A pub fit for a Prince!

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This Irish Tourism Association Collection is proving to be a veritable lucky dip of bizarre and interesting images with local stories and long forgotten legends. Gallagher's pub in Mohill, Co. Leitrim on the face of it is just another small Irish pub but apparently it was the birthplace of "The Prince of Cloone"! Who was Father Conefy and why was he known as "The Prince of Cloone"?

Photographer: Irish Tourism Association Photographer

Collection: Irish Tourism Association Photographic Collection

Date: 1942 - 1944

NLI Ref: NPA ITA 1383 (Box VII)

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4647
irishtourismassociation irishtourism nationallibraryofireland ireland bwfilmnegatives glassnegatives anunpublisheddatabaseisavailableatnpareadingroomcounter gallagherspub mainstreet mohill coleitrim connacht fatherconefy theprinceofcloone

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  • profile

    Black and White Fine Art

    • 14/Oct/2022 07:44:48

    Excellent!!

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:32:23

    Streetview - goo.gl/maps/ZEWsf4R5mH5Lh8xY7 ?? I think it is this green house because of the arrangement of the doors, windows, and chimneys. Not 100% sure, as the roof line is different. BUT the reflection in the window of the arch across the street fits, if you swivel streetview 180 degrees ...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:36:58

    Possible streetview? Zam Zam pizza

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:44:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I like the doors/windows on yours

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:47:00

    Not a million miles away: Northern Bank, Mohill, Co. Leitrim

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    Quite Adept

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:48:19

    He was Father Peter Conefrey. He seems to have quite the life story! As does the parish of Cloone. No specific reasons given for him being dubbed a prince, but it seems to be a title well earned. Fr. Conefrey In 1933 Fr. Peter Conefrey became pastor of Cloone, replacing Fr. Denniston who died the previous year. Refered to as the “Prince of Cloone.” He was born in Mohill but the family moved to Drumgowna where he received his primary education. He went on to study at St. Mel’s and finally Maynooth College. He developed an intense love for the Gaelic way of life. Music sessions were held at the parochial house and musicians from all over were invited to take part, incidentally the house was once owned by William West. This was the nucleus for the founding of the Cloone Ceili Band. On March 17th 1935 the band broadcast over Radio Eireann and again in 1937 from Ballinamore and finally in January of 1939. Fr. Conefrey worked unceasingly to revive the language and music of Ireland. At the great Cloone Feis in 1936 he gathered together musicians, dancers, storytellers and ceili bands from all over the county. Local spinners, weavers and knitters displayed their art to all attending, a tribute to Fr. Peter’s philosophy that households should be self-sufficient in all things. Cloone became the boxty capital of Ireland, something he was very proud of and it is still synonymous with the village even today. Fr. Conefrey died suddenly on the 24th April 1939. He was buried in a paupers coffin, by his own request at Farnaught graveyard. On a memorial now situated outside the Old Cemetery in Cloone there is the following inscription “This patriot priest throughout his life laboured unceasingly to reconstruct the Irish nation by promoting all aspects of Irish Culture, he equally worked for the economic betterment of rural Ireland by fostering the cottage industrial system in preference to the factory system”. A plaque on St Mary’s Church reads “by his charity, piety and zeal, he lives in the affections of his people”. From www.aughavascloone.ie/content.aspx?par=8&ContentId=28 He also has a Wiki page en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Conefrey

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:50:35

    I think [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] is correct, see NPA ITA 1382 (Box VII) for a view down the steeet, bank at left. The shopfront on Zam Zams is not a match, the roofline further down is uneven as shown.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Oct/2022 08:56:13

    DOWN WITH JAZZ ! Flickr is sometimes amazing! A poster via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/] (again!) - www.flickr.com/photos/infomatique/14300575216/ Down With Jazz! takes its name from Father Peter Conefrey’s Anti Jazz Movement from 1934, when the priest and Gaelic League fanatic led a herd of his parishoners down the main street of Mohill, Co Leitrim on New Year’s Day to protest at “music borrowed from the savages of Africa by the anti-God society, with the object of destroying morals and religion”.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Oct/2022 09:08:02

    In 1901, Peter Conefrey is 20 and studying at Maynooth. Birth record father James a shopkeeper in Mohill. Record of his death as Parish Priest in 1939. In 1911 he is a curate in East Athlone St. Mary's Parish, not mentioned in the bio pages above.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Oct/2022 09:09:29

    JIG NOT JAZZ ("Sun" Special) DUBLIN, Tuesday. [02/01/1934] Three thousand persons paraded at Mohill, County Leitrlm, with banners Inscribed: "Down with Jazz and out with Paganism." A public meeting was held subsequently, at which a letter from Mr. de Valera was read. In It he declared: "I hope the effort to restore national forms of dancing will be successful." Cardinal McRory wrote that he heartily wished success to the campaign against all-night Jazz.
    See - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/230510788?searchTerm=m...

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Oct/2022 11:05:56

    Shortly after his death the Catholic Standard punbished an article entitled 'Random Memories of Fr Peter Conefrey'. Most of the memories were of his barefoot activities:

    When be was young priest in Athlone he used walk barefooted the whole way to Lough Derg and back, in the traditional style. The Bishop got to hear about it, naturally, and Father Peter was commanded to confine his penitential exercises within the bounds of reason. For some years had to content himself with removing his boots at Pettlgo and climbing barefooted the mountain.
    Then his Bishop died and was succeeded by a former assistant priest on Holy Island. Father Peter instantly discarded his boots once more, but the years had told their tale; he could not dare the tramp all the way to Lough Derg and back. He used come to Dublin and walk from his hotel to the train barefooted, and remain barefooted until the end of the pilgrimage. He detested most the evening walk from Amiens Street down to Talbot Street up O'Connell Street and Parnell Square, to his hotel.

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    John A. Coffey

    • 14/Oct/2022 11:54:48

    Vincent Woods. When a young Fermanagh woman said she toiled with praties and fire . One day I`ll walk out of here And I`ll walk and I`ll walk Until I find a ship to America And when I get there I`ll set out again And keep walking until I meet a man Who never heard of boxty And I`ll marry him

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Oct/2022 13:13:13

    Peter Conefrey's parents' wedding in 1872. 2 reverend uncles assisting. Carlow Post - Saturday 27 April 1872Carlow Post - Saturday 27 April 1872

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    Bernard Healy

    • 14/Oct/2022 17:19:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner I was curious as to who the two bishops were. The first must have been Joseph Hoare who died in 1927. His sucessor was James Joseph MacNamee, a priest of the Clogher Diocese, within which is found Lough Derg.

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Oct/2022 19:21:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ The former 1902 Northern Bank