The view through the trees.

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After a weekend with howling winds, snow, sleet, rain, and everything else the weather gods could throw at us, Morning Mary needed a fix, and the Stereo Pairs are always good to cheer us up! A view through the trees from a mossy bank with a pool, falling water, an ancient bridge, and in the distance a distinctive mountain. So where are we?

+++ UPDATE +++
Sounding the Location Identified Klaxon for this one. Sharon Corbet was in like Flynn with Cromwell's Bridge in Glengarriff. And a nice detail in from Suck Diesel, that the bridge has a lovely name as Gaeilge – Céim an Ghabhair (Goat's Path), anglicised as Keamagower – ironically sourced from a German wiki article...

Photographers: Frederick Holland Mares, James Simonton

Contributor: John Fortune Lawrence

Collection: Stereo Pairs Photograph Collection

Date: between ca. 1860-1883

NLI Ref: STP_0618

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7420
lawrencecollection stereographicnegatives jamessimonton frederickhollandmares johnfortunelawrence williammervynlawrence nationallibraryofireland bridge river mountain stereopairsphotographcollection locationidentified cromwellsbridge glengarriff cork munster ireland keamagower goatspass goatspath

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  • profile

    robinparkes

    • 15/Feb/2021 09:08:13

    It's a blind guess but could it be Sugar Loaf?

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    sharon.corbet

    • 15/Feb/2021 09:38:32

    I think it's Cromwell's Bridge in Glengarriff.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Feb/2021 09:48:30

    617 next door in the catalogue says Cromwell's Bridge, Glengariff

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:04:31

    It has lost several arches since then. Here at latest 1883 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/britishlibrary/11162505915/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:09:10

    I am a bit doubtful, several sources seem to suggest Cromwell bridge was a single arch.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:11:39

    Just one arch left now? In 2007 via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/1807924030/

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    Niall McAuley

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:24:26

    Ah, there are two Cromwell's bridges, one in Kenmare (the single arch one), and this one in Glengariff.

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    sharon.corbet

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:29:44

    For some reason there is a German wiki entry but not an English one. It claims that it was a 5 arch bridge, but that there is only one left now.

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    B-59

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:37:05

    From maps.archaeology.ie/HistoricEnvironment/: "Remains of hump-backed road bridge (Wth 3.55m) near mouth of Glengarriff river. Single semi-circular arch extending c.8m from S bank of river; coarse voussoirs; pointed breakwaters extend to full height of bridge. Voussoirs of central arch evident. Other features associated with Cromwellin area are Cromwell's Road (CO104-010---) and road crossing bridge(CO104-03---)."

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Feb/2021 10:46:11

    In the 1830s by W. H. Bartlett via https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5501357183/

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Feb/2021 13:27:57

    The 6" of 1842 shows full bridge standing, whereas the 25" of 1896 shows partial bridge as it stands today. The bridge in background visible in other views is Glengarriff Bridge

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    Carol Maddock

    • 15/Feb/2021 13:27:59

    Good afternoon. Apologies for veering off-topic, but I thought ye might enjoy this short outpouring of love for Robert French, photographer of this parish. From BBC NI and our photographic curator, Elizabeth Kirwan.

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Feb/2021 14:21:17

    Google translation of the German Wiki article: "Cromwell’s Bridge was an arched stone bridge with an overlying driveway that crossed the Glengarriff River directly at the mouth of the town of the same name in County Cork, Ireland. The bridge is also known under the name Keamagower, 1 which is called Céim an Ghabhair (goat path) in Irish. 2 All that remains is a semicircular arch on the southern bank of the river, which protrudes about eight meters into the river and is 3.55 m wide. 1 According to Bartlett's drawing from around 1842, there were originally five sheets. 3 A few wedge stones are still preserved from the central arch. The pointed ends of the river pillars, which were used to break the waves, extended to the full height of the bridge. 1 Until the mid-19th century, Glengarriff could only be reached practically by sea. The few paths and this bridge only served the cattle drive, pedestrians and horse-drawn carts. The bridge was probably built by the English settlers who first settled in Glengarriff in the 17th century. 4 Oliver Cromwell, who reconquered Ireland from 1649 to 1653 and to whom the bridge refers by name, was never in Glengarriff himself. 5 It was not uncommon, however, to label bridges and structures built by the English from this period with the name Cromwells. Other examples near Glengarriff include Cromwell’s Road, a disused stone walled path, 6 and another Cromwell’s Bridge over a mountain stream on Shrone Hill. 7 In the 19th century, the old bridge and the scenery corresponded to the romantic ideal, so that it became known early on through drawings and photographs. Joseph Stirling Coyne described this around 1842: "The most extensive view of the glen is to be obtained from the steep on the old Berehaven road, near Cromwell's Bridge, from whence the spectator beholds the dark woods, hills, and rushing streams of Glengariff, the lofty mountains of Berehaven, the bold shores of Bantry Bay, and, afar off, the line of ocean, bounding all with its dark blue cincture. "

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Feb/2021 14:24:49

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] Not certain, but suspect that ref is incorrect, and refers to the original Glengarriff Bridge visible in background in some of the other old photos.

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    cargeofg

    • 15/Feb/2021 19:31:35

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia A bit off topic as well but I just recently got a couple of Bartlett /Bentley prints. I will see how they photograph and upload them .

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Feb/2021 20:33:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] What a magnificent beard!

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 15/Feb/2021 20:45:32

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I was fascinated by [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/]'s album of Bartlett's Irish views, from where the one above came. Fantastic fantasy! I wonder whether Mr Bartlett's views inspired Fred, Jim and John to investigate these places ? - www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/albums/72157626206294106 Google streetview has a glimpse of the remaining arch (reverse view), now looking very unloved and unnoticed - goo.gl/maps/Jd3g4KWKwCsFnUg27

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    suckindeesel

    • 15/Feb/2021 23:53:22

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Apparently the illustrations are in the "Wordsworthian romantic nostalgia tradition", whatever that means, anyway very fanciful Published in two volumes, but a facsimile edition in one volume reprinted in modern times of which I have a copy somewhere. The Scenery And Antiquities Of Ireland By Coyne, J. Stirling ISBN 101904668410 ISBN 139781904668411

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    cargeofg

    • 16/Feb/2021 10:29:44

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I have two framed prints. One is titled The Meeting of the Waters (Vale of Ovoca) also sub titled in French and German. Attributed to Bartlett and Bentley. The other is Glendalough and no.French or German subtitles and that one is Bartlett and Willmore.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 16/Feb/2021 18:22:32

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ That beard should have a Flickr account of its own! :)