Yo-ho-ho and a bottle of rum

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Where: England, Greater London, UK

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When: Unknown

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A remarkable image from the Clonbrock Collection for today's shot with the Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria front and centre! The Naval Brigade standing in for horses, as is their tradition, towing a gun limber as they pass the Scots Guards Regiment formed up at the side of the street. There appears to be some form of "Stand" behind the soldiers and to the left is a balcony festooned with flags and nobility!

Photographers: Dillon Family

Contributors: Luke Gerald Dillon, Augusta Caroline Dillon

Collection: Clonbrock photographic Collection

Date: Most likely the 21st June 1887

NLI Ref: CLON895

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4443
theclonbrockphotographiccollection lukegeralddillon baronclonbrock augustacarolinedillon baronessclonbrock dillonfamily nationallibraryofireland queenvictoriasjubileecelebrations london england greatbritain navalbrigade scotsguardsregiments gunlimber cannongun

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 23/Sep/2021 07:53:14

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gwydyr_House

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    derangedlemur

    • 23/Sep/2021 07:55:19

    goo.gl/maps/1AnHtE4wYy6gCCJ6A

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    derangedlemur

    • 23/Sep/2021 07:56:24

    It would appear that the end of Gwydyr house has been rebuilt since this photo. There's a flying bay window in the photo whereas the wall is flat now.

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    cargeofg

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:02:40

    Gwydyr is Welsh for Wild Land

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:11:15

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I think I see three window openings before the bay window in todays shot. In streetview, there are just 3 windows on the side. So the bay window part has been demolished to make way for the MoD behind?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:20:32

    Here is a link to an OS 25" map, you can see this building with its bay window labelled Charity Commissioners, and no MoD behind.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:26:03

    Per wikipedia: On 20 June 1887 the Queen had breakfast outdoors ... The following day, she participated in a procession in an open landau through London to Westminster Abbey So most likely the 21st June 1887.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:34:29

    Building also known as the Ministry of Administrative Affairs.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:35:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Location and date updated.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 23/Sep/2021 08:56:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Yes Minister

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Sep/2021 09:03:20

    🔧 Hmm ... Wondering if this is the Diamond Jubilee in 1897, not the Golden Jubilee in 1887? The ladies' hats and frocks seem a bit later than 1880s, almost Edwardian. How reliable is the catalogue date?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:06:38

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] This related image of the Queens Carriage passing CLON899 looks identical to the 1897 footage : www.youtube.com/watch?v=XsFyph8mKNE But I think they used that coach in 1887 too.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:14:57

    There is a sequence of Jubilee shots, the next photo with a date in the catalogue is CLON 904, from 1901.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:17:07

    886 features Bobs the dog, not sure if we ever dated him. OK a search shows pics from 1902, 1904. 1912. Was unlikely to be about in 1887.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:24:40

    In this Alamy stock image of 1887, the post riders are on the horses to the right, in CLON899 and the Youtube video they are to the left.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:25:46

    So yes, https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia, I think this is the 1897 diamond jubilee, not the 1887 golden one, and the date is 22 June 1897

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:58:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] Thanks for the confirmation; I was worried my brain had been affected by the equinox! It would be a fairly easy error for a cataloguer to make. Nearby in 1897 - www.mediastorehouse.com.au/mary-evans-prints-online/queen... www.prints-online.com/queen-victorias-diamond-jubilee-maj... And a little to the left, via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5866339191] From a flickr album - www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157713912681632

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Sep/2021 11:59:53

    Of interest - history, map, and more films - thebioscope.net/2012/06/16/the-other-diamond-jubilee/

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Sep/2021 12:36:23

    Meanwhile, in Coleraine - https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/8527831550/

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Sep/2021 13:57:28

    "Far-called, our navies melt away; On dune and headland sinks the fire: Lo, all our pomp of yesterday Is one with Nineveh and Tyre! Judge of the Nations, spare us yet, Lest we forget—lest we forget! If, drunk with sight of power, we loose Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe, Such boastings as the Gentiles use, Or lesser breeds without the Law— Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet," --Kipling

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    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Sep/2021 15:36:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Do you like Kipling?

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    suckindeesel

    • 23/Sep/2021 20:04:38

    Not particularly, but Kipling wrote this at the time as a counter to the pomp of the jubilee, so it seemed appropriate.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Sep/2021 04:51:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Sorry, old joke: "I don't know, I've never Kippled!"

  • profile

    Skirls&Chokes

    • 28/Sep/2021 22:52:30

    A Scottish regiment, no doubt, but not the Scots Guards. They haven't been a kilted regiment since 1714 and then only the Highland Company. Only the Guards pipers wear them. The late 19th century had plenty more Scottish units to choose from.