Old stones and winding roads...

Download this image

More from this collection

Related by When

Related by Where

Research Help!

Where: Unknown

Try to find the spot where the photographer was standing.

When: Unknown

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Mellifont Abbey in Co. Louth, yet another fabulous monument in the wee county, though not quite as ancient as the wonderful Brú na Bóinne! To my shame I have never visited it, so will have to remedy that once the pandemic has passed.

Photographer: Robert French

Collection: Lawrence Photograph Collection

Date: Circa 1865 - 1914

NLI Ref: L_CAB_04773

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6803
robertfrench williamlawrence lawrencecollection lawrencephotographicstudio glassnegative nationallibraryofireland mellifontabbey colouth theweecounty thereformation kinghenryviii lawrencephotographcollection louth leinster contaelú laighin cúigelaighean ireland anmhainistirmhór he mill building has lost some masonry

Add Tags
  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 23/Mar/2021 09:14:59

    If my memory serves me the monks at the new Abbey used to make marmalade on a commercial scale in the 1970s The new Abbey some 3 or 4 miles from this site was set up in 1938 with foundation stone blessed in 1957.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Mar/2021 09:23:28

    Mr French's transport (see note) has "57" painted on the rear - see - catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000325146 That six-storey mill on the left appears to have had trouble; not even a pile of rubble there now.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Mar/2021 09:24:32

    No similar angle in streetview, but it does walk right into the ruins in abbeyview

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Mar/2021 09:30:43

    OSI is still not generating links, but the most obvious change is the mill building at left, which is completely gone now.

  • profile
  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Mar/2021 09:46:10

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The driver might be Mr Heinz!

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 23/Mar/2021 10:01:38

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Bean there heard that one before

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Mar/2021 10:02:04

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Ha ha! Photo must/might be before 1897, the publication date of this book, see first pic - www.gutenberg.org/files/38999/38999-h/38999-h.htm

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 23/Mar/2021 10:18:21

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia The number might be an early version of a taxi plate, issued by the Carriage Office

  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:20:10

    excellent placing for the cattle, ah it's always the details ...

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:20:21

    Mellifont was the first & largest Cisterian Monastery in Ireland. It was founded in 1142 at the instigation of St Malachy of Armagh. Those who are interested can find plenty of information online. To my mind, two things are worth noting. The Cisterican Order was a reformed (stricter) branch of the Benedictine family & really started growing in the 1110s with the arrival of St Bernard of Clairveax. One of the things that is astonishing is how quickly the order spread across Europe. Given the time and effort needed to build a monastery, to say nothing of the fact that you need a full community of monks from somewhere else to start off a monastery, it's extraordinary that the Cisterians were able to extend their reach into Ireland with a substantial monastery like Mellifont within the lifetime of St Bernard himself. Mellfont then went on to establish a substantial number of daughter-houses throughout Ireland in the following decades. The second thing is the name Mellfont. It either comes directly from the Latin Fons Melli (Fountain of Honey) or via what we would now call the French language Miel Font or something like that. The Cistercians had a happy talent for naming their monasteries. St Bernard's monastery was called Clairvaux, or Clear Valley. When they established a monastery in Abbeydorney Co Kerry they called it Kyrie Eleison (i.e. Lord Have Mercy) with the idea that Kyrie is a punning reference to Kerry. Likewise, their Laois foundation was called Lex Dei (The Law of God) with Lex being a pun for Laois. So what about Mellifont? That could be a theological reference - the idea that the monastic life was a sweet one for those who loved God - i.e. a Fountain of Honey. Alternatively, local folklore suggests a reference to a spring or a stream that provided an unfailing supply of good, sweet water to the community. I've also read a suggestion that there might be a punning reference or a direct derivation from a now-lost native placename. In any event, Mellifont is a beautiful name for it.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:26:38

    Lawrence visited more than once - the mill building has lost some masonry over the furthest window in archive entry L_ROY_06193

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:29:52

    From the beachcombers 1897 book: a mill was erected about 100 years ago close to the site of the church Also In 1884, the few remaining ruins became vested in the Board of Works, and the excavations which revealed the plan of the church, as described in Chapter I., were carried out I think we are post excavations here, so 1884-97.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:38:24

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy mêl is also Welsh word for honey. There are a number of Welsh words have their roots in Latin.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:43:16

    The building which is now the visitor's centre is visible in the background, but the NIAH lets us down and does not date it.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 23/Mar/2021 11:57:23

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] www.bonappetit.com/test-kitchen/ingredients/article/the-o... Honey sounds similar in the Celtic and Romance languages to the best of my knowledge. The above article traces it back to a Proto-Indo-European word. However, English and German take their word for honey from another source.

  • profile

    John Spooner

    • 23/Mar/2021 13:48:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Mention of honey and monasteries reminds me of the Orthodox saint Zozimus. He founded a monastery on the largest of the Solovetski islands in the White Sea near Archangel in northern Russia. It is said that when he found that there were no bees for beeswax to make candles, he walked to Egypt, procured bees, and walked back to northern Russia. He's the Orthodox equivalent of a patron saint of beekeepers, and in Ukraine and elsewhere beehives are decorated with his image. The reason I know all this is that a beekeeper I know became obsessed with this legend and in 2013 she persuaded me to cycle with her to visit the island and the monastery. Solovetski monastery, despite being shelled by British gunboats during the Crimean war and being a gulag from 1919 until 1939, is in rather better shape than Mellifont.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 23/Mar/2021 14:19:08

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] That's wonderful. There are plenty of connections between monasteries and bees. St Gobnait of Ballyvourney was a famous beekeeper & the image of a beehive has often been associated with the idea of a monastery. More recently, Br Adam of Buckfast Abbey bred the so-called "Buckfast Bee" during the interwar period when the native British bee species were being felled by disease. There is something about bee-keeping that fits in well with monastic life. This might be of minority interest, but in 1948 Pope Pius XII gave an extraordinary talk to a gathering of Italian bee-keepers about the virtues of the bee: www.ewtn.com/catholicism/library/on-bees-8944 Bees are models of social life and activity, in which each class has its duty to perform and performs it exactly—one is almost tempted to say conscientiously—without envy, without rivalry, in the order and position assigned to each, with care and love. Even the most inexperienced observer of bee culture admires the delicacy and perfection of this work. Unlike the butterfly which flits from flower to flower out of pure caprice; unlike the wasp and the hornet, brutal aggressors, who seem intent on doing only harm with no benefit for anyone, the bee pierces to the very depths of the flower's calix diligently, adroitly, and so delicately, that once its precious treasure has been gathered, it gently leaves the flowers without having injured in the least the light texture of their garments or caused a single one of their petals the loss of its immaculate freshness.

  • profile

    cargeofg

    • 23/Mar/2021 15:19:07

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy Thank you for the link. Every day is a learning day here.

  • profile

    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 23/Mar/2021 17:03:26

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner John, I calculated via Google Maps that it would take a man 2,076 hours to walk the round trip to Egypt (without any stops!) as was said in the Quiet Man Movie - "It's only five miles. Just a good stretch of the legs."

  • profile
  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 23/Mar/2021 20:47:13

    🐝 There bee trouble at t'mill ! 🐝

  • profile

    suckindeesel

    • 23/Mar/2021 23:18:08

    “How changed, alas! from that revered abode Graced by proud majesty in ancient days, Where monks recluse those sacred pavements trod, And taught the unlettered world its Maker’s praise.” Keats