What would happen if Clones was cloned???

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Where: Ulster, County Monaghan, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Continuing Monaghan Week with a slight diversion to meet Mr French and Jaunty, we are with the O'Dea Collection today and to the town of Clones in - wait for it - County Monaghan! The title is "Station and Sheds" and it looks like a complex junction with a water tower in the foreground and an unusual set of sheds in the background. No doubt those lines would have been jammed with carriages for the Ulster finals of yore?

Photographer: James P. O'Dea

Collection:James P. O'Dea

Date: August 31st 1959

NLI Ref.: ODEA 13/41

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie


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Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5049
jamespo’dea o’deaphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland clones countymonaghan railwaystation watertower sheds lines permanentway points border ulster

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 24/Jun/2021 07:21:40

    A wet evening in April by Patrick Kavanagh The birds sang in the wet trees And I listened to them it was a hundred years from now And I was dead and someone else was listening to them. But I was glad I had recorded for him The melancholy.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Jun/2021 07:56:42

    31 August 1959 was a Monday . . .

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 24/Jun/2021 08:32:12

    GoogleGlimpse - goo.gl/maps/1PQ91Gr7UTjJ8PBT7

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jun/2021 08:47:16

    In 1852 it was foreseen that the junction at Clones would enable not great things in stimulating trade and industry not only in the areas crossed by the lines and the regions linked by the lines but also bring great prosperity to Belfast (and everyone would live happily ever after). At any rate, that was the opinion of Belfast News-Letter onWednesday 15 December 1852

    That these designs will be realised we have not the slightest doubt when we consider what sort of link "The Belfast and West of Ireland Junction Railway" will really form in the great iron net-work of the North. At Clones, it will catch the traffic brought down by the Derry and Enniskillen line in one direction, and by the Sligo and Enniskillen extension in another. At the same point it will receive nutrition from another great " feeder," which will undoubtedly be in operation before long - we allude to the branch of the Great Midland from Mullingar to Cavan, and thence extended to Clones ; whilst along its entire length it will collect the traffic now in a state of rapid development throughout that considerable and fertile district which trends South-west from Armagh. To this hitherto unopened, or very imperfectly opened, region, it will impart a stimulus to manufacture and agriculture which will speedily enable it to rival the most favoured portions of the North-east; and whilst the line will have this beneficial effect on the country it traverses, it will throw the whole industrial result into Belfast, and thus materially add to the opulence, influence, and greatness of the Northern capital.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 09:07:02

    The arc shaped engine shed is on the 1930s Cassini, but not the 1900ish 25" map, although the turntable is on both.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 09:13:26

    Per Eiretrains: The lines through Clones closed to passengers in 1957, and to goods in 1960. wikipedia says the station closed on 1 October 1957.

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2021 09:23:25

    Ireland's only roundhouse, even Inchicore didn't have one en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railway_roundhouse Must have had great plans for the area

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 09:58:00

    That shed is from 1924 per the DIA.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 10:05:29

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] There was a much bigger roundhouse at Broadstone.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 10:44:37

    You can see the roof of the engine shed in this reverse Streetview

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    John Spooner

    • 24/Jun/2021 11:46:44

    In 1911 about 60 men were employed at Clones junction (including platelayers), but unlike other railwaymen at Dundalk and Belfast, they had shown no disposition to strike. (Belfast News-Letter - Tuesday 26 September 1911)

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2021 12:21:11

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley I think the roundhouse was built "late 1900s", according the Eiretrains, so later than the 25". It must have been solidly built, as it survived an atttempt by the army to demolish it with explosives! It was built, of course, as a loco shed for the NIR. Clones was an important junction of the east/west Dundalk/Enniskillen and the north/south Belfast/Cavan lines. However, by the 1950s the northwest of the island was a railway desert thanks to partition and Stormont.

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2021 12:25:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley yes, I forgot that one. I wonder if there were others?

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 12:57:38

    In the 1911 census there are 79 people with Railway in their occupation in Clones (Urban and Rural), including one "Railway Spellsman", whatever that is supposed to be.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 13:30:28

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The Great Northern works were in Dundalk - no roundhouse there. The Great Southern were in Inchicore, nope, so just the MGW in Broadstone, I think.

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    Ernies Railway Archive

    • 24/Jun/2021 15:17:58

    The Great Northern built a similar roundhouse in Portadown at the junction of the lines to Dundalk, Armagh and Omagh. The Guinness brewery in dublin also had aroundhouse for its narrow gauge locomotives www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/5736188267/in/album... Portadown behind the train. www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/6593622729/in/album... Guinness (partly demolished)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 24/Jun/2021 16:17:34

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie] Yes, I see the Portadown one on the OSI map (labelled OSNI Historical 4th edition 1907-1957) at the PRONI site, it looks just like todays image! Now the A3/A4 junction. I was staring at the James' Gate brewery for a while without seeing this shed, but I found it, it is across James Street, connected to the main site by a tunnel! The turntable was under the cars in this google aerial view, you can still see some tracks. OSI map link (click through and select the 25" map to see the quarter roundhouse and mad tram tunnels)

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2021 16:35:24

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] The only one I remember was in Altoona, a very American thing. commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Altoona_Works_turntable... for a photo of how it works. Dundalk, however, did have one unique feature, who ch was the 'square crossing'.

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    suckindeesel

    • 24/Jun/2021 16:38:50

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie The number of times I've passed that station without noticing that structure! It seems rather an elaborate structure for somewhere like Clones, I wonder if it saw much use?