 21 1879, Aug 11 1899

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 08:23:16

    I do not see any of the four, birth or death, in the records. Possibly in the UK?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 08:27:25

    O'Kelly was born in 1882 - younger than all of these Dillons.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 08:56:11

    If only there was a way to find a grave... Wait, there is! www.findagrave.com/memorial/53859225/sarah-rose-dillon Saint Patricks Cemetery Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas, USA Kansas Streetview! In todays image, we see a couple of fenceposts in the background. Those are still visible in Streetview, but in the 90 years since, a row of pine trees has been planted and grown at the boundary.

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    suckindeesel

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:01:49

    At top is inscribed something like “In memory of the daughters of James? and Agnes M Dillon”

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:04:50

    At bottom Requiescant in pace Go ndeunadh dia trocaire orra

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:16:19

    St. Patrick Parish – Lincoln Back to Parish Map Founded 1878 French Jesuit missionaries celebrated the first recorded Mass in Lincoln County on “Rocky Hill” southeast of what was known as Lincoln Center. Traveling priests continued to offer the sacraments as they were able. In 1878, the town’s Catholics built a church on ground donated by the city. Foundation stone was quarried north of town, and native cottonwood was milled locally. Other supplies came from Ellsworth, which also supplied the priest, Father Bernard Nuttman. A rectory was built in 1901 for the first resident pastor. A new stone church was dedicated in May 1907. In 1938, the ladies’ guild began work to provide a bell for the vacant bell tower. The Santa Fe Railroad donated a 300-pound bell from a decommissioned locomotive. It was removed from the tower in the 1960s because of safety concerns, but repairs were made, and it was returned to the bell tower in 1986. A parish hall was built in 1960, and a new rectory with a basement for religious education classes was completed in 1971. In 2010, an addition to the 103-year-old church included a new entry and gathering space and restrooms. Streetview of the church.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:29:25

    The Lincoln County census for some years seems to be online, but I don't have a Kansas drivers license to authenticate on ancestry.com

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:36:27

    I've done a search on FamilySearch.org and have turned up a bit more. Re the parents, the 1900 Census gives the following: NameJames W Dillon SexMale Age71 Immigration Date1878 Birth DateFeb 1829 BirthplaceIreland Marital StatusMarried RaceWhite Years Married39 Relationship to Head of HouseholdHead Relationship CodeHead Father's BirthplaceIreland Mother's BirthplaceIreland Event TypeCensus Event Date1900 www.findagrave.com/memorial/54045758/agnes-m-dillon Agnes M. Dillon BIRTH 1838 DEATH 1913 (aged 74–75) BURIAL Saint Patricks Cemetery Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas, USA Event PlaceIndiana Township, Lincoln, Kansas, United States NameAgnes M Dillon SexFemale Age62 Immigration Date1878 Birth DateSep 1838 BirthplaceIreland Marital StatusMarried RaceWhite Number of Living Children3 Years Married39 Relationship to Head of HouseholdWife Relationship CodeWife Father's BirthplaceIreland Mother's BirthplaceIreland Mother of how many children8 Event TypeCensus Event Date1900 And Find a Grave has the following: www.findagrave.com/memorial/54045817/james-w-dillon#source James W. Dillon BIRTH 1829 DEATH 1919 (aged 89–90) BURIAL Saint Patricks Cemetery Lincoln, Lincoln County, Kansas, USA

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:48:17

    Again, basing myself on what is present on FamilySearch.org, this is said to be the birth cert of a son of James W Dillon and Agnes Dillon - and I see no evident reason to doubt it - Edward Byrne Dillon civilrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/images/birth... Born in Wicklow July 5th 1872 to James W Dillon and Agnes Dixon.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 17/Jul/2023 09:55:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy https://www.flickr.com/photos/184711311@N04 I have updated the map, it is up there with some of our most distant locations! Thank you.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 17/Jul/2023 10:14:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Great! from the birth record of Edward Byrne we see James was a Grocer in Wicklow town. Also that Agnes senior was formerly a Dixon. There are no Dillons in Wicklow town in 1901. There are some Dixons, they are not Grocers, there is one Baker.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 10:24:20

    I think I have an idea of James W Dillon's historical import. Here is a link to O'Donovan-Rossa's memoirs. cartlann.org/dicilimt/2020/12/Rossas-Recollections-1838-t... On page 298, a James W Dillon is signatory to a letter addressed to John O'Mahony, founder of the Fenian Brotherhood in the US. From the letter, it seems that Dillon signed as a senior member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood's organisation in Wicklow.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 10:28:57

    Thom's Directory of 1870 mentions James W Dillon as being one of the Harbor Commissioners in Wicklow town.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 11:07:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] See also this: www.ksgenweb.org/lincoln/stpats1955.htm Anne Dillon, a long-time member of St. Patrick’s church, and who was present at the corner stone laying, has written an article entitled, “Early Memories of My Church,” in which she recounts many interest incidents. It follows; Back in the [18]‘60s the Catholics of Lincoln county were served by priests from Salina. The first I know of was Fr. Temphaus, but that was years before my parents, Mr. and Mrs. James W. Dillon, came to the U.S.A. Then there was Fr. Adolph Wilbert. He it was who established the first Catholic school in Salina, long before there were any Sisters there. He taught the children himself with the assistance of a lay teacher. When the Catholics decided to built a church in Lincoln the city very generously gave them a whole block, which is still in possession of the church. But for years we had no resident pastor, being served by priests from Wilson and Salina, but mostly from Ellsworth. In 1900 the rectory was built and Fr. John McNamara came to Lincoln, our first resident pastor. The stone in the new church is all native, having been obtained from quarries four or five miles north of Lincoln. I think the quarry was operated by a man named Van Valkenburg, but I am not sure of that. My father, James W. Dillon, John Whalen and Thomas Corrigan were the committee that assisted Fr. McNamara. Some, at least, of the stone was brought from the quarry to Lincoln by the parishioners, for my two brothers drew some of it. Our house was about nine miles from the quarry. The roads were mere trails, compared with the present ones and there was no modern machinery to load the heavy stones. Horses provided the power. It was, indeed, an arduous task. Note - 1910 Census for the Dillon household shows "Nany Dillon", single daughter of James W Dillon & Agnes Dillon. I don't think it a stretch to think that Anne might be her real name.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 17/Jul/2023 11:14:59

    The wedding of James Dillon of Wicklow to Agnes Mary Dixon of Baggot Street, Dublin in St Andrew's (Westland Row) in 1861 churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/details/62e... Note that one of the witnesses is a Byrne which shows up in the name of their son Edward Byrne Dillon.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 17/Jul/2023 21:37:20

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Great Gravedigging, Guys!

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 18/Jul/2023 07:31:37

    Sometimes we post a photo and think this will go down like a lead balloon and then pop it lights up the sky with the information that you guys dig up! Thank you for the joy of the search and for bringing this image to life! https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/184711311@N04