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Where: England, Greater London, UK

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When: Unknown

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Father Dominic in the centre flanked by Father McCormach(?) and Father O'Connor arrive at Brixton Prison for the inquest on the death of Terence McSwiney, former Lord Mayor of Cork.

Photographers: London News Agency photographers

Collection: Irish Political Figures Photographic Collection

Date: 27th October 1920

NLI Ref: NPA POLF185

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6534
irishpoliticalfiguresphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland politicalfigures ireland england uk brixtonprison london terencemcswiney hungerstrike death inquest

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  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:00:31

    The inquest was held on the 27th October 1920, according to the Pall Mall Gazette of that day.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:07:51

    An article on Father Dominic: Fr Dominic ministered to MacSwiney throughout his hunger strike in Brixton Prison and was present at his death on 25 October 1920.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:13:56

    The prison at Brixton still has a tall brick wall like the one seen at right, as in this Streetview. (Not suggesting that is the same spot).

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:15:50

    Previously on this channel: "Two unidentified Franciscan friars walking alongside a church carrying an umbrella" is Fathers Bibby and O'Connor

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:18:10

    Here they are outside the gate with some police officers.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:21:12

    Father Dominic appears in the 1901 census as John O'Connor, 18, a Member of Community and Student of Theology in Rochestown, Cork.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:22:19

    Back then, Capuchins (a branch of the Franciscans) were obliged by their rule to grow a beard, and Fr Dominic’s is a fine example of a Capuchin style beard. Most other priests - either by rule or custom - were clean-shaven.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:24:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I have updated the date.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:28:15

    Re: the other two priests, I think our best shot at identifying them would be from a newspaper account of McSwiney’s funeral Mass at Southwark Cathedral. Bishop - later Archbishop Peter Amigo gave permission for a funeral in the Cathedral & indeed lobbied the authorities for McSwiney’s release. This was despite the opposition of the British government & I know that one of the chapels of St George’s Cathedral, Southwark has a plaque remembering McSwiney & expressing the gratitude of the Irish to Amigo. www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorial/59612

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:33:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy I read a couple of descriptions of the funeral. One of them helpfully mentioned that there were hundreds of Catholic priests present. Neither O'Connor nor McCormack are mentioned by name.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Jul/2021 08:52:57

    27 October 1920 is a Wednesday ...

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 20/Jul/2021 09:00:20

    Guy in the centre looks more like a rabbi

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 20/Jul/2021 09:04:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ When I’m rich I’m going to buy myself a full set of the past issues of the Catholic Directories for Ireland, Britain, America & Australia to research problems like this. 😂 They’re probably on the list of clergy serving in Southwark back then, but I don’t have access to that.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 20/Jul/2021 09:29:39

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! From an 1827 book 'The Antiquities of Lambeth' via [https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/] [https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/11007036713/] en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HM_Prison_Brixton (built 1820)

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 20/Jul/2021 11:14:51

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy] Is this what you mean by Catholic Directory?

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 20/Jul/2021 12:00:04

    The Daily Mirror - Thursday 28 October 1920 has a picture of Father Dominic leaving the prison after the inquest, but he is accompanied by three bowler-hatted gentlemen from Cork. Accounts of the inquest mention Father Dominic arriving during proceedings, and that space was limited in the room in the prison where the inquest was conducted. About 50 people were present.

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    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jul/2021 12:05:09

    "a nation which has such citizens will never surrender" - Ho Chi Minh

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jul/2021 12:52:38

    An account by Fr. Dominic of his conversations with Terence McSwiney Capuchin Annual 1942, p337, annual.capuchinfranciscans.ie/1942/html5/

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 20/Jul/2021 13:12:18

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/50898926372/in/dateposted/ Funeral procession

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 21/Jul/2021 00:39:15

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Interesting to see the Capuchin Annual 1942 refers to "Province of Ireland" . . . That would be like Taiwan stating it is a "Province of China", when in fact it is a sovereign country, under international law.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Jul/2021 05:31:55

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography] I think they were using the term Province in the context of a religious province, "The term province, or occasionally religious province, also refers to a geographical and administrative subdivision in a number of orders and congregations. This is true of most, though not all, religious communities founded after the year AD 1000, as well as the Augustinians, who date from earlier" In fact, I see recently in the Irish Catholic dated 1st July 2021 the headline "Historic moment as GB Capuchin’s become delegation of Irish Province"

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 21/Jul/2021 05:34:05

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Well done.

  • profile

    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 21/Jul/2021 07:02:10

    Glad you cleared that up. Learn sumthin evry Béarla

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 22/Jul/2021 13:49:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Ooooh! Sorry for the delay, but thank you! That is useful, although I can't really pin down the priests pictured.

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 22/Jul/2021 14:51:40

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy They have quite a few digitised for future reference, and yeah, I didn't see any likely candidates either. (I did have fun looking at the advertisements at the front).

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 22/Jul/2021 14:54:37

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I love those adverts as well. There are probably more detailed lists - with an index - in the England & Wales Catholic Directory. The American version is good, but it omits the names of most of the priests who were part of religious orders.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 22/Jul/2021 20:06:57

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet I see an advertisment on page 9 of the 1942 Capuchin Annual from our own Keogh Bros., Ltd.,