Curtains of water, gently falling down

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Leinster, South Dublin, Ireland

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
We've been to the Dodder before but not, I think, to this particular section? The weir at Rathfarnham looking magnificent with curtains of water gently falling down as the river makes it's way to Dublin Bay and the sea. Once upon a time I did kayaking and when there was a lot of rain there would be great excitement in that community as the Dodder would be suitable for a run. It didn't often happen but when it did it was great white water stuff!

Photographer: Unknown

Collection: Eason Photographic Collection

Date: between 1900-1939

NLI Ref: EAS_1902

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4770
eason easonson easoncollection easonphotographiccollection glassnegative 20thcentury nationallibraryofireland theweir rathfarnham dublin countydublin leinster

Add Tags
  • profile

    Marin Stanišić Photography

    • 20/Sep/2022 07:57:44

    SPECIAL AWARD ★★★★★ 5 stars for your photo... Seen in:..Flickr Hall of Fame Flickr Hall of Fame (Post 1 – Award 1)

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:17:02

    [https://flic.kr/p/2a7t5xL] via Pat Dempsey Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/AFiHeA #googleearth

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:23:03

    If the wall was part of Rathfarnham Castle it was a big estate!

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:29:25

    Oooo! Mr French / Lawrence was there too (before 1914). Spot the Differences - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000327325 Hint - bigger greenhouse ...

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:32:17

    Lower Dodder Road Streetview

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:44:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ The estate was bordered by the Dodder as far as Ely’s Gate https://flic.kr/p/aDzUKi via Eyair

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:47:52

    There is an marooned entrance gate, it would be a 100m behind the photographer. The gate/lodge was the main entrance to the Rathfarnham Demesne while travelling from the City.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 08:59:34

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland The demesne was about 1.5 km square. A lot of it is now the Castle Golf club.

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 20/Sep/2022 09:11:40

    The weir supplied a head of water to run a, long since gone, sawmill on Orwell Road.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 09:23:54

    Eyeballing the houses on Lower Dodder Road, I'll guess 1950 or so, no help with dating.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 20/Sep/2022 09:27:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ “In commemoration of regaining ownership, the Loftus family constructed another entrance for the castle in the form of a Roman Triumphal Arch. The arch can still be viewed from nearby Dodder Park Road.” The wall seen in our photo formed the northern boundary of the estate, along the banks of the Dodder. The eastern limit of the estate was where Hazelbrook Dairies was. The southern limit was what is now Nutgrove Ave.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 09:29:37

    NIAH no help. telling us the weir is from 1800 or so. The house on the right is River Dale, still standing, and from before the date range.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 09:36:58

    The man lying bottom right wearing a Boater suggests the early part of the date range to me.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 20/Sep/2022 10:18:47

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ thank you.

  • profile

    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 20/Sep/2022 10:31:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] - goo.gl/maps/A9WgoxyVHQEkCNLY6 🐶

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 10:57:39

    EAS_1903 is Rathfarnham bridge, just visible here upstream, but undateable.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 11:01:22

    EAS_1904 includes a 1921 building at nearby Loreto Abbey, looking fresh.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 11:32:56

    EAS_1905 Rathfarnham church from 1875, EAS_1906 is Grange Golf club (not a million miles away) from mid-late thirties:

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 11:42:52

    Ah, EAS_1907 bursts my bubble - it is the same church as EAS_1905, but decades earlier from the tree growth. These Easons are sorted together because Rathfarnham, not because taken at the same date.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 11:44:36

    And then we have Rathfarnham village, 1910ish: Post Card brings van to your door

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Sep/2022 12:12:37

    For completeness, EAS_1900 and 1901 are the church on Beechwood Avenue in Ranelagh dating from 1914. The doorway is missing a statue which a HAGS suggests was added in the early 1920s. The church does not yet have railings, and the temporary wooden/tin chapel which preceded it is still standing. Close to the 1914 opening I think.

  • profile

    DannyM8

    • 20/Sep/2022 12:29:01

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ a nice one too!!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 20/Sep/2022 12:57:30

    Dramatic scenes as the Dodder overflowed causing a family to abandon their cottage, (while kayakers were no doubt licking their lips) reported in the Daily News (London) on Thursday 02 October 1856. The last sentence doesn't quite fit in with the rest of the report.

    The tremendous floods in the river Dodder have done much damage to the walls and land at each side of it. The water rose so high at the weir below Rathfarnham-bridge as to overflow the mill pond and drive a massive wall in upon the river that completely flooded the opposite banks. The weir still lower down, and near the road leading to Rathgar, is also flooded, and the little cottage adjoining it only escaped being carried away by the flood. The inmates were aroused out of their beds by the roar of a winds and waters, and were obliged to fly for their lives, at least fly to avoid a dangerous inundation. The water had rushed into the garden in front of the cottage, and the poor people were at a late hour of the night compelled to drag their children through it and put up with the best accommodation for them and themselves which the neighbourhood could afford. The waterfalls at both weirs are highly picturesque, and worth an hour's ramble.

  • profile

    dave.ryan.media

    • 26/Sep/2022 19:50:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Thats not a streetview link.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 03/Oct/2022 07:57:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/daveryanphoto Thanks, edited now.

  • profile

    Aidrean S

    • 07/Oct/2022 17:50:06

    The Dodder plays a considerable role in Dublin Moving East (Wordwell, €35) by Michael Branagan. Concentrating on the period from 1708 to 1844, the book is filled with remarkable illustrations. During that period the city more than doubled in size and the author discusses what triggered the expansion eastwards. The turbulent river was vital to the capital, providing water and power from Templeogue and Rathfarnham down to the sea, and the walling in of the Dodder helped with flooding and tidying up the area for port activities. www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/local-history-on-the-tra...