“Church exterior, in an unknown location” = St. Mary’s Cathedral, Killarney

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Where: Munster, Co Kerry, Ireland

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When: 01 January 1910

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We haven't had an “unknown” O’Connor for a while, so let’s see what you make of this church. No sticky buns though, sorry. Morning Mary hid the key to the petty cash box when she went off on her holliers...

Photographer: Fergus O’Connor

Collection: Fergus O’Connor Collection

Date: 1900-1920

NLI Ref: OCO 248

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5022
fergusoconnor fergusoconnorcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland church stmaryscathedral killarney kerry munster romancatholic cathedral locationidentified coign

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 19/Jul/2022 08:05:27

    Found via Google Lens and Google Images, which ignored the nave being four bays/windows longer. See "design for the extension of the nave and completion of the tower"- catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000317703

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 08:06:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, spot on. St. Mary’s Cathedral, Killarney. Spire completed 1907

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 08:12:54

    https://flic.kr/p/zzppq2 via Murphman61 St. Mary’s designed by Pugin, said to be inspired by Ardfert

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:11:30

    Via Trove from 1846 - "... Whilst Valentia slate from Kerry is used in the Houses of Parliament for roofing, the proprietors of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Killarney, within forty miles of Valentia, are importing slate from Wales, a distance of six hundred miles ..." See - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/12901245?searchTerm=ca...

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:24:51

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Money no object, and within living memory of the Famine

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:38:44

    And the wholly imaginary sticky buns go to the amazing https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia/! Off to sound the Location Identified COOEE in his honour...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:48:31

    The NIAH dates the extension to 1908-1912

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:49:54

    The DIA says First coign of extension of nave and aisles and of completion of tower and spire laid 15 Nov 1908.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Jul/2022 09:50:48

    COIGN is my new word for today: a projecting corner or angle of a wall.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 19/Jul/2022 10:22:36

    A couple of priests were fund raising in Australia 1909/1910 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/75305268 "... The appeal to Australia is for £5000, which is only £1000 more than the amount found by the parishes of the diocese, and Father O'Connor was able to testify to the kindness and generosity with which he has everywhere been met. ..."

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    Bernard Healy

    • 19/Jul/2022 11:33:56

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ It was begun before the famine, during the famine what was already built was used as a hospital & the grounds of tbt cathedral were used as a burial ground.

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 11:59:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Mark 10:21-22 Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said, "You lack one thing; go, sell what you own, and give the money to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me." When he heard this, he was shocked and went away grieving, for he had many possessions.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 19/Jul/2022 12:18:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I’m not sure what point you’re trying to make - the Cathedral & the various schools, convents & other buildings on the surrounding land (given by Lord Kenmare) were & are at the service of the poor. The point I’m making is that when the partially-completed building was needed as a hospital, it was used as a hospital. When that need passed, it was completed as a house of worship, for the benefit of the entire Catholic population. It might not make sense to you, but to the people of the time, that was important.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Jul/2022 15:15:05

    Is it odd that the finished building is asymmetrical? The side chapel/porches on each side are in different positions...

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 16:20:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I’ve seen the equivalent in many third world Arab s-holes, where the only decent building is the local mosque. Same here, local slate wasn’t good enough, so had to be imported from Wales. This within living memory of the Famine, when many were still living in mud cabins. However, the poor parishioners still had to foot the bill. “Yet stop I did: in fact I often do, And always end much at a loss like this, Wondering what to look for; wondering, too, When churches fall completely out of use What we shall turn them into, if we shall keep A few cathedrals chronically on show, Their parchment, plate, and pyx in locked cases, And let the rest rent-free to rain and sheep. Shall we avoid them as unlucky places?” - Phillip Larkin

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    suckindeesel

    • 19/Jul/2022 16:30:18

    Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/ptSyHy #googleearth

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    Bernard Healy

    • 19/Jul/2022 16:58:04

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I'm not sure if I'm answering your question, but the different chapels/porches have different functions. The chapel at the south-west was the Cathedral's mortuary chapel. This is where bodies would be received prior to funerals. You'll see that it has its own entrance door. I think it was added on during the early 20th century extensions. The chapel protruding to the west of the north trancept was the Cathedral baptistry. That would have been seen as a more essential feature of the church than the mortuary chapel and is visible in our pre-extension story. Finally, the part of the cathedral that sticks out at the north east of the Cathedral is the sacristy - that's where clergy would put on their vestments, and all needed for relgious ceremonies would be stored and prepared. That was located there so as to be near the High Altar at the East end of the Cathedral.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 19/Jul/2022 17:12:31

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy It is the mortuary and baptistry I am thinking of, why not opposite one another symmetrically? The architects clearly did not have OCD.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 19/Jul/2022 17:20:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ I can’t say for certain, but I have a few ideas. Firstly, they were not built at the same time. The Baptistry dates - I think - from the original building of the cathedral. The mortuary chapel from the extension works in the early 20th century. So the question becomes why not build the mortuary chapel opposite the Baptistry? This would have involved knocking through walls that had been standing for a half-century or more. It was much more convenient to add it on when building the extension as part of the same project. Also, unlike the Baptistry, the mortuary chapel needed an external door - from my own knowledge of the cathedral, a mortuary chapel with its own entrance located symmetrically opposite the Baptistry just wouldn’t make sense - it’d bring extra foot-traffic to a location very near one of the busier entrances of the cathedral. Putting it where it is would lead to less congestion. That’s speculation on my behalf, but I think it’s reasonably well-informed speculation.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 19/Jul/2022 18:08:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I have tagged Coign.

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    O Mac

    • 19/Jul/2022 21:11:46

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ A Coign stone is also know as a Quoin stone or Coin stone. Coin being French for corner.

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    ɹǝqɯoɔɥɔɐǝq

    • 20/Jul/2022 00:47:54

    What have the Romans ever done for us? - uselessetymology.com/2017/11/15/the-etymology-of-coin/#:~.... Strikes me that this wonderful building was more than a little influenced by the 'Early English' architecture of the fabulous 13th century Salisbury Cathedral, where Augustus Pugin lived and worked from 1833. He could see it from the house he built. - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augustus_Pugin#Salisbury - [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia/279765340/]

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jul/2022 06:57:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Thank you.