The Republican’s Plot?

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Where: Munster, Waterford, Ireland

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When: 20 April 1930

Try to find the date or year when this image was made.
Throughout Ireland in many cemeteries there is a “Republican Plot”, meaning a group grave dedicated to those who died in the Irish Revolution years, and this would appear to be a ceremony in Waterford. Given all the garlands, wreaths, and flowers, there would appear to have been a recent interment or anniversary. Taken by a Poole Studio photographer, it is actually in the “Irish Political Scenes Folder C”.

+++ UPDATE +++
Location Identified was ticked off our wish list in jig time by Rory Sherlock, with the Republican Plot at Kilrossanty, Co. Waterford. Sharon Corbet swooped in with Easter Sunday, then Niall McAuley with 30 April 1930. And we finally settled on Date Established as Easter Sunday, 20 April 1930. And plenty of information on the people named on this memorial, erected by “old comrades in Waterford and Chicago”. Great to find out that the memorial was unveiled by Caitlín Brugha, who had been Sinn Féin TD for Waterford from 1923 to 1927.

Photographers: Poole Studio photographer

Collection: Irish Political Scenes Folder C

Date: Easter Sunday, 20 April 1930

NLI Ref: NPA DOCC2

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 5032
nationallibraryofireland ireland irishpoliticalscenesfolderc arthurhenripoole waterford graveyard memorial ahpoole republicanplot locationidentified killrossanty munster eastersunday sunday april 1930 1930s 20thcentury dateestablished zantedeschiaaethiopica caitlínbrugha

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  • profile

    Rory_Sherlock

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:24:29

    The Republican Plot at Kilrossanty, Co Waterford, apparently: www.waterfordmuseum.ie/exhibit/web/DisplayImage/K0qsOIKSB... Streetview: www.google.com/maps/@52.1768245,-7.5464476,3a,90y,146.66h...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:28:59

    The note on the back of the photo helpfully says that the cross was unveiled on Easter Sunday, without mentioning a year...

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:31:35

    catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594324 in the archive is another Poole, titled "Committee of Kilrossanty memorial cross at Lemybrien" dated ca. 30 April 1930.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:39:03

    catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594325 is another Poole of the cross, ca 30 April 1930, looks ike the same occasion as today's shot. Yes, definitely the same crew in catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594326

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    derangedlemur

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:40:48

    Streetview doesn't seem to be a great match now, but the 25" looks a lot more plausible.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:42:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley 20th April was Easter Sunday in 1930.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 09:58:14

    The ca. dates are based on the Poole photos being consecutive. POOLEWP 3692 is ca. 15 April. Then there is this run of shots dated ca. 30 April. Then catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000594327, Miss Bolger, dated ca. 22nd. So I think 20th is very likely.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:04:29

    Flickr is sometimes amazing! In 1936 from the right left via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5482847767/

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    John Spooner

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:04:57

    Kilrossanty graveyard featured in the press earlier in the year. Laurence Griffin, a Stradbally postman, had been missing since Christmas Day, and no body had been found. Disused mineshafts, lakes and bogs were searched, as well as graveyards at Stradbally and Kilrossanty, where the grave of a man buried at about the time of the disappearance was examined. "At Kilrossanty the villagers assert that men drove up to the graveyard in the small hours of the morning and delved until they reached the coffin." (Reynolds's Newspaper - Sunday 02 March 1930 under the headline 'Sensational Turn in Missing Man Mystery') PS It was still referred to as an 'unsolved mystery' in 1937. PPS And also in 2021 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disappearance_of_Larry_Griffin

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:08:21

    Is the lad with his hands in pockets and the double breasted suit wearing an early Easter Lily badge?

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:12:42

    Yes, in the committee shot above, rakes of Easter lilies. Wikipedia says they were introduced in 1926.

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:17:32

    [Aside] Meanwhile nearby ...

    100 Years in One House Ted Pillow, a carpenter, of Dalligan, Kilrossanty, Ireland, who recently celebrated his 100th birthday and has lived in the same house all his life, died last month.
    See - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/131480050?searchTerm=K... (September 1932)

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:41:06

    Matching the names & dates to particular events: 19th March 1921: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgery_ambush "IRA volunteers Seán Fitzgerald and Pat Keating were shot dead." 14th August 1922 - Death of Johnny Dobbyn www.facebook.com/groups/ButlerstownKilmeaden/permalink/13... "the volunteers withdrew and headed into the Comeragh Mountains, where columns were being organised to continue guerrilla warfare. It was there that he met his fate on August 14th 1923; killed when a comrade’s rifle misfired on the range during the Truce. He was just 24 years of age. John Dobbyn is buried in the Republican Plot at Kilrossanty Churchyard and is named on the Ballinattin Memorial in Tramore." 14th March 1923 - www.irishwarmemorials.ie/pdf/373.pdf "John Walsh Kilmacthomas, age 23, fell in Kilkenny gaol March 14th 1923" www.facebook.com/1916risingirishcivilwar/posts/molly-wals... "Molly told the story of how John and his comrades had decided not to co-operate or tell their names when there was a morning roll call in the prison. John was first in line and was beaten and shot for refusing to tell his name. He died on March 14th 1923 in the prison hospital." 11th April 1923 - Thomas Keating irishhistory1919-1923chronology.ie/april_1923.htm "Thomas Keating, leader of an anti-Treaty ASU in the Comeragh mountains is wounded and captured near Coolnasmear. He is brought to Dungarvan Hospital, Co. Waterford but dies the following days." A few observations - you'd have to imagine that the men at the graveside were friends and colleagues of those commemorated. Although it's difficult to form a historical judgement about the accuracy of every detail of every atrocity from the Irish Civil War, accounts such as that of the death of John Walsh give some indication of the kind of thing that these men found themselves at the receiving end of, or in other contexts, may have been responsible for. When you think of it, the way in which the Irish State managed to become a more-or-less stable democratic state given the circumstances of its birth is quite extraordinary. On the other hand, the fact that "Civil War Politics" perdured for so long should not be a surprise, given the experiences of the generation who had the task of building that State. I know that in Kerry, the strength of the GAA played a great part in establishing a dimension of public life where political differences could be transcended.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:46:49

    I'll add that the last line of the inscription explains that the monoment was erected by the deceaseds' "old comrades in Waterford and Chicago."

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    John Spooner

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:53:22

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia] Now there's a coincidence (or wires have been crossed somewhere) Waterford Standard - Saturday 30 April 1932 (Waterford Standard - Saturday 30 April 1932) Also in 1932:

    The wife of a Kilrossanty (Co Waterford) road mender has given birth to her forth set of twins. We understand the husband is going on as well as can be expected.
    (Leeds Mercury - Wednesday 08 June 1932, in a column of one-liners headed "Flashlights - by Thomas Jay, the famous 'Punch' writer", so probably not to be relied on as factual reporting)

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:54:29

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley] The lady with the glasses in that photo is surely Mrs Cathal Brugha. She was TD for Waterford until 1927, and spoke at the inauguration of the monument. marymcauliffe.blog/2018/12/04/remembering-caitlin-brugha-... There was a march from Lemybrien to Kilrossanty for the unveiling.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 10:59:19

    The full account of the unveiling of the monument can be found in the Dungarvan Observer on the front page for 26 April 1930. snap.waterfordcoco.ie/collections/enewspapers/dungarvan_o...

  • profile

    an poc

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:08:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/bernardhealy You're right about Caitlín Brugha. Seated in front of her is Mick Mansfield. To the right of Mrs Brugha but one is Pax Whelan. Front row, far right looks like Paddy Ormonde. I think the two boys are Pax's sons. The man standing far left, second row from the back looks like Larry Fraher. This is a wilder guess, but the tall man standing far left in the back row looks like Mike Walsh of Ballingown. The good folk at the Kilrossanty Remembers blog might be able to identify more, likewise Waterford County Museum. If anyone has a copy of Seán and Síle Murphy's book, The Comeraghs: Gunfire and Civil War, that might help with further identification. EDIT: Front row, second from the right looks like Mick Morrissey: cf. Tommy Mooney, The Déise Divided: A history of the Waterford Brigade IRA and the Civil War (2014), 42.

  • profile

    an poc

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:16:17

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner Kilrossanty was one of several graveyards where recent graves were dug up in the search for Larry Griffin. See Fachtna Ó Drisceoil, The Missing Postman: What really happened to Larry Griffin? (Mercier Press, 2011)

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:20:53

    I would guess the gentlemen sitting next to Caitlín Brugha in that group shot would be TD Séan Goulding and ex-TD Eamonn Dee, but I don't see any pics of them anywhere to confirm.

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    an poc

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:27:46

    In today's photo, the grave behind the Republican Plot is that of William Connors of Curraheen.

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    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:34:46

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley There was also an "Alderman Jones" of Waterford amongst the VIPs. We don't have a digitised photo of him, but there should be a picture of him in the NLI, assuming he's the same Alderman Jones who became Mayor in 1930

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:40:04

    Two along from Brugha is Séan Goulding TD, pic of him here at Waterford County Museum site.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:54:12

    I believe there is a story on Friday April 18th 1930 on the Waterford News announcing the march.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:56:59

    And a report on Friday April 25th.

  • profile

    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 11:59:08

    I don't see any announcements of a committee or fundraising in the run up.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 01/Mar/2021 12:03:27

    The Dungarvan Observer of April 19th has a short notice about the upcoming event, but names only Mrs. Brugha, Mr. E. Dee presiding, and an oration by Mr. S. Martin.

  • profile

    Bernard Healy

    • 01/Mar/2021 12:39:02

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley It looks as though most of the money came from the States - namely the Waterfordmen's Association of Chicago per the Dungarvan Observer

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    an poc

    • 01/Mar/2021 13:53:53

    For more on Pat Keating: kilrossantyremembers.wordpress.com/2020/07/03/pat-keating/

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    an poc

    • 01/Mar/2021 13:55:37

    For the perspective of non-combatants in Kilrossanty, I recommend John Hobbs' article, 'The Troubles in mid-Waterford: a family perspective' in the 2020 issue of Decies (journal of the Waterford Archaeological and Historical Society)

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    suckindeesel

    • 01/Mar/2021 18:42:04

    Comrades by Eva Gore Booth The peaceful night that round me flows, Breaks through your iron prison doors, Free through the world your spirit goes, Forbidden hands are clasping yours. The wind is our confederate, The night has left her doors ajar, We meet beyond earth’s barred gate, Where all the world’s wild Rebels are

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    Dr. Ilia

    • 04/Mar/2021 09:00:05

    wonderful shot!