Muckinish Castle

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Where: Clare, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1885

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This photo of a castle near Ballyvaughan in Co. Clare hasn't gotten much attention, and we know next to nothing about Muckinish Castle, so see what you can do...

Date: Circa 1880s??

NLI Ref.: L_ROY_04090

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 28969
castle clare muckinish glassnegative munster ireland robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection shanmuckinish shanmuckinishcastle muckinishwest ballynacreggan ballynascregan shanmuicinis shanmuckinis shanemukenes seanmuicinis oldhogisland munsterset haunted fordescorner pigisland nationallibraryofireland 19thcentury

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    Niall McAuley

    • 22/Jan/2013 15:51:47

    Streetview. [edited]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 08/Feb/2013 09:57:34

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Hi Niall! Your Streetview is odd. It is the right place but the co-ordinates are in Limerick city, so I've slapped it down rather loosely in Muckinish...

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    DannyM8

    • 08/Feb/2013 12:05:49

    OSI 25 Shanmuckinish Castle (in ruins) on all versions of OSI

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    DannyM8

    • 08/Feb/2013 12:20:18

    From County Clare Library Autumnal Rambles about New Quay, County Clare About a mile and an half from Muckinish, on the right, is the castle of Ballynacreggan (Ballynascregan was called shan Muicinis, or Old Hog-Island. Uaithne Mor O'Lochlainn is said to have inhabited this castle about AD. 1720.

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    Yellabelly*

    • 08/Feb/2013 23:08:22

    Another view: http://www.flickr.com/photos/theyellabelly/3736466525/in/photostream/

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Feb/2013 04:32:10

    The ruins of Muckinish Castle (Turlough, the son of Owny, son of Mcloughlin O'Loughlin (of Burren) was in the beginning of the month of March in this year taken prisoner on Muicinis by Turlough, the son of Donnell O'Brien, and put to death at Ennis by Captain Brabazon at the ensuing summer sessions. Four masters ad an. 1584) stand on the verge of the sea, Pouldoody bay, not far from Mr. Ryan’s cottage. They present the appearance of long decay; one-half only of the castle has survived the shock which razed on the reminder to the foundation. The partially demolished arches and hanging vaults yet unfallen seem like a sad monumental mourner pausing in melancholy silence over the prostrate wreck of kindred walls and sidelong towers which lie around them. The desolate keep of Muckinish is now one of the many memorials in Ireland, pointing back to that ruthless puritanical spirit when scourged the land in days long gone by. Some of the fallen masses of masonry here strewed around are very large, and still exhibit entire the prostrate apertures once used for windows, chimneys, and portholes. Adjoining the castle are the remains of a more modern illicit malt kiln, contrived to serve the double purpose of drying malt and burning lime. The gently-rising hill of Muckinish will amply repay the autumnal visitor for the trouble of ascending it, by presenting him with an enchanting prospect, which embraces the ruined castle just described, relieved by rich corn fields, the sea, and Beha mountain in the distance. Historical and poetic Geeze, another death on here. eww

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Feb/2013 04:37:04

    www.geograph.ie/photo/954099 This seems a bit sad. Modern houses built right up to the property line...

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    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 10/Feb/2013 04:41:30

    Summary Description An area of clearance, possibly representing a former slipway, immediately adjacent the ruined medieval tower house Muckinish Castle (in ruins) (RMP CL003-00801-803). The coastline in the immediate area is dominated by outcropping limestone which extends along the shoreline out to sea. However on the west side of the castle, the outcropping limestone has been removed possibly for construction purposes (relating to the castle) but it also provides an area where it would be feasible to pull up a boat. The area measures approximately between 10m – 17m wide. Appraisal This is a striking location with the ruined medieval castle perched on a rock out-crop overlooking the sea. The castle although in ruinous condition displays wicker centring and good examples of carved masonry. The possible slipway is located immediately to the west with the castle standing guard above it is testimony to a past era. That's from the local heritage board, www.clarecoco.ie/planning/publications/architectural-cons... see page 43

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 10/Feb/2013 10:02:59

    Searches for "Shanmuckinish" (as it is marked on the old 25" map) produce more results. But I am getting confused which ruined castle is which - these two photos seem to be of a different building - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000323179/Image?lookfor=http:... catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000333909/Image?lookfor=http:... Unless it was partially "restored" c.1900 ?? And they built the square wall around, which looks newish in this photo ?? There is a photo in the Clare County Library with this "new" wall dated c.1910 - search for "Shanmuckinish Castle" at foto.clarelibrary.ie/fotoweb/

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 11/Feb/2013 11:27:21

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks for the location from the OSI.

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    cold measure

    • 27/Mar/2013 18:19:48

    Wow was only here recently, you can access the ruins, not much inside but still its an impressive structure.

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    dennis the thatcher

    • 01/Apr/2013 20:53:09

    We moved into the old white cottage overlooking Muckinish. This was the view from our front door, virtually unchanged in 1998. It's known locally as Forde's Corner since Fordes own the cottage. 'Muckinish' means 'Pig Island,' and indeed pigs were once kept there. Similar ruins can be found a mile along the shore towards Bellharbour. Our neighbour's brother drowned in the channel in the photo, in 1997 and the area to the left, where a woman and baby perished in an arson attack many years ago, is haunted. The screams can be heard day and night and we have heard them ourselves (definitely NOT foxes or sea birds - we're country folk) Our pony refused to stay in the barn adjoining the old burned out structure of which just the porch remains. He was terrified.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 02/Apr/2013 19:18:24

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thanks very much! Lovely to have the local name, and I've added it as a tag, plus thank you for the ghostie story. We haven't had very many of them.

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