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Where: Leinster, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Coincidentally one week after we had the wedding of a man who was a Garda Superintendent present the night the British Embassy was burned down, we have a Walker image of what remained of the Embassy. A very crowded Merrion Square with lots of cars and jaywalking pedestrians on display!

Photographers: Michael S. Walker

Collection: Michael S. Walker Photographic Collection

Date: 1972

NLI Ref: NPA WALK3

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 6898
michaelswalker michaelswalkerphotographiccollection 1972 1970s britishembassy merrionsquare dublin ireland leinster nationallibraryofireland hollesstreethospital february bloodysunday 39 20thcentury

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  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Jan/2021 08:50:21

    Mr Michael S. Walker was about here - goo.gl/maps/qdRRADimeKBHGc4N8 (going by the lampost being near / between those two front doors)

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:01:44

    British Movietone contemporary footage - youtu.be/WbxJkdslxIo

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:25:14

    Holles St. hospital, where I was born, and I was probably not the only one of us.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:26:38

    also nice early 1900s lampposts, gone from other streets, survive here.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:29:30

    A Fiat 850 Coupé

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    suckindeesel

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:50:22

    It was a wild night which acted as a safety valve for the anger and rage felt against the British. When the building eventually caught fire the police pushed the crowd back a little, the force of the crowd collapsing the railings behind us. Hard to believe that Merrion Sq at that time was privately owned and not open to the public.

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    cargeofg

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:50:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/gnmcauley Beat me to that one. A rare bird Fiat 850 coupe. Ford Escort Mk1 estate behind a(Garda ?) Ford Transit Minibus. VW Beetle to our left. To our right by the Ford D Series truck is what I am fairly sure is a Fiat 124 Special or Special T. Ordinary Fiat 124s had single headlights. Twin lights are just visible through the 850s screen. But It could be a Fiat 125 ?

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    cargeofg

    • 28/Jan/2021 09:53:26

    www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/37987096092/in/photoli... Not forgetting the Merryweather Fire Engine also. We have had one of these on this stream before at a traffic accident. If that is there for damping duties we must be the morning after?

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    O Mac

    • 28/Jan/2021 10:21:06

    Burnt down on 2nd February 1972.

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 28/Jan/2021 11:19:06

    So this photo is likely Wednesday 2 February 1972. Here is how it was reported in Papua New Guinea (!!) on 3 February 1972 - trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/250208300

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    sharon.corbet

    • 28/Jan/2021 11:41:17

    Here's a reprinted Guardian article.

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    DannyM8

    • 28/Jan/2021 11:44:43

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ We had a photo a while back showing Archbishop Ryan in Merrion Square. The Catholic Church owned the Square and had considered it as a site for a Cathedral. I think it was also a Walker photo.

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    suckindeesel

    • 28/Jan/2021 13:21:00

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ Yes, I remember that one, how times and attitudes to religion have changed

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    suckindeesel

    • 28/Jan/2021 13:59:39

    The patients in Holles St., or as affectionately called by the Coombe, "Horror St.", had a grandstand view.

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    Frank Fullard

    • 28/Jan/2021 15:48:32

    I was a student in Dublin at the time and I think that like nearly every student in Dublin was there on the night as part of a huge crowd. Strangely it did not feel like a riot, more like a boiling over of emotion. The burning of the embassy seemed to act like the release of a pressure valve and helped to bring back an air of near normality afterwards. The embassy had a symbolic thing about it and focusing anger on it seemed to focus it away from one on people.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 28/Jan/2021 16:56:10

    These two were next door to the embassy. https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/16513312315

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 29/Jan/2021 08:06:56

    A challenge! What is the white car front and centre, roof only visible?