FLYING HIGH IN CELEBRATION – 90 MILLION VIEWS

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Where: Leinster, Dublin City, Ireland

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When: Unknown

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Today we are celebrating having reached 90,000,000 views, and to mark the occasion we have been given access to the aerial photography of Alexander “Monkey” Morgan. So for today what could be better than to have a parade, a St. Patrick’s Day Parade to be sure, but with a wonderful view of Dublin’s city centre from high in the sky. Which is where Monkey Morgan was of course! As we post his images in the future, it is going to pose its own challenges seeing places from a very different PoV!!!!

+++ UPDATE +++
I think it's safe to say that we're going to very much enjoy the lofty point of view that Monkey Morgan’s photos will give us. We've established the exact date for this one – Thursday, 17 March 1955, and also that the parade started from St. Stephen’s Green at 11am. It went up one side of O'Connell Street, and then back down the other, which certainly seems to give better value to spectators than modern parades. You couldn't miss a thing that way. And 'twas far from a St. Patrick's Festival the parade was in those days. It was sombrely called the Industries Parade, and was organised by the National Agricultural and Industrial Development Association. We found out there were about 250,000 spectators on this day, and thanks to Sharon Corbet, we know there was “a bit of an incident”!

Photographer: Alexander Campbell “Monkey” Morgan

Collection: Morgan Aerial Photographic Collection

Date: Thursday, 17 March 1955

NLI Ref: NPA MOR878

You can also view this image, and many thousands of others, on the NLI’s catalogue at catalogue.nli.ie

Info:

Owner: National Library of Ireland on The Commons
Source: Flickr Commons
Views: 7690
morganaerialphotographiccollection nationallibraryofireland ireland bw alexandercampbellmorgan captainacmorgan monkeymorgan piperapache eiajl westonaerodrome phaseboxes mylar aerial 90millionviews dublincitycentre stpatricksdayparade bankofireland collegegreen oconnellst thursday march 1955 1950s dublin leinster nationalagriculturalandindustrialdevelopmentassociation naida industriesparade 90000000 90mviews 90m 20thcentury

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  • profile

    Foxglove

    • 25/Jan/2021 08:43:53

    90M+1

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    Carol Maddock

    • 25/Jan/2021 08:44:29

    Ooooh! This is better than Google satellite view... :) And it's March 1955 according to the catalogue record, so this is Thursday, 17 March 1955. The Lemur will be able to work out the time of day from the shadows!

  • profile

    Wendy:

    • 25/Jan/2021 08:45:20

    Congrats another milestone reflecting your alway interesting posts!

  • profile

    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:00:14

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ is ALWAYS AMAZING! Congratulations! There must be a legible clock in there somewhere ...

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    BeachcomberAustralia

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:09:29

    3D Google Satellite View - www.google.com/maps/@53.341387,-6.2590501,201a,35y,357.47... The google data above should give exact location and height with a bit of twiddling

  • profile

    sharon.corbet

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:15:48

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] The parade seems to be ongoing, which was supposed to start from St. Stephen's Green at 11.

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    Niall McAuley

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:17:43

    I see The Tomb of the Unknown Gurrier on the bridge, but the Bowl of Light seems to be gone already.

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    DannyM8

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:18:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/beachcomberaustralia Forget the clock, there must be a dog in there somewhere. https://www.flickr.com/photos/foxglove

  • profile

    Paddywhack56

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:26:35

    Well done, folks. Here's to next 90M views.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 25/Jan/2021 09:44:45

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet Midday at the very earliest, if not later...

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    sharon.corbet

    • 25/Jan/2021 10:10:56

    There were about 250,000 spectators at the parade, according to the Irish Times the next day and it was supposedly the biggest parade yet. One highlight was a tugboat on wheels. There were 231 individual vehicles apparently. The parade route went from Stephen's Green via Dawson St., Nassau St. Lr. Grafton St., Westmoreland St., one side of O'Connell St., Parnell St., then right around Parnell Square, back down the other side of O'Connell St., D'Olier St., College St. to St. Stephen's Green again. There was a bit of an incident when the parade reached College Green, as a student waved a Union Jack from the parapets of Trinity. (He declined the invitation of the crowd to "come down here with that thing")

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    Carol Maddock

    • 25/Jan/2021 10:48:02

    At this stage, the parade was called the Industries Parade. It was run by the National Agricultural and Industrial Development Association, and the 1955 march saw NAIDA celebrating its golden jubilee. This parade was filmed for newsreels. I wonder if any survive... The Indo said it took over an hour for the parade to pass any given point on the route. And “about a dozen firms which had entered displays were unfortunately forced to withdraw because of the labour dispute affecting building firms”. (Irish Independent, 18 March 1955)

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    sharon.corbet

    • 25/Jan/2021 11:20:42

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]] I found a bit of the Galway one, and some more photos of Dublin.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 25/Jan/2021 11:29:16

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/scorbet They're great. The Mackintosh confectionery float has put a longing on me for a Rolo!

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    robinparkes

    • 25/Jan/2021 12:08:12

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I wouldn't mind a Rolo now you mention it :-). Regardless, that's an amazing achievement Carol.

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    Carol Maddock

    • 25/Jan/2021 12:32:06

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected] I planted the acorn, Robin, but 'tis the Marys who turned it into a mighty oak for Library Towers. We're steeped to have them.

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    robinparkes

    • 25/Jan/2021 12:34:32

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/ They’re doing a grand job. I haven’t got near the place since the time I met with you.

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 25/Jan/2021 13:18:56

    National Library of Ireland, I am sending you an enhanced version of this Alexander “Monkey” Morgan image to your email address posted in the profile. One is high quality TIF. I (more or less) used the same process to enhance the photo I took below- www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography/25996529047/

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2021 13:32:34

    I wonder if Monkey Morgan had a little passenger. From Drogheda Argus and Leinster Journal on Saturday 05 May 1956:

    Ireland's youngest "student pilot" is up in the air at least once a fortnight during summer months. She is five-years old Jennifer Morgan, who dons her flying helmet and clambers into her father's Auster for a flying lesson. "She's dead keen" says her father Major "Monkey" Morgan. "Her legs are still not long enough to reach the rudder bar, but she can operate the stick like a veteran!" Jennifer made her first flight at the age of three, Since then she continually urges her father to take her up. ... When she goes up, however, Jennifer doesn't always forget her pets - "Andrew" the Corgi and "Gillie" the cat.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jan/2021 13:55:13

    [https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner] Well found! Yes, it is that very Jennifer who wrote this lovely biography of her father, Monkey Morgan, for us!

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    sharon.corbet

    • 25/Jan/2021 14:03:13

    Here are some photos of "Monkey" Morgan and his wife (with dog).

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jan/2021 14:10:53

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography Thanks a million, Robert, you're very good to do that! If you'd like to let everyone see your enhanced version, maybe you could post it on your own photostream, explaining and acknowledging the source, as we can only post photographs here from our own collections...

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2021 15:44:42

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland Another bit of the article quotes him saying that it would be ten years before she could get a student's licence, and eleven before she would be able to fly solo with a private pilot's licence. He'd obviously planned it all out for her. Without him about to encourage her after his untimely death in 1958, did she get her pilot's licence?

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 25/Jan/2021 15:46:52

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/johnspooner We don't know, but will try to find out...

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2021 16:02:30

    Looking through the collection, I couldn't help wondering if any of the items would give a different perspective on places we've 'visited' previously. And yes, there are several aerial views of Straffan House ('visited' courtesy of Lawrence/French a month ago). And quite possibly several more.

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    John Spooner

    • 25/Jan/2021 16:32:10

    ni[https://www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland] Jennifer might be interested in seeing the original article at flic.kr/p/2kvCaZQ

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2021 18:02:12

    It was a different place and a different time back then. As Maeve Binchy said in her 2001 article for the New York Times: “Dublin was the dullest place on earth to spend St. Patrick's Day.” The pubs were closed and wouldn't open on that day for another 20 years, it fell in the middle of Lent and was a day of obligation. Any drinking would have been frowned on. The only place to get a drink was in the members bar of the RDS during the Dog Show, and that loophole was soon shut down. It was an industrial parade with floats from various local businesses and not the week long festival of modern times. Looks pretty dull by modern standards The route seems to have been twice as long as the modern parade as it doubled back on itself.

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    suckindeesel

    • 25/Jan/2021 18:22:00

    Treasure Hunt St. Patrick's Day is coming And you might think it's a joke. But I'd like to get my hands on One of the little folk. For they say in good old Ireland If a Leprechaun you hold. You'll go to the end of the rainbow To his treasure pot of gold. It may be a lot of blarney For tis written in Irish folklore. The Isle is home to the fairies To be sure, to be sure, to be sure. By : Nancy Russell

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    CASSIDY PHOTOGRAPHY

    • 26/Jan/2021 01:47:36

    www.flickr.com/photos/nlireland/ I would not mind posting my enhanced version of your aerial photo , but I do not have a "Pro" account, though I earn a coin from photography. I refuse to pay Flickr for something that was once free, as a matter of principle. Thus, I am limited to less than 1,000 photos. I constantly cull photos to keep it below 1,000. I just thought that NLI would like to have a better version, for posterity. That was just a rough effort, but you can clearly see detail and almost make out names on buildings and see what models the cars are.

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    National Library of Ireland on The Commons

    • 26/Jan/2021 09:11:54

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/cassidyphotography Ah, I understand about the Pro account, Robert. Thank you again for taking the time to do this.

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