Going to the Loo Bridge

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Where: Munster, Co Kerry, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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A strange photograph from Mr. French not least for the big cracks in the plate. with the broad white stripe running up and down the mountain behind the bridge. A railway line with the gate across the line, a seemingly dry area beneath the bridge and very little else bar rocks, fences, and a curve in the line. What can we find out about it?

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914 Soon after c.1893 (rail line opened)

NLI Ref: L_ROY_04361

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 3218
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio thelawrencephotographcollection glassnegative nationallibraryofireland loobridge railwayline mountain countykerry munster

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Nov/2021 08:57:22

    We skipped to the Loo Bridge previously - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/46562101255/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Nov/2021 09:14:53

    Today's looks to be date match with https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia's one. Consecutive catalogue numbers, same widow open in the station, a white board propped against the gable. The men at the station have gone, and there is a stepladder there. I think both are fairly soon after the line opened in 1893.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Nov/2021 09:17:15

    L_IMP_2790 is one of the huge Imperial plates and has a choo-choo at the station, but the digitized copy is tiny.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Nov/2021 09:21:57

    Google Maps Satellite 3D is okay - www.google.com/maps/@51.9752746,-9.3363063,61a,35y,48.23h...

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    cargeofg

    • 23/Nov/2021 09:49:38

    Broad white stripe !!!! Are the Mary's having us on. That is the crack in the plate that runs through the roof of the thatched cottage. I would agree with https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley soon after line opened. Stone walls look fresh no weathering on them. Look at contrast of wall with stile where it meets wall coming from behind gable of thatched cottage.

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    John Spooner

    • 23/Nov/2021 10:10:35

    When the line opened on 4th September for Passenger, Parcel, Goods, and Livestock traffic, there were three trains per day in each direction Loo Bridge

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Nov/2021 10:20:15

    Track bed view Google Earth Link earth.app.goo.gl/pmFkYY #googleearth A little history eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/Railway%20Stations%20L/Loo%2...

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Nov/2021 10:37:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] George, indeed it is a crack! It was early! Mary

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    John Spooner

    • 23/Nov/2021 10:39:58

    A reporter from the Cork was on a train on the line's first day of operation and the report the next day gave this account of travelling on the Loo Bridge section

    After passing the bog the line goes on by Glenflesk chapel into the valley of the Flesk until Loo Bridge station, which is the first on the railway, is reached. Opposite Loo Bridge station is the Robbers' Cave—a place of some notoriety. It can only be reached by a ladder. Then after passing over the Flesk river the valley of the Loo—the most charming spot in the course of the journey—is entered. The sylvan beauty of this valley is most charming. On the right are the Ceshane mountaine, which rise to a stupendous height. On the left is Rossacroon, also with its extended mountain ranges and large tract of wooded landscape. Irish red deer are to be met with in great abundance in this place.
    Robbers' Cave, eh?

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    John Spooner

    • 23/Nov/2021 10:52:07

    Robbers' Cave, before the railway came. Cork Constitution - Monday 25 February 1867:

    KILLARNEY, FRIDAY NIGHT. A search was made this afternoon for arms of Fenian fugitives in the Robbers' Cave in Glenflesk, but without success. As the troops and constabulary were returning signal fires were lit in the mountains.

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Nov/2021 13:05:37

    On the 25" of 1897 arcg.is/1auWny

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Nov/2021 13:16:10

    I see a small waiting room, ticket office?, water tower and what could be a pen for cattle.

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Nov/2021 17:39:02

    The old trackbed looks like an ideal candidate for a greenway. This remote station allowed access to Dublin in a little over 6 hours, some going for the 19th century.

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Nov/2021 21:39:58

    The former station was used as an An Óige youth hostel between 1965 - 1998, but can now be hired as a holiday home. www.hogansirishcottages.com/cottage/County-Cork-Poulgorm-...

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    O Mac

    • 24/Nov/2021 11:49:08

    The last timetable...1959/60. flic.kr/p/2mLFo45 It took an hour and seven minutes to go the 34kms from Headford to Kenmare i.e.21mph.