Cushendun

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Where: N Ireland, Causeway Coast and Glens, UK

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When: Unknown

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To finish off the week we are visiting the Glens of Antrim and specifically Cushendun. I am thinking that the current view will not be that different from what we see in this photo. I also wonder if the group on the near side of the bridge is the transport for Mr French and his assistants?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_IMP_1960

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5327
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland cushendun coantrim antrim ulster northernireland bridge river coast

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  • profile

    Pawel Wietecha

    • 23/Jun/2023 06:33:21

    Vista su - Seen in: Flickr Global Vai a Flickr Global

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    John Spooner

    • 23/Jun/2023 07:16:10

    In the Coleraine Chronicle of Saturday 10 September 1904 the County Surveyor is quoted at the quarterly meeting of Antrim County Council: "The fallen arches of Cushendun Bridge have been rebuilt." The stonework of the 2 arches at the nearest end of the bridge looks to be lighter. Could this be a result of the 1904 rebuilding?

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    John Spooner

    • 23/Jun/2023 07:20:38

    Possibly not - the surveyor reported in 1902 (Irish News and Belfast Morning News - Wednesday 18 June 1902) that three arches had been destroyed by flooding, not two.

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    Foxglove

    • 23/Jun/2023 08:02:34

    ..I have walked under the bridge... and have a photo somewhere...my Ireland 2006 album

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 23/Jun/2023 08:09:46

    Trifecta again! Spot the differences - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000329184 Imperial (this photo) catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000042832 Royal catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000335725 Cabinet Also an earlier Cabinet from a slightly different angle - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000336478 And an odd Eblana - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000560872

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Jun/2023 08:38:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia What was the logic of taking the three almost identical photos?

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 08:55:11

    No. 3 Main St, the second house on the right after the bridge is operating as a public house, going by the barrels outside. This ties in with this record: “.. McKillop continued to reside at No. 3 Main Street until 1869 when the house passed to Archibald McDonnell, a local farmer and publican who converted the building into a public house by at least the 1880s (the site was first recorded as a public house by the Annual Revisions in c. 1881). McDonnell remained at No. 3 Main Street until his death in 1907 at which time the address passed to Sarah McVeigh who did not maintain the public house but occupied the site as a private dwelling (PRONI Wills)…” apps.communities-ni.gov.uk/Buildings/buildview.aspx?id=11... So, a date range of c. 1880 to 1907

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 09:20:54

    A little history: “.. The village of Cushendun, located along the River Dun, was developed from the early-19th century when travel across mainland Europe was cut off by the Napoleonic wars. Ireland became a popular destination for British tourists during this period, necessitating the development of new routes and hotels between Belfast and the picturesque sites along the Antrim Coast such as Dunluce Castle and the Giants Causeway. The previously isolated Glens of Antrim at once became accessible with the development of the Coastal Road between 1832 and 1842. Villages along the coast such as Cushendall and Cushendun were transformed from minor settlements into popular seaside resorts that soon became thronged with seasonal visitors. A number of summer houses (or ‘Bathing Lodges’) were constructed along the coast by city-based professionals and merchants, including the impressive residences of Glenmona Lodge and Glendun Lodge at Cushendun..” apps.communities-ni.gov.uk/Buildings/buildview.aspx?id=80...

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 09:35:02

    The building on the right with the flagpole was the coastguard station, “in ruins by the 1920s” Replaced by Maud Cottages in 1926. Our photo predates the remodelling of Cushendun in the style of a Cornish village “The village was designed by Clough Williams-Ellis in 1912 at the request of Ronald John McNeill, Baron Cushendun. The picturesque Cornish appearance was deliberate, in an effort to please Maud, the Baron’s Penzance-born wife. After Maud’s death in 1925, Ellis designed a row of quaint, whitewashed cottages in her memory, called Maud’s Cottages. www.nationaltrust.org.uk/visit/northern-ireland/cushendun...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:06:58

    Archy McDonnell, Farmer and Publican, is 61 in 1901, with wife Mary and mistranscribed daughter Caroline J. Record of his death in January 1907. Daughter C.J present. He is recorded as a widower. Yes, Mary died in 1906. Daughter Caroline June married farmer and naval pensioner Daniel McGill in August 1907. I do not see them in the 1911 census, Here is Sarah McVeagh and household in 1911.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:25:16

    Also, DOG noted at the pub door.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:32:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I think it is unlikely that 2 arches were destroyed, rebuilt and then 3 arches were destroyed in 1902. I think we are between 1904 and 1907. Edit: Unlikely, but apparently true! see below.

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:35:51

    https://flic.kr/p/g7qHrY https://flic.kr/p/g7qW4G https://flic.kr/p/g7qFWq all via Brian O’Neill

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:36:13

    In the photo, you can see that the pub has a basement and access beside the front door. No longer visible in Streetview

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 10:38:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Makes a useful beer cellar

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Jun/2023 12:00:22

    In this Monkey Morgan you can see that the former pub and its neighbour are three storeys at the back. away from the road.

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    Don Mosher Photography

    • 23/Jun/2023 16:44:03

    SPECIAL AWARD ★★★★★ 5 stars for your photo... Seen in:..Flickr Hall of Fame Flickr Hall of Fame (Post 1 – Award 1)

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 21:03:56

    https://flic.kr/p/g7oWAD Our photo colourised for a PC, dated c. 1903 via Brian O’Neill https://flic.kr/p/2oK8Cau compared with a modern AI colourised imaged

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 21:28:42

    https://flic.kr/p/2gn3uDW via Photographs and Images of Northern Ireland. The first two houses on the right

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 22:13:24

    Looks like a lovely spot to visit when doing the Antrim Coast tour

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 23:09:53

    Also catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000335725

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Jun/2023 23:35:26

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/47290943@N03/] A new date, pre 1895, although that contradicts the later date for the repaired bridge. Our photo appeared in ‘Around the Coast’ Published by Newnes 1895 www.thornburypump.co.uk/Coast1895/contents.php?thepage=207

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/Jun/2023 00:58:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/184711311@N04 Good find!

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2023 05:16:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/47290943@N03/ Here’s a copy of the original page 207 https://flic.kr/p/2oKdqLX The book contains several Lawrence photos, which will be useful for dating purposes