All change at Kilfree for Gouldavoher, Aghalane and Manulla

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Mr. O'Dea has that ability to take us back in time to the era of the steam train and a full network of rail throughout the country. This lovely shot of a branch train arriving at the junction at Kilfree in Sligo shows a scene that is most likely long gone but still carries memories. Anybody who says they ever caught a train to the first two names above is a chancer while Manulla always struck me as a great name for a junction!

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: May 1960

NLI Ref.: ODEA 20/10

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4707
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland branchline kilfree countysligo cie corasiompaireireann irishrail steamtrain locomotive points manulla

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  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:15:38

    OSI Map Link

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:22:57

    I like railways, but as a composition, this is shockingly bad. The eye isn't drawn to any point of interest, the train (if that's meant to be the focus) is too small, the centre is a telegraph pole and the whole thing is basically a big triangle in the lower half a horizontally split field.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:23:22

    The Ballaghadereen branch is gone, but the Sligo line is still there in Streetview. I think O'Dea may have climbed one of the signal posts to get this angle.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:26:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Maybe O'Dea took this one in a hurry so he could climb down, run and take one at the station.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:27:43

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Looking at your map link, he seems to be where the .400 field meets the .831 field.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:37:03

    I bet that loco is no. 556 655. Before or after the turntable? https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/5994423216/

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:37:38

    The Ballaghadereen branch line, and Kilfree Junction were closed in 1963.

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:38:33

    Actually, the signal is directly in line with the bridge over the road, so that would put him in the station - maybe on top of the building or leaning out a window - or perhaps the house behind the station. Edit: Mind you, there's few enough common identifiable points between the map and the photo, that it could also be from the station wall.

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    derangedlemur

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:51:10

    Now that I've drawn a few lines on the map, I think it's taken from either the house behind the station or the lime kiln behind that house.

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:51:36

    Merely the branch line to Ballaghaderreen via Edmonstown, not Manulla Junct. or the rest. All gone by 02/1963

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Sep/2021 08:53:44

    More of No. 655 - Earlier, in July 1957 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/16687815828/] And in September 1960 via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/11373954474/

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 07/Sep/2021 09:28:29

    ¡¡¡ Sudden death Man Severely Shaken klaxon!!! The "worst rail crash in the West of Ireland for many years" occurred in June 1956 when a 75-tonne goods train from Dublin to Sligo crashed through the buffers at Kilfree Junction station.

    Travelling along a down gradient as it approached Kilfree Junction railway station, where it was due to halt, the train, after passing the station platform, went along a siding and crashed into the buffers behind which was a high embankment. The force of the impact caused wagons to pile up, while the cab of the engine was torn from the chassis. The cab, with the driver still trapped inside, tore along the embankment for more than 25 yards, then somersaulted three times through the air as it fell on to the main line track almost fifty feet below. When it struck the track it rebounded against the embankment on the opposite side before coming to rest roof upwards
    Goods wagons, one of which contained gelignite, were smashed to matchwood and piled on top of one another.
    The driver, Mr. Michael Conlon. Mullingar, had a miraculous escape but suffered from a very severe shaking and some minor injuries, while the guard on the train, Mr. James Kelly of Longford, also escaped without serious injury.
    (as reported in a 'from the archives' piece in the Sligo Champion on Wednesday 29 March 2006)

  • profile

    O Mac

    • 07/Sep/2021 09:34:10

    [http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/] mobile.twitter.com/BealachanDoirin/status/745540297132695...

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 07/Sep/2021 09:48:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] You beat me to it! On 7th July 1956 the Sligo Champion reported that the main line was once again blocked, when the 36-tonne steam crane clearing up wreckage fell onto the main line. The crane operator John Burns had a miraculous escape when he jumped from the falling crane, but Thomas Dempsey was struck by a splinter and needed medical attention. And on 30th June it was reported

    The disappearance of a large quantity of clothing and other material from the wreck of the 85-ton Diesel locomotive and wagons in a siding at Kilfree Junction led to an extensive search of the locality by Garda officers over the weekend. The goods which littered the railway track after the crash were unaccounted for when the check-up was completed.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 10:21:07

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Clearly before the turntable shot - the loco is approaching from the South, facing North. Looking at ODEA 20/9, the Kilfree diagram, the branch line from the South leads into a platform. Then they'd uncouple the loco, steam forwards to 30, back it up to 21, forward to the turntable, turn, then head along the loop to 19, back up to the platform and couple the carriages on again, ready to head South to Ballaghadereen again.

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Sep/2021 10:44:37

    A nostalgic trip down memory lane youtu.be/7S9U0IirWOU

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Sep/2021 12:50:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley But ... something I have never really understood ... then the guard's van would be behind the engine and tender, and be relatively useless. Someone will explain.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 07/Sep/2021 13:12:50

    complete aside Somebody who likes sensational censuses might be interested in this from https://www.flickr.com/photos/state-records-nsw/, the Colony of NSW Australia 1828 Census, available online (follow links) - https://www.flickr.com/photos/state-records-nsw/51432327849/

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 13:13:05

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] I don't think this little branch line train had a guard's van. Here is a pic of them doing this maneuvre at Ballaghaderreen at the end of the branch line: Ballaghaderreen. No. 655 running round its train. 23.9.60

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    Niall McAuley

    • 07/Sep/2021 13:14:23

    But if it did, you would have to shunt the guards van to the other end as well.

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    suckindeesel

    • 07/Sep/2021 14:29:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Looks like an MGWR class K, built 1893. Class G2 or GSR class '650'. Originally mainline, but later reduced to branch line service at the time of the photo. Most of them remained in service for more than 60 years.

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    O Mac

    • 07/Sep/2021 16:19:51

    flic.kr/p/2mmWAGq

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 07/Sep/2021 17:24:55

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The braking effort from the guard's van is the same wherever it is in the train.