Crimea

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Where: Leinster, County Wexford, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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We are off to Wexford to peruse the Crimean war memorial there. Florence Nightingale said of the war “Beggars in the streets of London were at that time leading the lives of princes, compared to the life of our soldiers in the Crimea when I arrived on the scene with thirty-six nurses”. Tennyson in his famous poem said “Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die”.

What a terrible time it must have been!

Photographer: Irish Tourism Association Photographer

Collection: Irish Tourism Association Photographic Collection

Date: 1943

NLI Ref: NPA ITA 1589 (Box VIII)

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4669
roundtower irishtourismassociation irishtourism nationallibraryofireland ireland bwfilmnegatives glassnegatives anunpublisheddatabaseisavailableatnpareadingroomcounter crimeanwarmemorial wexford countywexford leinster ferrycarrig

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  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 06:59:04

    From an account of the laying of the first stone, reported in the Illustrated London News on Saturday 17 October 1857 "The scene was most impressive. The hilltop where the proposed monument is to stand commands a vast and lovely view, and, erected, will be visible from far and near. His Excellency delivered to the people an animated, touching, and impressive speech, which showed that he felt the subject one calling forth his warmest sympathies and the full flow of his unfailing eloquence. The silver trowel used on the occasion, and presented by Sir Thomas Esmonde to the Lord Lieutenant, was a beautiful work of art, the production of Mr. West, the jeweller, of College-green."

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 06/Oct/2022 07:05:12

    Streetview N11 maps.app.goo.gl/B9gydnFowSXA4DCP9

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 07:13:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Who has the trowel today? https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Very impressive!

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    suckindeesel

    • 06/Oct/2022 07:34:39

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Is that the right tower

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 07:39:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think so, it must be?

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:07:07

    I cant find any report of completion or dedication, but in August 1859 large crowds flocked there, though not to honour the fallen men. Wexford People - Saturday 20 August 1859:

    A STUPID HOAX was played off on the inhabitants on Monday last. On the previous Saturday large bills, " a la dramatique," were posted up, setting forth that a Signor Duvalli would walk on a rope attached to the Crimean Monument, and extending over the river at Ferrycarrig, and fastened to the ancient Castle at the other side. He was also to perform wonderful feats in his perilous journey. The bill purported to be printed at Newcastle-on-Tyne. Much interest prevailed amongst all classes, at the prospect thus afforded them of seeing this wonderful performer, who was to rival the famed M. Blondin. Before half-past five o'clock, on Monday—the hour named for the exhibition—the road leading to Ferrycarrig was crowded with pedestrians and equestrians ; others whizzed along on jannting cars, and some were contented to have their joints nearly rent asunder in the jolting of donkeys cars. All seemed in most exuberant spirits. At the appointed hour there were no less than four or live thousand persons present—numbers of whom had come from Enniscorthy, and other districts, at a considerable distance. Some had taken their places on the surrounding heights, and in the mellow light of the setting sun had a most picturesque appearance.— Many an anxious eye was cast up to the monument, but no Duvalli appeared. Most of those present felt they had been "sold," and returned home crest-fallen, others "refreshed" themselves under the projecting rocks, with mug and glass in hand.
    The previous month the Morpeth Herald reported that Duvalli had "performed the somewhat dangerous and daring feat of walking along a rope stretched across the River Tyne" witnessed by a large number of people. In August 1860 Duvalli performed some tightrope walking at Malahide above the water. "The spectators, at least, were of no very select character" (Southern Reporter and Cork Commercial Courier - Thursday 30 August 1860) In Newent, Gloucestershire, he rolled a barrel along a rope above the town square and stopped halfway for a glass of beer, before filling his pipe and smoking it.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:07:24

    Flickr is sometimes ... In 2015 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/backpackphotography/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/backpackphotography/18656046633/

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:08:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Good question. I think it's mentioned in Archeology Ireland Vol. 35, No. 2 (Summer 2021) in an article about Memorial Towers, but I can't access it. I imagine the National Library of Ireland has a copy somewhere. The google tease says: "The elaborately decorated silver trowel used to lay the foundation stone was made by John. Donegan, one of Ireland's greatest jewellers at the time, and is ..."

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:24:47

    completed in 1858 according to the NIAH www.buildingsofireland.ie/ Includes this image of the commemorative plaque.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:25:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner You should have told me last week! The dreaded message - Main Reading room, Item stored offsite, Order 1 week in advance.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:34:20

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] While you're waiting, there's this interesting article about Victorian silver presentation trowels . [BTW I assume it's interesting. I haven't actually read it as such, but it's got lots of nice pictures.]

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:39:14

    More details - "...Out of the 250,000 British soldiers that were deployed to fight in the Crimea War, it is believed that over 30,000 of them were Irish. In his book Ireland and the Crimean War, historian David Murphy estimates that 7,000 Irish men lost their lives during the conflict. ... ... "... Interestingly, there is a 19th century “time capsule” buried beneath the foundations of the tower. The capsule was placed at the site on the 8th of October, 1857, by the Earl of Carlisle and Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, George Howard. The capsule consists of a heavy casket, which holds coins, a parchment scroll, a list of those who contributed to the tower’s construction and a newspaper from the day that the capsule was buried. ..." From - wexfordhub.com/history/crimea-war-monument/

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:48:12

    Perhaps in 1943 the Irish Tourism Association had secret plans to convert the tower into a rocket launcher against possible invaders.

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    suckindeesel

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:48:52

    It's just that there are 2 faux roundtowers along that stretch of road, the other one is in the nearby folk park on the right going towards Wexford Our one is on the left

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:49:28

    The silver trowel had this inscription (including OCR errors) Excellentissimo Principi, Georg: Guliel: Frederic: Comiti Carlioli, ord. Periscelidis Equiti, Hibernia.' Pro regi. primum deponent! lapidem in substructioucm monument! a comitatu Wexfordiaj erigeudi in honorem memoriamq : Wexfordiensiura, qui pro patria militantes in Crimea clarissimara subierunt mortem Banc truellam, D.D. Dom. Thomas Esmonde, Baronettus, consiliariusq: Reginae Secretior. mdccclvii. Obviously it would have been insulting to the readers of the Illustrated London News to provide a translation. I would gladly provide one, but if I don't go now I'll be late for my booster.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:50:07

    This Poole shot, POOLEWP 0474a, shows the full span of the proposed tightrope walk, as does this streetview

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:55:43

    Looks like 3 generations of bridge, the 1794 timber one, the 1912-14 concrete one and a modern one.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2022 08:58:59

    An STP from the previous century: STP_1540 Another STP: STP_1539 Looks like a toll bridge at the time?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 06/Oct/2022 09:09:03

    Some more bridge photos in this facebook thingy, says the latest bridge is from 1980.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 09:15:58

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I worder if there was a rope strung on the day https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner refers to? It would have been a bit of a giveaway to the masses assembled if there was none. There is a very "Lawrence" look to the Poole shot you referred to, is that his pony and trap?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 09:22:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner We can wait for the translation until you get back from your booster appointment. Hope you are feeling well post injection.

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    CHG PRO PHOTOGRAPHY incorporating the APL archives

    • 06/Oct/2022 09:41:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I can remember the current bridge being built in the early 1980’s, just before that the previous bridge had been restricted to one way traffic at a time due to weights of modern cars being too heavy for the bridge! Later on during the 1990’s the cure bypass was constructed.

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 10:52:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The report in the Wexford Constitution has the answer (I think the writer was paid by the word):

    ... while the stalwart arms of the boats* crews propelled their tiny crafts in many a meandering course over the sparkling waters, from which even the salmon were leaping on look-out, in vain endeavour to catch a view of the fine cord which was to hang like vapour between the earth and sky. And like veritable vapour they found the whole affair, for both cord and gymnast were missing. The Crimean monument stood unmolested, smiling as it were at the terrible take-in, while its venerable brother on the other side the water, frowned in grim majesty upon the graceless intruders who surrounded it ...

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    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 11:11:05

    More on Signor Nicolo Duvalli -a short man of 55 summers, bearing traces of poverty and for his performance at Newcastle he was neatly attired in white stockings, short blue trowsers sic, and red-bodied shirt, with a fancy ligature round his head (word for word in scores of newspaper reports of his Newcastle feat). No wonder thousands turned up to see him. Mind you, there was nothing on TV that evening. For his appearances at the Queens Royal Theatre in 1860 he was billed as "Champion Ascensionist of the World".

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 13:41:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley The Irish Times mentions Signor Nicolo Duvalli five times The report on the event at Newcastle previously mentioned (August 1859) Malahide where he ascended an elevated rope over the Estuary in August 1860 Rotundo Gardens Dublin cancelled because someone broke his balance stick in July 1860 Queens Theatre, where he walked on an inclined rope from the stage to the back of the gallery in June 1860 Kingstown Dublin, where after torrents of rain his attempt at the ascent of the electric wire was postponed in August 1860

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 06/Oct/2022 14:41:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland He was mentioned widely in the press in late May 1892, when the train he was travelling in collided with another train. He is described as a "performer on the high wire and a pyrotechnist". With him was his wife, "a singer well-known in music-halls as the 'Spanish Nightingale'". They were travelling from a six-week engagement in Grimsby to a performance in Swindon. From Signor Duvalli's account they were near Birmingham and he was chatting to his wife when there was a crash like thunder, a fearful grinding sound, and the carriage began to pitchviolently. His wife, with her back to the engine, was thrown across the compartment into his arms. He put one arm around her and grabbed the bar of the luggage rack with the other to steady himself, but the bar broke and they were thrown violently across the carriage. He didn't know what happened next, but shortly afterwards found himself lying on the track with his wife helpless beside him. They were taken to a hospital in Birmingham and apart from shock and a bruised knee, were not seriously injured (unlike the two people and horse which died ). He found it difficult to describe the terror he had experienced. Either the much-quoted age of 55 in 1859 is incorrect, or he was still performing on the high wire at the age of 88. I know what I think. That's quite a lot of information today about someone with no connection to the day's picture and never went there (as 4000 people could testify). Opera singer Dame Adelina Patti was also known as the Spanish Nightingale. So it would seem there was one in the music hall and another in the opera house.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 06/Oct/2022 15:12:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Agreed, enough about him!