All hands on deck at Achill Railway station.

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Our photographers are reversing roles this week. Yesterday we had Mr. O'Dea with the church that was not in Recess who normally captured railway related subjects. Today we have a fine Imperial image from the lens of Mr. French and he has captured a railway station and cast! Achill Railway Station in County Mayo with the station staff and excited passengers adorn this lovely image giving it the real holiday feeling.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_IMP_3351

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5645
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland achillrailwaystation achillisland imperialplateglassnegative countymayo connacht locomotive steamtrain platform stationmaster passengers permanentway compartmentedcarriages

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  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2022 07:49:33

    Well, 1895 onwards. Loco looks like the ‘Bat’, Class E no. 110, from 1891 Edit: This loco ended its days on the Waterford to Tramore line up to 1961. In service for 70 years. They don’t make them like that anymore!

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:12:36

    Station opened 1895. Looks very fresh here, lime on the red brick, zero weeds in the track bed.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:19:12

    In 1901, Robert John Boag was stationmaster, but he was only 27. I think the gent in the bowler is master here and twice that age. Or maybe the man next to him in the fanciest uniform is Boag, and Mr. Bowler Hat is a boss from the railway company?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:29:52

    There are several pics. In L_IMP_3526 there is a torn poster advertising FAIRS AUGUST, and a noticeboard marked GLASGOW AND SOUTH WESTERN RAILWAY??

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:32:11

    L_IMP_3528 still has neat stacks of red bricks and roof tiles from construction of the station. {EDIT see below, that is one is Clifden, not Achill]

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:36:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley L_IMP_3528 seems to say CLIFDEN on the platform sign. Mistitled ??

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Sep/2022 08:45:46

    Flickr is sometimes amazing. In 2004 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/37750218645/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Sep/2022 09:11:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia You are correct, that is Clifden station mislabelled, also built in 1895.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Sep/2022 10:25:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley That was baffling me too.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 01/Sep/2022 10:33:36

    Yikes! The Achill Tragedies ... "These disasters had been prophesied in the 17th century by Brian Rua Ó Ceabháin from Inver in Erris, who was granted knowledge of the future after showing great kindness to a poor widow. He had foretold of the coming of the railway to Achill, describing carriages on iron wheels with smoke and fire. He prophesied that the first and the last trains to the island would carry home the dead. ..." From - www.askaboutireland.ie/reading-room/environment-geography... Also - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Rua_U%27Cearbhain

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Sep/2022 11:14:21

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] The prophecy was seen to have been fulfilled when the 32 young victims of a drowning tragedy were returned to Achill on a special train in 1894. This was a year before the commencement of passenger services and could be seen as the ‘first’ train. flic.kr/p/2m9kNbQ The last train to Achill, some years after its official closure also carried the bodies of another tragedy back to Achill, the 1937 Kirkintiiioch fire. Thus fulfilling the second part of Red Rua’s prophecy

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 01/Sep/2022 13:21:56

    Tiocfaidh an lá nuair a thabharfaidh carráiste tine ar rothai íarainn bás. - BROC í Beaumont (2005). Assuming no misprints and transcription errors! (Beaumont ,2005,p52) also has the image. On P..33 he says Achill station opened on 13 May 1895 and on P.91 says the E-Class were replaced by 4-4-0 type locomotives with six-coupled (0-6-0) types rosie'd (CRS banned) from 1920. The reason 0-6-0's were banned is essentially due to the fact is that two sets of 3 wheels that are essentially close to being rigid in a straight line don't do as well on a curved piece of track compared to say a 4-4-0 which only has to have two times two set of two wheels in a straight line which causes a lot less pressure and far lower risk of derailment or track movement..

  • profile

    Aidrean S

    • 08/Sep/2022 13:05:37

    Achill has a long history of human settlement and there is evidence that Achill was inhabited as many as 5,000 years ago. Megalithic tombs and promontory forts testifying to this can be seen at Slievemore, along the Atlantic Drive and on Achill Beg Island.

  • profile

    jh428

    • 30/Sep/2022 23:31:19

    The "first and last trains carried the dead" is a local legend of comparatively modern origin. Firstly, the prophecy did not mention trains at all, let alone the forst and last of anything. It said "The time will come when fire carriages will bring death". While the first train did indeed carry the dead, several months before the line opened in 1895 (it was already open as far as Newport by some months, the last one certainly didn't. The line closed on 30th September 1937 (85 years ago this very evening), but the "coffin train" had run over the line two weeks earlier - the fire disaster was mid-September. Numerous local references toi the line being "specially opened" to carry the dead are incorrect, as anyone who checks the dates can see - despite Enda Kenny repeating this tale on his cycleway programme on national TV. The last public trains were 30th September. The ACTUAL last train was the following day, and this consisted of a locomotive leaving Wesport to go out to Achill to collect empty wagons from the siding there.