Coastline, Railway line and curved lines in Recess

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Where: Connaught, Galway, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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An interesting shot from the Lawrence Collection today with the Recess Hotel, in Recess, Co. Galway the subject matter. Interesting to see a railway line running so close to the sea effectively providing a breakwater for the nearby road where Jaunty and his friend await the master and his camera.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_07355

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5414
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland recesshotel recess connemara cogalway connacht jauntingcar jaunty railwayline road hills

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  • profile

    Domhnallcos

    • 26/Aug/2022 07:44:01

    The line opened on 1 July 1895 and was closed on 29 April 1935. It's not the sea, it's Glendollagh lough.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Aug/2022 07:51:43

    Previous visit with Mr Eason - hotel built 1898 - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/32096153578/in/photostream/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 08:35:13

    I see construction in the background - is that the station going up? The station opened on 01.07.1896 1897 Nature:'The Recess hotel is now far advanced. The hotel in the Eason has a visible 1898 in the brickwork.

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    Black and White Fine Art

    • 26/Aug/2022 08:44:11

    Excellent!!

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 08:57:38

    From wikipedia: The Railway built an hotel at the station at Recess.[7], with a one platform halt specifically for the hotel in 1902 some 2 miles (3.2 km) east of the main Recess station towards Maam Cross and Galway. So I think this is between the 1898 hotel opening and the 1902 Hotel platform. Definitely before this 1906 image at wikipedia

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 09:26:09

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ The halt closed with the destruction of the hotel by fire. I wonder when that happened?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 09:31:58

    From comments on the Eason above: in August 1922 when the hotel was burnt to the ground by the Republicans in the Civil War to prevent the Free-State Army from using it as a billet

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Aug/2022 09:46:21

    THIS HAPPENED HERE in 1901 !! ... ... As we were returning to the hotel, a white automobile approached us at high speed, and we could not but admire the dexterous way in which our driver got out of difficulty; for the horse had become panic-stricken and was about to plunge down the embankment along which we were driving. He jumped from his seat, whipped off his coat, and wrapped it round the horse's head. The animal was so much surprised at the novelty of the proceeding and the sudden loss of his sight that he forgot all about the "white ghost" till it had safely passed us. The chauffeur shouted back, "Great work; that's a new patent!" ... From the wonderful 1902 book 'On an Irish Jaunting-Car Through Donegal and Connemara' by S. G. Bayne. Page 93. archive.org/details/onirishjauntingc00bayn/page/93/mode/1...

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Aug/2022 09:47:54

    There was already a hotel ("Taggarts") on the site before the railway came, advertising as early as 1853 (and probably earlier). The Irish Independent noted on Wednesday 03 February 1897 "we are glad to observe that the company have purchased the Recess Hotel, which is about to be remodelled and improved." although how far this was along the scale between "a-lick-of-paint" and "demolish-and-rebuild" isn't made clear. The work was "all but finished" in February 1898, and in late May the hotel was being heavily advertised by the railway company in the Dublin press. An early pair of guests were announced in the Pall Mall Gazette of Wednesday 13 July 1898: " Lord Talbot de Malahide and his son have left Malahide Castle for the Recess Hotel, Connemara".

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 09:57:58

    “On 13 October (1922), Republicans burned down the Recess Hotel and nearby Glendalough House to prevent the National troops from using them as billets.” - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifden

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Aug/2022 10:06:32

    Mr French / Lawrence really liked revisiting. See how the vegetation has grown - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316471

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Aug/2022 10:14:33

    Sometimes Flickr tickles your funnybone. Not far away, via https://www.flickr.com/photos/mazurka666/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/mazurka666/3012965990/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 10:37:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Those bus tour shots are after 1911.

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Aug/2022 11:09:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Not that it matters much, but I think the wikipedia date for the burning of the hotel is wrong. According to numerous press reports on Monday 9th October, it took place "in the early hours of Saturday", which would make it Saturday 7th October. The only mention I can find of the burning of Glendalough House is 2 lines in the Aberdeen Press and Journal of 18th October, which doesn't specify a date, just "last week", so that could have been the 13th.

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    Günter Hentschel

    • 26/Aug/2022 11:16:26

    SPECIAL AWARD ★★★★★ 5 stars for your photo... Seen in:..Flickr Hall of Fame Flickr Hall of Fame (Post 1 – Award 1)

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 26/Aug/2022 12:28:00

    The hotel had a dark room for photographers. No wonder Mr French liked it. ... The pretty miniature railway station of Recess itself predisposes the traveller on arrival to like the place. It is, as the board announces., merely the arrival and departure platform for hotel visitors. The hotel almost adjoins the platform, a road deeply shadowed with trees alone intervening. No other houses are near. It belongs to the railway company, and is undoubtedly comfortable and homelike, and the views of Lough Glendalough from the windows, seen in glimpses through leafy frames, are most attractive. The hotel is just at the head of the lough, which is a mile and a half long, and stands in a pleasant garden of shrubs, flower-beds, and greenest of green lawns, with ample trees around to afford shade. The house is modern, with large rooms, and it has every comfort and convenience, including electric light made on the premises, and a dark room for photographers. Every first-class hotel in these days should have a properly-equipped dark room, but many hotels even of quite modern construction are devoid of this attraction, even necessity, for travelling photographers. ... From - 'Connemara and the neighbouring spots of beauty and interest...' by John Harris Stone, Health Resort Publishing Co., London 1906 archive.org/details/connemaraneighbo00stoniala/page/122/m...

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 12:50:29

    Recess and its fishing www.castlegar-galway.org/galway-clifden-railway-line#rece... Tennis and croquet on the lawn catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000316394 Edit: now called the Midland Great Western Hotel by Lawrence

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 12:51:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ What year were those press reports?

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 13:13:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, looks like the halt is still under construction, so pre 1902. Railscot seem somewhat contradictory in its dates

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 13:18:35

    Nothing to see here Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/zYcGY2 #googleearth

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Aug/2022 13:51:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] 1922. I did get a bit confused when looking for reports of the burning of Glendalough House when I found that the following month Glendalough House was where Erskine Childers was arrested. A different Glendalough House on the other side of the country, of course. D'Oh! PS I also tried all the variations of Glendalough/Glendallagh etc I could think of, without success

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    John Spooner

    • 26/Aug/2022 14:32:21

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I couldn't help noticing that google earth says that Recess Station is "temporarily closed" Google earth - Recess Station Edit: but it's not the same station as the one which served the hotel "The Railway built an hotel at the station at Recess, with a one platform halt specifically for the hotel in 1902 some 2 miles (3.2 km) east of the main Recess station towards Maam Cross and Galway." (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recess_railway_station)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 15:38:25

    The 1830s 6" map shows a small Police Station on the later site of the Hotel.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 26/Aug/2022 15:42:48

    Google books has this 1853 guide. In it Mr. Taggart is the tenant running the Hotel on this spot, and Alderman Andrews of Dublin is the proprietor and landlord.

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 16:35:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Perhaps they’re referring to Kylemore Abbey as being temporarily closed?, it’s another photo in the same folder. I don’t think the station will reopen anytime soon!

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 16:56:23

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Try Glendollagh House, as per the lake and map

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    O Mac

    • 26/Aug/2022 17:23:57

    There's few photographs of Glendollagh house in the Chatham Library's Galway Album taken 1872ish... flic.kr/p/eLJoyF flic.kr/p/eLVLeY flic.kr/p/eLVLLy flic.kr/p/eLJonK

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    suckindeesel

    • 26/Aug/2022 17:25:47

    “then in 1898 a halt platform was created at Recess to service an hotel that MGWR owned.” According to ‘Rail through Connemara’ www.platform5.com/Catalogue/Overseas-Railways/Rails-Throu... This date differs to that quoted here www.railscot.co.uk/Ireland/Irish_railways.pdf ‘Recess Hotel Platform *??.06.1896 - 08.10.1922’ which a further note states ‘Recess Hotel Platform Opened to public traffic in 1902, closed when hotel destroyed by fire.’ So is there a different opening date for hotel guests than for the general public?

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    Deirge (Del)

    • 27/Aug/2022 00:15:54

    The English Wikipedia article(s) were triggered by the news of the preservation/conservation work being done at Maam Cross. See www.connemararailway.ie/. In regards of the totality of the branch line that originated from from this article on the German Wikipedia: de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connemara_Railway. The English Wikipedia articles pre-dated the publication of Beaumont's "Rails through Connemara book" by a small margin and have not leveraged that work at all or at least not to any great extent. The 1902 open date for the Recess Hotel Platform comes from Ernie Shepherd's 1994 book "The Midland Great Western Railway of Ireland" Appendix B p.119. To a degree Beaumont has likely done deep research into this specific line and would have obviously had access to Shepherd so I assume that information (on P.52) would be more accurate. Both claims might be made on Wikidata www.wikidata.org/wiki/Q107132956 but as the Wikipedia article covers both the main Recess Station and the Hotel Platform this is not as simple as if might seem. I am currently not permitted to edit the English Wikipedia but can possibly make the relevant changes to wikidata or maybe even on Vicipéid, Suggest anyone wanting to follow this up contacts the IRRS archivist. Slán.

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 27/Aug/2022 12:22:08

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Thanks for that comprehensive comment. Railscot quotes 1902 opening date for ‘public’ traffic, a date which agrees with Shepherd, both are reliable sources. However, whatever the correct date is, it’s possible that the waiting room shown under construction in our photo came later. This was the case with both Maam Cross and Ballynahinch stations where the buildings were finished after the line opening. The only real evidence we have is that 1906 photo showing the completed station. Edit: Photo could be anywhere between 1895, line built, and 1906 photo. However, I’d go with 1902 as most likely date.

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    silverio10

    • 27/Aug/2022 20:11:26

    Buenas fotos antiguas .