Why did the piggies cross the road?

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Where: Munster, Cork, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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They called it Rock Street but it could just as well have been Doggie street or even Piggie street? Perhaps "Bonham" street might have had a better ring to it? Regardless of what it is/was called Rock Street was rocking from our point of view with all the action taking place!

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_08857

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5086
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland rockstreet cloyne cocork munster sow bonhams dogs

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  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:06:19

    Pork in Cork !

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:09:06

    Reminds me of comics from the '70s - Pig Dogs!

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    Black and White Fine Art

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:13:40

    Amazing image!!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:13:56

    Pig and dog free reverse view, possibly a few years earlier as Walshe is not so frillyitus - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000331543 Edit - wrong! Same day.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:21:13

    Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/GGiXe5 #googleearth

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:22:22

    Streetview

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:24:56

    The Fountain is from 1879.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:25:36

    Great photo!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:28:59

    Mary I. Walsh and sons, no "e", in 1901. Margaret Sheehan, publican, 1901. From the reverse view: David Lawton and family, 1901. Rachel Heron is 71.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:37:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] At least TWO dogs and no comment??? Are you gone to the dogs on us?

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:44:00

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ lovely Dogs.

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 12/Oct/2022 08:57:35

    oh if I had not been a sleepy head I could have noted "dog" before dannym8 .... but this is a first for the seldom seen Irish ghost pig

  • profile

    Frank Fullard

    • 12/Oct/2022 09:24:30

    If it was circa 1920 it could have been to visit the birth place of Christy Ring!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2022 09:32:53

    The Daly shop may help with dates. Pretty sure in the reverse view that two signs in the window say: P. Daly Tailor and Mrs. P. Daly Dressmaker. There is no P. Daly in either census. (Edit: yes there is! see below). In 1901 William, 63, is a Draper, wife and daughter (both Johanna) are dressmakers. So before I check, I will guess William has a son P, a tailor, who takes over the shop after 1911. William died in 1926 aged 86, retired merchant and widower. Yes! Guys 1913 and 16 lists William, but also Patrick Daly, Tailor and Clothier. William was a Draper in Cloyne in 1873, for the birth of daughter daughter Johanna. And for the birth of Patrick in 1868. Here is a Patrick Daly Red Herring (see later comment), tailor, 45, born in County Cork, in the 1911 census. He is single and living in Cloghan.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 12/Oct/2022 09:38:16

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Our hero was foremost, he never showed fear. Eight medals he now has, a record unbroken, Of hurlers he now is surely the king. So now all together, one last rousing chorus, Three cheers for the maestro, the bold Christy Ring

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 12/Oct/2022 10:40:19

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ So 1879 - 1900?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 12/Oct/2022 10:55:08

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] EDIT: Patrick Daly is in the 1910 Guys too. And 1907! Ahhh! Spelling errors! Patrick is in Cloyne as a Master tailer in 1911: www.census.nationalarchives.ie/pages/1911/Cork/Cloyne/Chu... Married 8 years, so after October 1903

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Oct/2022 11:58:01

    Was it September? It was a year ago, September a day I well remember I was walking up and down in drunken pride when my knees began to flutter and I fell down in the gutter and a pig came by and lay down by my side As I lay there in the gutter thinking thoughts I could not utter I thought I heard a passing lady say, "You can tell a man who boozes by the company he chooses..." And with that, the pig got up and walked away

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 12/Oct/2022 12:53:20

    In November 1890 it was decided to flag the north side of Rock Street at a cost of 6s 6d per square yard. The material to be used was 'ferrumite'. I can't find ferrumite in the OED, and google returns references to a fictional weapon. Whatever it is, the pavement looks in good nick when the picture was taken. Edit - "Ferrumite was granite based paving with iron filings added to give improved wear" from a Portsmouth trade directory. The Ferrumite Company Ltd was active between 1879 and 1892.

  • profile

    lonewolf77357w

    • 12/Oct/2022 12:58:33

    Love this old country scene!😍

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 12/Oct/2022 15:33:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] See sources.nli.ie/Record/PS_UR_066291

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 12/Oct/2022 15:47:36

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] Ferrumite paving, the new wonder material, in the Irish Builder babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uiug.30112107847946&vi...

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 12/Oct/2022 22:40:23

    Hartys of Cloyne have our photo on Facebook, dated 1910, if that means anything www.facebook.com/HartysCloyne/photos/pb.100063700834494.-...

  • profile

    KenjiB_48

    • 12/Oct/2022 23:36:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Ah, now I see the context of "a well-metalled road" that puzzled me in The Wind in the Willows.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 13/Oct/2022 05:24:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] A metalled road has a level surface made of small pieces of stone; used especially of country roads and tracks. A new one on me. Mary

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 13/Oct/2022 09:20:01

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] From mentions in newspapers, its use declined in the first half of the 20th century. I thought there were some from 1946, but they were in the 'fifty years ago' column. Given that it was invented and manufactured in Portsmouth, and that Fareham is near Portsmouth, 'ferrumite' became an alternative word to describe people from Fareham (Farehamite -> Ferrumite) - twice used as a pseudonym by a letter-writers to local newspapers, and once when someone playing for Fareham was described as a "Ferrumite home from Derbyshire for the holidays"

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 13/Oct/2022 11:49:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ It contained iron, a ferrous metal, hence the name. It sounded like great stuff

  • profile

    KenjiB_48

    • 13/Oct/2022 15:09:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Thanks! On this side of the Pond one still has much to learn about the language!

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 13/Oct/2022 19:20:15

    That fine young fella is wearing Knickerbockers?

  • profile

    Aidrean S

    • 18/Oct/2022 12:42:41

    I read that pork was part of Irish life back in the early 20th century. It was found even in the smallest of farms. Families kept them and there were two kills every year, one in April and the other one in October. Back in n 1935, There was a government debate to introduce a Bill to regulate the manufacture of bacon, control the supply to bacon factories to conversion into bacon, finally to provide a method of fixing the price to be paid for bacon to producers. Bacon from Ireland was exported to England, Holland and Denmark. More can be found here: www.oireachtas.ie/en/debates/debate/seanad/1935-05-15/5/