Ballitore Mills.

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Where: Leinster, Co Kildare, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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You could have made a fortune or two in Ireland during the lockdown periods if you owned a good flour mill, everybody in the Country was baking scones, brown bread, soda bread, sourdough bread, French baguettes, ciabatta, flat breads etc. By the looks of this photo there was not much milling going on then, never mind the 2020's.
Please feel free to post your best bread recipe or to tell us of some of your bread baking disasters?

Photographer: Irish Tourism Association Photographer

Collection: Irish Tourism Association Photographic Collection

Date: 1942 - 1944

NLI Ref: NPA ITA 1144 (Box VI)

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4939
irishtourismassociation irishtourism nationallibraryofireland ireland bwfilmnegatives glassnegatives anunpublisheddatabaseisavailableatnpareadingroomcounter kildare cokildare leinster ballitore ballitoremills

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  • profile

    Dún Laoghaire Micheál

    • 14/Sep/2022 09:27:51

    Good outline of history here - irelandinruins.blogspot.com/2021/05/ballitore-mill-co-kil...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2022 09:51:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] thank you.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:00:16

    Streetview from a similar angle(?). A great deal more rubble at t'mill since 1944 - goo.gl/maps/YeCRS2LYPFXfMjaZ6

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:06:25

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia I never understood why these mills went bust? It was in a good location and had free power.

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:07:07

    No relevance to mills or baking, but Google told me yesterday was 5 years since the opening of the "Photo Detectives" exhibition, when I made the rather rash but fully worthwhile decision to accept the invitation and attend the opening, where I had the pleasure of meeting, amongst others*, Carol (of course), Bernard Healy, derangedlemur and many others*, including a selection from Dublin's who's who. Here's Monkey Morgan style photo I took that day. Dublin (I don't know if it'll appear as I don't have access to my usual setup) * apologies to those I've left out.

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    Foxglove

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:32:17

    my favourite way of making bread is the two day poolish method. Day 1 make a 50/50 mix of flour and water so that it's like a pancake mix. Add a very small amount of dried yeast, a pinch would be generous and leave to ferment overnight. In the morning add the same volume of flour and a teaspoon of yeast. Give it all a pull/ stretch and knead three or four times for a few minutes over the period of an hour. Then let it rise and then bake. Poolish is a French method and a slightly stiffer first batter is called Bigga in Italy. There was a famous mill in Bruree, apparently the biggest in Ireland or maybe the biggest waterwheel....

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:48:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove Sounds great, I will give it a try, Mary

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2022 10:50:46

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Oh yes, we remember it fondly. Here is an Album of the 26 photos we featured in the exhibition. Photo Detectives Exhibition album

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Sep/2022 11:05:29

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! Similar angle in 2012 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonestown_pic/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonestown_pic/7574800088/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Sep/2022 11:20:35

    At the NIAH

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Sep/2022 11:24:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] So it was in use for just 40 years, and has been out of use for 150!

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 14/Sep/2022 11:34:47

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Short answer to why Irish mills went bust: cheaper imports from France and America. 1851 - Long answer from Hansard - api.parliament.uk/historic-hansard/commons/1851/jul/15/mi... And 1930 - British flour companies bought Irish mills to close them down - www.oireachtas.ie/ga/debates/debate/seanad/1930-11-26/4/

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Sep/2022 12:27:56

    Similar view Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/vqGWaj #googleearth

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Sep/2022 12:39:43

    Just one of two mills near Ballitore on the River Greese. This one is south of the town and is only shown & identified on the early 6”, as a flour mill. The other, a corn mill, is north of the town and in a much better state of preservation. Was there a Quaker connection?

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    John Spooner

    • 14/Sep/2022 13:03:04

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, if the Inverness Courier - Thursday 11 October 1855 is to be believed. It contained "a letter from a young man, a native of the North of Scotland, now resident at Ballitore, Ireland"

    The greater number of people in business in this part of Ireland are Quakers: my employers are so. All the largest mills are in the hands of Quakers ; and flour mills in Ireland are like what cotton mills are in Scotland and England. We work twelve pair of stones, and many of them work from twenty to thirty pair of mill-stones.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 14/Sep/2022 13:38:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Yes, a quote from the link provided by https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]: The ruins are the remains of a once productive flour mill founded in 1834 by George Shackleton (1785-1871) who was the grand uncle of Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton. The Shackleton's were part of the local Quaker community that began with the founding of the village of Ballitore by Quakers from Yorkshire. The first two immigrants John Bancroft and Abel Strettel began farming the area in 1685.

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Sep/2022 16:22:15

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] The Quaker Meeting House in Ballitore, one of several surviving local Quaker buildings. maps.app.goo.gl/uL1XbQYgs5Vb72pY7?g_st=ic quakers-in-ireland.ie/quakermeetings/leinster/ballitore/ I think it was the only purpose built Quaker town in Ireland.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 14/Sep/2022 18:10:59

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia That answers my question perfectly. Thank you.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 14/Sep/2022 19:38:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ It was a pleasure to meet you.

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    suckindeesel

    • 14/Sep/2022 22:42:51

    https://flic.kr/p/2dbEiWh Enjoying some oatmeal from the mill

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    Carol Maddock

    • 16/Sep/2022 11:11:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner It was a great day. I couldn't believe that you had come from another country for an exhibition launch! You immediately gained legendary status in Library Towers. Future generations of staff will ask in hushed tones: "But did he really cycle to his nearest airport?" :)

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    John Spooner

    • 16/Sep/2022 15:21:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] And older wiser generations will say "What's that? Speak up! ... No, he only rode his bike to the railway station, then got the train to Gatwick. Now get on with your work!" The hardest thing was finding suitable apparel for such an auspicious occasion. It's not every day you meet a head of state (or the wife of one). After I'd drawn a blank in my wardrobe and the numerous charity shops in the locality, my neighbour helped me out by lending me a green tweedy* jacket - or rather his wife lent it to me on his behalf. * I doubt it was really tweed, but probably looked convincing from a distance.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 16/Sep/2022 15:58:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner It did look convincing, though sadly lacking leather elbow patches...