Quartz, Sodalite, Temperature, Graph paper?

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Calling all those with a physics or engineering bent as I must say from the outset that I do not understand what this photo is about. If you are not that way inclined, you could just tell us which is your favourite photo about some of your favourite photos on this stream. Either way I look forward to your comments.

Photographer: Thomas H. Mason

Collection: Mason Photographic Collection

Date: 1890 - 1910

NLI Ref: M23/52/8

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 4601
thomasholmesmason thomasmayne thomashmasonsonslimited lanternslides nationallibraryofireland quartz albite oligoclase sodalite hornblende augite olivine meltiness fluidity graph

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  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:31:00

    Refractive index, maybe. They're all translucent minerals.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:31:35

    But it could be crush strength, tensile strength, bending moment melting point, who knows what else?

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    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:33:14

    In fact, if I pay any attention at all, it says on it; fluidity at different temperatures. So basically, how melty the stuff is.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:37:05

    It doesn't seem to be a standard chart, though. Searching for this list of minerals doesn't produce a result with all of them. Could be either a write up of an experiment or a chart specific to some industrial process in a particular company.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:40:21

    I suspect it lives in the museum building in Trinity, given the adjacent pictures in the catalogue, and is related to geology/volcanology.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:46:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I was thinking it's probably another slide for an RDS lecture/article like this one: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/49869700842

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:48:41

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Also a good theory. If you know where the programme or minutes are, we could see if there were any lectures on The Meltiness of Minerals or similar.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 06:54:30

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The internet archive has a lot of the proceedings. I already searched the same volume as the one above for quartz, and it found nothing relevant.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:02:37

    Lots of reports of mineralogical excursions, but this is a physical analysis, not a field trip.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:03:44

    Joly himself was apparently interested in melting points of minerals (which is a little different to fluidity / "meltiness" but I'm not capable of explaining the difference right now.) He had his own meldometer.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:12:52

    Roughly speaking, melting point is simply the point at which a substance turns from solid to liquid. Not everything has one of these - e.g. carbon dioxide goes straight from solid to gas, toffee doesn't have any clear point at which you can say the transition has been made. Fluidity is a measure of how well something flows and is often different at different temperatures, though not always - e.g. water is the same until it evaporates, whereas toffee (always with the toffee) flows a lot better at 180 than at 50 degrees

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:18:29

    Here's one paper by Joly which looks at fluidity of minerals, though it doesn't include this graph.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:29:06

    Page 408 has a similar list with melting points, though not fluidity and not all the same minerals.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:33:17

    Quartz, Albite, Oligoclase, Sodalite, Hornblende, Augite & Olivine seem to be common to both documents. They haven't come up with the same melting points for them. For sodalite, the melting point matches the point of maximum fluidity, whereas for hornblende, the melting point is the point of minimum fluidity.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:37:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland By the way, how can you expect anyone to choose just one photo as their favourite? That's impossible.

  • profile

    derangedlemur

    • 22/Jul/2021 07:43:50

    You're all my favourites!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:01:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ My favourite photo is tomorrow's ... “The suspense is terrible. I hope it will last.” Oscar Wilde

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:17:39

    I'll check to see if De Selby mentions any of these 'french' words. he was a great man for the physics.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:32:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet you make a good point - I will redraft.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:34:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia tomorrow's photo will leave you in a spin!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:37:33

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Gee, Thanks

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:41:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer Believe it or not, I recently selected a nice photo of Dalkey from our archive to be shown here in a few months time.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:44:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer nails it.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:48:29

    Groovy! I love Dalkey, but really hated the sand there, it even smelled / smelt of oil, back in 1959. From my google search it now appears to be all cleaned up. I guess they were waiting for me to leave.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:50:18

    Thank you, Mr Spooner, nice sandals!

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:57:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer I know a bit about oil spills. There are species of marine bacteria in several families, including Marinobacter, Oceanospiralles, Pseudomonas, and Alkanivorax, that can eat compounds from petroleum as part of their diet. I presume they were responsible for cleaning up the sands over time.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 08:59:57

    Blimey, I am going to use everything you say, in my magnum opus, which I am hoping to publish posthumously, so you can't sue me. It's a great pleasure to meet you.

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:02:06

    Your photosteam is wonderful, I plan to be all over it, like a rash, to bulk out my waning grey matter.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:11:39

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer you are more than welcome and I am sure you will fit in with our regular visitors (collectively "Flickroonies").

  • profile

    Billy Quinn 1954

    • 22/Jul/2021 09:14:55

    I have been lurking forever here anyway, loving it all, but firmly in the closet. Flickroonie Pride Rules! There it is, I'm out and let the devil take the begrudgers. There'll be no more closet for yours truly!

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 22/Jul/2021 10:11:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/mutter_fluffer https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland I'm sure anyone familiar with the works of de Selby will fit in here.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 13:27:21

    As no one else has yet, here is one of my favourite photos from the stream: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/6015148582

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 14:30:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Sharon, it is a much loved one, thanks. Mary

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 22/Jul/2021 14:52:40

    www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/39584391104/ I have so many favourite photos, but this is the one that sticks in my mind because we managed to trace down the descendents of the couple getting married, one of whom is a retired priest serving at a parish that I visited in the States some years ago.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 17:01:47

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I agree Bernard, it portrayed perfectly the work you all do here.

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    silverio10

    • 22/Jul/2021 21:32:00

    Buenas fotos antiguas .

  • profile

    oaktree_brian_1976

    • 26/Jul/2021 11:52:21

    the graph is measuring how various minerals flow when in a liquid/molten state, temperature graph.